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Full text of "Duluth Evening Herald"


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Duluth Evening HERALD 



Inclusive 

Dates: Jan. 1 



1894 



March 31 
1894 



171-4 -T978 



Originals held by: MHS X Other 



Prepared by: 
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Date: 

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Fi!i out the Coupon in 
The Herald this evening 
and send it to ihis office. 




"I" Tj' T rii 






Jtl j^1_j1J 



Who is your choice (tr | 
Mtyor at Um ccNuinfl clcc' 
tionT 



ELEVENTH YEAH 



]MONDAV, JANUAKV I, 1891. 



THIIEE CENTS 



If 



A Wm Iflslitation Oiiitil and Coctrollsd by D:liitli Men and not Triba!ary 
to any Eastira SiSi^eineiit. r " " ::6d in Dalatli in 1881. 

Happy New Year! 

TODAY WE OFFER OUR 

ANNIVERSARY SALUTATION ! 

■ -I I I II ■■■-ii III I - I ■ i m 1^ 

THIS IS THE FOURTEENTH, lourtecn Ncirs as:o, In 
qitilo a small wav. wo boijan tlu> sollimr "F C'lotliinu;- just 
a^ii>-^> Iho stiv .;. Xobiuly knew us. \\\' didn't siuwod 
to anvbodv's ut5od will. We hadn't either g-rand store or big' capital 
l>chim! u-^ ^■wccui a bis^- stork cf jilucl; atui [Jush- 

\\\' - Aitbin;;- as we ci'uld i,'-et at that day. Had to 

be next dot»r neig-iibu- t.> sueh store-keeper as the time atTtird>Ml, A 
peae^ful revolution can't be made in one day. 

Most of all, we had peculiar ideas a^'ort our business. We meant 
t,i ^,.11 fi.wiiln.r iiQnorably, and to buy /^ <. lothiny; as we could 



T: le bcj4-inuing- of today's 'j^ .air.^..., We didn't see 

im-- at once. V. Z id chaos and distrust. 
iiuhl readv-nuule with cenlid ^ e. Tiien came our dcclar- 

(JL'ALITY PLAINLY 
\XTEK, MONEY KE- 



73 



lilt for trade— Clothing- 
— nutiods' else as hit;"li. 



iiiitiu of l^i?:\ embodied on our ticket, § 
STATED. ONE PRICE, FULL OU J" 

Tk... ....... the ki^jhest platform ev 

or a:iv ot.!i;:r— and we stand on that '^i-_ 
To.' - for itself. We have accoTiij^iished the impossible. We 

-■ y -ell bank drafts, or muslin, or iron. Clothing- 
\v;is never sold so fairly as it is today — nor as good. But William- 
! . Mciideuhall are the hig-hest exponents of fair trade in it. 

Why do vre tell these old facts over ? 

They light up the present and the future. This isn't the store 
of the sleepers. We go from better to better and best. We're fol- 
lowing up the custom-tailor. His styles, his materials are ours; his 
way of i.J\ ring aliuosi ours. We shall overtake him bye and bye — 
and then keep on. That is the future for our ready-made. 

More This is an all-wool store. Year after year we pepper 
away at half-cotton - not because we couldn't make money on it — 
but because the colors fade, it wears shabby so quickly; it's sold so 
largely under a deception. Rather tban that we'll not sell it at all. 

So, this is an all-wool store. That's the sort of Clothing we 
sell today. 




W 



ILLIAHSON* 



y^ENDENHALL 



Complete arid Trust^ortliy Ontflttsrs fct Men, Boys acfl CMidrep. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 

Thrjw* 161'5'T 0*^"> ::feel Boilera. 

Thr- ' Boilers, Bntman SotHnjf. 

Ogi- ce Automatic Cut Off Kuglno. 

Oti- Vostiutrhonse En^inp. 

Una;.: , -.,; ■■ estingiioaeo Eagme. 

Ail ia tirst-claeti condition. . . » 

Also th» old j>owpr lions'^ building of the Hartrean CToaorft! E'ectne to. at thn root 
of Fifth aveimo east, on ldk« front, and a miscellanootia lot of Piping and Steaui 
Fitting!*, Pninps. -Shafting, Vulloye, etc. 

ENQUiKE 

HARTMAN GENERAL ELECTRIC GOHPANT 



ROOM 3, EXCHANGE BUILDING- 



More Bread ! ^ % 
Better Bread I 

Is made from a sack of 

Than from any other similar amount 
of Flour in the world. It is the best 
and sold everywhere by all dealers. 

ASK YOUR GROCER! 




leiBkrs of U Dnlatli Clearlag House Association. 



First Nat'ana^ 



CAPITAL. 
$1,000,000 



» 



:,3 Bank 

■'■".k J. - — « 

■nm'JToa —1 



t" t.iit iyA-:-.t:. v)T i,"x»van _...^-.. 

e...i'iiri».y Bunk of D'alath -V-*«- 



600,000 
260,000 
200.000 
100,000 
100.000 



nup.PLUf' 

8200,000 
350,000 
20,000 
21,000 
40,000 
40.000 



MENDENiiALL & HOOPES, /Employers Liability, 

i>«r,.:.' jw«nu,v,r., I ElevEtor Accident, 

liOliiii fjira.iiG I ACCiW Co. workmen's collective, 
(MMiTKD). /Surety Bonds, 

\ Individual Accident 



OF LONDON, ENG. 







Reduce Stock 



.V '-T turn it into Cash. 

• "GO Sack Suits, nov/ $23.00. 

OO Back Suits, now $^8.00. 

i Sij48.O0 Sack Suits, now $33.00. 



Tliese prices are for CASH ONLY. 



J. S. LANE, 




MERCHANT TAILOR, 
430 SPALDING HOUSE BLK 



HE Kms Pffll. 



Per [\hi first Time in Their History, the Ger- 
man Conservatives VViil Oppose 
tl:e Emperor. 



Thay Will Attack the Issue of the Extraordi- 
nary credits He Asked For the 
Navy. 



Discord Between Chancellor Von Caprivi and 

Financo Minister Miquel, Which May 

Result Seriously. 



ICopyrigbtoil 1S»3, by the Lnitod Press. | 

Bkklin, Jan. i. — The government's 
first encounter with the Conservative- 
Clerical coalition will take place on the 
issue of the extraordinary marine credits. 
It is an entirely new feature of the Con- 
servative policy that the party is willing 
to make an open and general fight 
against emperor and ministry. The 
newspaper organs of the government, 
tiinahly the Nord Deutsche AUegemeine 
Zeitung, either deny that discord ever 
existed between Chancellor von Caprivi 
and Finance Minister Miquel, or contend 
that if such discord existed, it has been 
removed by the new compact, .iccord- 
ing to which Miquel has submitted and 
Caprivi has triumphed along the whole 
line. 

Vv'ith this compact as a prcmiae. the 
official theory is that the chancellor has 
assured the passage of the military and 
naval extra credits and of the Russian 
commercial treaty, in other words all 
that he wants from the reichstag. • The 
defect in this theory is that thsre is in it 
no recognition of the strength of the 
Conservative opposition. The party's 
■Jefcat on the first series of commercial 
treaties has not liisrouraged the Agrarian 
Conservatives at all. It has rather in- 
furiated them. Their present conduct 
il'ustrates well the truth of the popular 
saying about their absolute loyalty to the 
king, as long as he does their will. If 
ihc 'imperor and king will not favor in 
every way the interests of the titled land 
owners, these gentlemen v/ill throw their 
traditional loyalty to the winds. 

Kerr \;on Ploetz, president of the 
Agrarian league, in speaking at an 
Agrarian meeting last week, emphasized 
the fact that his parliamentary group 
would avenge itself upon the govern- 
ment: for the minor comuiercial treaties. 
The emperor is known to have a strong 
pel sonal interest in the development of 
the navy, yet Herr von Ploetz announced 
?ns dot:.nair.rvt;on to op pcac that feature 
•u the government program with special 
energy. 

VVualaddsto the complexity of the 
situation is the dubious attitude of Miqurl. 
His assent to the tactics of the emperor 
and Caprivi was wrung from him, and 
what»;ver his official organs may say 
ihere is still a dormant feud in the min- 
istry, the chancellor with War Minister 
Bronsart von Schellendorff, facing 
Miquel and Count Hotho Zu Eulenburg, 
both of whom will rejoice to see the 
reichstag give a vole adverse to the 
chancellor's projects. The differences 
between the ministers remJn despite the 
emperor's intervention, and the crisis is 
becomitig publicly acute. 

The first check received by Capri vi's 
policy in the reichstag will be the signal 
tor a general election. The chancellor 
has already the emperor's orders to dis- 
solve the reichstag in ca^e of adverse 
action on the army and navy credits or 
the Russian commercial treaty. The 
draft of the commercial treaty is now 
under ^cruiiny in St. Peter^burg. It 
probably will be signed about Jan. 14, al- 
ihough there is no certainty about this. 

The desperate efforts of the French- 
men at the Russian court to prevent the 
signing may yet battle all the arrange- 
ments whicii would be so beneficial both 
to Germany and Russia. The delegates 
of both nations have done their work 
and nothing but intrigue remains to pre- 
vent the acceptance of the draft by 
Russia. Russia has reduced her 
import duty on coal and mar.ufac- 
lures of iron and steel to such 
an extent as to enable Caprivi to over- 
power the resistance of the reichstag to 
ihe measure. The bourse already is 
dealing in Russian loans and rouble 
paper, in confidence that the matter is 
settled. The principal interest of the 
bourse during the last week has cen- 
tered on Italy affairs. Paris has bee.T 
selling Italian securities with almost vin- 
dictive ferocity, while Berlin and P' rank- 
fort have absorbed these securities 
silently and passively, in the conviction 
that time would prove the solidity of 
Italian finances under the reforms of the 
Crispi regime. 

Political impulses seem to rule the 
selling in Paris, while affecting German 
dealings much less. The chamber of 
commerce in Rome has sent Count Fon- 
tana to Berlin on business relating to the 
lottery loans. The only significance of 
the mission is that it markii the growing 
closeness of the relations between Ger- 
man and Italian finances. 

The Post printed a story on Friday 
about an anarchist meeting at which tlie 
extremists of Berlin resolved to form 
isolated groups and demonstrate their 
existence by a series of outrages. Odier 
reports connect the young Czech Omla- 
dina society with the German anarchist 
plotters. The police authorities, how- 
ever, attach no importance to their 
rumors and think it hardly worth while 
to arrest these few vaporing vagabonds, 
and beery orators who proclaim anar- 
chism m this city. 

The Omladina is the remotest affilia- 
tion with socialism or anarchism either 
in German or Austria. It was merely^ 
ramification of the P;m-Slavist agitali.m, 
and in the central European empires its 
activity is limited to Bohemia, Moravia 
and Croatia. It also has branches in 
Servia. It is recruited largely by discon- 
tented pe.'i^ants of ihj i;Ia?s which in Ire- 
land form the secret societies. The tri^l 
of the voung Cz'Xh agcnt!^ who mur- 
dered Rudolph Mciva in Prague a week 
ago yesterday will take place in January, 
j If th3 government permits it to he public 
I it will doubtless attract general interest 



by Us disclosures concerning the Omla- 
dina. 

Galician prelates have issued letters, 
advising the people net to attend the 
meetings at which lying agitators incite 
their hearers to crime. Count Hech- 
burn, intendent general of the royal the- 
ater, has ordered the abolilion from to- 
day lioin the time honored custom that 
actresses on the royal stage have the use 
of the theater carriage alter rehearsals 
and regular performances; Henceforth 
the actresses will have a monttily allow- 
ance for cab fares and mist pay their 
owa way. 

A congress of German chambers of 
commerce will meet here on Ian. 13. 
When he went to Kiel last weeic. Em- 
peror William ordered a special train 
fur a private per.son. lie arrived un- 
heralderl and surprised a dancing party 
at Prince Henry's. The object of his 
visit was to settle the domestic troubles 
of his sister, the Princess Charlotte and 
^.er husband I'.ernard, hereditary prince 
of Saxe-Meniergen. 



THE CROWD WAS MAO. 



The Chimes ol Old Trinity in New York Were 

Silent. 

New Yokk, Jan. i. — The chimes of 

Old Trinity church on Broadway did not 

ring at midnight, and a practice which 

has delighted New Yorkers for years has 

been eliminated. The ringing of Trinity 
bells chiming a' the midn;ght hour on 
New York's welcome year has been a 
custom so closely interwoven with the 
history of ihe city that great crowds 
gathtr to listen. 

For three hoars before the expected 
hour last night the people began to con- 
gregate on Broadway. Most of them 
.'lan borns and they blew them. Along 
Park row the din was horrible. But as 
the midnight hour approached and the 
throng in front of the church increased 
there was an unusual silence. Only an 
occasioual horn sounded, A^U sorts of 
rumors were afloat and much specula- 
tion indulged in as to whether the bolls 
to which ihey had listened so often 
would sound or not. No chimes were 
pounded. 

Then a burst of indignation swelled 
from the disappoii;ttd people. Every 
one who had a horn-.-and the majority 
were provided wiih one — blew it. Those 
who were without shouted. 



This Conpou ccnnts for oao vote it sor.t 
I to The Herald }K\cJ previam to Jan. 3. 

i 

My choice ^or Mayor 
at the ensuhig spring 
election is 






Si'jtuiture. 



Jannary 1. 



RYAN'S COMMISSION READY. 



Maj. Baldwin Says Boric Will Probably be 
f/arsha!. 
Washington, Jan. i.— Representative 
Baldwin stated taThe Herald today that 
the commission ef Fred Ryan as receiv- 
er of the Duluth land office has been 

made out and will be sent to the senate 
by President Cleveland during the pres- 
ent week. Maj. Baldwin also states that 
if Uorjn does not use his "pull" at the 
White House, J. Adam Bede will prob 
ably be appointed marshal this week. 
He is also of opinion that the district 
attorneyship prize lies between Mayor 
d'Autremont .ind J. L. Stryker, 
of Minneapolis. It is thought, 
however, that Doran will arrive 
in Washington very shortly and take a 
hand in making the different appoint- 
ments that must be made immediately. 
Minnesota's representatives in con- 
gress were not ai all conspicuous todiy 
in the New Year's fe:.tivities. Mrs. Davis 
had the only Minnesota house open to 
callers. Representative and Mrs. Bald- 
win and nearly ail the other Minnesoti- 
ans in the city .•\ttended the White 
House reception and were callers at the 
residences of the members of the 
cabinet. 

CONVICTED OF FORGERY. 



Decision of ihe Court Martial in Surgeon Ash- 
bridge's Case! 
San Francisco, Jan. i. — The Call 
published yesterday wh.at purports to be 
the decision of the court martial at Mare 
island in the case of Richard Ashbridge, 

past assistant surgeon of the United 
States navy. 

Ashbridge, who comes from a promi- 
nent Philadelphia family, was charged 
with forging the signature of Secretary 
of the Navy Herbert to a telegraphic 
message of instruction to Capt. Howison, 
commandant at Mare island. Ashbridge 
and his superior officer Howison had dif- 
fered regaidiijg the order of examining 
officers who came up for promotion. 
The surgeon insisted that the physical 
examination should be made beiore the 
examination as to mental requirements. 

Capt. Howison finally pre-emptoriiy 
ordered the physical examination to be 
last. He was surprised the following 
day to hnd on bis table a telegraphic or- 
der from the secretary of the navy bear- 
ing out the surgeon's claim. Investiga- 
tion proved the telegram fraudulent, and 
the commandant charged the surgeon 
with forgery. 

The court marshal sustained the 
charges and the findings have been for- 
warded to Washington, recommending 
the dismissal of Ashbridge from the scr- 
vi'je. 



Leading Banker Dead. 
Philadei.I'HIA, Jan. i.— Alexander 
I Erov.n, a well known citizen of this city, 
! flied l.i5t night Sged 78 years. Mr. 
i Brown was the soo of John A. Brown, 
; one of the founders of the great banking 
i house of Brown Bros. ^< Co. He Wc^s 
i identified with the management cf a 
I number of financial institutions. 




The Grounds of the Great international Ex- 
pos! lion at San Francisco Opened 
to the Public. 



An Immense Crowd in Attendance, Full of 
Enthusiasm and Proud of the Mar- 
vels Presented. 



A Glance at the Handsome Buildings That 
Have Been Erected and the Lead- 
ing Exhibits. 



San Fkancisco, Jan. i.— The grounds 
of the California International midwinter 
exposition were opened this morning. 
The rainy weather and the delay in the 
arrival of exhibits necessitated the post- 
ponement of the form.al opening of the 
fair, which was set for today, for a 
fortnight, but there was nevertheless nn. 
immense crowd in attendance, full of en- 
thusiasm and individually and collect- 
ively proud of the marvels which it was 
their good fortune to gaze upon. 

Here in the Western metropolis, at 
the extreme edge of the Western hem- 
isphere with the placid waters of the 
great Pacific in view, the hand of man 
has created a city neither so beautiful, so 
wond»;rful nor so extenave as the now 
quickly fading great white City by 
Lake Michigan, but one that is truly 
grand and which the people of Califor- 
nia and the other Pacific states may 
ju.-tly be proud of. 

It was only in the latter part of last 
May, when the end of the Chicago fair 
was in view, that some Californians in 
Chica^jo conceived the idea of having a 
fair iu Sau Fr-ancisco. Shordy after- 
wards it was decided to go ahead in the 
matter, and Golden Gute park was 
selected as the location for rhe fair, con- 
ceded by all to be one of the prettiest 
spots on the face of the globe. On Aug. 
2^, in the prssence r;f fully 6o,oco people, 
the enterprise was inaugurated by turn- 
ing the first shovelful of dirt, immediate- 
ly after which work of grading wa^ com- 
menced, followed in a tew weeks by the 
inauguration of work on the five main 
structures. 

These are the administration, manu- 
factories and liberal arts, agricultural 
and hordcultunil, fine arts and mechanic 
arts buildings. All are grouped around 
a p:nallelogram, in the center of which 
ii an electric tower over 250 feet in 
height, several artistically ornamented 
fountains, siatuary and a wealth of paims, 
flowers and shrubs. This is known as 
t^e grand conrr. Many buildiiajs sur- 
round the court, and scattered iu every 
direction over 163 acres arc speci."! build- 
ings erected by the different states, coun- 
ties and concessions (erected at the cost 
of the states, counties or individuals) for 
their exclusive exhioits. 

The manufactures and liberal arts 
building is the largest on the grounds. 
Its dimensions are 462 by 237 feet, cov- 
ering 101,784 square feet of ground. This 
building IS Moorish in design, with all 
the picturesquencss which that sty'e of 
architecture readily lends itself. There 
is a long array of columns and arches 
at torming the arcade of the front of the 
building, which is elaborately ornament- 
ed. There are four ereat towers, one in 
each corner, ornamented, and v/ith pro- 
jecting fiower ba'.co'iies, covered with a 
low dc»med tiled roof. 

There is a main entrance in the cen- 
ter of the building and one io each of the 
towers. The exterior cf the arcade 
across the front is decorated with sym- 
bolic figures cf the various arts and 
sciences. Within the building t'aere is a 
gallery covering 35 feet in width, and 
extending around all four sides. The 
galleries are approached upon the main 
tloor by five large stairivays. 

?.Iechanical arts building, second lar- 
gest, is a structure 450 feet long by 200 
ieet wide. It 13 nearly pure Indian in 
design and highly artistic in its rich ori- 
ental style. The grand entrance, in the 
center of the building, is rectangular iu 
form and is covered with rich decora- 
tions. Immediately in the rear of this 
building and separated from it by 6 feet 
of space is placed the boiler house, con- 
taining thirty boilers of 100 hors'i-power 
each, which furnish power to operate the 
electric lights and the machinery of the 
exposition. 

By far the most striking architectural 
feature of the exposition is the horticul- 
tural and agricultural building. It is in 
the Spanish mission style, and is a low 
roof design so much in favor on this 
coast. The great dome is 100 feet in 
diameter by 100 feet in height and 
around this dcue on the outside is a roof 
garden. The extreme dimensions of the 
m.ain building and annex are 4C0 Ieet in 
lengih by 190 feet in width. This struct- 
ure contains the greatest display of the 
products of the soil of California ever 
put together and, that is synonymous 
with saying that it is such a display of 
agricultural and horticultural material 
as the United States has never seen 
placed on exhibition. It is typically and 
almost exclusively Californian and will 
afford visitors an opportunity of judging 
of the vastness and variety of Califor- 
nia's resources such as no amount of 
travel and observation could give. 

The fine arts building is intended for 
a permanent structure, constructed of 
brick and iron. It is simple in plan, 
being a rectangle, 120 feet long by 60 
feet wide. The brick walls on the side 
are 40 feet high and to the apex of the 
pyramid It is 81 feet. It is an example 
ot Egyptian architecture, and ttie sculp- 
ture and columns .ire in harmony with 
it. The interior is arranged in two sto- 
ric?, representing the "stepped" con- 
struction of the tyrJimids. 

The administration buildine, which 
contains the offices of the exposition 
management, the department of pub- 
licity and promotion, the foreign depart- 
ra.nt, assembly rooms for forei:.'i> com- 
missioners, pre;s headquai ter-, the post- 
olTice and information bureau is the 
smallest of the five principal buildings 
but the form of. the structure is such th.it 
it is one of the roost imposing. The de- 
sign is Oriental in outline, and in the de- 
tail of its omaiueutations is undoubtedly 



Siamese. It consists of a central square 
structure, covered by a lofty and highly 
ornamental dome with four pavilions 
one on each angle cf the square. 

This building, like its namesake at the 
Columbian exposition, which faced the 
grand basin, is directly in the rear of the 
allegorical fountain. In this the sculp- 
tor has tried to tell the whole history of 
the state and much can be plainly read 
from his design. The familiar statue of 
California, crowned with a wreath cf 
poppies, stands on a pedestal whose rug- 
ged character suggests. the mountain re- 
gions. The principal central figure is 
the eagle, emblematic of the state's 
loyalty to the nation. 

The California resources and indus- 
tries are represented in the statuary, 
pomcna and flora, apart from the main 
grouping. The cherubic figures are 
pressing grapes. Commerce and agri- 
culture are appropriately portrayed and 
at one side of the fountain is a group of 
miners. The central feature of the grand 
court is the electric tower. On the 
ground floor is ^ pavilion for theguse of 
the public and flanking the open space 
there are four Moorish pavilions, con- 
taining four stories and decorated in 
Oriental colors. 

The base of the tower occupies-^ space 
fifty feet square while the first gallery, 
eighty feet from the ground, has a Si^ax- 
ing capacity of 200. There are three 
other galleries of large seating capacity, 
the topmost one being within six feet of 
the binnacle. In this upper gallery is a 
great search l-ght and on the extreme 
top of the tower a large gold ball bearing 
the emblem of the state, a grizzly bear. 

The counties of Norther:! California 
and those of the southern portion of the 
state have their own distinctive build- 
ings, and Oregon, Colorado and Arizona 
have their extiibits noused in separate 
structures. The concessional features 
of the midwinter expo.dtion are 'ooth 
numerous and iiiteresting. There is a 
modest counterpart of the great Ferris 
wheel of the World's fair in the Firth 
wheel, which is 125 feet in height. There 
are Chinese, Japanese, Hawaiian, Esqui- 
mau, Canadian and German villages, an 
ostrich farm, a Colorado gold mine, a 
scenic railway, Santa Barbara atjuarium, 
containing a dozen sea lions, a repro- 
duction of o'd Cairo, a Turkish theater, 
a Moorish mirror maze, a reproduction 
of the celebrated prater of Vieniia, a 
tomale house, a reproduction of Anne 
Hathaway 's cottage, and last, but by no 
means least, a '49 mining camp. It 
occupies a space 450 feet lang and 250 
feet wide. 

In the center of the camp is a street 
450 feet long, lined on each side with old 
time shanties, which do service as news- 
paper offices, saloons, hotels, theaters 
and gambling houses, as in davs of yore, 
representing a typical miniiig town. 
Mackay'.*;, Perkins' and Jones' cabins are 
set up just as they were when the mil- 
lionaire miners deserted them. The 
c.imp promises to be one of the most in- 
teresting spots on the exDOsition grounds, 
as itis the intention to faithfully represent 
the days of '49, by mock due?£, tri.4ls, 
Ivnchmgs and other episodes of those 
stirtiug times. 

MESSAGE BY McKINLEY, 

Ohio's Governor Urges the Practice of Econo- 
/ my in Ail Departments. 

CoLiMHL's, Ohio. Jan. i.— -Governcr 
McKiuley's message opens with a refer- 
ence to the prolonged industrial depres- 
sion from which he says there is no pros-" 
pect of immediate relief. "A short ses- 
sion and little legislation," says he, 
"v/ould be appreciated in a time like 
this." 

The auditor's statement of the condi- 
tion ot the state tfeasury on Nov. 15 is 
then given to introduce the question of 
taxation. There may be some doubt 
about the biennial session, but being 
pledged to give it there should be a trial 
of it provided for by this Republican 
legislature. "If after a fair trial, it ap- 
pears that biennial sessions will not sub- 
serve the state's interest, the people will 
readily acquiesce in a return to annual 
sessions." 

If the burden of taxation were made to 
rest equally upon all property, there 
would be no occasion iu Ohio to com- 
plain that it was a grievous burden. In- 
tangible "property in this state, he de- 
clares, almost wholly escapes taxation. 
One class of property should not escape 
taxation at the expense of other prop- 
erty. Tax laws should not be framed to 
confiscate property or to drive capital 
from the state. 

He urges the consideration of the re- 
port of the special tax- commission, and 
a careful and well adjusted revision of 
our tax la.ws. Local and special legis- 
lation ought to be avoided as far as pos- 
sible. Local indebtedness should not be 
authorized, except alter vote of the oeo- 
ple, except in great emergencies. Lib- 
eral treatment of the national guard is 
recommended, but it is suggested that 
$100,000 could be saved with no great 
disadvantage to the guard by omitting 
the annual encampment this year. 

The work ot the Ohio World's fair 
commission is commended and his rec- 
ommendation ot saving revenue by dis- 
pensing v/ith much of the public print- 
ing, made a year ago, is renewed. The 
condition and work of the state institu- 
tions are treated individually. These 
are generally commended, and attention 
is called to the general reduction in the 
per capita cost. The governor recom- 
mends that the requ-est for $75,000 to 
erect buildings on the agricultural ex- 
p.;riment farm at Wooster be granted so 
far as the state revenues will permit. 
He closes with this: 

"The party charged with the legisla- 
tion of the Slate has had committed to it 
a great trust for the faithful execution 
of which it will be held to the strictest 
accountability. For the exceptional 
confidence bcslowed by the people it 
must give in turn the best and highest 
service. It should keep the expenses 
safely within the revenues. There 
should be no increase in the 
rates of taxation which can be 
well avoided, in the absence ot 
the most prudent economy. If the ma- 
jority parly of the general assembly shiU 
administer its responsible duties with 
hontity ivnd fidelity ;ind tcononiy, and 
use iis g'cat power only fvr the general 
goodi as I confidently believe it can be 
relied upon to do, it will further demon- 
strate its fi'ness tor public trust, and re- [ 
ceive the continued confidence of the | 
people.' j. 



New 

Year's 

Presents 

Are Now 
In Order! 

Yon oug^ht to reciprocate for 
that handsome Christmas present 
3'ou received. 

IT WILL ONLY COST YOU 
half the amount of money it cost 
them — all our 

Holiday Goods 

Go at 

Exactly 

Half Price 

TONIGHT. 




Will be divided equally among"st 
the charitable institutions of Du- 
luth if in any instance you will 
find us chargfing- other than our 
regular prices and then sell them 
for half price. We leave the illeg-it- 
imate and dishonest methods of 
doing- business to schemers and 
imitators. 



We Say, Buy Now! 

Albums — Half Price. 

Collar and CufiF Boxes— Half 
Price, 

Glove and Handkerchiefs Boxes 
—Half Price. 

Manicure Sets — Half Price, 

Smoking Sets — Half Price. 

Shaving Sets — Half Price. 

Photograph Boxes — Half Price. 

Jewel Cases — Half Price. 

Cigar Cases —Half Price. 

Work Soxes — Half Price. 

Perfume Cases — Half Price, 

Music Rolls— Half Price, 

Traveling Companions — Half 
Price, 

Brush and Comb Sets — Half 
Price. 

Combination Manicure and Toi- 
let Sets— Half Price. 

Christmas Cards — Half Price. 

New Year's Cards — Half Price. 

All Boxes— Half Price. 

Ail Sachets— Half Price. 



Jewelry Dep't. 

A chance of a lifetime ! 

All our Hardwood, Metal and 
Onyx Clocks go at exactly Half 
Price. Positively no Clocks re- 
served excepting our 95c Nickel 
Clocks, all go at Half Price. 

Crockery Dep't. 

Tuesday and Wednesday were 
both big days in this department, 
SEVEN TABLES of the Finest 
Bric-a-Brac and Fancy China ever 
shown outside New York and 
Chicago, go at HALF PRICE. 

Dinner Sets at Half Price. 



Cloak Dep't. 

This entire department goes at 
HALF PRICE. Positively noth- 
ing reserved. 

Millinery Dep't. 

No half price; not a quarter 
price; but two prices on our entire 
stock of Trimmed Millinery. 

Each 



$1.00 



For your pick of any Trimmed 
Hat in our store, formerly sold 
for $2. 50, $2,75, $3,25, $3.75, $4.50, 
all go at $1.00. 

ReadThis! 

All our Trimmed Hats, formcr- 
1 v sold at $5.00, $6.00, $7.00, $8.50, 
$10.00, $12.50, up to $18.00, FOR 

$2.95. 



That's the 
department. 



way we clean our 



♦»♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



I 



ATTEND 

X THE 

I GREATEST OF ALL SALES | 



BEGINNING 
AT OUR STORE 



I Toniorroi MorniDg! 











V. 







I 



— 1 — 








THEraTSOFIiy™ 



A Complete Record of the Remarkable and 

Interesting Happening During the 

Past Twelve Months. 



Appalling Railway Disasters, Fatal Storms 

and Cyclones, and Many Commercial 

failures On the List. 



A Long Obituary Record— Social, Politic, I 
and Scientific Gatherings and Cele- 
brations Without Number. 



Bet\^ • in. -'1 and Xov. 8. 1893, tbero 

nt-re IS railroati nccitli-nta in the 

UnJttfti Siittt-,-.. resuhhiv; in the death of iiHt) 
people find the injury of (<^. There were 
several fatal cyJloues on hiiul und sea dur- 
ing the year, many marine disasters and an 
unusual number of destructive th-es. Bos- 
ton was visited by two large flres, one of 
them iu the old burned district. Chicago 
^vas also swept by a large fire. Many dis- 
tiufniishetl names appear on the obituary 
list. The year has also been made notable 
by the World's fair and a great number of 
cotivention.s and con^sresses. Following is 
a condensed diary of the most impurtaut 
events arraugeti by mouths and days: 

JAXIAKY. 
L Ftres: BinKhaniton, N. Y., Bayless' paper 
mill; loss, ftil>,i*U. Emporia, Kan., dry 
goods store destroyed; loss, $85,000. 
S. Fire: Iienisou, Tes.. dry goods store; loss, 

f75.«U 
ll Fire; Memphis; loss. S1T5.000. 
Obituary: Mrs. Martiia .loan Rcade Nash 
Lamb, Lisli>rian, in New York city; agedtX. 
iiilbert PiUsbury, once a prominent aboli- 
tion leader, iu North Abingdon, Mass.; 
aged 79. 
ft. Fires: Omaha, the Omaha Pi-inting com- 
pany burned out; loss, SlUi.OOO. Hitsbnrg, 
several fires; losses. gCiW.UOO. Denver, Hal- 
leck boildin;; destroyed; loss, §290,000. Liv- 
erpool, 30,000 bales of cotton burned in ware- 
house. 
6i. Obituarj-: M:vJ. J. P. Frost of the Boston 
Globe, an old New Enylund journalist, in 
Ijoston. C. A. C.appa, bandniaster of the 
Seventii Xew York militia, in Xcw York 
city; ased .5S. 
Miscellaneous: ^Vickham & Co., wholesale 
fish dealers, of Huron, O., assigned; liabil- 
ities, $2iji>,0ua * 
1. Fire: Fall River, Mass., the Troy building 

biu-ned; loss, §135.000: 
0. Fire: New York city, a six story building 

destroyed; loss, S^'AOOIK 
10. Fire: Boston, several warehouses burned; 
losses. Sl,ti5w,UU). 
Obituary: Gen. Benjamin F. Hutler, at Wash- 
ington; aged 75. 
Disasters: Several men killed by the burst- 
ing of a fly wheel in a Pittsburg mill. ~ 
miners killed by gas exiiktsion at Como, 
Colo. 
U. Fires: Chicago, several; losses. SS50.00a 
Chateaugay, N. Y., 15 stores burned; less, 
Sl.'W.OOli. 

13. Fires: Kansas City; loss $245,000. Duluth, 
St. Louis hotel destroyed; loss, $100,000. 

14. Obituary: Gen. Joseph J. Bartktt, a Union 
veteran and ex-minister to Sweden, in Bal- 
timore; aj;ed 50. 

Miacellaneou.s: Kevolution iu Hawaii; Queen 
Llliuokaiaui deposed. 

15. Obituarj': Gen. Kufus Ingalls, U. S. A. 
(retired), in New York city; aged 74. 

l<i. Per;?onal: James Smith, Jr.. elected United 
States senator from New Jersey. 

17. Fires: Chicago, the Calumet clubhouse de- 
stroyed; loss, SJOO.OOU. Kichmond, Allen & 
Gintner's cigarette factor>-; loss, $200,000. 
Obituary: Gen. Rutherford Birchard Hayes, 
ex-president of the United States, at Fre- 
mont. O.; aged 71. 
Personal: Edv.ard Murphy. Jr., elected 
United States senator from New York- 
IB. Disaster: A train dashed into a sleigh load 
of people at Lonadale, R. I., killing 8, 
maiminz 7. 

■L Fire: Rochester, the McKay building de- 
stroyed; loss, 82.50,000. 
Disaster: An oil tank exploded on a wrecked 
freight train near Alton, Ills.; 21 killed and 
nearly 100 ii^jurcd. 

IS. Fires: St. Louis, the Carondclot grain ele- 
vator destroyed; loss, 81,50»),000. Elmwood, 
Ind.; loss, SIOO.OOO. 

33. Fires: Clinton, Mo.; loss, 810O,0tX). Indianap- 
olis, grain elevator destroyed; loss, SIOWOO. 
Obituary: Kev. Phillips Brooks, bi.shop of 
Massachusetts, in Boston; aged 5S. 

SL Fire: Sioux Falls, the Beehive building 
burned; loss, «200,00a 
Disaster: Fire damp exploded in a coal mine 

at Dux, Bohemia, kilUng 132 miners. 
Obituary: Justice L. Q. C. Lamar of the 
United States supreme court, at Macon, 
Ga.; aged 68. 

SI. Obituary: Hon. James Gillespie Blaine, iu 
Washington; aged iH. Gen. xlbner Double- 
day, U. S. \., retired, a veteran of the Mex- 
ican and civil wars, at Mendham, N. J.; 
aged 74. 
Persotlal: John H. Mitchell, elected United 
States senator from Wisconsin. 

28. Obituary: (ien. S. S. Carroll, U. S. A., re- 
tired, in Washington; aged 70. 




ipair 



•m <* 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY. JANUARY 1, 1894. 




LOUiS O. VANDERVERE, 

ime of tho twst kLown tfasinega men in ClilcagBj 
reprewiitatiTe of tho creat Bradstreet Oo. 

HEADAOHE, SLEEPLESSNESS, NERVOUS 
PROSTRATION. 

I>r. Miles M«die<Ml Co., Slkhart. Ind. 

Cfentleinen : I toko pleasure in 'nformini? yoti 
of the very t*neficial xesulti; which have tohowed 
the u>e of On. Miles- Rcstorativx Ncrvink 
m the case of myseli and « ife. For a year I waa 
RUbiect to a dutrefjing pain at the buse of the 
bnun and upper portion of the epinal cord. I 
^^ , . _^ mm r^ '^^ ^^^^ '^"'^ ^'^ (greatly 
f^l I C7 t Ij troubleii with sleeplessncsa. 
^^^^ ■ ■ "" "^ Your Nervine was bixhlv 
rocommenfleil to me. My rnse bn^l hoon so obsti- 
nate that 1 bad no coniidencc in the t'fRcacy of 
any medicine. Yet as a la»t resort I consented lo 
giveitatrin! Much to mysMrrT: ? • st>erienced 
in&r!se<l benefit; my s eepl' -Hjipeared; 

my heaiittchev.ufl removed; n.} .; ..... uiidKCueral 

aH-iTHOUSANDS 

SAINCO TrltflTt POUNDS. ALL THIS OCCUMnCO 
Urten LCAIIM3 «,NO WCLL KNOWN rHYSICIANB 

HAD r*iL£r.. My wife l- irtklii*. ll«:- N.rvi;:e ■viUi. 
the Us;t oi reculLs. Loiris 1*. VANi/tavtac 

Sola ou m Foaitivo Ouaranter. 
Dr. MILES' PIULS.50D08Cs26Ct«l 

FOB PAT.i: BY ALL DRUOQI3T8. 



utroyed; iohs, V1UO,oou. 
SL IsarthQuako: The island of Zante, Oreece. 

FEBKUARY. 

L I'lre: Uttlo Falls N. Y.; k«S $200,(100. 
M>Mvllaueous: Uuiteid Slates protectorate 

established in Hawaii. 
t, ^liscellaneous: Algernon Sartoris, huslmnd 

of Nellie Grant, died at Capri, Ita)^. 
i. Fire: Fail-port, N. Y., chemical works 

burned; loss, $aoO,OU). 
& Fire: Peoria, ills., warehouse of the Qrape 

Sugar company destroyed; luss, $1011,000. 
Disaster: Norwegian bark .\lice went ashore 

at Lon^ Braneh; 5 sailors dniwned. 

I. JVrsonal: Judge W. B. Allen, PopuU.-<t, 
elt-cte«l Unitetl States senator frum Xe- 
bi aska. 

& Sliipwrvck: 38 pe€>plo drowned by the loss 
of the Hriti^fh steamship TriuacrlaofT the 
ciMv^t of Spain. 
tk Fires: Dover, N. H., lunatic as) Am de- 
stroyed; *4 deaths. Clarksville. Tex., 
block of stores burned; loss, Sl-'A'.OOO. 

11- Disasters: U miners killc-d by a landslide in 
a tunnel at Villa Grove, Colo. 10 men 
crushed to death by falling rocks at a mar- 
ble quarry in West Rutland, Vt. 

n. Fire: Nashville: loss of {284,000 in three 
condagrations. 
Obituary: Dr. Norvin Green, president of the 
Western Union Telegraph company, in 
Louisville; aged 75. 

UL Disaster: Zi persons burned to death at a 
carnival duute at Deutsi;h Perez, Hungary. 

lA. IVlitical: Prcbident Harrison scJit to the 
senate his message rt'commeudlng the an- 
nexation of Hawaii and the treaty. 

M. Obituary: Riar Admiral Augustus Ludlow 
Case. U. S. N., in Washington; .nged SO. 

la Obituan" George E. Spencer, cx-United 
States senator from Alabama, in Washing- 
ton. 

m. Obituary: Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard, the 
Confederate vcteran.'at New Orleans; aged 

73. 

Personal: William N. Roach, elected United 
States senator from North Dakota. 

3L Fire: Louisville tobacco factory burned; 
loss, S250,C;jO. 

a. Obituary: Hufus Hatch, a well known stock 
broker, in New York city; aged 54. 
Miscellaneous: Beaupre, Keogh & Davis, 
wholesal-j grocers, assigned in St. Paid; lia- 
bUities over $400,000. 

M. Miacellantous: The California capitalist, 
John W. Mackay .shot and seriously wound- 
ed by an insane man. 

9& Fire: Felton, Ga., planing mill burned; loss, 
$150,000. 

S. Disaster: Seven persons killed by the fall- 
ing walls of a burned out store in Cidcagoi. 

MARCH. 

Sl Obituary: R. M. Bishop, cx-govemor <rf 
Ohio, at Jacksonville. Fla.; aged 81. 

& Sporting: Ed Smith defeated Joe Goddard, 
It) rounds, at New Orleans. 

4. Fire: Ogdenaburg. N. Y., the state insane 
asylimi parL< Uy burned; loss, $150,000. 

'» * Ilea, vtrmngiou, rv) .; loss, c^^*','*^ xtixw 

lo, Colo., Lannou's foundry burned; loss, 

$ioo,o(.a 

Obituary: Hiprolyte Adolphc Taine, French 
historian and critic, in Paris; aged 75. Gen. 
Thomas Reynolds, a union veteran, in Chi- 
cago, 
t. Fire: Barberton. O., Kirkham's tile and 
pottery works destroyed; loss, $200,000. 

Disaster: A hurricane causetl heavy loss of 
life and property at Famatoy, Madagas- 
car; 10 vessels foundered in the harbor. 

Political: President Cleveland's cabinet of- 
ficers nominated and confirmed by tho sen- 
ate; Walter Q. Gresham of Illinois, secre- 
tary of state; John G. Carlisle of Kentucky, 
secretary of the treasury; Daniel S. La- 
ment of New York, secretary of war: Rich- 
ard Olney of Massachusetts, attorney gen- 
eral; Wilson S. Bissell of Now York, post- 
master general; Hilary A. Herbert of Ala- 
bama, secretary of the navy; Hoke Smith 
of Georgia, secretary of the interior, and 
JnliiLs Sterling Morton of Nebraska, secre- 
tary of agriculture. 

L Earthquake: Shock felt in New York city. 

Sporting: Bob Fitzsimmons defeated Jim 
Hall, 4 rounds, for the middleweight cham- 
pionship, at New Orlpaii.s. 
O. Fire: Bo.stou, a $2,500,000 fire in the old 
burned district; 3 people killed and 30 In- 
jured. 

Obituary: Rev. Andrew Preston Peabody, 
professor emeritus in Harvard university, 
at Cambridge, Mass.; aged 82. 

II. Obituarj-: CoL Charles E. Taylor, the old- 
est telegrapher in the west, at Frankfort, 
Ky.; aged 50. 

ta. Fire: Denison, Tex., the Denlson compress 
destroyed; loss, $130,000. 
Miscellaneous: The Atkinson House Furnish- 
ing company in Bf)ston assigned, with lia- 
biiitics of $1,500,000. 
Obituary: Luke Schoolcraft, well known 
minstrel, at Cincinnati. Harry Kernell, 
Irish comedian, in New York city; aged 4-3. 

U. Fire: Arkansas City, Ark., one-half the vil- 
lage destroyed; loss, $1110,000. 
Miscellaneous: The Kansas Trust and Bank- 
ing company of Kansas City suspended, 
with liabilities of $«>J.i«ja 

IT. Fire: Toledo, Wheeler Opera house and • 
stores burned; loss, $2<X),O0O. 
Obituary: Jules Ferry, the French statea- 
man, in Paris; aged CI. 

18. Fire: Milwaukee, the Friend block burned; 
loss, 350lt,0(«. 

18. Fires: Bf)ston, Tremont temple, tho fa- 
mous Baptist house of worship, partially 
destroyed; loss, $375,000. South Easton, 
Miss., Morse's thread factory; loss about 
S'iOO.OOO. 
Obituary: Captain Jacob Vanderbilt, brother 
of Commodore Vanderbilt, at Stapleton, N. 
Y.; aged 80. 

20. Obituary: Commodore Horatio Bridge, U. 
S. N., retired; aged 87. 

SL Fire: LJtchflold, Ills., the Kehlor flourinij 
mill; loss over 81,000,000; an employee killed 
and many injured by an explosion of flour 
dust. 

28. Obituary: Ex-Senator Eli Saulsbury of Del- 
aware, at Dover, Del.; aged 76. 
Sporting: Oxford crew defeated Cambridge 
in 18 minutes 47 seconds, the best time on 
record; Thames course. 

a. Fire: Cleveland, the Morgan House burned; 
5 deaths. 
Cyclone: 18 deaths by a cyclone in Mississip- 
pi; damage to property, $2,000,000. 
Miscellaneous: Dobbins & Dazy, cotton bro- 
kers, as-signetl In Nashville; liabilities, 
S1,0(«,000. 

Si. Obituary: Colonel Elliott F. Shepard, editor 
of the New York Mall and Express, iu New 
York city: aged 59. 

26. Fire: Detroit. Snedicor & Hatliaway's shoe 
factory burned; loss, $150,000. 

W. Fires: Scranton, Pa., the Elm Park Meth- 
odist church destroyed a second time; loss, 
$r»,000. Montreal. The Daily Herald 
burned out for the fourth time; loss, 
$130,000. Mason City, la.. Kirk Bros\ stock 
barns destroyed; loss on horses over 
$100,000. 

88. Obituary: General E. Klrby Smith, the 
Confederate veteran, at Sewanee. Tenn.; 
aged 69. 

SO. Political: Hon. Thomas Francis Bayard of 
Delaware appointed United States embas- 
sador to Great Britain, the first appoint- 
ment under the title embassador. 

APRIL. 

L Fires: Buzzard's Bay, Mass., tho summer 
residence of Joseph Jefferson, the actor, 
destroyed; loss, $250,000. Bradford, Pa„ 
hotel burned; 5 deaths. 
Disaster: Fire damp explosion in the Nelson 
shaft at Shamokin. Pa.; 10 deaths. 

2. Fire: New York city, Duke & Sons' ciga- 
rette factory burned out; loss $400,000. 

a Fire: Montrose, Pa.; loss, $60,000. 

i. Fire: Alleghany, Pa., paper warehouse, 
malt house, planing mill and pickle works 
destroyed; loss, $280,000. .\nson. Tex., the 
business portion burned out; loss, $75,000. 

6. Fire: Louisville distillery warehouse 
burned; loss. $23O,00a 

Obituar>-: E. K. Bruce, formerly known in 
Chicago as the "Corn King." at Chicago: 
aged 68. 
8. Fire: Near Cincinnati, the College Hill san- 
itarium destroyed; loss, $200,000. 

Disaster: 6 sailors drowned oft Barnegat, N. 
J., by the capsizing of schooner Genesta. 

Miscellaneous: Tho great Mormon temple 
at Salt Lake City, begun over 40 years ago. 
dtditatod. 

7. Fire: Ironton, O., 8* dwellings and a lum- 
ber yard burned; loss. $730,000. Houston, 
Cleveland & Co.'s wholesale grw-ery 
burned; loss, $l«o.ogO. Owensboro. Ky., 4 
distillery warehouses burned; loss, $350,000. 

Disaster: Nino men killed by tho fall of a 

cantilever at Romeo, Ills. ' 
Obituar;: in. Bev. William lugrahaot Kilt. 



tfie nrsi I'rott'nai/,. Kpist'opai oishopuf Cal- 
ifornia, in San Francisco; iige<l 81. George 
I. Sency,' tlnaiicii-r ai.d philanthropl.-»t, in 
Now York city; a','«-d (17. 

8. Fire: War.-*aw, Intl., bi-eeding stables and 
23 valuabU- liorseH liurned; loss, $2(Xi,000. 

0, Fire: Watorbury, Conn., the Lily block 
burned; liws, $l..ti.(ll)0. 

10. Miscellanouus: Manuel Gonzales, ex-presl- 
diut of the Mexican republic, died in the 
City of Mexico at the ago of 73. 

11. Lire; St. Mary's, O., 7 business places 
burned: losses, ?2iX),O0i). 

Dlsa.ttcr: Over fiO deaths by pa'< explosion in 
at-ollifry at Pont-y-PrIdd, Wales. 

Cyelone: tlreat havo<; by cyclonic storm In 
lowii, Illinois, Nobi-n.ska and Kansas; many 
jH-opU' killed and injured. 

12. MiscellnncoiL-t: The Kuglisli, Scottish and 
Au!»tralian('hartfr«'d bank failed, with lia- 
bilities of i;8,0i)0,ix».t. A barn near Gallatin, 
Tenn., struck by lightning and 25 valuable 
mares killed: loss over $300,000. 

13. Miscellaneous: The United States flag 
hauled down at Hawaii. 

16. Personal: The Duke of Veragua, a lineal 
descendant of Columbus, arrived in New 
York from Spain. 

17. Earthquake: Tho island of Zante; the city 
of /.ante and many villages destroyed. 

18. Fire: Cassville, Mo., swept by ftames; loss, 
S2tXi.tn». 

Cyclone: Town of Boles, .\rk., destroyed: 7 
j)v'oi>le killed, many injured. 

19. l-'ire: Clinton, Mass., the Clinton wire 
works de.-troyed: lo<s, $2r>0,(«). Detroit, the 
Kling Brewery company burned out; loss, 
$350,000. 

SO, iire: Wardnor, Ida., the business portion 

burned; loss »it-arly 8700,000. 
Disaster: Tl • intake end of the Milwaukee 

tunnel, nnuer I..nke Michigan, wrecked by 

a .ca'o; 11 workmen drow ned. 
Obituary: Mrs. Almira Hancock, widow of 

Gen. W. S. Ilancoi-k, in New York city. 
Crime: Frank W. Rohl and Thomas Pallis- 

ter, condemned murdeivrs, est-ape<l from 

the New Y<jrk state prison at Sing Sing. 
Miscellaneous: The Australian Joint Stock 

bank failed for i'l3,(Oi»,l00. 
22. Fire: Colf:ix, Wash.; loss, $100,000. 
Obituary: Gen. E. F. Beale, a Union veteran 

and ex-United Slates minister to Austria, 

In Washington; agfd 71. 
Miscellaneon.s: Tlio Hank of Milbank, S. D., 

nst,i;{ne<l, with liabilitiesof gUlO.nTO. 
85. Cycloiie: Okl;ilu)ma swept l>y two cyclonic 

lilasts; over lliO deaths. 
Miscellaneous: The Union Loan and Trust 

company of .'^ioux City, la., closed itsdw rs; 

liabilities, $75t),ai!i. 
81. Obituary: Gen. John M. Corse, tho hero of 

Allatoona, at Winchester, Mass.; aged 58. 
Miscellaneous: lnteru;itional njival i>ai-ade in 

New York city. 8 settlers killed by Navajo 

Indians in Cok>ra«la 

35. Cyclone: The town of Cisco, Tex., wiped 
out: :W Uiili'd and 40 injured. 
Miscellaneous; International naval ship re- 
view in New York harbor and in the Hud- 
son river. 

2). Fire: Woburn, Mass., Currying factory 
burned; Ics.". Sl"5,000. 

W. Miscellanco is; The National bank of Aus- 
tralasla failed for £7,DOO.00a 

MAY. 

L Miscellaneous: World's fair opened at Chi- 
cago. 

8. Fire: Steam and Electric Power company 
bir.nod out at Louisville: loss, $300,000. 

i. Obituary: M.-c-United States Senator J. W. 
Pntti-raon of New Hampshire, at Hanover, 
N. II. 
Personal: Dean William Lawrence chosen 
El>i.-copal Ihsliop of Massachu-setts to suc- 
cee<l PliiLUps Brooks, lately decea.sed. 

8. Disaster: 10 killed and many injured in a 
v.rock on il.o Big Four road near Lafay- 
ette. Ind. 

7. D:si-..^ter: 12 killed, 7 injured by a boiler ex- 
plosion on tJie steamer Ohio running on tho 
Mi.-sissippi river. 
Obituary: Col. Ward H. Lamon, at ono tlm;; 
Liiicoln'.i private secretary, at Martins- 
burjr. W. Va. The wife of Chaunccy M. 
Depew, in Nc-w York city. 

8b Flics: Fraiikforil, I'a., Bromley & Burns' 
yarn dyein-,: mill destroyed; loss, $240,000. 
Chic-a;;o, tho Slicpnrd Hardware company 
burned out; lo.s», 520i).O0O. 
Miscellaneous: II. U. Warner, the patent 
mcilicine manufacturer of Rochester, a»- 
B!,';i!ed; liabilities estimated 550i),tX)0. 

9. Fire: UlicH. N. Y., J. B. Wells' dry gooda 
Etorc destroyed; loss over $250,000. 

Personal: James II. Blount appointed United 
States minister to Hawziii. » 

Miscellaneous: The Bank of Victoria at Mel- 
bourne sua ended, with JE2,4U),()00 liabilities. 
10. Obituary: Josejih Francis, the noted life- 
boat inventor, at Ot.sego lake. New York. 
Dr. Charles Carroll Lee, president of the 
New York ^ledical society, in New York 
city: aged .',4. 
IL Fires: Spring Lake, Mich., half the \-illaeo 
burned: loss, $80,000. Rochester, electric 
road plant destroyed; loss, 00,000. Pittsburg; 
loss, $lKl,mi. 

Obituary: Gen. E. D. Townscnd, adjutant 
general of the army, retired at Washing- 
ton: aged 7i). 
U. Obituary: Gen. S. C. Armstrong, principal 
of Ham 1)1 on Normal institute and Indian 
school, :a Hampton, Va.; aged 54. 

Miscellaneous: The Sioux City Engine Works, 
Sioux Ciiy, la., susiiended; liabilities, $20o.- 
€00. The Cuiiard liner Campania reached 
Liverpool 5 days 17 liours 27 minutes from 
NeW York, b.-eaking tiie ea.st bound leconl. 
13. Miscellaneous: Steel company at Belleville, 
Ills., placetl in hands of a ixceiver. Ken- 
'dall & Smith, grai:i de;ilers of Lincoln, 
Neb., failed for over *2.M),0Cii. Bank failures 
lit Orleans and Hossville, Ind., at Frceiwrt, 
0., and Kockford, Mich. 
li. Obituary: llev. W. II. A. Bissell, bishop of 
the Protestant Episcopal diocese of Ver- 
mont, at Burlington; aged 80. 

Disaster: 10 miners killed by falling down 
a shaft at the Calumet and Hecla mine, 
Mich. Tlie steamer City of Hamburg run 
down the ship Countess Evelyn off the Cor- 
nish coast; 2.J lives lest. 

16. Sportlnu: 1 )iablo won the Brooklyn handi- 
cap at (iravesend, N. Y. 

Miscellaneous: Erastus Wiman. New York 
capitalist, nxade an assignment. 

17. Disasters: 25 lives lost in a storm on Lake 
Erie. C death.'* by the explosion of a gener- 
ator in a gluco.se factory at Geneva, ills. 

18. Pergonal: The Intanta Eulalio of Spain ar- 
rived in New York c.ty. 

19. Obitu:i.ry: James E. M;:rdock, actor and 
elocutionist, at Cincinnati; aged 83. 

Sa Fire: Saginaw, Jlich., 200 houses burned; 
loFSOver $1,:>IX).000. 

28. Miscellanto-as: The cruiser New York sur- 
p.'issed the cruiser record of the world, 
making a speed of 21 knots an hour. 

23. Fires: Reading, Mich., lost $150,000 by 
flames; 2 deaths. SontJi Salem, Mass., tan- 
nery (iestroyed; loss, $132,000. 

36. Obituary: Dr. Lyman A. Abbott, a New 
England cancer specialist, at Malden,Mass.: 
ngeil 8li. 
Miscellaneous: Ex-Sccretary of the Treasury 
Charles I-'oster of F'ottoria, O., assigned, 
with liabilities of nearly $1,000,000. 

28. Fire: Bal;imore, sugar refinery destroyed; 
loss, S1,OIX),0jO. 

29. Sporting: .lim Hall defeated Frank Slavin, 
7 rounds, in London. 

30. Di.'aster: M.aia's circus train wrecked at 
Tyrone, Pa.: 5 deaths. 

JUNE. 

8L Fire: Oms.iia. Schiiierick's furniture store 
set in ft.ames by lightning; loss, over 9200,- 
IM>. 5 people killed by a falling wall. 

Disaster: 5 deaths iu a burning flat in New 
York city. 

Personal: Mrs. James G. Blaine, widow of 
Secretary Blaine, sailed for England, where 
she win reside permanently. 

Si'crting: Frank Ives defeated John Roberts 
at billiards in London. 
Gl Crime: 6 men raidetl tho People's bank at 

Little Rock and secured glO.OUJ. 
a. Cyclone: The town of Woodington. O.. 
nearly demolished by a storm of wind and 
rain; 1 death. , 

7. Fires: Fartio, N. D., one-half the city de- 
stroyed and a,(X)0 people made homeless; 
loss over S;j,500.00(). Oslikoth. Wis., a r.'MO.- 
000 blaae ou the main street. San Francis- 
co, a do;:iin t' no residences destroyed; loss, 
g2l«>.0ui»; 4 deaths. IMiuneapells, the Brad- 
street-Thurljti company's store damaged 
to the extent of S1H>.000. 

Personal: James Gordon B«M!Uctt, proprietor 
of the New York Herald, seriously injured 
by falling from a coach In Paris. 

Obituary: EiUvin Booth, the eminent ti-.age- 
dian, in New York city; aged U<). Dr. J. E. 
Hendricks, a noted mathematician, at Dea 



it;omcs; ageu lu. 

8. Fire: Motitroid, the Vll'.e Marie convent 
destroyed; Iojv'j, $l,(iXJ,<:t.O. 

Obituary: Kev. Dr. O. It. liluo, prominent In 
tho Mothodibt church south, at Greens- 
boi i>, Ala.; n;.rcd 70, 

9. Dii»a.Htei-B: Tim floors of i'ord's old opera 
liuuse, V«'u»liiiig!on, where Lincoln was as- 
sassinated, (ell, carrying down hundreds of 
government clerks at work in the building: 
22 diallis, over '><> injured. 

Riot: !' nun killed and sexeral injureU lu a 

nieliH! wilii strikers lit Romeo, Ills. 

U. Mihcellaiit'ous: Gen. Joseph A. Hall, a civil 

war Vetera:! f)f .Muine, died on board a Now 

York Central train near Syracuse. 

13. Di.sa*;ti'r: :"i deulh^j in tins burning of a 

"sv.cal sh< ,)" in New York eily. 
17. Miscellaiuous: TIse Viking ship from Nor- 
way arriv«-d in New Vork harbor. 
30. Fire: Dulfh. Minn., friime bl(x:k destroyed; 
lass. 8»<),iJ<«); 4 deaths. 
Disaster: 4 killed und UU injured bythede- 
niilm<-nt of a train on tho Lnng Island rail- 
road at Parkville, N. Y. 
Sporting: lAJwlan<ler won tho Suburban 

handicap at Siieepsliead Bay. 
Miscellaneous: Li/zio Borden acquitted of tho 
murder of her father and mother at New 
Bedford. M.a.ss. 
£1. Disa-ster: Lightning struck a circus tent at 
River Falls, Wis., and killed 7 people. 
Oj-clone: JeiFerbon county, Kan., swept by a 

fierce tornado; 20deiLths. 
Obltu&ry: Sen:'.tor Lcland Stanford, the Cal- 
ifornia capit:dist, at Palo .\llo, Ca!.; aged 09. 

22. Di.s.ibtrr: 6 tlcaths from gas explosion in a 
c( ..1 mine at Nanticoko, Pa. 

23. Disast'ir: Th(* Hi-itisli battleship Victoria 
sunk in a collision with the battleship Cam- 
pertlo-.vn in the Mediterranean sea; over400 
lives lo.->t, including .\diniral Tryon. 

34. SiK>rtint:: iioundless won the American 
Derby at Chicago. 

S5. Fln>: Oiua la, Wnkefield's Inmbcr yards 
detitroNcd; loss, S-'WO.OOO. 

Ml. Disaster: 'J'ho Tremont hotel. Fort Scott, 
Kan., coll->o.sod. with loss of life and seri- 
ous injur\ Lo inmates. 
Miscellaneous: Governor Altgeld of Illinois 
l)ardoiied \ lie anarchists Eiuldeii, Neebe an<l 
Schwab, iiMprL-^ned at Joliet for complic- 
ity in the liny market riot. 

27. Fire: Lake tieor^c, N. Y., tho Sagamore 
hotel: losf,«2tii,0i(i. 

Obituary: l<ev. W. VV. Kone, the oldest Bap- 
tist iui:iLsl r in tiie United States, nt Deui- 
Kon, Tex.: ai:i-d 00. 

28. Sporting: '";. V»'. (iofi*, amateur athlete, won 
the all round championship of America at 
Kev>- York. 

20. Sporting: Vale beat Harvard in the a.inoal 
boat I ace. 

JULY. 

8. Miscellan-.-out Tl'.c Nev.- Vork .stuto inou.v 
ment dediratiy.l at (Jetrsbun:. The Fal- 
con, with L!t ut. I'cf.ry's cxplorin-j i-arty on 
board, started for the arctic re'.;ir:is, 
i. Disasters; Mine explosion in the '! iiOiiioiU 
mine. Engl:'.nd, caused th.- death of i::3 
miners. A pa.'^.sengo:- sieaiiicron the Vclga, 
near Romanov,-, Kussiii, exi)lode<l her boil- 
ers; :9> deaths; a Russian ycueial was 
among tho vicliin.-;. 

Miscellaneous: Sevious rioting broka out 

among the students in I'ari.s. 
ft. Fire: New liavea,ioi>era i;o;ir,c damaged by 
flames to tho amount of iJliKl.CtK). 

Obituary: Commcvlon! Francis Lock wood, U. 
S. N., rctinu, at Flushint;-, N. V.; inM 'M. 
0. Fire: McDonald. Pa.. 10 biiiidin;,'-!, i;icli.d- 
ing a church, de.-':oyed; !:)■!-■, jJ'.Hi.ii !ii. 

Cyclone: Pomeroy, K:in., destroyed by a tor- 
nado; 53 p'.-oplc killed, 50 fatally injured 
and \M mal:ucd. 

Obilu.iry: Guy de Maupassant, tho French 
romantici-st; a^'cil 44. 

Miscellaneous: Tho Christian Endeavor in- 
ternational convention opened in Montreal. 
The Duke of York (Prince George of ^V;l:c£) 
a!;d Princess Victoria Mary of Teck mar- 
ried in London. 
7. Obituary: Justice Samuel Blalcliford of tho 
United States supreme court, at Newport, 
R. I.; Jiged 73. 

0. O'oituary: E;;-Governor A. K. Allison of 
Florida, in Jacksonvilk'; u;j:ed 8IJ. 

10. Disaster: 18 i>ersons killed and 19 injured 
at the burning of a co!d storage warehouse 
in the World's fair grounds. 

Obit'.iai-y: Chaiiea Brcnnekc-, form-jrly well 
known as an architect and engineer, at Mar- 
shal Itown, la.; aged 79. 

IL Fire: West Sujierior, Wis., the plant of a 
paint and builders' supply company de- 
stroyed; lo.'.s, SllXJ.O'X!. 

18. Disaster: 5 iieople killed and »0 injured in 
a collision on the West Shore road at New- 
burg, N. Y. 
Mi.sccllaneous: The international convention 
of tho Baptist Young Peoples' unitm of 
America opened nt Indianapolis. Shots ex- 
changed between Siamese forts and French 
gunboats at the mouth of Meinam river; £0 
Siamese killed and 14 woimded. 

I& Obituary: Gen. David W. Miles, a Penn- 
sylvania Vf<teran, at Lancaster, Pa.; a;;ed 
61. Gen. J. C. Kolton, U. S. A., retired, at 
Washington; aged 61. 

Id. Fire: Mount Washington, N. IL, the Glenn 
House destroyed; los.s S100,!X10. 
Obituary: fJen. Edwanl Jardine. a union vet- 
eran, in New York city; aged 05. Rear Ad- 
miral Earl English, U. S. N., retired at 
Washington; aged C5. 

17. Fire: London, 30 buildings in the business 
district destroyed: los.s, £1,.500,000. 

Disaster: A locomotive crashed into a 
crowded street car in Chicago, killing 4 
passengers. 

Mibcellancons: The educational congress 
ofiened at t'hicago. 

18. Cyclone: A destructive tornado swept over 
the towns of Voghera and Oastcggio, Italy. 

Miscellaneous: Exciting bauk panic m Den- 
ver. 
20. Fii-o: Emen, Miss., the business portion en- 
tirely destroyed; loss, S:.V.O,000. 
Obituary: Gen. J. G. Walker, a veteran of tho 
regular army and of tho Confeder.icy, in 
Washington; aged 70. 
a. Fire: Long Island City, N. Y.. 31 buildings 
burned; h'ss, gJOO.OOO. 
Obituary: Rear Admiral Melancthon Smith, 
U. 8. N., retired, at Green Bay, Wis.; aged 
83. 
28. Fires: Paulding. O., 30 of tho principal busi- 
ness houses destroyed; loss, $21X1,000. Port 
Louis, the capital of the island of Mauri- 
tius, devastated by Hamcs; the city was 
wrecked in \i0'2 by a hurricane. 
SL Fire: Columbus, O., the Oiiio Transfer and 
Storage co:upany's buildings destroyed; 

loss, !p:»!(1.0tXl. 

SS. Miscel!a:ieous: The Erie Railway company 

placed lu hands of receivers: floating debt, 

$U,Otl(i,(XX). 
SB. Obituary: (Jen. George \V. Morgan, a 

Mexican and civil war veteran, at Fortress 

Monroe, Va.; aged 73. 

28. Fire: Ludi:igton. Midi., Carter's lumber 
and shingle mill destroyed; loss, $125,(XX). 

Miscellaneou;: 350,0tX> EngUsh coal miners 
v.-ent out on a sti-ikc. 

29. Fire: Lockport, N. Y., tho United Indus- 
trial Fiber company burned out; loss, $80,- 
000. 

80. Fii-e: Pittsburg, the storesof the L. H. Har- 
ris Drug conipany and of A. C Henderson, 
druggist, destroyed; loss. C140,iX)0. 

8L Di.'aster: 5 men killed and 4 badly injured 

by the explosion of a farm engine boiler, 

near Newark, O. 

Obituary: John Stephenson, the noted street 

car builder, ntNew Rochcile, N. Y.; aged 84. 

AUGUST. 

L Miscellaneous: Tho nr.tional convention of 
the Catholic Total Abstinence union opened 
at Springfield, Mass. Panic in tho provision 
pit of the Chicago board of trade. 

2. Fire: niiinebcck, N. Y., the barn and other 
outbuildings of ex- Vice President Morton's 
farm destroyed; loss. $3X1,0110. 
Obituary: Gen. William P. Innes, a civil war 
veteran, at Grand Rapids. 

8. Fire: Kansas City, branch house of tho 
Whitman <*c Barnes Manufacturing com- 
pany of Akron. O.. burned out; loss, $135,000. 
Disasters: 9 seamen killed by the explosion of 
a grenade on the German armor clad steam- 
er Baden at Kiel, Germany. Tho pi ,asuro 
yacht Rachel, on Lake George, sank and 
carried down 9 persons. 
Obituary: Jiuies L. Wrirht, one of the seven 
foundcr.s of the Knights of Labor, at Ger- 
ni.nntown, P;i.: aged 70. 
Miscolla:ieous: The French blockade of Slam 
raised. 

^ Mi.seellaiifous: Keceiveri^ were aT)pointed 
for the bi;.«ineiS of J. H. Walker company, 
dry i,oods dealers, whosucceeded lutheChl- 
cago tradi' of .\. T. Stewart & Co.; debts 
a'Kdit S2.<lili|,i«X>. N. L. Corto & Co., the old 
till idaie iini>ori'.'rs, a.-'slgned iu K«W Vurk 
L.,UiiiUe>i. i^JiJLUUli 



•. t<ire: invKianu, < al., f'acinc Mall works 
burned; loss, $350,(100. 

Disaster: 32 pleasure excursionists drowned 
by the swamping of a rowboat in Swansea 
bay. Port Talbot, Wales. 

Obilu;u-y: Gen. George B. Bingham, a Union 
veteran, at Westljoro, Mass. 

Mi»<;ellaneou8: Tho reservoir of the Portland 
(Me.) Water company burst, letting free 
80,000,000 gallons of water; 2 houses crushed 
and 4 people killed. 
7. Fire: Snow Hill, Md., the busineas section 
nearly de troyed; loss about $500,000. 

PDliticnl: Couipt^ss met in extraordinary aes- 
sion. 

Obituary: Alfred Butler Starey, editor of 
Harper's Young People, in New York city. 

Sporting: George Dixon defeated Eddie Price 
for the world's championship, at Coney Is- 
land. 
•. Obituary: John B. Wright, manager of 
Ford's theater when President Lincoln 
was assassinated, at Aiiston, Mass.; aged 
78. Geor; 5 Makepeace Towle, historian 
and journalist, at Brookllne, Mass.; aged 
62. William T. W. Ball, an old journali f. 
In Boston; aged (53. Rear Admiral Thorn- 
ton A. Jenkins, U. S. N., at Washington; 
aged 81. 

Miscellaneous: R. H. Coleman, the "Iron 
King" of Lebanon, Pa., assigned. 
10. Obituary: (Jeorge Shiras, father of Justice 
Shiras, am' an old Pennsylvanian, at I*ltts- 
burg: aged 89. 

13. Fire: Milwaukee, several mills, lumber 
yards and over 200 houses destroyed: loss, 
$2.0(K).0U». 

14. Fires: Stotibcnville. O.; loss, $200,01)0. Den- 
ver, flour mill and ele^ator burned: loss 
over $26(I.(;(Xj. 

liisnster: 5 people killed and 14 injured at the 
burning of tho Senate hotel, Chicago. 
1&. Fire: BulTalo, the Coalsworth elevator de- 
stroyed; loss nt-arly f.voo.fiOO. 

16. Disasten^: 7 passengers killed in a railroad 
accident at Milton, Pa. 17 excursionists 
drowned in the river Shannon, Ireland, by 
the capsizing of a boat. 

17. Fire: St. I'aul, Dyer Bros., musical instru- 
ment-s, burned out; loss, 4^100,000. 

Obituary: John W. Casilear. a noted Amer- 
ican landscaix! painter, at Sai-atoga Springs, 
N. Y.; aged 82. 

15. Obituary: John F. Ballyntine, a journalist 
who helped found the Chicago Herald, in 
Chicago. 

VO. Disaster: Mr. J. L. Bovoe, his wife, daugh- 
ter and 3 young ladies, while driving to 
church at Leroy, N. V., were instantly killed 
by an express train at a railroad ctn.ssing. 

22. Disaster: 4 pecjjlo killed and 3 dangerously 
wounded in a battle between citizens and 
tho employees of a traction company al 
Gilberlon, Pa. 

33. Fire: South Chicago, 200 buildings burned 
and 5,000 people made homeless: loss over 
£lXX),0O0. 
Disasters: The Reading company's collier 
i^anthcr and barge Luykens Valley wrecked 
off Sonthamjjton, N. Y.; 17 sailors drowned. 
Fierce gale on the New England, New York 
and Now Jersey coasts; vessels and summer 
hotels wrecked; many -i' saths. 
Obituary: Mrs. Anna llydo died at Peek- 
skill, N. Y., at the ago of 104. 

17. Disaster: 16 killed and 16 Injured in a colli- 
sion on the Long Island railroad at New- 
town. 
Cyclone: A West India hurricane devastated 
the South Carolina and Georgia coasts; ap- 
palling death lists in Savannah, Port Royal, 
Beaufort and neighboring islands. The 
steamer City or Savannah, from Boston, 
wrecked on the South Carolina shoals. 

£9. Personal: Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes cele- 
brated his8JLh birtliday. 

30. Sporting: Domino won the $65,000 Futurity 
stakes at Shcepshead Bay, N. Y. 

3L Disaster: 20 killed and many injured by the 
collapse of a bridge on the Boston and Al- 
bany road near Chester, Ma.ss. 

SEPTK.MIJEK. 

L Fire: The Thornton worsted mill nt Provi- 
dence destroyed; loss, S22.5,tl(X). 
8. Disiistcr: people killed and 40 injured by 
a runaway electric car in Cincinnati. 

Obitr.iiry: Colonel Jerome Bonaparte, grand- 
nephew of Napoleon I, nt Pride's Crossing, 
Mass.: aged t»i. 

Mi^cellaneous: Dr. Thomas Thatcher Graves, 
the ar:e:.;cd whisky poisoner, died myste- 
riously in his cell at Denver. 
& Slisccllanetms: The twenty-seventh annual 
encami-ment of the Graml Army of the 
Kepublie opened at Indianapolis. 
8. Obituary: Miss Emma M. Converse, a noted 
astronondcai writer, at Whiteficld, N. H.: 
aged rJ. 

Disaster: Tho Haytian warship Alexander 
foundered off Cajio Tiburon, Haytl, carry- 
ing down FO people; among the lost were 
several Haj-tian diplomats. 
7. Dis.asters: Tlie schooner Windemere from 
Key West capsized in a squall 180 miles off 
Moldl'j; the. captain, his wife, first mate, 
steward and one seaman drowned. 12 killed 
and 10 injured in a liend end collision at 
Colehour, near Chicago. 5 people killi.-d by 
n tornado nt Loekport, La. 

Obituary: E.\-Sccretnry of State Hamiltor. 
Fisli at (iaii-i.son's, N. Y.: aged 85. 

10. Fire: Spokane, Wash., the exhibition build 
ing burned; loss, $100,000. Mount Vernon, 
Ind.. elevator destroyed; loss, $100,000. 

11. Crime: 20 marked men held up a Lake Shore 
train near Kendallville, Ind., and rifled an 
express safe of nearly $20,000, 

15. MiL^cellaneous: Do Lcsseps, tho Panama 
canal projector, released from prison :it 
Paris. 

13. Obituary: Frederick Lathrop Ames, the 
wc;ilthi<.st man In New Eagland, on board 
th" sound steamer Pilgrim: aged 58. 

14> Fire: Schell City, Mo., 20 buildings de- 
stroyed; loss. ?gO,C0O. 
Miscellaneous: Rebel warships bombarded 
the government forts at Rio Janeiro, Bra- 
zil. 

16. Miscellaneous: 6.000,000 acres in the Chero- 
kee strip opened to settlers. 

17. ffire: I'atterson, O., the town partially de- 
stroyed; loss, $00,000. 

Crime: 3 negroes lynched at New Orleans for 
shielding the murderer of a judge. 

IS. Miscellaneous: The insurgent ships at Rio 
Janeiro turned their guns upon the city. 
The centennial anniversary of the laying of 
the cornerstone of the capitol celebrated 
at Washington. 

13. Fire: Canton, Ills., opera house burned; 
several mi.^sing: many injured in a panic. 
Disaster: 8 killed and 20 injured in arearend 

collision Mantono, Ills. 
Obituary: Sir Alexander T. Gait, a promi- 
nent Canadian official, at Montreal; aged 76. 

20. Miscellaneous: Citizens attempted to lynch 
ft negro at Roanoke, Va.. and were fired 
upon by militia; 6 killed, many injured. 

SL Disaster: Skilled and 5 Injured by an ex- 
plosion in the Lance colliery at Plymputb, 
Pa. 
Miscellaneous: Robert Smith, tho negro who 
caused th - riot at Roanoke, Va., on the 
20th, hanged by a mob. The twenty-fourth 
annual reunion of the Army of the Cumber- 
land opened at Cleveland. 

28. Fire: Red Wing, Minn., lumber plant 
burned; loss, $130,000. 
Disaster: An express wrecked by an open 
switch on the Wabash at Kingsbury, Ind.; 
12 killed, many injured. 

28. Fire: Chicago, the Purcell company's malt 
houses burned; loss, $400,000. 

24. Crime: Train robbers foiled at St. Joseph, 
Mo., by a train load of policemen: 2 robbers 
shot dead. 

25. Fire: St. Joseph, Mo.; loss nearly $1,000,000. 
ao. Miscellaneous: Thirtieth annual convention 

of th e gran d 1 odge o T Good Tem plai-s ope ned 
in Haitforu. Eighteenth annual convention 
of tho Knights of St. John and Malta met 
in Philadelphia. 

87. Obituary: Professor J. F. Parish Steele of 
Illinois, a well known writer on agricul- 
ture, in Mobile; aged 65. Louis Lange,a 
German journalist and publisher, in St. 
Louis; aged 64. 

28. Disaster: 28 miners drowned in the Mana- 
field mine, Mich., by a break in the bed of 
the Michlgamme river, which ran above 
the mine. 

2B. Miscellaneous: Cold wave In the northern 
states; snow iu the New England and mid- 
dle states. 

OCTOBER. 

1. Obituarj-: Judge Irving R Handle, who waa 
an intimate friend of Lincoln, at Alton, 
Ills.: aged 82. 

8. Fire: Omaha, Farnham Street theater de- 
stroyed; loss, $250,000. 
Cyclone: Terrible storm on the gulf coast; 
over 3,000 lives lost, damages several mil- 
lion dollars. 

7. Sporting: The American yacht Vigilant 



America H cup over tne i:.ngiisii yacnt vm. 
kyrie by 5 minutes 48 se( onds. 

9. Biiortiug: Tho American yiiclit Vigilant 
won the second race from tho English 
yacht Valkyrie by 10 minutes 35 seconds. 
Misc-ellancouh: Over 700,000 iiersuns visited 
the World's fair in honor of Chicago day. 
A carload of powder exploded near Alli- 
ance, O.; hiss, ^50,000; 2 deaths. 

18. Fire: 30 1 uildiiigu burned in the busineaa 
district of Sioux City, la.; loss about 
$5(X>,000. 

18. Siiorting: Tho American yacht Vigilant 
won the third race against the English 
yiw-'ht Valkyrie by 40 seconds, deciding the 
contest for the America's cup in favor of 
America. 
Disaster: Rear end collision of World's fair 
excursion trains on the .Michigan Central 
at Jack.son; 12 killed, 40 injured. 

14. Disaster: Storm on the great lakes; the 
propeller Dean Richmond lost at Van 
Burcn Point, carrying down 18 sailors, the 
captain, his wife and 3 children. 

16. Fires: King City, Mo., 30 buildings burned; 
loss, $150,000. Detroit: loss, f 2aj,000. 

17. Fire: New York city, 2 blocks. Including 
factories and dwellings, destroyed: loss, 
S1,500,(/(X). 

Obituary: Lucy Stone Blackwell, tho woman 
suffragist, at Dorchester, Mass.: age<l 75. 
MacMahon. Due de Magenta, marshal c: 
France and ex-prcsidenl of the republic, in 
Paris; aged 85. 

Disaster: 5 killed and 5 Injured by a dyna- 
mite explosion at Emingiou. Ills. 

18. Sporting: Directum trotted 1 mile in 2:05}4 
at Nashville: new world's record for trot- 
ters. 

19. Fire: Springfield, Mass.; loss. $140,000. 
Obituary: Gen. Dennis F. Hurke. one of tho 

commanders of the Irish brigade, in New 

York city; aged 5.J. 
JO. Disaster: A head end coUi.sion ou the Grand 

Trmik at Battle Creek. Mich., caused the 

death of 28 people. 
Obituary: Rev. Dr. Philip Scl>aff, celebrated 

Biblical exegetc and church historian, in 

Now York city; aged 7-1. 
22. Fire: East I)ougla.-.s, Mass., a $200,000 blaze 

in the As and Tool company's works: 1,000 

men llirownout of employment. 
81. Disaster: Rear Admiral Walter W. Queen, 

U. S. N., retired, in Washington: aged 60. 
2&. Fire: San Francisco, an entire block de- 
stroyed: loss. S15O,U0O. 
87. Fire: Pittsburg, the Chautauqua Lake Ice 

company and the Pittsburg Storage com- 
pany burned out; lo>i3, $8.')0,(i(a). 

28. Obituary: Hon. Carter II. Harrison, mayor 
of Chicago, in Chicago; aged 63; Mayor Har- 
rison was shot dead by a man named Pren- 
dergast. 
Miscellaneous: Battle between Spanish troops 
and lliffians at Melilla. in Morocco: Gen. 
Margallo, the .Spanish commander, and 70 
of his men killed. 

80. Obituary: Sir John Abbott, ex-premier of 
Canada, at Montreal: aged 72. 
Miscellaneous: The World's fair declared of- 
ficially at an end. 

NOVK.MBER. 

L Fire: Dixon, O., lumber mill; lo.ss, S;.'00,000. 
Disaster: Steamship City of Alexandria, off 
Cajimar, Cuba; 35 people drowned. 

8. Fires: Zanesville, O., plaiurg mill and lum- 
ber yard; loss, $100,00(1. Iron Mountain, 
Mich.. Roman CathoUc church destroyed; 
the pastor. Father Cavacchi, fatally burned. 
Disaster: Boiler esploded in a street c,ir sta- 
ble in New York city; liiiled, 13 injured. 
Sporting: Directum, king of irollei-s. dtfeat- 
cd Mascot, king of pacers, at Fleetwood 
park. 

8. Disaster: Cargo of dynamite exphxlcU at 
the ijuay in Santander, Si)ai:i; neariv l.(XX) 
people killed and injured. 

4. Disaster: 10 workmen drowned froii an 
overloaded sailboat in New Vork harbor. 

i. Fire: Galena, Ills., smelting works: loss, 
gltXI.OttO. 

8. Disaster: 24 castaway sailors drowned off 
Point aux Barques by the swampincof a 
boat. 

7. Fire: Dan vers. Ills., the business di:jtricl 
nearly destroyed. 

Crime: Anarchist threw bombs intr. the 

opera house at Barcelona, Spain; 30 killed. 

80 injured. 
Sporting: John S. Johnson, bicyclist, with 

dying start, rode a mile in 1 minute 55 3-5 

seconds: world's i-ecord. 

8. Fire: Memphis, Lyceum theater burned; 
loss, $3t;(),0(Xl. 

Disaster: Twelve killed by a rear end collision 
on the Rock Lsland and Pacific in the 
streets of Chicago. 

Crime: Lawyer Francis H. Weeks, tho de- 
faulting speculator, sentenced to 10 years' 
liard labor. 

Obituary: Francis Parkman, eminent histo- 
rian, at Jamaica Plains, Mass.; a^^d 70. 

9. Obituary: Annie Pixiey, the actress. In Lon- 
don. Professor Herman August Hagen of 
Harvard college, well known entomologist, 
at Cambridge, Mass.; aged 70. 

IL Obituary: Ex-Governor Charles II. Bell of 
New Hampshire at Exeter, N. II.: aged 70. 

13. Fire: Utiea, Ills., fire brick factory destroy- 
ed; I0S.S, Si200,(!tH). 

Obitunry: Mr.s. J. Roosevelt Roosevelt, wife 
of the newly appointed secretary of the 
American embassy, at Lo.'idon. 
18. Fire: Memphis, the Schmalzried block de- 
stroyed: loss nearly Sl,OtX»,000: 4 people 
killed. 

14. Obituary: William A. Beane, a prominent 
Denincnitof Indiana, editor of tho Goshen 
Democrat, died suddenly in tho streets of 
Goshen. 

Ifi. Fire: Fergus Mills, ^linn., the Page flour 
mills and other property destroyed; loss. 
$100,000. 

Crime: Robbers carried off a valise contain- 
ing $20,(X)0 from thp office of the Indiana, 
Illinois and Iowa Railroad company'sofllce 
in Chicago. 

Obituarj-: Elizabeth Oaksmith, poet and 
lecturer, at Hollywood, N. C; aged 87. 

16. Obituary: Samuel Augustus Cole, well 
known art collector and critic, in St. Louis: 
aged 68. 

17. Earthquake: Town of Kuchan, province of 
Khorassan, Persia, destrojed; over 12,000 
persons killed. 

18. Fire: Kansas City, the Western Warehouse 
and Storage company burned out; loss, 
$200,000. 

Obituary: Rev. Charles F. Deems, pa.stor of 
the Church of the Strangers, in New Yflrk 
city: aged 73. 
Mlscellaneo is: The new cruiser Columbia 
made the fastest time on record in I lie 
world, in a trial trip; average speed , 23 knots. 
2,000 train operatives and telegraphers on 
tlie Lehigh Valley went out on a strike. 
8L Fire: SUrkville, Miss., the Masonic and 
Odd Fellows' building and Watts' Opera 
House destroyed; loss. $100,000. 
Disaster: 7 men killed and 7 badly injured in 
the burning of the ilerriU House at Beaver, 
Pa. 
Obituary: Hon. Jeremiah ZhIcLain Rusk, ex- 
governor of Wisconsin, and also secretary 
of agriculture under President Harrison, 
at Viroqtia, Wis.; aged 63. 
SL Fire: Springfield, Mass., several blocka 
burned: loss, $450,000. 
Sporting: Directum defeated AJix, queen of 
racing trotters, at Fleetwood park, iu 3 
straight heatu; beat mile trotted in 2:08. 
28. Fire: Edson, Moore <fc Co.'s dry goods store 
burned in Detroit; loss, $800,000; 7 employees 
kiUed. 
Si. Fire: Columbus, O., the Henrietta theater, 
Chittenden hotel and Park theater and 
auditorium destroj-ed; loss, $1,000,000. 
Obituary: Ex-Governor John J. Jacob of 
West Virginia, at Wheeling; aged 61. 
86. Fire: Hannibal, Mo., the William Voorhla 
dry goods store, Klster hotel and other 
buildings destroyed: loss, «aX),000. 
Obituary: Congressman Charles O'Neill, tho 
"father of the hooae," in Philadelphia: 
aged 72. 
Sporting: Yale defeated Harvard at football: 
score. 6 to 0. 

86. Obituary: William L. Banning, a political 
and business leader of Minnesota, in St. 
Paul: aged 79. 

87. Personal: General blaster Workman T. V. 
Powderly, Knights of Labor, resigned. 

Miscellaneous: The proposed IKiuocratic tar- 
iff bill given to the public press. Earth- 
quake shocks in northern New Vork, New 
England and Canada. 

28. Fire: .\ business block burned in Oil City: 
4 deaths; loss on property, $90,0 «i. 

80. Sporting: Princeton defeated Vale at foot- 
ball: score, to 0. 

DECEMBER. 

L Fire: Philadelphia, the Thornton worsted 

mills destroyed: loss. $2;»,000. 
Obituary: WilUam Lilly, a prominent public 

aJaajUMi..CftVitall8.tLj3t Pwuuurlvuida. »t 



iuaiicn i^nuiiK, ageiT .3. 
Mi.'-cellaneons: Admiral .Mello eacaiicd from 



the buy 



rl Rio Janeiro on tbo flai.>hlp 




I 



A<|uid:il:Qn after faome hard flsluu'g vi-ith 
govcriiim nt forts and ships. A score or 
n:r,i-c of kr<M.ks occurred on the LehigA 
Valley road ::.>» a result of the strike. -\bo 
Stein & Co., importers of goatskins, bldea, 
etc., in New York, failed for over $1.<«0,- 
WX). J. R. Sovereign of Iowa installed gen- 
eral master workman. KnlghU of Labor. 
& Fire: Baltimore, $400,000 worth of propertr 
destroyed in the businesa district. 

Obituary: Paulino Cushman, the noted Un- 
ion rcuut, in San Francisco. 

Disaster: ;t me!i killed at a slate quarry at 
Wclchtown, Pa., by the breaking of a cable. 

Crime: 3 highwaymen robbed several paa- 
eengcrs and employees on the Cbicaeo aad 
Northwestern road at Luzerne. la. 
4. Fire: Rome, -\. Y., the New York locomo- 
tive works, valued at $600,000, almost to- 
tally destroyed. Corsicana, Tex.: loas, tl0(V- 
000. 

Obituary: Professor John Tyndall, the celo- 
brated British scientist, at Haaiemere, 
county Stjrrey. England; aged 73. 

Miscelianeoas: Congress met in regular sea- 
Bion. Green B. Raum, Jr., general mer- 
chant and Indian trader at Perry, O. T^ 
failed for a large amount. The Citizens' 
National bank ot Grand Island, Heb., 
closed its doors, 
ft. Miscellaneous: Annual congress of Baptists 
of the United States met in Augusta, Oa. 

Crime: Joseph U. Lotiis, bookkeeper for N. J. 
Schloes & Co., clothiers in New York, ar- 
rested for defalcation, said to amonnt to 
$50,000. 

Personal: The president again nominated 
William B. Homblower of New York for 
Justice of the supreme court. 

Miscelianeou.s: N. J. Schluss & Co., wholesale 
clothiet-s in New York, assigned. 
8. Fire: Norfolk navy yard steam engineering 
department building destroyed: loss. $225,- 
000. 

Disaster: British ship Jason wrecked off 
Highland Light, Me^s.; 25 seamen lo6t. 

Miscellaneou-s: Lehigh Valley strike ended 

by arbitration. 
f. Crime: The South Bend (Ind.) National 
bank robbed of $15,000 cash in broad day- 
lighu 

8. Obituarj*: Hon Rudolph Laflamme, ex- 
minietrr of justice of Canada. 

9. Fire : At Sj racuse, N. Y.. fJOO.OOO worth of 
property b-Jrued. 

Obituary : Bishop Moore, of tho A. F. M. E. 
church, in (irocneboro, N. C , aged 90. L. 
B. Mizuer. ex-minister to (iiiatemaia. at 
Benicia. Cal., aged 6S. Most Rev. John Mc- 
Carthy, ('atholic Bishop of Cloyne, Ireland. 

MiscolhiDeoun : Bomb thrown into Froncb 
chamber of deputies and eighty persons in- 
jured. Sctjtch miners' strike ended. 

10. «d)ituary: Elx-Senator N. A. Farwell, at 
Rockland. Ma. aged M. 

Fire: The Maeon Uan^atiquo, a famoiu 
jrr inary in Antwerp, burned ; loss tl,600.000. 

11. Miscellaneous: Thirrieth animal conven- 
ti.iu of Amfric<-n Federation of Labor 
opened at Chicago. 

Obitu:'.ry: Jeremiah H. Murphy, ex-member 

of congress ttuia Iowa, died at WasluDgton. 

15. I'lsasti-r: Bridge in cnane of erection at 

Lnnievilie fell and over twenty worionan 

killed. 

10. SiKirtiDg : Jacob Schaefer won the billiard 
tournament at New York, breaking the rec- 
ord Oy a run of 666 noints. 

19. Political: Waj'ne AlacVoaKh nominated as 
atnba<^6odor to ltalj°. John P. Hopkins, 
Democrat, elected mayor of Chicaco. Gen. 
Eppa Hun ton and Thomas S. Martin elected 
United Slates senators from Virginia. 

22. Fire: Two severe tire- iu Ho-tou ; in one a 
life lost and SMO.OOO damage done. 

25. Obituary: Ex-Governrr Bitrge, of Dela- 
ware, died of pneumonia. 

£i. tViiniual: Prendergaet. 8SBa»i>in of Mayor 
Harrison, of t'hicago, funnd guilry of mnr- 
dar, and death named as his punishment. 



Hood's sarsaparilla, the king of medi- 
cines, conquers scrofula, cafarih, rheu- 
matism and all other blood diseases. 
Hood's and only Hood's. 22 




DIAMOND 

CRYSTAL 

SALT 

Is best for table use, 
cooking iise and evcrj* 
Ask the grocer for it 



use, 




Faber's Golden Female Pills 

Relieve Fuppressod 
Menstrua tlou. Used 
successfully by thous- 
ands of prominent la- 
dies ■monthly. Thor- 
oughly rellat>le and 
sale. Worth twenty 
times their weight In 
gold /or frmaie irreg- 
vlarit'U't. 'Never known 
to faiL 

Bent by mail scaled 
tor SS. Address 

Tbe Aphro Mediclu 

COMPANY. 

Western Branch* 

Box 27. Portland, Oregon. 

Bold in Dnlutb by Max Wirth and Sellaek A 
Walbank 




IF you wish to drink a choice 
Glass of Lager call for 

Fitger's Beer. 

WTiolesotne. Palatable and Nourlshlna 



N 



OTICE OF AXNU.VL MEETING-THK 
a. ^ secretary of the Dulntli & Winnipeg Rail- 
road company having omitted to give proper 
notice by publication of tlif annual moetini^ of 
said railroad company, which annual meeting 
is reijnired by the by-laws of eaid companf ta 
be hold on the second Thursday of Dpccmber in 
eacli year, now thereft'ii^, we, tho undersigned 
director? of said raumad company, do horeby 
^ive notice that the aontiol meeting of the 
stockholders of the Duluth & Winnipeg Rail- 
road company to elect directors for the ensuing 
year and to transact all puch other bnaiiiess aa 
may lawfully bo transacted by said company at 
its annual meeting, will be held at the oihce of 
tiie company in the Lyceum buildiuK. in the 
citv of Duluth. Minnesota, on the twelfth day 
of Janoary, 1894, at two o'clock p. m. 
Dated Dec. 18, 1893. 

W. F. FrrcH, 

H. J. U0ART>MAK, 
J. IICGR PetEES, 

Directora of the Doluth Jfc Winnipeg Railroad 
Company. 

Dec 23 to Jan 12 inc. 



Tie NorMtemLliiB! 

C. ST. P. M. A O. R'Y. 

THE SHORT LINE TO CHICAGO 

And the Pullman Car Line to 8t. Panl 
and Minneapnlia. 



For ttt. Panl 
and Miniieapolie. 



Lt Dnlnth. 

IivWeet Snperlor 

At SttUwater 

4r8t. Pan] 

,Vr Minneatmlui 



DayKxp 
Kx.8an^ 



10 00 am 

1030 am 

4 30 pm 

500 pm 

6 40 pm 



For Ban Claire, <^ »""« • ; Day Kxp. 
and the R aat and Sonth. gx. Bcn^ 



LvDalutn 

Lt W"at HT'prriof 

Ar Milwaukee ■ 

Ar n,ie»ji>. 



'P 00 arr; 
10 SO a.n 

"8 00 "m 



MLKniKx 
DaOy. 



11 00 pm 

U»pin 

7 28 am 

6M>aia 

790 am 

CbiwiT 

Llttited 

Dail y, 

5 85 I m 
'liOtin 
3 1 fc,„ 



Bt. 



LnT^^ioll^' Parlor ("arp on day train*. 

Direct c .nn">c:i'>ns iu Fti>"n depot. 
Pa I. for all 1 • inTuJ-iooth <*• d West. 

Pnilrnn" and ;Wiiirt>' r fn.M buffet aleepera 
on the • ChJc«o I imiii»d " 

Connectif>n»in('hici»tro with morning tral:j 
South nnd F.«a*. 

GBO. M. ^MITH. n W ^UMMRKS. 

General A^en'. '"'Vr, TtokM Am&v 

4J&Wt4t8ut«tiotgi 



W' 



J 




I . 




1 ! 



: I 



! 1 




THE DULUTP :p:VE:^rIN<^H|CBAIiD: MONDAT, JANUARY 1, 185^4. 







iiiiiiii II 



lEST OyiOIH ITEIS 



Fire Destroyed a Laundry and Residence 

Last Night Causing a Loss of Two 

Thousand Dollars. 



Nearest Hydrant Was Three Blocks Away 

and Nothing Could Be Done to Save 

the Building. 



Peti McDonald Turned State Evidence at 
Hastings and May Get Off- 
Other News. 



The hand laundry and residence of 
John Melin, on Eleventh avenue west 
was completely destroyed by fire last 
ni^ht, about 7 o'clock. The building is 
localeil at such a distance from the busi- 
ness portion ot the town that the fire had 
gamed gre.it headw.iy before 
an alarm was turned in at the 
city hall. When the department ar- 
nvctl at the scene it was found that the 
nearest hydrant was three blocks away 
and there was insufliicient hose to cover 
the distance. 

The hre is supposed to have originated 
m the upper portion of the residence 
part from a heaiia>f stove. A portion of 
the furnituii: and laundry machinery was 
sa\edbut through an oversight some 
valuable papers were lost. Mr. Melin 
estimated his loss at nearly S2000 with 
no insurance, 

Turned State's Evidencf. 

Capt. Doyle, of the police department, 
returned yesterday from Hastingi, 
Minn., where he was summoned to give 
testimony at the trial of Belanger and 
Fete McDonald, who were .arrested tor 
robbing a store and committing other 
crimes at that place. McDonald 
Is a West Duiuth boy who 
has been implicated in various 
kinds of robberies since be left here and 
tinally found himself behind the bars at 
Hastings. He has turned sute's evidence 
and Capt. Doyle tninks he will get clear 
through^ his youth and his assistance in 
convicting Belanger of his misdeeds. 

Wili Soon be Completed. 

Notwithstanding the unfavorable 
weather work is progressing finely on 
the new tire alarm and police patroi 
svstem. A crew of thirty-five men is at 
work under the supennteadence of Dan 
Neary, of Duiuth. The poles on Grand 
avenue are all in and the great- 
er portion of those on Norton 
making about 200 already iu. 
The remainder to be erected on Norton 
avenue and the extras will add about 
ninety to this number. Both tire and 
police boxes are now in Duiuth and it is 
expected that the sys.em wiil be com- 
pleted abjut Jan. I. 

West Duiuth Briels. 

The funeral of Mrs. Curo, mother of 
John Curo, took place yesterday and the 
body was intarred io the Oaeota ceme- 
tery. The deceased lived at Mason, 
Wis , and was brought here for burial. 

Misses Mageie and Nellie Murray are 
visiting friends in Ironwood, Mich. 

The Odd Fellows will install officers 
tomorrow evening at the hail on Central 
avenue. The ceremonies will be atten- 
ded with a banquet and social amenities 
and the members of the order are antici- 
pating a jolly good time. 

The health officer reports ten deaths 
for the past month, none of which re- 
sulted from contagious disease. 

THOMAS A KEEPER DEAD. 



A Well Known Port Arthur Man's Sudden 
Death. 

A week ago last Saturday night 
Thomas A. Keefer, of Port Arthur, was 
sitting up with Robert Maitland, and at 
daylight helped to perform the last kind 
offices for the dead, for that gentleman. 
On the following Thursday at midnight 
Mr. Keefer followed his old friona to 
that bourne from which no traveler < re- 
turns. Grip, followed by pneumonia, 
caused his death. 

Mr. Keefer, who was known to many 
in Duiuth, was about 43 years of age, 
and was a widower, bis wife having died 
a year ago. He had been a resident of 
Port Arthur for some ten years, previ- 
ously residing in Toronto and Strathroy. 
He was instrumental in attracting more 
attention to the Port Arthur silver dis- 
trict than any man in it. He was for 
many years Dominion fisheries inspector 
there. His summer residence was at his 
farm on Pie Island, and he wintered in 
Port Arthur. 

-■-■ - — ' m 

Births Recorded Today. 
Births as follows have been reported 



to the bo-T-rf rf he^ 



Franklin and 



Antoinette Fame, 2 bixtecnth avenue 
east, a daughter; William and Emilie 
iSracher, 626 West Second street, a son; 
W. H. and Nettie Grave?, 1908 West 
Superior ■;»-.--• . ,-. J ^an D. and Tillic 
Campbtl., - /^z Huron street, a d.iughter; 
S. C. and Eilie Wood, 117 Twentieth 
avenue west, a son; Albert and Augusta 
Jjhnson. 820 Third avenue west, 
a son; Christ and Jennie Hau- 
gen, 217 Piedmont avenue east, 
a daughter; Erick and Augusta 
Nelson, 2318 Eighth street west, a son; 
Fred and Elizabeth Forsberg,320^ East 
Third street, a daughter; Carl and Bennie 
Bergren, 6 Thirty-first avenue west, a 
daughter; Ole and Karin Wikan, 1121 
East Sixth street, a daughter; George 
and Marie Eikos, 1016 West First street, 
a son; Carl and Mary Lund, 426 East 
Ninth street, a son; August and Ida Nil- 
son, 126 East Etjjhth street, a son; John 
and Minnie Olson, 10 East Fourth street, 
a daughter, Charles and ^edda Nelson, 
23 r I West Seventh street, a son; Peter 
and Betsy Widholra, 17 Seventeenth 
avenue west, a daughter; John and Mary 
Robertson, 3r2 .Second avenue ea^t, a 
son; Knut and Ronda Olson, 109 Eist 
Fifth street, a son; Carl F. and Julia 
Chalman, QI9 West Fourth slrcc, a son. 



Read Ccntjry Piano Cu.'a ad , pige 6. 
Read Century Piano Co.'s aJ., page 6. 

— —•■ ■ " ■ — — — -.^>» _ — 1. — 

You can rent >our rooms, or houses 
quickly throu;.;h The Herald want 
columns. 

Order at Once 

The number of copies of the Christmas 
Herald you want. Tbev can he bad at 
The Herald counting room. 



For Colds, 

Cough."*, 

Croup, Influenza, and 

Bronchitis, 

use 

AVER'S 

CHERRY PECTORAL 

the best 

of all anodyne 

V 

expectorants. 

Prompt to act, ^mm 

Sure to Cure 



THE FIRE DEPARFMENr. 



Chief Jackson's First Report— Thomas O'Con- 
nor Has Resigned. 

The fire commissioners held their regu- 
lar monthly meeting Saturday afternoon 
and Chief J.ickson made his first monthly 
report. The document states that dur- 
ing the rao.ith of December eighteen 
fires occurred in the city and that prop- 
erty to the value of $1 25,800 w.isdeitioyed 
with |?87,455 insurance. The chief also 
recommended that 3000 feet of new hose 
be purchased, so that each company may 
have Its full amount, which is not now 
the case. 

The fire warden reported that there 
was great negligence among those in 
tenement bouses in regard to stopping 
up stovepipe hoks with paper and straw 
and in leaving combustible rubbish on 
aih piles. 

Electrician Xarey reported that the 
new fire alarm boxes for West Duiuth 
have anived and that by fan, 20 he ex- 
pects to have then in workmg order. 
The alarm svstem throughout the city is 
in good working order. 

The resignation of Thomas O'Connor, 
a member of Fire Company No. 2 was 
received. O'Connor w^as suspended for 
drunkenness by Chief Smith on recom- 
mendation of Assistant Chief Jackson. 
Commissioners Hart and Helinski 
quietly endorsed that ac.ion but Com- 
missioner McGregor said that in the 
past such cases had been investigated 
before the commissioners and he de- 
manded that this case be not made an 
exception. The resignation ends the 
matter. 

A GRAVE CHARGE. 



A. B. Miner Languishes in Jail and Must 
Answer to Attempted Rape. 
A. B. Miner, a carpenter, whose place 
of abode has been at the City hotel, com- 
mences his new year in jail. The cause 
of it is due to Mrs. Robinson, a colored 
woman who lives at First avenue west 
and Second street, who charges the pris- 
oner with attempted rape on her 12-year- 
old daughter Cora. About three weeks 
ago, it is claimed, the officer on ihe First 
street beat caught Miner in a compro- 
misiifg position with the girl 
in the carpenter shop at 

21 West First street. The 

girl claimed that she had been enticed 
there under promise of a doll. Mr-.. 
Robinson at the time refused to enter 
complaint hut on Thursday the girl 
Cora came home fronn the sk.iting rink 
and stated that Miner had chased her 
and her younger sister and had threat- 
ened to kill her. Saturday, Mrs. Robin- 
son made complaint as above stated 
and Miner now awaits arraignment. 



WON THE HOUSE AND LOT. 

C. Williams the Fortunate Winner in M. S. 
Burrows & Co.'s Drawing. 
The big drawing at the Great Eastern 
clothing store for the $2500 house and 
lot which M. S. Burrows gave away, 
took place today at 11 o'clock. There 
was an immense crowd of people outside 
the big show window and the street was 
blocked for an hour or more. The 
drawing was conducted in the presence 
of a committee of newspaper men and 
could be witnessed from the street by 
the entire crowd. A little girl blind- 
folded drew the tickets and about 12.10 
o'clock drew out No. 25,917, the winning 
ticket. It was held by C. V/illiams who 
will now receive a deed for the house 
and lot. 

MELLO BADLY WOUNDED. 



Report That He Was Struck By a Piece ol a 

Shell. 

New York, Jan. i.— The Herald's 
Montevideo cable says: It is re- 
ported in this city that the Brazilian 
rebel. Admiral Mello, has been serious- 
ly wounded and will soon come here in 

der to have his injuries attended to. It 
is su/mised that a fragment of a shell 
must have struck bira, when the Aquida- 
ban was escaping from the harbor at Rio 
andhad run the gauntlet of the loyal 
torts at the entrance. 

Mello's provisional government in 
Desterro, Santa Catharita. has published 
a manifesto saying that Mello and da 
Gama are freely in accord as to the ends 
to be aimed a*, and that both intend to 
maintain the constitution and the re- 
public. 

An Elephant Ran Riot. 
New Orlea.ns, Jan. i.— An elephant 
which arrived here yesterday, intended 
for a local circus, broke loose and ran 
riot through the streets, inflicting consid- 
erable damage to property and causing 
many bruises, knocking over several 
horses and breaking several show win- 
dows. He was finally overtaken and 
captured two miles from where he 
started on bis romp. 

- - I 

Earthquake in England. 
London, Jan. i.— Three shocks of 
earthquake were felt Saturday night at 
Somersetshire. One between 11:30 and 

1 a. m. was especially noticeable. It was 
accompanied by rumbling noises and in 
the bhepton -Mallet district aroused 
many persons from sleep. Beds were 
rocked and furniture and crockery dis- 
lodged. 

Escaped From the Natives. 

Cape TowN.Jan. i.— Advices received 
today from Buluwayo say that native 
runners who have arrived there state 
positively that a portion of the force of 
Capt. Wilson, reports cf the massacre of 
which by the Matabeles have been cur- 
rent for some time, escaped froni the 
natives and fled in the direction' of the 
Hirtlcy trills. 



FELL BY THE WAYSIDE. 



World's Fair Enterprises That Did Not Make 
Money. 

ClllcAOO, Dec. aC.— I have been making 
an inspection of the theatrical bnttlefleUl 
and in a tender, sympathetic way looking 
after the victims that have fallen during 
•\ud since the opening of the World'tt fair, 
the 1st of May. The review has been star- 
tling, even to nie, and I hud notetl the fate 
of each a» he fell. The inort>ility list must 
begin with Steele Macknye and his great 
St>ectutorium scheme — which, however, wan 
ntvor niutvrializeil. Steele is probably the 
mast marvelous dreamer the theatrical pro- 
fos.sion ever knew, and hi.s ex-Spectatorium 
vision was tUs crowning achievement iu this 
line. A few moments of sensible thought 
would have convinced any ordinary busi- 




8TEKLE MACKATE. 

ness man that there could not possibly be 
any profit in his scheme to build the most 
gig.antic theater the world had ever known, 
which could bo operated for no longer than 
six mouths had it been completed on time. 
That there was bound to be a loss was as 
plain as the nose on his face. 

Still, MacLaye talked hifi plans so plausi- 
bly into the ears of several prominent and 
wealthy Ciiicagoan.'* that they walked right 
up to his ofTice in the Auditorium and laid 
great stacks of greenbacks into his upturn- 
ed palm.s, in return for which they carried 
away Spectatorium stock. The building 
of the great theater began. Had it been 
completed, it would have been more ornate 
in design and finish than any of the fairy 
structures on the exposition grounds ad- 
joining. Its materials were a framework 
of steel— the sides and immense arches of 
the roof — wood and staff, which is a sort of 
white plaster th.'it gives a building the np- 
l>earance of n marble structure, very like 
the fair buildings. But after !p500.000 bad 
l)een expended, and it was found that the 
building could not he completed before the 
middle of August instead of by May 1, as 
had been expecteil, and even then only by 
the exjienditure of $300,000 more, the stock- 
holders' eye.s were opened, and they s-tw 
that their money was hopelessly sunk. 
They refused to advance more funds, and 
the enterprise was given up. At last a 
house wrecking company was paid a 8ul> 
stantial sum to remove the building, and 
now there is not even a trace of the great 
structure which was designed to seat an 
audience of ;30,00() persons, and across the 
stage of which it was intended to have run 
a river of real water 60 feet wide and 13 feet 
deep. 

Next in importance came a novel enter- 
prise called Hardy's Underground theater. 
A splendidly proportioned lot was secured, 
the owner taking stock for his pay, and the 
building went up. The plan of this house 
was to have a number of underground 
theatoriums, their stage.^ one below the 
other. The andieoces were to be carried in 
a body on a gigantic hydraulic elevator 
from one show to another until the last 
one, down in the bowels of the earth, was 
reachwl. A revolving panorama was to be 
unrolled between the various stages as the 
audience descended, heightening the effect 
so as to make it seem as if the descent was 
to a vast depth. Well, the projectors along 
in June announced that they had struck a 
pocket of quicksand in excavating, but 
hoped to get through it safely. They never 
made another announcement, and I have 
always suspected that the flaw was in an- 
other kind of "pocket." The grin wal^s 
still stand, a monument to the projectors, 
whose money "never came back." 

Then came the Isabella theater, away 
out near the fair. It was built with the 
intention of giving American dramas by 
American authors. It bad a handsome 
stage and was supplied with 3,000 opera 
chairs. After three nights' performances 
by a stock company of 85 persons the man- 
ager found himself in hot water, and in less 
than three weeks the theater was in the 
hands of a sheriff. It was opened again as 
a variety theater, but after a fitful career 
of a few weeks was closed for good. An- 
other house in the World's fair neighbor- 
hood was the Corbett theater, named after 
the pugilistic champion, who was expected 
to appear on its stage all through the 
season, but who did not do so. It had a 
checkered career for several weeks, when 
it was besieged and captured by the Sal- 
vation Army. 

John Brown's Fort War Museum was a 
failure on a smaller scale. The little old 
one story brick building that stood for so 
many decades in the little town of Harper's 
Ferry was brought to Chicago, as old 
Libby prison had been, re-erected within 
an inclosure and stocked with war relics. 
It never had a profitable day. Barlow's 
Music hall, a large vaudeville house, 
failed because it was surrounded by thea- 
ters of a better grade. 



Jack Haverly has had some sad experi- 
ences in Chicago this year. He leased the 
Crit«riou theater, a well built and hand- 
some house, opened it In connection with a 
summer garden and called it Haverly's 
Criterion Garden theater. Its inaugural 
was accompILihtd with a flourish of trum- 
pets, but in two weeks it closed without a 
toot. Haverly's venture with the Eden 
Musee, giving two performances daily of 
his "Mastodon Minstrels," was also a losing 
one, and he gave up a few days ago and 
will retire to private life. "No more show 
business for me," says the colonel. He has 
made and lost fortunes as a minstrel man- 



ftCk J O AJO X^ IktJ V9 r» 



eoouKcb. The Savoy Music hall, which was 
opened about Dec. 1, has closed, with sal- 
aries for three weeks unpaid; the People's 
theater, only a few seasons ago one of the 
most profitable playhouses in Chicago, has 
just at the holiday time closwl its doors for 
want of patronage, antl there are at least 
half a dozen more of the "up town" thea- 
ters—there are several of Uiese, located 
from one to two miles from the business 
center of the city— that are in very bad 
financial condition. I doubt if there are 
three theaters in Chicago today making 
■any money. Truly, these are troublous 
times. 

In spite 9f the lamentAblfl UtftLOt tOa 



i^peetucurnun, iMeeic MacKayc Is undnunt- 
etl. It tak(» a great deal to daunt the au- 
thor of "Hazel Kirke"and "Paul Kauvar." 
The grwit hiiiiorical production called "The 
World Finder," which he was to have 
brought out on such a colossal scale during 
the World's fair, is soon to h.ave a hearing, 
though in a form modified somewhat from 
the original plans. It will he backed by 
ttie Chicago Entertainment company and 
will be given in the building formerly oc- 
cupied by the Chicago Fire Panorama, 
which, by the way, is another failure of the 
World's fair year that I had overlooked. 
The building has been remo<leled into an 
auditoiium, with a large seating capacity, 
and at the rear has been constructed a large 
stage after the plans of the inventor — who 
built the double stage of the New York 
Madison Square theat<>r— upon which will 
be displayetl the 23 traveling stages and the 
paraphernalia u.sed iu the big spectacle. 
Above the stage are rooms to he used by 
the orche.stra and the invisible chorus, 
which will be amalgamated with the scenic 
production. There are also roomy apart- 
ments for the reception of the complicated 
machinery which is to move the telescopic 
stages, and the exhibit of electricity will be 
under the control of one man. Mackaye 
has added many new inventions, and it is 
promised that the electrical effects will be 
a great surprise. If the production proves 
a success such as the projectors anticipate, 
the entire theater going public of the coun- 
try will be given a chance to see "The 
World Finder." 



The appearances in "The Crust of Socie- 
ty" of the ouce famous burlesque star, Lyd- 
ia Thompson, bring up a reminiscence of 
the days when I was a boy. It wus about 
25 or 'il> years ago that the first real "Brit- 
ish Blonds' " burlesque company landed on 
the hospitable shores of Lake Michigan. 
They created a furore, but .some of the news- 
papers pronounced their show immoral. 
Among these was The Times, which vi- 
ciously attacked the fair Lydia in its edi- 
toriid columns. The burlesquer .took the 
law into )ier own hands, and one forenoon 
in the fall of 1SU7, accompanied by Pauline 
Markham, the stately, she drove up Michi- 
gan avenue to the residence of the groat 
editor, Wilbur F. Storey, waited until he 
came down his doorsteps en route for his 
office, and then proceeded to give him a 
good horsewhipping, Markham lending her 
.stalwart aid. Storey retaliated only by si- 
lence and pursued the same course in his 
newspaper until his death 10 years ago. No 
advertisement was ever permitted in The 
Times' columns if it mentioned Miss Thomp- 
son's name, and no comment was ever al- 
lowed on her performances. More than a 
quarter of a century has passed since then. 
Lydia is as fair as ever and doesn't look 
id years older. 

Pretty Alice Evans is now playing the 
leading role in "A Texas Steer." I went 
into the Grand to see her a few evenings 
since; but, in spite of her winsome face and 
intelligent performance of the role of 
Bos^-, I couldn't enjoy it. The role was 
created by poor Flora Walsh, who died so 
suddt-nly last spring. She was the very 
embodiment of the honest, open hearted 
Texas girl, and the character was written 
for her by Charley Hoyt, her husband. The 




ALICE EVANS. 

many good qualities ot Flora Walsh will 
keep her lc:ig in the memory of all who 
knew her, and I for one have no desire to 
see another woman play her favorite char- 
acter. 



Alice Evans was born at Sedalia, Mo., 
Nov. 3, 1871. When quite yotmg she moved 
with her parents to St. Louis, in which city 
she gained her education at the Loretta 
convent. Her first stage experience was 
with the Conreid and Hermann Opera 
company during the season of 181S6-7, when 
she sang in the chorus. The season of 
1887-8 she played Susan with Bartram & 
Bnrbidge's "A Night Off" company. In 
1888 she joined Hoyt & Thomas' "A Brass 
Monkey" company for a few weeks, and 
was then transferred to their "Hole in the 
Ground" company, playing the Telegraph 
Girl. She has since been almost uninter- 
ruptedly in the employ of Hoyt & 
Thomas, or, as the firm now is, Hoyt & 
McKee. She is n hard and consistent work- 
er, and her bright appearance assists her 
materially in her successes. 

David Elliott Sasseek. 



To Slake Football Less Brutal. 

There has been so much public clamor 
against the brutality of football as itLsnow 
played that the game will be materially 
modified before the next season opens. 
Prominent ex-football players who have 
great influence over the college teams have 
been agitating the matter quietly, with a 
view to making the game more open and 
interesting to look at, and at the same time 
to remove the brutal features in the shape 
of flying wedges, mass plays and rough in- 
terferenl^. 

A committee consisting of recognized 
football authorities from Harvard, Yale, 
Princeton and the University of Pennsyl- 
vania will soon be appointed, and it is pro- 
posed to change the present rules of the In- 
tercollegiate Football association. It is 
possible that the committee will consist of 
Walter Camp, Billy Rhodes and Josh Hart- 
well of Yale; Billy Brooks, George Stewart 
and Arthur Cumnock of Harvard; Tracey 
Harris, Alex Moffat and Phil King of 
Princeton, and George Woodruff and ex- 
Captain H. A. Mackey of the University of 
Pennsylvania. 



Arthur Enipe, the famous half back, will 
captain the University of Pennsylvania 
football team during the campaign of 1SU4. 

No Work, Mo Bent. 

A Boston dispatch of recent date con- 
tained the following, "We will pay no 
house rent until we find regular employ- 
ment." Such was the nnanimons decla- 
ration of 400 or more unemployed me- 
chanics, who crowded into Columbian 
hall to discuss their condition and de- 
vise means of relief. 

Landlords who refuse to reduce rents 
during the poor condition of business 
were denounced, aud resolutions were 
adopted calling upon "all persons out of 
work to refuse to pay rent until they 
have opportunity to relieve the hunger 
of those dependent upon their exertions 
for the necessltiea of lljt«u" 



Well Known Man Dfad. 
London, Jan. 1.— Mr! Jamison, a direc- 
tor 0} the Anglo-American Oil company, 
and a conspicuous figure in city circles, 
died Saturday at Kensington, of influ- 
enza. 



Ocean Steimihips. 
Delaware Breakwater— Passed in: 
Steamers Illinois from Antwerp for Phil- 
adelphia; Glenvech, (British) Liverpool 
lor Delaware Breakwater. 



St. Augustine, Fla. 

HOTEL. SAN MARCO 

Op»D8 Jan. Of.b. A nuxlein hot*'! iu a soporb 
location; perfect sanitary appoiDtmvnts; litM^rnl 
n'Riinec'iiH'nt, rfasonnblc pricim. <;«pHci'y. ."iCJ. 
MU81C HY THK IMPhKlAL HUNGAHlAN 
GVPSy OANn. Fort'-rniHand circulars, adtlrt^B! 
BLANCHARD & HAGKR, 

Iluiel Jdarlix>rou«b, N. Y. 

^K ^K ^K ^B ^K ^B ^K ^B ^K l^& ^B ^B fiS ^Bt ^K ^ft 
^P Q^ 9^ ^B ^B fl^ ^B 2l ^B ^B ^B ^^ ^B ^B ^» vn 



$115 



EARNED BY OUR SYNDICATE IN 
SEVEN MONTHS. Little capital 




may be multiplied by our speculEtiug sys- jj» 
*n tem. We are expert judges ol" the niarket s* 

$and successful o[H'rators. Book with full ^ 
informaUou and tcstimoniala of our many ^ 
$ customers mailed free. tW. A. FRAZiER & ^ 
CO., 1141 Monadnock BIdg., CHICAGO. ILL. $ 

^$$$$$$$$^^$$$$$ 

S. GELHAAR 

DCLUTH'S 

PRACTICAL FUSILIER, 

Eddbtislied 1SS7. Makoo and repairs all kiude 
of FUH GARMENTS. BealBldn Sacqnes re- 
dyed aud re-iittod on the premUoa. PLUSii 
COATS STEAMED. 

£09-21' WE3T SUPERIOR ST. 

>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

TEMPLE THEATER. ♦ 

New Yoar's Matinee and Evening, 
MONDAY. JAN. 1. 
Maguiflcent new proiiuctitiu ol the great- 
est of all Ecenic epectaclee 

"Lost in New York" 

A play fnli of boart interests. A vivid pic- 
ture of Now Yo- li iife fiom the Battery to 
tCeut al ''Krk. The entire 8t8«e convfited 
juio A VAHT RIVER OF REAL WATER 
(sTiBtainini? real yRchtF. rowbotts hud A 

♦ rB\(TJ('AL STEAMBOAT RUNNING 
f Al Fl'J.L SPEED. Two car loads of 
T Hpatitful new Ecen«ry painted by Artlinr 
T Voeetlin, f^f the Madison tfqnare Theater, 

♦ New Yorli City. TLe New iorlc Cast Now 
T Specialties, 
T S-'Htsou ealn at nsoal places. Prices: 

♦ Matinee, 25c, 50j. 7.')C, Niglit, 23c. 50c, 75c, ▼ 

♦ $1.00. ♦ 



Summer's 

40 Hours Away, 

A trip of two-score hours, will take 
you where the weather's warm— 

THOriASVILLE, GA., or 

JACKSONVILLE or TAMPA, 

FLORIDA. 

A pleasant and continuous journey 
via the Chicago and Eastern Illinois, 
Louisville and Nashville and Savannah, 
Florida and Western R. R's can be 
made for a short time, at very low 
rates. Write to 

CHAS. W. HUMPHREV, 

T70 East Third St., St. Paul, Minn. 
Or CHAS. L.^ 'ONB, 
Gen. Pass. Agt. C. & £. L R. R., Chicago^ 111. 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE & 
ATIVAN TIC B. R. 

Atlantic Limited (Daily) 

Leave Dalnth 5 45 pm 

Arrive Marqnette 4 45 am 

Arrive SaultSte. Marie Iti 30 aiii 

Arrive Detroit (2d day) „ 9 JO am 

Arrive Toronto (2nd day) 6 :% am 

Arrive Montreal (2nd day) S 20 am 

Arrive Boston (2nd day) 8 35 pm 

Arrive New Yorlf (2nd cay). 850pm 

Wwst bound train arrives Dolutb 10 3"i anj 

Wagner Bnfi'et Sleeping Car between Dolntb 
and Sanlt Ste. Marie. 

Direct line and lowest rates to Toronto, Mon- 
treal. New York, Boston. Saginaw, Grand Rap- 
ids, Detroit aud all points East. 

Lowest rates for Emigrant Tickets via this 
line to and from Enropo. 

T. H. LAEKE, 
Commercial Agent, Dnlnth. 
Ticket ofiQces 426 Spalding Hotise and Union 

Depot. 




THE 

EVENING 
HERALD 



• • • 



You Don't Get 

The News. 



A MONTHi eOp Piil 

The Evening Herald, 

THE PEOPLE'S PAPER, 

Is fearless and independent and stands first 
among" the evening- papers of this country. It 
is by all odds 

T/ie Best 
Tidverttstng Medium 



/' 



-IN- 



Duluthf 



1 



And if your ad. is not in it you are making the 
big-gest business mistake of your life. 



The Evening Herald 



-HAS- 



THF, DULUTH k IRON RANGE RAILROAD CO 


PASSENGER TIME TABLE. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


STATIONS. 


P.M. 


A.M. 




11 50 

10 BO 

9 20 


Ar Duiuth Lv 
Two Harbors 
Allen Jtmction 


3 15 

4 15 

5 53 






835 
8 15 
800 


Biwakik 

McKinley 

Lv Virginia Ar 


6 40 

7 00 
7 30 






8 20 
7 30 


Ar Tower Lv 
Lv Ely Ar 


6 47 

7 40 




Daily except Sunday. 

A. H. VIELE. 
General Passenger Ajrent, 
Dnlntb. Minn.. Nov. U. 1S«3. 



IT 




To give the People 
an invitation to trade 
with you 
The best way 
is to advertise in 
THE HERALD. 



THE LARGEST CIRCULATION 

OF ANY PAPER IN DOLUTH. 

Your business languishes because you adver- 
tise in dead newspapers that are read by people 
who are dead and don't know it. The newspaper 
for you is 

THE EVENING HERALD, 

A Live Newspaper, 
Read by Live People. 

You do not advertise enough. You are asleep 
and want your business to run itself A. standing 
advertisement in 

The Evening Herald 

Commands eonfldenee. The man who for a year 
lives in one community and leads a respeetble life 
will grow in the confidence of the people. On the 
same principle an advertisement in The Evening 
Herald becomes familiar to the eyes of the readers. 



^ 



IT 
PAYS! 



¥ISCONSIN GEMTRAl LIMES. 



Z^sitest Tinci© Osirci. 





Lt. Ar. 






4K)5pm 


....Dulnth..-. 


lldOam 


\ 7:SSpm 


7 :25(>m 


...Ashland 


8:a)am 


8:S0pm 


lOaafiam 


Ar ("liicapo Lv 


5 : Upm'. 


11 :45pDi 



Tickets sold and bagaage cbecked through to 
all tHjints iu the Du!t«(l States and Canada. 

CloM oonneotions made in Chleaco with all 
trains going Bast and Booth. 

For fnll information apply to your naa|r«M 
ticket agent or JA8. C. POKD, 

Maa. P»M. and Tkt. Agt.. Ohio»|b. }$t 





If You Don't 
Take 




THE 

EVENING 
HERALD 



/ 



\ 





THB DULUTIi BVENIl^G HBBALT>; MOKD AY, JANUARY 1, 1894. 



EYENTOO HEEALD. 



n™i.iaH«i> m thi 
DULDTH PRINTINO * PUBUHUINO tX). 



Kft«li 



Mid editorial rooma In The HeiKll 
.61 »np«rtor itreet. Tolepbiiue 
I, 324. two ria«»; BditorUlfO.vnas. 



„ ■-> \.\ W 



SUBSCRIFTIOS ILiTES: 

Dnilj, iMsr jraar ^•'^ 

Daily. i»r thrta months ^-^ 

Omily, par month •** 

W««kUM»' »car 



IJM) 



LLH6BST CIRCUIATI OH 18 DOLOTH. 

totarod at Uia i<o»toSlce kt Dnluth, Minn., M 

lUti-oliuik m^il inattar. 



The Weather. 

\V\H>".iXGT»iv. Jan. I. Forecast nt; 
t»>rn.ir-.>-j\-: For Wlsoonsia: Uenpral > 

» vurmor tmu».'J»t; iit\-«U 

r Miuno«ota: Partly 
iiiiTiPs; ct>UJer toui«ht ; 
.mth. r!> V. c«»!uinK variublo. 

'1 h.i Pioneer r u.l company soils tlx' bPtt nr^dcs 
«f piiHi. aii.t friMii tho low l'rii*'.>* ""^" i"_<^°_'"y* 



Cl"l.,i 






.iml miiku prouijtt 

Mxi-rrior stroot. 



It Was Not Unexpected. 

Accordinj^ to .\ VVa^hiiixton dispatch, 
published this morninjj, M.nj. Baldwin 
st;itccl last night that he will vote for the 
Wilson b:ll with its provision for free 
iron ore. He mack this announcement 
after receiving the resolutions .adopted 
at the double-headed meeting here last 
Thursdjiy .ind after uivir-i; "earnest con- 
tion." no doubt, to the protests 
ij^auist free ore unanimou<;ly adopted by 
tbi' -tork e-\cb?.r<s'c and the board of 
tr .iiis city, the members of which 

miuic the protests regardless of their po- 
litical lies. 

This action on the part of the major 
can hardly be re^^arded as a svirprije. 
The Her?ld has expected that he would 
adopt this course and that it was a waste 
of time and energy to hold 
meetings and make protests 
against free iron ore, with 
the hope of inducing him to take a posi- 
tion in support of the existing tariff on 
ore. The meeting of last Thursday was 
called because he wished an expression 



to ha\ ing iron and lead ore on the free 
list who in&isl that, no nnlter how Hild- 
win m.iy vote, they can win anyway." 

The above was written previous to 
Maj. Baldwin openly declaring himself 
m favor of free iron ore. but it will be 
luiticed that those who are working 
against this and similar features of the 
Wilson bill were not counting very 
strongly on his support and they will not 
give up the fight because he is for free 
ore. There are many congressmen who 
do not believe that the Wilson bill will 
pass congress. Representative Bocu. 
who was in Uuluth on Wednesday, said 
he did not expect the bill to pass the 
senate, at least in its present form, and 
he rather expected the senate to amend 
it by restoring the duty on iron ore, coal 
and lead. The I'oston Advertiser of a 
recent date contains an interview 
with C.en. Draper, t)nc of the con- 
gressmen from Massachusetts, who has 
been giving very close attention to the 
impending tariff legislation. He author- 
ized the Advertiser to say th.it of three 
contingencies which can possibly hap- 
pen, tirst, the passage of the Wilson bill, 
second, the defeat of any new tariff leg- 
islation, third, the adoption of a senate 
substitute bill, he considers that an alter- 
native between the last two is alone 
probable. He does not believe that the 
Wilson bill can possibly pass the senate. 

The probability, in hii mind, is that 
the bill when it re.tches the senate will 
be amended in order to placate the Dem- 
ocratic senators who are now vigorously 
opposing the Wilson measure. They 
represent the coal and iron interests 
of the Southern states and the indus- 
tries of New Jersey and New York. 
In order to make them satisfied, raw ma- 
terials with the exception of wool, are 
likely to be taken off the free list and 
other amendments made intended to im- 
prove the position of their local indus- 
tries. This arrangement will be entirely 
Democr.^tic. A change of three votes 
on th J Democratic side in the senate 
would defeat the Wilson bill or secure 
its .".mcndmcnt. The Populist senators 



ONE PRICE. 
AND THAT RIGHT. 



riOWARD 

' Haynie ^ 




AMERICAN STORE. 



Whoever 
You Are, 

We earnestly wish you a 

Happy, 
Prosperous 
New Year! 



THESE mwL mimmmn m monei-mk m 

EVERYBODY SHOULD USE THEM. 




Howard & Haynie 



ONE CENT A WORD! 
Herald Wants, 

Popular Because Efioctivo. 

Oun oout a word ; 75 cents a lino p.3r mouth. 
No advortlBemeut tiikeu lur it<8b man 15 ccsnte. 
Paymcute must be maiie in a'ivaucn, 

SITUATIONS WANTED. FREE. 

All perM)nB wantiu*< situatjou/' eun uso The 
Herald want colomus for thred inaartlons freo 
of rliarg-a. 

This does not inclado agenta or employment 

OffiCf'8. 

Pflrtiea advert ieinp in tliesecfilnmns may have 
auHwera aadreeoed iu care of Tlio ileruld and 
will bft given a clitMrk to oaable thoin t-o t^v-tt 
aiiHW>')rs to their advortiei'-mr^uts. All answers 
Bliiralii bo iiroperly bticlosod iu «uvolor"«i. 

irp2,H5B3. 



ONE (JENT A WORD. 



T^ KNT YOUK I100.SE3, KLAT8 AND STOEE8 



Qiniob.SESrKLATS A> 
Alexandtir &. Bpeyore, 216 W. Sniierior 8t. 

AHODSE TO Il&NT FOR TilK WINTER 
free. Call ou If. A. TautEig & Co., 17 
Third uvbuuo wett. 



I^UH IJENT-IlOnSE. SIX ROOMS. WITH 
city -water and clt>hi't, contrally locatiiii, 



chcai.'till May 1. 
roy liuililiii;;. 



W. C Siicrwood A; Co., Tor- 





BESTOiJEii mm;..„„. „.. . , 

♦jV> Thcierpatr<'nio(iy fi.rncrvous protitnulon nrid adnervousdisciigcs of 
tjvi thOi;oncrnitv«i'r^riiJ":oiU;i.rro.;. ii<-haM>;erv>.ua)''rcstrnUon, J-aa- 
inT;* Intf or L<.»t irt.iuUood. iuipotenoy. M«bU7 i:nilwl<)C8,\ ouUd-Jl Krrprs, 
•M'ii Motilal Worrv.oxoffijivoviFeot Tobm-ci > or Opium, ■which lt?art to cen- 
ter-- tun.pUonand InfMi.ity. With every seoi.rdor vo irlvu a wrilWiipua> 
_ ^- ... .,o.„,- ameptorrro I'rrtlutKl thi'iiioTHO. >" >ld at J^.OO perboi:. Cboxes 



O ITDATION AS PAtiTRY COOK BY A COM- 
O pt'tput woman or would cook for a family 
of teu or twelve. Adilress II 9, Herald oflic". 



ONE CENT A WORD! 




FBA TKfiSrTIKS. 

P~" ALKbTlNE LOIKiK No. Vfc, A. V. 4 
A.M. I'..-i?ulart:iout:i!StlrBtond third 
Moriday eviiiiiaJre of evorv mcr.! h a* 7 ^*) 
u ck>ek. Nost me"''nc Jaa I, IMM. W. 
iJ. rattoc, W , M., Edwin Mooerfl. secre- 



tary. 



ij^OlIR SMALL ROOMS WITH CITY WATER, 
buitablo for E-mail family, at 24 East Scm;- 
iiud ."troot. Ai<(>!y at iy<)l West buijorior street. 

if«01t KENT-FURNl.SllEL) ROOM. IN- 
quire i:i Webt Bocoad street. 

ir«UUMSHEt) ROOMf* 
light houeekocpisg. 
•troet. 




e; 



FOR RENT, FOR 
4:U East Superior 



S^ 



bune also donned a new dress of type, | 



Whioped inio Line, 
which will g,ca.ly.dd .o .h= everyday 2:^^:^?'i.^:^^:^^i^^^^^^^^ 



appearance of the paper. In view of the 
depressed condition of business every- 
where, the enterprise of the News Tri- 
bune should be more than ever appre- 
ciated by the public. 



from the people, yet he had already re- 
solved to vote for the Wilson bill with I will vote .ngainst the whole incisure, and 
its free ore provision and he took goc 



care 10 have his personal friends here be 
on hand at the meeting and create a 
roiniature riot, so that he would not be 
placed in the emaarrassing posi lion of 
acting con'rary to a unanimous protest 
against Iree ore. The split at the city 
hall, resulting in two meetings suited 
him exactly, as it afforded biaa the loop- 
hole that he was seeking. 

No one will probably deny John Ci. 
Brown's authority to speak as to Maj. 
Baldwin's intended action. In that 
famous interview which, despite his in- 
tense modesty Mr. Brown gave to the 
Si. Paul Globe, appeared the foUowmi.' 
paragraph: "I wish to correct several 
misst-itements that have appeared in re- 
gard to the position Maj. Baldwin will 
take upon this question. In reply to a 
letter sent to him, protesting against free 
ore, Maj. Baldwin said: 'I was nomi- 
nated as a Democrat on a Democratic 
platform, and elected as a Democrat to 
carry out the policy which the Demo- 
cratic party, or which the Democratic 
majority in congress should determine. 1 
have not forgotten these facts nor do 1 
propose to forget them.' " 

This statement, mmd you, was made 
previous to the meeting ot last Thurs- 
day. It was made at a time when Maj. 
Baldwin was refusing to tell the Wash- 
ington correspondents "where he was at" 
on this question and was pretending that 
he was seriously considering the argu- 
ments pro and con and had not reached 
a decision. It was likewise made at a 
time when he was writing letters to Du- 
luth Democrats, opposed to free ore, 
telling them that he was anxious to get 
a fuller expression of the views of the 
people of Duluth on this subject. 



The Prospect Encouraging. 
Maj. Baldwin is reported to have said 
in Washington last night that the Dem- 
ocrats from protection districts had tiled 
hard, but now had abandoned all hope 
of combining to defeat the Wilson bill 
and the scheme was to get 30 cents tax 
per ton on iron ore in the senate amend- 
ment and also tax on lead. He believed 
that such an amendment would also pass 
the house if the senate agreed upon it, 
otherwise iron ore would go through 
free. 

This statement does not agree with the 
information which The Herald has been 
receiving direct from people in Wash- 
ington who arc in as good a position as 
is the major to know what combinations 
are being made. A letter received by 
The Herald this morning says: "Those 
capitalists who are interested in mming 
iron ore, kid ore and coal are deter- 
mined to fight to the bitter end the pro- 
vij'.on in the Wilson bill placing all these 
minerals on the free list. They are not 
only tinancially interested in oreventing 
the proposed change that the 
Wilson bill makes, but they arc 
still deeply mterested in the fact that 
thousands of workir.gmen in every sec- 
tion of the country will be thrown out of 
employment, and their interests in other 
ways affected injuriously. Both Demo 
crats and Republicans seem inclined to 
unite in making this fight, and up to the 
present time it is claimed that they have 
nearly the entire support of congressmen 
wtst of the Mississippi river. As yet it 
cannot be learned that they consider that 
Representative Baldwin will fall into 
line and vote as they think he oaght to 
do in jtistice to his constituenfii. The 
Duhnh congrc-. .11 1\< is still noncommit- 
1 is not at ^.11 iisclined to come out 
cither for or against this provision in the 
Wilson bill. There are some men opposed 



it is almost certain that the tv/o Demo- 
cratic senators Irom Alabama will vote 
against the free iron provision. Senator 
Murphy, of New York, already pledged 
to vote against the bill in its present 
form, and Senator Hill is likely to vote 
the same way. It will thus be seen that 
the prospect of retaining the existing 
duty on iron ore is very encouraging, 
despite the action of the Duluth con- 
gressman. 

A Splendid Edition. 

The Herrdd extends hearty congratu- 
lations to the News Tribune upon the 
mammoth "wedding edition" of forty 
p.iges published this morning. It is a 
splendid piece of enterprise that is 
highly creditable to the management and 
speaks volumes for the prosperity of 
Duluth. There are few cities in the 
country where the newspapers have 
found it possible to issue special editions 
this winter, except at a heavy loss, and 
the mere fact that this splendid edition 
has t^een published by the News Trib- 
une, taken in conjunction with The Her- 
ald's Christmas edition, will do Duluth 
much good. 

The editorial staff of the News Tribune 
deserve high praise for the ability and 
careful regard for accuracy which they 
have displayed in the preparation of this 
number. The general public has but a 
faint idea of the immense amount of 
labor that it involves, of the intense 
strain which so much extra work pro- 
duces upon a staff already busily occu- 
pied in the daily publication of a news- 
paper. They have done their work well, 
however, and can ever look back upon 
it as an achievement of which 
they have a full right to be 
proud. The number is well illustrated, 
while the harulsume cover is very attract- 
ive. For this occasion the News Tri- 



The Baltimore Sun proposes that the 
government shall raise revenue by levy- 
ing a tax on bachelors. The Chicago 
Dispatch thinks this is a heartless propo- 
sition. In the first place, bachelorhood 
itself is a punishment; and, in the sec- 
ond, a tax on it v/ould be class legisla- 
tion of the rankest sort. Why should 
the old maids escape? They ccrlainiy 
ought to be taxed every time they refuse 
an offer of marriage and thus help to 
pile up the taxes of poor devils who can- 
not help themselves. 



their fathers did, and ask no questions, 
responded to the crack of the Globe's 
whip, and passed resolutions favoring 
free ore. The other meeting adopted the 
reverse. 

• * - ■ - 

On Which Side? 
Minneapolis Tribune: Mr. Baldwin 
should now be satisfied. His views are 
expressed.'5 He has them made to order. 
He has all the variety that could be 
asked for. Apparently his constituents 
are of the same mind as himself: that is 
to sav, thev arc very much on the fence, 
like himself, and have greatly varying 
and shifting opinions. On which side of 
the fence will Mr. Baldwin nov/ jump? 



liaATlON WANTED HY THOROUGHLY 

coirpot/'nt yoiinit man abStO'KicrnphT, two 

ynrs' exiiwripiipp ill iirHT-cluys JawoHico: ma- 

"orcnccs. Aiidrcas M 125, 

mg Jiorald, 

WT-ANTED-PESMANKNT POSITION 15 Y 
V? C'liupetent bu'>kk«>opr.r of flvo years' •■»;- 
txjriouce. Address liookkeoper, Ucrald ollice, 
Duluth. 



no BJQTT'S 

viovr^finsv i ••hiiie f u'riuf.hed : rcfoj 
NEBYEUISB Duluth Evouing lloral. 



tj^OK RKNT-FUKNISIIED ROuAl 
board. liO First avcuuo west. 



WITH 



IWO PLEASANT 

!, hot water iiPat. Kat . 
blocks from Spaldiug. 'IX'i Fiftli avoaue west. 



T^OR KENT. TWO PLEASANT ROOMS. 
J^ brick fiouse, hot water iieat. Kas.bath, twi» 



VVr ANTED- SITUATION 



ienctd baker. 



BY AN EXPHR- 

Adiiress F Ci. Herald. 



AF]KST-CIiAi?S GENERAL SHRVANl" 
wibihos a 6itxi;ition in a small pwvate 
f imily. not so ranch for wanes as a nico liome. 
Thiir.iUKhly uuderstraada cookicR. 1023 Vve*t 
Michigrau street. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY EXPERIENCED 

O stcnoijr.tpher in any ki.nd of oHice. A.iilress 
Stsao/jrapher, 226 Fourtneuth avenue eai-t. 



WANTED-SEWING BY 
V T drosi .1-V (, Her jld. 



THE DAY. AD- 



NIGELY FURNISHED ROOMS. FVr.r.Y 
modern convenience, at tho Low oil. Rof- 
erencea required. ' , 



IONIC LODGE No. VeA. A. F. A A. M 
Rejrnlar nip'ftiiiKBBOcoiid andfonr'h 
iL'o;i.-tuy rveDiiijcJ uf f-vory incuth, Xost 
mti«tia«Dec 2*tt., 7:.i'J p. m.,— Installa- 
tion-H. L. Ifrazer, W. Hm M. W. 
CLoadle, eecretary. 

KEYSTONE CHAPTER No. 20, R. A. M. 
bt!iU=dcorunuiiication8 ««cr.o(] aar! fourth 
Wodijobciay ovf»iijn;f8 of oevIj .'ii<>iitJ« at 7 •'.'O 
oV'jr-. !,»»xl nii?«ting Dpc. i;i, annual meeting 
— election of oiiicors. (iao. A. inack H. P., T. 
J. Huntar, eecretary. 



«XX>T"kULUTH (X)MMANDKB¥ No. W, 
/i^Ok.i-'' K. T. Htatoi conclave at 7:30 
o'clock Kmt Tnn&day <^vsti\\,%t, of 
mrwry roooth. Next conclsve will 
held ou Tne«>day, Jan. 2, 1^S4. W. 
G. Ton Bro.yk, if. C. ; Alfred LeRicheux. eecre- 
tary. 




y.MPl^OYMENT OFFICE. 



LICENSED 

_ _ ?a or charge to ail gu]M, 

oleo have a fri'l line <J hnJr hwitcheB.ciiainB, ate. 
y rs. M. f '. Hiiibr.lrt. '/.:!& E«i*t Hnporior 8tns«t- 



ri^b;-: MOST BEiPECTABLE 
L o;as0 if- Dniatl., fif 



17<0K EENT-TU(tES UNFURNISHED - 
n>om8 choai>. City water, lia Sixth ave- 



nue west. 



iM)R RENT - THREE UNPrHNlSHED 
' rooms for lifjht hoasokeopinfr- rent $5 per 
month. Apply 1-0 Firtt avenue wegt. 



^TITANTED— WASHING TO TAKE HOME. 
V V All work first class. 25 West First fitre^^t. 



H<A //•;/> *i !lt Hilt. 

TIT-ANTE !>— POUTER TO WOKK FOKKOOM 
V » and board. Addret'J G 87, Herald. 



WANTED-i'iEN OF FAIR AHDF.ESS 01 
of enipTi>yniCMt to know they caumj 



WHIST PLAYER3 TO MEET. 



The St. Paul Globe on Saturday had 
an article on the Duluth meetings on the 
iron ore tariff, which was headed "Dote 
and Antidote." The Glo'oe must have 
been thinking of the last mayoralty 
election in Duluth. when it was a fight of 
Dote and auti-Dote. And "Dote" won. 



The Globe calls the Duluth Demo- 
crats who oppose free iron ore Shanghai 
Democrats. This is one of its strong ar- 
guments in favor of free ore. 

. » « * 

A complete record of ail the great 
events of 1893 will be found on the 
second page of this issue. 

m » * 

To all its thousands of readers The 

Herald wishes a happy and prosperous 

new year. 

. » ■ • 

Cannot Hold Back Duiuth. 
Ashland Presa: The city ot Minne- 
apolis is so inordinately jealous of Du- 
lut!:i, that it favors putung ore on the free 
list. The Tribune tears that the develop- 
ment of the Mesaba range will make 
Duluth a still more powerful rival than 
It is now. Ttie efforts of the Tribune 
will not stay the onward march of the 
head of the lake to destiny. 




Oh, IVIy_HeartI 

Palpitation and Rhoumatlsim 




Mr. James S. Jonea 

Bruce, Wis. 



"From my experience I think ITood's Sars*. 
parllla will do everything it claims and more 
too- Itli surely entitled to my he::rtfclt thanks. 
1 think It U the best medicinss in ihe world. For 
25 years I have aiiUered with palpltetionof the 
htuirt and rlicucialism. I trie<l everything I 
could hear of. but none of tlio medicines did me 
any pood, in fact 1 grew worse all the time untU 
tor tiree years 

I Could Not Labor Any. 

Xread about Hood's Sarsap.arllla and thought I 
would try it. I h.ave taken four bottles, and I 
feel like a ne w man. I have Improved so rapidly 



Hood's ^ Cures 



Bars*- 
parllla 

In health that I am able to work hard now. I 
recommend this medicine to all who are suffer- 
ers. I would not be without it in my house." 
Jamzs 8. Jotnss, Bruce, Chippewa Co., Wis. 



KOOD'S P1LL8 are purely vegetable, and d* 
net porg*. pUa or fttf. Sold by »U druggUtk 



Credit to Maj. Baldwin. 

Princeton Union: The Union has 
given Hon. M. R. Baldwin due creditfor 
his labors in behalf of the Mille Lacs 
settlers, and has siid that he was entitled 
to the hearty thanks of the settlers and 
should be held in grateful remembrance 
by them. We are not a hide-bound par- 
tisan, and it will be an exceeding cold 
day when the Union throws any rocks at 
Maj. Baldwi n. 

An Amusing Claim. 
Mankato Free Press: One of the most 
amusing claims of the free traders is 
that free coal will break the coal trust. 
As anthracite coal has been on the free 
list for years, it is hard to see how the 
putting of soft coal ou the tree list will 
affect the trust. 

• 

Mr. Brown's Modesty. 

Two Harbors Iron News: John G. 
Brown, Duluth, while in St. Paul this 
week, was accorded the distinguished 
honor of an interview by the Globe. * 

* * We publish Mr. Brown's re- 
marks, not because we endorse them or 
their author. With them he makes his 
debut as a leading iron miner, although 
we have never heard his name associated 
with a shipper. There was no necessity 
of mentioning his modesty. Ibat was 
inferred. 

Nature Shaped Their Future. 
.Superior Inland Ocean: So far as the 
citiea ot Superior and Duluth arc con- 
cernLd their greatness among the lead- 
ing uietfopoluan cities of the nation is 
but a matter of time. Their growth can 
no more be hindered than can the growth 
ot the nation itself. They did not, and 
do not depend upon booms or boomers 
for their urjbuilaing. Nature, which does 
not tlactuate in its intentions, has shaped 
the future ot the two cities. Men may 
come and men may go, but Superior and 
Duluih will continue a substantial and 
tver expanding advancement. 

— — ^— ■ — —~— 

Famtius in Legend and Poesy. 

New York Sun: Duluth, long the 
most fanijus of Gopher towns in legend 
and in poesy, has won a new triumph. 
The next convention of the National 
Educational association is to be held 
there, and St. Paul and Minneapolis are 
hanging their diminished heads, and only 
opening them to remark in a lifeless 
manner occasionally that summer, with 
full calahaj-h, continues to smile through 
the orange groves aiod cocoanut reserva- 
tions ot the B^naia Belt, where by the 
way, the thcrmomettr is now out of 
sight. Duluth, meanwhile, grows proud- 
ly, and meditates great deeds for the 
n^xt census. 



Plannine for a Congress Durinc the Cali- 
fornia M.id winter Fair. 
Nearly a dozen cluba of the American 
Whist league and many of tho best play- 
ers in the country 
have promised to 
attend the propo.s- 
ed whist congress 
in Siiu Francisco 
duriug the Cali- 
forniii Midwinter 
uiir. The couiiiess 
is to he held in 
March under t)ie 
auspices of the 
San Francisco 
Whist club. Hen- 
ry Payot, presi- 
dent of this club, 
is one of the lead- HENRY PAYOT. 
ing spirits in the scheme and a whist en- 
thusiast of more than loail reputation. 

He is a prominent tnercluint of San Fran- 
cisco and an iirdeTit .supporter of all plans 
for the sidvancenicnt of the game of whist. 
A trophy value.l at S300 will be donated by 
the San Francisco Whist club and will be 
contested for by IU of the best whist organ- 
ixations in the country. Among those whe 
will litteud the congn^ss is MissKute Irwin 
Wheelock of Cliiciif;o, who teaches the 
game aiKl Is calleil the queen of whist. The 
!?eiulemen who h.ive i>een sclecte«l to do 
battle for .San Fnincisco in the congress are: 
W. T. Sawyer. E. E. Washburn, H. G. 
Richards, P. J. Tormey, A. S. Baker, Dr. 
J. M. Porter, George H. Wheaton, Arthur 
Morton, Dr. W. U. Lovegrove, J. J. Tobin, 
J. B. Keinsteiii, A. Lyser, A. S. Howe, 
Isaac Iiecht and George Batss. The pe^ 
aonnel of the team is subject to change. 
Mr. Tormey is a director in the American 
Whist league. 

THE WORLD OF SPORT. 



10 

hifi money at wark for 116 hero in thi» city. Ciill 
at once The Singer Mauufucturing company, 
tiiS West Snpericr Ftroct. 

^ALKSMES TO SKLL BAKING !> -WDKR. 

Cj V/'>put onr ffooils iu Glass Kollinff Vius. 
$80 m<mth Olid expfiiiM's. » r cornmissson. C!ii- 
cJitjo Kaliina I'owder Co., 767 Van Bureu Btreet, 
('hicaijo. 

TWO GOOD HUSTLERS, SALARY AND 
coniTTiission to Bell goods oa instalment. 
7.'3 W'fjst Superior street. 



FOR RENT-FIRST FLOOR FLAT OF 
live rooin.s, hHrdwiwd finigh, coutrally lo- 
cated. Apply 120 First avenue west. 

ipOR RCNT-TWO FURNISHED ROOMS 
' for rent with bath. 129 VVcgt Fourth btreet.- 

I;>URN1SIIED ItOGMS, 523 WEST SECOND 
' Ftroot. 



LADIES-IF YOU LIKE TO KNOW THE 
w»y tbrouKh married life troubles, send 
'.^-c?nt stamp and got a pass. Address £ 23, 
Herald. 

ARRIED LADIES-SEND 10 CENTS FOR 

"lu'allib'o Satoefnard" (no modiciue, no 
docoiHion :) jait -whiit jou want. Ludiet,' Eosar, 
Kp.n.suk City. Mo. 



AUCHIT^VTS. 

ALKSET BHyInToIO BUEROWS. WAKE 
honsee and heavy biiildinfrs a ep^cialty. 




r|'»KAPlVAtiES & FITZPaTRICK, AliCHl- 
X t>^ji9. Kuoms 9U and ld7. Torry building, 



WANTED-A COM!?ETENT GIRL TO DO 
stredt. 



general housework at 1011 East Third 



w 



ANTED GIRL FOR GEVEKAL HOUSE- 

work, 120 East Third street. 



^E(;OND GIRL WANTED AT 209 THIKD 
15 avanuo wost. 



''KAPIVAGKS 

^ t"'>'ji!". Ko 

Dtdiith, Minn. 




BJSJJL ISSTATE TitAKHJ/'JESi.K 



\\7^>*"''KI>. L^i>V'S PUJSn .SAQUES TO 
'V (jtcftxn 8ii<l repair, at a. (xolhaar, 209 and 
;;il W^est Supori'ir strost, DalutJi, Minn. 



ForSa ie or Rent. 

The baildiiiR fiiwutB at 106 W>tt Micbiean 
f*.ri>et, now i>ccupu:d l>y tho Dciath lilec-iic 
Lisht find Power Company, with central atedia 
beavinif at-piirrtuR. 
Foifi rlinT iniorination enc;nire at 

IIAETMAN EL/iCTRK; LIGHT CO.. 

Room 3, ExcheuRO Buildhig. 



HOTELS. 



HOTEL BENNETT, WEST DULDTH. C.i- 
tors to Kticia! clubs and sleifib-uij partirr- ; 
brinrjnet and (lancii'fir b-ill; all mo/lern con- 
veniences. P. F. Sniitl:, jiroprietor. 



T D. GORDON, 324 WEriT SUPERiOBS'X. 



W. 



MASSAGE. 
GREENFIELD 



MASSAGE 



Denver, Ashury Park and San Francisco 
are striving for tho league meet in ISO-L 

P.-tderewski is nu enthusiastic bicyclist, 
despite tho declaration of his friends that 
Crasplng the handle bars will injure his 
artistic touch. 

Philadelphia is to have an amateur bil- 
liard tournament in January. 

Gcorye D. Phillips of the New York Ath- 
letic club, who will soon publish a book on 
skating, is one of the gi-eatest figure-skuter-s 
in America. He won the championship in 
VS»i. 

The most sanguine wheelmen who proph- 
esied on the mile record of 1K)3 never came 
' wthin livosecouds of the correct fiKurcs. A 
flying mile in 1:51 and a standing mile iu 
1:54 4-5 weie the new figurefs matle by Dirn- 
berger and Bliss at Birmingham recently. 

William A. Splnks, the Cincinnati player, 
has issutd a challenge to the world, barring 
Schiiefer, Ives and Slc^sou, to play balk 
line billiar<l3 for Sl.OOO a side. Schaefer is 
Spinks' backer. 

The stakes and gate receipts in the recent 
triaugular billiard match iu New York 
were divided as follows: Schaefer, $3,350; 
Ives, $1,050, and Siosson, iBT(X). Each player 
contributed ?CiX) to the sweepstakes. 

Flyini^ Jib made live starts ng.ainst time 
and took a reconl of 2:04 at that way of 
UoiuR, and he has pjiccd 15 heats in 2:10 or 
better, his best race record being 2:04?^. 

There are moie skates on the market 
thau ev'sr Jjefore this year, and a fair pair 
may ho bought for $1.50. Charcoal ux)n 
skiites are only 25 cents a pair. 

The best 1«M toboggan is 8 feet long, 18 
inches wide, and sells for $15. 

Cruel Three In Five Heat Races. 

"I know very well, and the knowlege 
grieves me beyond expression, that the ele- 
ment of crm-lty ctmuct be entirely elimi- 
nate<l from horse racing, but the most cruel 
feature pertaining to turf contests can be 
gre.atly ameliorated and reduced to the 
minimum," s-iys Hiram Howard, the well 
known turf expert. "My plan for turf re- 
form is this: Abolish at once and forever 
tbat relic of barbarism, the inhuman cus- 
torn conceived in ignorance and foaled in 
depravity, of three in five heat races, and 
substitute therefor tho more htunane rule 
of best two in three heats, and one or two 
mile dashes for mature horses, with dashes 
of four or five furlongs for baby trotters, 
or, what is better still, rule yearlings off 
the tracL altogethes." 



DE. JOilN 
troatmont; satisfaction to all cuarant«ed. 
Rooms 1 anl '2 .Max Wirth block, 13 West SaiH»- 
rior htreet. Othco hours, 11 to I a. ra., 4 to 6 p. m. 



jfiNAKVIAh. ^ 

.^-OK MONEY LOANED ONl)LA>«ONDa 
(?_'«' A .^.TX watches, jewelry, etc.. Standard 

<(a Is Jewelry oli I Loaa Oriicc, 324 W. 3up. 

^**' '•'St. Bneinese strictly confidential. 



MONEY TO LOAN IN ANY AMOUNT O? 
hcirses, wagons, household famltxnw, pj 
anos. diamonds, jowelry and ail kinds of per 
sonai property, on short notice PJid a lower ratt 
than 70U can uossibly get it elsewhftro. IntjrJrf 
of ?Vm. Horkan, nianag«r, Dolurh Mortjfhfit- 
Loau company, room 430. Chambor of Conunsrot 
building, Dnlotfa. 



N ON DLiMONDB ANL 

Ijjein, ( 
brokw- in I>nlatli. 17 West Scpfnor Frj-s«t. 



MONEY Tf> LO; 
Jew?lr/. H. A. Klein, caty licensed pawn 



CHARLES F. HOWE. SPECIAL ATTEK- 
tion given to th-* ci;iniiijat.>OD and ropori; 
ia^' on mtuarat lands. Iri-n lands bought and 
Bt'j.iL Aa«ly'<»'6 of ail kiniis niads on ehori 
notice. 631 (^hamnBr of Commerce. 



FLVXHISih 



\K^ \v. McMillan coftii'ANY. 

* HEATING AND PLUMBING. 

yJ5 Woet Hup<»rior street. 



Lakeside Land couipany to J W Batch- 
ari. hit 28, block 13, Lister Park 

D W Scott to A I' N.irvepcn, lots 3 
aud 4, block '25, Oakland Park addi- 

GPTt^edtto Chtis Johnson, lands in 
secti-Du 2-.51-16 __ 

O Knu(8ou!to John Dwau, lands iu sec- 
tion 32-^7-12 

R H 'I'rumbnll to L C Armsirong, lot 10, 
block 11. Shwp's adriition to Imlnth . 

A l3rover to L C Armstrong, lot 20, block 
11, Sharp's addition 10 Duliith 

P Smith to .lohii Biirk, lots IS, 21, 22, 
block 8, etc., Hibbiusf 

O'o B?rtr to B Kingfcred, lands in section 
2'.V.-)2-l2. 

L J Wexum to F S Coulter, lands in sec- 
tion S'i-.'iMrj 

J Raycruft to F Taarue. lot 7, block 2i. 

TiJWtT 

A Fraser Gaard to C M Hill, lands in sec- 
tion .%:i-26... . - 

R i) Mnnfrer to G Mnnger. lot 14, block 
rO, Wrst Duluth, .Second division 

P J Krupp et nl to M K Taylor, lot 267, 
block ti8, Dnlnth Proiier. Second di- 
vision.. 

C W Hovt to National Investmnnt com- 
pany, 1 )ts 9, 1- . 11, block 191, West Du- 
Ipth, Seventh division 3,C00 

One \inpubl'.''hcd, Jands in section 20-21- 
2y and .Si>.M-14 

J Smith to C tYjkberg, h>t 7. block IU, 
Sniitli addition to North Dulntli 

L J Mwntt to P Gallager, lot 4. block 14, 
Grant.. 

P Gallager to M Shea, lot 4, block 14, 
Grant 

M L Strook to M G .Johnson, p.-irt lots 1. 

2, and 8. bfock 57, West Dulath, Second 
division 

A L VVillcntts to J M Sinitii, one-half 
lots '2.1 and 26, block 13, Lester Park 
Second division 

R C Harris to C Olprnan, lot. 'i7, block 
149. Duluth Proper, Third division 

M B Fields to M C Starch, lots 5 and 6, 
block 79, Portland division 

C A Stevens to M V Stewart, one-half 
lots 173, 17". 177 and 179, St. Louis avo- 
nuo, New Diduth.. •:--.--- 

Lakeside Laud company to F H White, 
lot K), block 20, Lester Park, Second 
division 1 - 

V Johnson to M L Strook, loti 1, 2 and 

3. block 57, West Dnluth, Second divi- 

Western Land association to F B Ed- 
ward.H, lots 50. 25 and 54, block 178, Dn- 
lnth Prop(-r, Third divi.Mon 

F W Smith tc J M McLounon, % lots 44. 
4G, 48. block 119, Dulath Proper, Third 
division -- 

C M Laybonrn to C G Layboum, lands 
in section 33-51-14... 

A M Costcllo et al to J Monaghan. lot 6, 
block A. Endion division 

One unpublished, lot in Manger's sub-di- 
vision - -•- 06,000 

George F Piper to John A Willard, lands 
in soction '29-50-14 

A R Macfarlnnc to A C Wei.^s. lot 10, 
block Vi, Glen Avon, Third division.... 

E C Ciovr to Chauncoy Smith, part of lot 
15S, block 10, Duluth Proper, Third di- 
vision - : 

J Janzig to H E Hansen, lands in sec- 
tion 10-50-15 

Ona unpublished, Stewart's addition 

One unpublished, West Duluth, Fifth di- 
vision - - — -- --- 

New Diduth Land company lo James W 
Norton, lots m North Dulath, tirst 
divi?i'"<n - - .--- 

H Hansen to J Janzig, lands la section 
15-50-15 --- 

Onfl unpublished, lands in section 32-50- 
14 otc ,- 

D A Dnucan e' al t-^ E W Matter, lot 4, 
block 117, West Dulath, Second divi- 



HE-ATING STOVJvo, COOK STOVE-S AND 
ranfi'v^ rloanoil unit repaired on short '^i- 
tic", cftfcli'Jg* fnndnhed 'or any kind of stovoc 
roado: Ain-iricau 8to»e Repair Works, IIS Kiiol 
Baperior «tj etr. ' 



$1,750 

•275 

6.J0 

SCO 

3C0 

303 

1,450 

2.000 

400 

550 

1.000 

603 

6,250 



22,500 
300 
400 
400 * 

l.CCO 

4.CO0 
1,200 
S,(XX) 

500 

2.932 

1.000 

2.000 

1,003 
712 
650 



25,000 
700 

833 

TOO 

700 

2.0C0 

5,800 

800 

13.3GS 



600 



1.217 



CIVIL jnyaii^KRi/y. 



KlCE&MoGlLVRAY, CIVIL KNGlNKKHti 
and 8ar\'fcyore. 521 Cliamber of Ckim- 



nieroe. 



M. 



P. & W. H. COOK, M'RVKYORS AND 
clvi! engin«H>rs. 30(5 West Fonrth etreol. 



GOLD. 



OLD GOf.D AND StLVKR BOUGHT FOR 
cafch by Hirsct-.y & Rei;!!. mauafactnriu« 
jewelers. Ki5 W, Snp, st. Rooms 5 and 6, uostaira. 



DYEING AND CLEANING 

T^IRS JMU^AS^rDYEINtTANlTc^ OF 

Jl^ of all 'or'f'of Indirs and gents Rarmenti", 
at the Lake Buperinr Steani Dye V.orks, 32 
West First 8tn»ot '''-- * •«■—'"- »»-"■> 



Mrs. A. Forstor, Prot>, 



USE OF TWO LAROK 

H - ... . , 

Ai>pb at 415 Wood 



WANl'F!>— THK .. 
wo'.d heal ipgsUivfb for the winter, by 1 



tho A»so ial'-d Cliariiios 
bridge hnildiiitf 



N 



0TlCli.-PKll.iu.N8 HaVi«G GOODS' IN 
pledife With me mnvt rfnlwrn same within 
ninety da>s of time stated on ticket or they will 
be sold (or charges. G. A. Klein. CoUatoral 
Loan Bank, IV West Superior sUest. 



Bion - 

J S Jeutes to City of Dulntb. part of 
block 157. Dalath Proper, Third dlvi- 

J S Jout'^s to City of buhiVh. part of 
block 157. Duluth Proper, Thiid divi- 
sion .. 

E Schilleuboiger to IMty of Dulnth, part 
of hlock 150. Duluth Proper, Third di- 
vision 

D Aicivinley to M< liabH Land company, 
laud iu section 9-51-12, etc --..- 

r. Men.fonliHll ct al to R I) MoLachlan, 
lot 4, block 1. Duluth Heights 

G J A t K ins to S (t McCouanghy, part of 
lot 7, block 5fi, Eudion ----- 

Lako^idi' l^iud company to Mary f, Mc- 
Kiudi'^y, lot P, block I'J, Lostei* Park. 
Second division - 

A R Macfttrlanoto J C Hunter, block 6, 
Glen .Vvon, Third division 

D <j Willard to Westrrn Laud company, 
lands in section ."ir'-SiMl ..-. 

D G Willard to H E Thurston, lands in 
stC«<ou i..5014 ..--.-.-- 

DG Willard to J A Willard, lands in 
section a)-50-14, etc - -,---„- 

W A Kingman to R P Kingmau, lot 9. 
block tx London addition.. ....-..-- b.VW 

Lakreide Laud company t<i E \ Bald- 
win, lots 15 and 16, block 11, London 
addition- --■-,; 

M O'M. ara Ui B F HuthawHy, one half 
oflot3!i7. bloch 1^0, Duluth Proper. 
Si>coud divisio.T -... -- 

M A Kingmau to K P Kingman, lots m 
London addition, otc --— 

Ji^nni™ L Deauett to C J l<re«lricks«in, 
lot ■it', block 57, Dulnth Proper, i hird 
divi.sioa -.— - ---:z-\-,-.- 

N K Hugo to E Mooers ct al.lot 145, Min- 
nrsolaavcnuo. Lower Dulnth... .... 

W F Marvin ot al to David Wair, lot 53, 
block 57, Dulath Proper, Third divi- 
sion .--/-v ' 

Nine oupublished... 

Total »8*«B 



659 

4f0 
4,6)0 
1,500 
4,000 

4ri0 

6,000 
5.500 
2,3C0 
8,'3O0 



1,000 

6l>3 
6,500 

2,600 
8r>0 



4.500 
33,500 



A 3'ear's subscription to Scrib- 
ner's Magazine will bring into 
j'our home twelve monthly num- 
bers, aggregating over 1500 pages 
of the best and most interesting 
reading, and more than 600 beau- 
tiful illustrations. 

Announcements. 

GEORGE W, CABLE will begin in the January 
number a romance enutlod '"John March, 
Southerner." 

Two other important s?rial8 have been engaged : 
J. M. BARRIE, authorof thofemous "Little 
Minister," has v.rittaa a new novel, the first 
since that fcmous story. GEORGE MERE 
DITH, tl^e great English novelist, bas ia 
lireparalicn a novel entitled "The Amazing 
Marriage. ' 

SHORT STORIES will he abundant. 

W. D. 110 WELLS. MISS ELLIOT. W. H 
BISHOP. LDDOYIC HALEVY, PAUL 
BOURGET. JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS 
and many new writers will contribute. 

STUDIES OF AMERICAN LIFE will bo an im- 
portant feature, including Newport, Bar 
Harbor, Leuor, etc., and the VS'ost. 

THE ILLUSTR.VTIONS will be oven more 
numerons and b-«a'.itiful than ever. A series 
of Frontispieces chosen by PHILIP GIL- 
BERT H.AMERTON will be especially not- 
able. 

Complete Prospectus Sent on Request. 

Special Offer. 7i;%^?3'r^l 

a subscription for 1^S4 $4.50 

The same, with back numbers, boond 

in cloth $6.00 

Sample Copy, 10 Cents. 

Charles Scribner's Sons, 

743 Broadway, New York. 



Dalfitli, Sostli Shore I 
Atlantle R'y. 

Boston, Kk, 

Montreal, Bulfftio, 
PhiUdolphia, Pittsturg:, 
CleTOland, Detroit, 

All points in Kiehigtin, 
The East and South. 

Ovor 100 miles horter than any otbar 
line to Bosto and all Ne-wr Kagiasid 
Points. 

Over 70 mile the shortefct line to sJI 
Points East of Maciiiaaw or Detroil 
Mich. 

WAGNER SLEEPING CARS 

ON ALL THSODGH THAINS, 



For tickets, 6leei>ui7 car scoomtsodatious mn'i 
foil inlormation, apiily t<> 

T. H. LARKE, Ccmmercisl Asenk, 
12s West Superior «re«t, DUliDTB,KI>«? 
Boaldinc Hct* Rloek 



!>,, M. & N. RAILROAD TIME TABUL 
Daily, except Buudaj-; iu effoct Dec. 18, 1898. 

Train No. 1, northbound— 

Lv Dulnth (Uniuu depot) SK'Sara 

At Yiiginia 11:30 aa 

Ar Biwabik « l?:f'lin 

Ar Mountain Inm ....—_„ ■JliKBin 

Ar Uibbing — -- 11:80 pm 

Train No. 2, southbound — 

Lv Virginia .•... IMftni 

Lv Monntnin Iron ^IMOpm 

Lv Biwatiik 'SrftS pn 

Lv Uibbiog 12A5poi 

Ar Dalath (Onion depot) S:QS|t«a 

Q. C. QIIJriLLAM, 
D. M. FHILBIM, Owl Pan. A«t 

Q«q'1 Manaew. 




i 

I 
I 
I 




\ 




■ 


* 


"^■■' ( 






















: .t j^aSm . *T? i>-- i- ^trr^ttrjra^ rr t fr'^** -. ^.,r-> tw^i ".^ • ■^ 




THE DULTJTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY. JANUARY 1,1S94. 



II m CONSUMMATED. 



The Union of Duluth and West Duluth Fit- 
tingly Accomplished on Saturday Even- 
ing With Proper Exercises. 



Mayor Mai tin Turned Over the Keys With a 

Few Words and Mayor d'Autre- 

mont Responded. 



Masterly Address of C. A. Towne on Cities 
and the Responsibilities of City Gov- 
ernment and People. 



the 
Du- 
the 



The exerc.ses in celebration ot 
consolidation of Dululh and West 
lutli held at the assemtily hall of 
Central High schoiil on i^aturd.iy even- 
ing were atteiuled by a : Uiic audience. 
Upon the rostrum were Mayor il'Autre- 
numt. of Dululh. Mayor Martin, of West 
Dululh. IVesident Spencer, ot the Du- 
luth council, the trustees and lirerueu i»[ 
West Duluth and three aldermen of Du- 
luth. Messrs. Wilson, Helm and Nelson. 
The city band was placed just below the 
rostrum. 

The exercises opened with the play- 
ing of Sousa's "Washington Post" march 
bv the City band. President Spencer in 
a few words said that it seemed entirely 
titling to make some public recognition 
of tlie fact that the municipal family is 
to be increased by the addition of that 
charming vdlage of West Duluth. He 
said the absence of bridesmaids and a 
ring would be observed with regret. A 
ring the city of Duluth fortunately has 
not. He then introduced Mayor John 
M. Martin, of West Duluth. 

The Keys Turned Over. 
Mayor Martin said: "Six years ago 
where the very prosperous and beauti- 
ful city of West Duluth now stands was 
a forest hitherto hardly penetrated ex- 
cept by the celebrated Meiritt family 
and the St. Paul & Duiuth railroad. O. 
H. Sioaonds, Daniel G. Cash, Josiah D. 
Ensign. K. S. Munger and oiher promi- 
nent citizens of Duluth conceived the 
idea that on the upper side of St. Louis 
bay there should be a great and prosper- 
ous manufacturmg city. The Merrills 
and citizens of the then town of Oneota 
readily agreed with them, And it was 
to the united efforts of these who I have 
named that West Duluth owes its pres- 
ent prosperity. The plan succeeded be- 
yond the expectations of the greatest en- 
thusiast, li seems like a myth to the un- 
initiated Jand the one unacquainted with 
Western push and enterprise that in six 
years West Duluth should grow to such 
grandeur and immensity." The village 
comes into the city, he said, in a spirit 
of kindness and happiness. He 
also spoke of what the vdlage will de- 
liver to Duluth and referred to the large 
manufacturing institutions, vast street 
improvements, fine fire and police de- 
partments, etc., and closed by turning 
to Mayor d'Autremont and handing him 
the key to the city hall, saying with the 
poet "we die. but liveth a thousand 
fold." 

RNayor d'Autremont's Response. 
Mayor d'Autremont in response said: 
"As I. in my official capacity, receive 
from you the keys of your fair city, sym- 
bolical of the fact that West Duluth no 
longer exists as a separate municipality; 
but that willingly and cordia'ly it now 
becomes, and for all time will be a most 
important part of Duluth, it is my pleas- 
ant duty on behalf of all our people to 
bid you and those you represent a warm 
and hearty welcome as citizens of Du- 
luth. We have just reason to 
ieel proud ot this our latest and 
greatest acquisition, not as a conqueror, 
who by force has annexed an unwilling 
province, but as brothers who, believing 
in unity there is strength, unite the 
better to protect themselves and repel 
their enemies. As you now freely and 
cheerfully unite with arid become a part 
of us. a common duty is cast upon us all, 
that in future we recognize no East nor 
West Duluth, but that it be one and in- 
divisible, and all work and strive for the 
general good of the whole community. 
We owe it to ourselves and to our city to 
take an interest in municipal matters; to 
see that only honest men fill public offi- 
ces and that they do their duty; that the 
lives and property of our citizens are 
protected; that all public money is care- 
fully and economically expended, and 
that the burden of taxation is kept as low 
as possible, commensurate with the im- 
provement and work that is absolutely 
necessary in a place developing so fast. 
We feel proud of the wonderful growth 
of our city m the past fev/ years, and we 
have greater cause for pride that during 
the present terrible financial stringency 
that spreads like a pool over our entire 
country and its industries, that Dululh 
has maintained her credit and met her 
obligations, that her bonds at a low rate 
of interest have sold at a premium; that 
no bad failures have occurred, and that 
in spite ot everything her business and 
commerce have increased. What, then, 
must it be in the near future when pros- 

f»erous times again smile on our fair 
and. We will not only soon become the 
commercial and manufacturing metro- 
polis of the Northwest, but we will have 
the largest, the cleanest, the healthiest 
and the best governed city in our state." 

The old and popular Glee club, 
Messrs. Frank Burke. Jr., P. Doran, H. 
S. Moody and George S. West sang 
"Come Brothers Come" and the audi- 
ence went wild demanding three en- 
core numbers. 

Address of the Evening. 

Charles A. Towne was then introduced 
as the Chauncey M. Depew of Duluth, 
ai.d delivered a scholarly address, more 
a lecture than a speech. He said in sub- 
stance: 

"It is a most important and interest- 



ing occasion that brings us together. We 
celebrate tonight an event of much sig- 
niticance in the history of what shall 
some il.iy be known as one of the chief 
centers of population and industry on 
the globe. What might t>lherwise for 
many years have been a costly and hurt- 
lul .inugonism between two adjoining 
municipalities dependent for growth 
upon essentially ihe same conditions, by 
this consummation becomes a unitied 
and orgaiin: progress toward the goal 
of a common destiny. The grand i.>- 
taliiv ot hopes and interests aggregated 
oa the Minnesota sid>; of this harbor is 
hencefoilh in one keeping and to be 
known by one name, a name first her- 
alded to the general ear as the euphon- 
ious theme of jocular oratory and a con- 
crete description of Western preten- 
tiousness, now become one of most real 
and sane denotement; soon to be and le- 
main of commanding import m the com- 
mercial and industrial statistics of the 
world; the name Duluth. Speaking his- 
torically we may be said to be familiar 
with three general types of the city— the 
ancient, the medieval, and the modern, 
each the result of conditions character- 
istic of its era and representing the dif- 
ferent stages of political, social and 
economic evolution." 

A discussion of the growth of cities 
and the causes bringing about their de- 
velopment, together with their evolution, 
W.1S then entered upon by Mr. Towne. 
Ihc genesis of the American city was 
also discussed and tigures given showing 
the tendency of the cities to increase in 
population much more rapidly than the 
country. "The continued augmentadon 
of the number and size ol our cities," he 
said, "brings us face to face with many 
serious problems and grave responsibili- 
ties. For, however much, and 
however justly, we may felicitate 
ourselves upon our glorious institu- 
tions, 1 suppose nolxKly will soberly 
claim that they have stood with dazzling 
success the test of application to the gov- 
ernment of our American cities. We 
have furnished the world more well 
authenticated cases of maladministration, 
peculation and extravagance in city gov- 
ernment than would have sufficed to 
dowu utterly any other institutional sys- 
tem that ever existed. Boss Tweed, 
happily, has had no peers in our history, 
but he had some feeble prototypes and 
has had many ambitious ;and, in their 
way, quite creditable imitators." There 
could be no time more fit than this, he 
said, for making good resolutions and 
renewing vows of fidelity; springing from 
the high privilege of citizenship in this 
community. 

The Three Chief Evils. 
"American experience has shown that 
the chief evils of city government 
lurk in the following opportunities: 

"First: Special legislation, by which 
unconsidered and inconsistent, if not ac- 
tually vicious, enactments are conlinu- 
.ally being made to suit one or another 
coterie of politicians, or to meet some 
temporary exigency whose remedy be- 
comes a permanent prescription after 
the disease is passed. 

"Second: Extravagance, or sornelhing 
worse, in the creation and the objects of 
indebtedness. 

"Third: The dilution of responsibili- 
ties among a lot of boards, committees 
and commissioners. By recent consti- 
tutional adoption wc have provided in 
Minnesota that the legislature shall no 
longer cumber the public records with 
private or special legislation, laying 
snares and pitfalls for the unwary tax- 
payer and m-jltiplying op: artunities to 
what, by an apt expression in a very dif- 
ferent connection, have been called hid- 
den and abhorrent forces. The remedy 
for the second above mentioned evil, so 
far as one is sought beyond that of choos- 
ing honest and capable officials, is usu- 
ally applied bymeansof constitutional or 
charter limitations on the power to incur 
debts. Such a limitation is in force in Du- 
luth and I trust it may not be superfluous 
to express the hope that it may not be 
forgotten. The third evil is a very bad 
one. Nothing so conduces to keep a 
public servant both honest, active and 
accommodating as to compel him to act 
in the open and to go to the polls to find 
out how his actions are esteemed. 1 be- 
lieve, for municipal affairs, in frequent 
elections of executive officers vested 
with large discretion, and of a city legis- 
lative with ample powers, short of cer- 
tain limits designated by the constitu- 
tion, as in the case of the limitation on 
indebtedness. The voter knows then 
whom to punish when anything goes 
wrong, and an officer, whether executive 
or legislative, may be depended on to 
realize his responsibility when he cannot 
shirk it. 

The Chiel Safeguard. 
"It should certainly be an object of 
very careful deliberation how the pro- 
posed general municipal statute in Min- 
nesota shall be digested and enacted. It 
would seem as though enough co-opera- 
tion could be had with other cities in the 
state to insure the passage by the next 
legislature of a general law providing 
most of the safeguards that experience 
has shown to be needful. But the chief 
safeguard lies in the patriotism and vig- 
ilance of the electors. In the last analy- 
sis It is you and I, the individual citizen, 
that must be held responsible for the 
conduct of affairs. Our government, 
city, state or national, is pretty 
much as me make it. It cannot 
be permanently bad without a consent 
by an equivalent to a criminal conspir- 
acy. No defective machinery can ex- 
cuse carelessness by the operator; it 
rather should admonish him to unusual 
watchfulness. And have we not warrant 
and sanction enough, we citizens of the 
New Duluth, for the highest endeavors 
ot citizenship? Where can the eye rest 




A Natural Food. 

Conditions o f 
the system arise 
when ordinary 
foods cease to 
build flesh — 
there is urgent 
need of arrest- 
ing waste — assistance must 
come quickly, from natural 
food source. 

Scott's Emulsion 

is a condensation of the life 
of all foods — it is cod-liver 
oil reinforced, made easy of 
digestion, and almost as 
palatable as milk. 

Prepsred by Scott i Bowna. N Y. All dnirt>«U. 



m GRAVE OFFENIiE. 



Delegate J. H. Baker Accused in the Trades 

and Labor Assembly of Smoking 

Non-Union Cigars. 



To This Awful Charge He Pleads Guilty and 

Also Implicated State Organizer 

Emil Applehagen. 



The Latter Said a Scab Cigar Was ais Good 
as a Union Cigar— Will Be In- 
vestigated. 



DR. L. A. FAULKNER 

King of 
Specialists. 

Treat« Boceosffully 
all forms of Ulood, 
Nervoua and Uriuary 
diaeaaea. 

NKKVOUSDKBIL- 
ITY, with it* inaoy 
Klooiny syniptufUB, 
cured. 

LOST VITALITY 
P6rf<>ct.l)r au<i iiernia- 
uauUy raatoretl. 

BLOOD POISON eared for life witLoat mer- 

DISEA8ES curel quickly and 

FREE. 

Office Room 4, Over 19 East Superior Street. 

CURE YOURSELF! 




eory. 

U BINARY 
thoronsfaly. 

conSdltation 



the right governing of a united Duluth. 
It is related in Roman legend that when 
the great temple ot Jupiter was to be 
erected upon the Capitoline hill all the 
gods gave w.-iy to Jupiter and Juno with 
the exception of Terminus (the god of 
boundaries) and Juventas (the goddess 
of youth), whose sanctuaries the augur- 
ies would not allow to be removed. This 
was taken as an omen that the Roman 
state would remain ever undiminished 
and young, and the chapels of the two 
divinities were enclosed within the walls 
of the new temple. 

"Today we enlarge the boundaries of 
our empire, and we build here a temple 
of devoted citizenship about whose altars 
we and those who come after us shall 
gather in the sacred rites of civic com- 
munion to the remotest posterity. And, 
if tonight I read the auguries aright. 
Terminus and Juventas shall be not re- 
moved but we shall build our temple 
about their images and offer ceaselessly 
at the shrines ot youth and permanence 
the sacrifice of our highest, willing and 
noblest doing in the service of Duluth. 
Duluth forever!" 

Dr. Salter's Benediction. 
The City band then played Suppe's 
great overture "Poet and Peasant." Dr. 
Salter came forward next at President 
Spencer's invitation who said he was Du- 
luth's own and no more needed an in- 
troduction to a Duluth audience than 
does a son to his father. 

Dr. Salter said he was there because 
he was told that a minister was an abso- 
lute necessity at a wedding. He claimed 
the privilege of an old settler to speak 
of the groom now 22 years old. Poverty 
is an advantage, the poet says, and if 
this be true, Duluth in the early days 
had advantages for hard times 
then were here many years. 
The early citizens were hard work- 
ers and it was well that it was so for the 
location demanded hard work. Duluth's 
greatness is that of toil and service. He 
declared that young Duluth was always 
patriotic, loved the public school and 
planted it early, always went to church 
and never knew bigotry and was always 
the soul of hospitality. He closed by 
saying that he would repeat as he always 
does m the marriage ceremony "Whom 
God in His providence hath joined to- 
gether, let no man put asunder." 

The audience then rose and, accom- 
panied by the City band, sang "The Star 
Spangled Banner" and dispersed. 

AMUSEMENTS. 



The extensive sate of non-union cigars 
in Duluth has been a greater source of 
worry to the Federated Trades assem- 
bly than almost any other question 
claiming its attention. This condition 
of things has reduced the number of 
union cigarmak«rs from thirty to three 
since last July. The cigarmakers' union 
has cried long and loud for help. It has 
not ceased all efforts to help itself. The 
trades assembly not only has heard these 
cries, but it has comlemned this extens- 
ive trade in scab cigars. It has given 
words of encouragement and sympathy 
to the cigarmakers. It has passed reso- 
lutions and done everything that seemed 
possible. Some of the unions, foremost 
of which has been the Duluth Typo- 
graphical union, have established heavy 
fines for all members caught smoking 
cigars not bearing the blue label. Some 
time ago the assembly appointed a com- 
mittee to wait upon Duluth dealers and 
attempt to induce them to handle more 
union goods. The report of that com- 
mittee at the last meeting of the trades 
assembly brought about a little circum- 
stance both comical and dramatic. 

When the reports of standing commit- 
tees were called for, Delegate Wood 
arose and prefaced his report with a few 
remarks. He said: 

"I confess that I am but a young 
member of the ranks of organized labor. 
When I went from home to learn my 
trade and win my way in the world my 
father called me aside and warned roe 
not to have anything to do with labor un- 
ions. Years before, in the old country, 
he lost his position because he belonged 
to a labor union. That was the cause of 
his prejudice. I soon found out, how- 
ever, that if I wanted to do any good at 
my trade I must be a union man. I 
identified myself with the cause of organ- 
ized labor and in its ranks I shall ever 
remain. 

"But what is the use of all this work 
and agitation if we do not practice our 
union principles outside the wails of the 
hall of this assembly as well as within 
them? There are delegates high in the 
ranks of unionism and this assembly who 
are in the habit of smoking scab cigars." 

"Name th*m! Name them! Name 
them!" loudly cried the aroused and ex- 
cited delegate.^. 

Delegate Wo }d straightened himself 
up, directed his eves across the hall, 
slowly pointed his' forefinger at Dele- 
gate J. H. Baker and said in firm, loud 
tones: 

"There sits the man who smokes scab 




Tbeumy sale aad reliable curwlor CONOR RHSAf 

ILEET, LEUCORRHSA, ancTpther diachargei., 

•-■----- * -ipaady cure of the most obstinate 



OLEETv 

tn eilber «ex. A 

coHeR. CrXLekie. 

S«srlo«i»z-o. LeaUiJis druKKintu, 



OFFICE OF THE WABIQON IRON COM- 
pany, Duluth, Miun., December 29, lWt3. 
Notice is lioroby given that tho annual moetiug 
of the stockholders of the Wabigon Iron Com- 
pany for the election of directors and thetrane- 
action t>f such other business as may be brought 
before it, will bo hold at the ottice of tho ooin- 

f>any. 407 Lyceum building, in the city of Du- 
uth, state of Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, 1894, at two o'clock p. m. The trana- 
fpr books wUl be closed at noon on December 
auth, 1883, and reopened on Jana»y 11, li$94, at 
ten o'clock a m. W. H. Fisheh. 

Sec'y. 



OFFICE OF THE NIBIWA IRON COM- 
pany, Duluth, Minn., December 29, 1S93. 
Notice ia hereby- iriven that the annual meeting 
of the stockholders of the Nibiwa Iron Com- 
pany for the election of directors and the trans- 
action of each other business as may be brought 
before it, will be held at the office of the com- 
pany, 407 Lyceum building, in the city of Du- 
luth, state of Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, l!<94. at two o'clock p. m. The trans- 
fer books will be closed at noon on December 
80th, 1893, and reopened on January 11, 1894, at 
ten o'clock a. m. W. H. Fisher. 

Sec'y. 



upon another so fair a scene? When 
the foundations of the earth were laid 
this spot was set apart and designated as 
the seat of a peaceful empire. In the 
fullness ot time it is completing its 
destiny. It is our happy fate to be of 
those who, while not yet relieved from 
the labor, may taste the first fruits of the 
achievement. 

Will Pledge Our Faith. 
"With joined hands we will pledgeour 
faith and works to the upbuilding and 



'Lost in New York." 
This afternoon "Lost in New York" 
was presented at the Temple and to- 
night will also be seen. To theater- 
goers who admire realism and sensation 
in the drama it offers one of the strong- 
est attractions in that line, being a play 
full of heart interest and thrilling situa- 
tions. The company carries two car- 
loads of beautiful scenery painted by 
Arthur Voegtlen of the Madison Square 
theater, New York city. A vast river of 
real water, containing 60,000 gallons of 
Lake Superior water, upon which 
floats real yachts, row boats, ferries, a 
genuine steamboat and other craft, is a 
salient realistic feature of the produc- 
tion. 

Opening of Court. 

Tomorrow the district court opens 
again and the court cases of the Novem- 
ber calendar will be taken up and tried. 
The following is the setting of cases for 
the week: 

Tuesday— 4, 10, 13, 17. 19.22, 24, 25, 26, 
27. 28, 2g, 32. 

Wednesday— 37, 39, 41. 42, 45. 48, 55. 
56. 

Thursday— 57, 60, 64. 65, 67, 6g, 70, 72, 

74- 
Friday— 78, 79, 80, 82, 88, qo, 91, 94. 95. 

g6. 

The Most Pleasant Way 

Of preventing the grippe, colds, head- 
aches, and fevers is to use the liquid 
laxative remedy Syrup of Figs, when- 
ever the system needs a gentle, yet 
effective cleansing. To be benefited one 
must get the true remedy manufactured 
bv the California Fig Syrup company 
only. For sale by all druggists in 50c 
and %i bottles. 

All the comforts of home and the best 
table board in the city can be had at 113 
Second avenue east. Terms reasonable. 



OFFICE OF THE MINIWA IRON COM- 
pany, Duluth, Minn., December i9, 1893. 
Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting 
of the stockholders of the Miniwa Iron Com- 
pany for the election of directors and the trans- 
action of such other business as may bo brought 
before it, will be held at the office of the com- 

fiany, 407 Lyceum building, in the city of Du- 
uth, state of Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, 1894, at two o'clock p. m. Tho trans- 
fer books will be closed at noon on December 
aOth, 1893. and reopened on January 11, 1894. at 
ten o'clock a. m. W. H. Fishke, 

Secy. 



OFFICE OF THE WENONA IRON COM- 
pany, Duluth, Minn., December 29, 1893. 
Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting 
of the stockholders of the Wenona Iron Com- 
pany for the election of directors and tne trans- 
action of such other business as may be brought 
before it, will be held at the office of the com- 

f)any, 407 Lyceum buildiuK, in the city of Du- 
ath, state of Minnesota, ou the tenth day of 
January, 1894. at two o'clock p. m Tho trans- 
fer books will be closed at noon on December 
30th, UiU3, and reopened on Jannary H, 1894, at 
ten o'clock a m. W. H. TisnER. 

Sec'y. 



Highest of all in Leavening Power. — Latest U. S. Gov't Report 




Baking 
Pomier 



Notice of Stockholders Meeting. 

Please take notice that the annual 
meeting of the stockholders of Lakeside 
Laud company will be held at the office 
of the company. No. 506 First National 
Bank building, Duluth, Minnesota, on 
Wednesday, the third day of January, A. 
D., 1894, at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, 
for the purpose ot electing a board of 
directors for the ensuing year and trans- 
acting any and all other business that 
may properly come before said meeting. 
Wm. C. Sargent, 
Secretary. 



AB60ll/rEiy PURE 



Have You Any Work*? 

Are there any families in Duluth who 
would like a man to do odd work around 
the house, such as taking care of the 
fires, carpenter work, etc., by the week or 
month? If so. the Associated Charities 
would be glad to supply their need. 
There are several men who have been 
ill, and are out of work, who would be 
greatly helped in this way. Please send 
word to 415 Woodbtidge building. 

Gus Swendson, 106 First street, cariies 
a complete stock of fresh roasted coffee, 
roasted every day at the Eagle Coflfee 
and Spice mills. 



cigars! , , 

A death like stillness possessed the 
hall as the delegates gazed in a dazed 
manner at their fellow delegate. J. H. 
Baker smoking scab cigars! It cannot 
be possible! Why! He has been a 
member of the Carpenters' union. He 
has led strikes. He has helped to man- 
age labor papers. He has helped to or- 
ganize unions and assemblies. He has 
made speeches. He has acted on com- 
mittees appointed to bring obstinate op- 
pressors of union labor to time. He has 
roasted the plutocrats and defended the 
cause of the common herd. He even 
has held a municipal appointment as 
the result of his efforts in behalf of the 
downtrodden laboring men. J. H. 
Baker smoke scab cigars! It does not 
seem possible! Thus thought each of 
those dazed, speechless delegates. 

Delegate J. H. Baker cringed beneilh 
the sudden swift-sweeping accusation. 
He trembled with emotion most deep. 
The silence in that hall seemed to cry 
out in language louder than thumder: 
"Delegate J. H. Baker, what have you 
got to say. Arise and explain deeds." 

So Delegate J. H. Baker arose to pro- 
test against the roasting so bluntly 
given him. He told that how, on a cer- 
tain occasion, when shoving the saw and 
jack-plane at a place on a street remote 
from the better class of shops, he was 
taken with that irresistable desire to 
smoke. The craving had to be satisfied. 
All old smokers know how terrible such 
a craving is, so, seeking out a cigar 
stand. Delegate Baker found that it was 
an interior one, carrying nothing but 
scab cigars, but, under the circum- 
stances, he purchased and smoked one. 
The faces of the delegates, as they 
heard that explanation were studies for 
an artist's brush. But Delegate Baker 
had not done; continuing, he raised his 
hand on high and in an intensely dra- 
matic manner said: 

"Gentlemen! Aside from all that, I 
was told by a member of the Cigar Mak- 
ers' union that a scao cigar is as good as 
a union cigar." 

Delegate McCallum at once jumped to 
his feet and demanded that the name of 
the author of such a remark be given 

"I offer a reward of $5 for that inform- 
ation" excitedly shouted McCallum. 

Delegate Baker was in a tight t)Ox. 
The only way to get out was to give the 
name. Protesting that he did not want 
the $5, he slowly arose and said: 

"The man who told me that was Emil 
Applehagen. I can prove it by M. O. 
Hall." . . , 

That was a bomb shell. Emu Apple- 
hagen has often been called the god- 
father of organized labor in Duluth and 
to have Samuel Gompers' state organ- 
izer accused of such a remark, especially 
after years ot agitation in favor of union- 
ism in general and cigarmakers in par- 
ticular, made the delegates feel as if the 
last prop had fallen. 

Things began to get hot and several 
delegates jumped up and began to roast 
Delegate J. H. Baker, when President 
Griffin called them to order. There is 
considerable excitement over the mitter 
and it is said that some of the delegates 
will insist upon investigating Delegate 
Baker and State Organizer Emil Apple- 
hagen. 

The Associated Charities would like to 
know of a place where those who have 
no homes could be sent for a night 
or two. Call at the office, 415 Wdod- 
bridge building. 



OFFICE OF THE MINC8IN IRON COM- 
pany, Duluth, Minn., December 2d, 1893. 
Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting 
of the stockholders of the Miuosin Iron Com- 
pany for the election of directors and tho trans- 
action of such otlier busiuosa as may be brought 
before it, will be held at the otlloe of the com- 
pany, 407 Lyceum building, in tho city of Du- 
luth, stato of Miuuefcota, on the tenth day of 
January, 1894, at two o'clock p. m. Tho trans- 
fer booics will be closed at noon ou December 
aOth. 1893, and reopened on January 11, 1894, at 
ten o'clock a. m. W. H. Fisheb, 

Sec'y. 




CURB 



A New and Complete Treatment, oonslstlng o( 
SDPPOBITOBl^ Capsules ot Ointment and two 
Boxes of Ointment. A nevep-falllng Cure for Pllea 
ot every nature aitd degree. It makes an operation 
with the knife or Injections of carbolic Bcld,wnick 
are paintul and seldom a permanent cure, and often 
resutting In deatb, onneceeaary. Why •ndure 
this terrible diaease? Wf. «uajai>tM, • 
boxes to cure anv case. Yoa only P»y »?£ 
twnefltB receive . $l a box. for SB bv mail- awmue 

free. Gaaranteee issned by our agent. 

JOHNSON.S ORIENTAL SOAP, 

The Great Skin Cure and Face Beantitior. It 
isbifbly medicated, delicately perfumed and 
absolutely pure. 1 1 cleanser the skin and scalp, 
promotes the growth of the hair and is a Inxury 
for ladies' and chUdren'a bath. 8. F. BO.YCE, 



._. ajid children's bath 

Druggist. 335 Superior street W 



Duluth, Minn. 



NOTICE IS HEKEBY GIVEN THAT THE 
co-partnership heretofore existing under 
the firm name and stylo of Moor, Towno i Har- 
ris, has this day been dissolved by mutual con- 
sent, S. H. Moer retiring from said firm. 

Dated at Dalnth, Minn., this 30th day of De- 
cember, A. D. 1893. „ „ ,. 

8. H. MOEE, 
Cha8. a. Townb. 

LXJTEEB C. HAKBIS. 



NOTICE 18 HEREBY 
partnership for the practice of _ law 



GIVEN THAT A CO- 
has 
this day been formed between Charles A. 
Towne and Luther C. Harris, under the firm 
name and style of "Towne & Harris. ' with 
offices at No. 413 Palladio building, Duluth, 
Minn. , ^y 

Dated at Duluth, Minn., this 30th day of De- 
cember, A. D, 1893. , „ 

Chaelbs a. Towne. 

LutbbbC.Habbis. 




QimiEMi 
RAdFIC R.R. 



IS THE ONLY LINE 



UNNINO 
TO 



THBOUGB 



St. Fail, HiieapoUs ill CMcap 



HELENA BUTTE SPOKANE 
fAOOMA, SEATTLE. JPORTLAND 

Pnllman Slee^g C«i«. Elegant Dining Can 
on all Tbrongh Trains. 



tIMB SCHEDULE. 



Diolag Gars on Paoiflo 
— Ekpreas. 



Leave 
Dnloth 
DaUy. 



Arrive 

Dolnih 

Dally. 



Pacific Express for all Min- 
nesota and Dakota points, 
Winnipeg, YellowBtnne 
Park, Helena, Butte, Spo- 
kane, Taooma, Seatue, 
Portland, Alaska. Sen 
Franoisooand all Paotfle 
eoast points ..-..-• 3:45pm 

Chieago Limited for all Wis- 
ecmnn Central & Milwan- 
kee. Lake Shore * West- 
ern points, Milwaukee. 
Chicago and beyond . ..... 4 a» pm 

Wisconsin C«tral„ Loo*! 
Bz^tese tor kW Gogebio 
Range and Wiaeonsin Cto- 
tral points and Cbioago... 
t Except Sunday. All other trains daily. 
Bates, maps, or other pemptUets and infom.» 

tion will be cheerfnlly 'nrnlsKed on apnlic^ii.* 

City Ttrkot Agut, «6 W. Superior S'... 
°'^^|j.%dTk't.A.v.S.P.nl. 



7 i.^ am 



11 :10 an. 




DON'T 

YOU WANT 

A POCKETBOOK 

Or wouldn't it be a suitable New Year':: fi'di 

for ^iome one .'' Boyce is offering the pick of 2000 

Fine Leather Pocketbooks at actual wholesale cost 

price. Every purchase of 25 cents or over entitles 

you to a key which may unlock the box on April 1 

THAT CONTAINS 

$20 

IN GOLD 



/ 




I The 
Coming 
Contest 



In the spring election for mayor will be the most 
animated that has ever t.aken place in Dululh. 
In order to simplify matters and arrive at the real 
sentiment of the people as to who is their popular 
choice for mayor. The Herald hereby inaugurates 
a voting contest, by printing in each issue of The 
Evenmg Herald a coupon which every person in 
Duluth is requested to cut out and vote as often 
as they please and mail or bring it in person to 
The Herald office. The popular contestant who 
receives ihe largest number of votes will on Jan- 
uary loih, the day of the close of the contest 
receive his choice of the $125.00 Haviland China 
Dinner Set now on exhibition in Panton iS: Wat- 
son's window, or a Sioo.00 Easy Chair. The for- 
mer valuable prize will also interest the ladies ol 
Duluth to take a part themselves in this enter- 
prise of determining who is the popular choice 
for Duluth's executive head. All you have to do 
is cut out the coupon which appears on the first 
page of The Herald tonight and write on it your 
choice for mayor; every vote cast in De- 
cember counts three votes and each vote cast the 
first ten days in January will count one vote each. 
The China Dinner Set or the Easy Chair will be 
delivered to the fortunate winner on the morning 
of January nth, and he may also be successful 
nominee of the citizens' convention which will be 
held a few days Liter. Send in your votes. The 
outcome of this contest will be watched with a 
gfeat deal of interest and the standing of the 
different candidates announced from time to time. 



*' * 



--/ 



IF YOU 



I 



WANT A COOK, 



- WANT A SITUA1 lOy. - 
WANT A SALESMAN. 



WANT A SERVANT GIRL. 



- WANT TO HIRE ANY HELP. - 
WANT TO RENT A STORE 



— — WANT AN AGENT OR PARTNER. 

'.rAHT TO BUY OR SIJI-L A FARM. 
— — WANT TO BUY OR SELL A HOUSE. 

T".inT TO HIRE OR RENT A HOUSE. 
_ WANT A GOOD BOARDING HOUSE, i^— 
^— WANT TO BUY OR SELL A CARRIAGE, — ^—i 

— WANT TO GET BOARDERS OR LODGERS, — ^— 

- WANT TO LEND OR BORROW MONEY'. — — 
WANT TO TRADE OR EXCHANGE ANYTHING,— 

— WANT TO FIND ANYTHL<G YOU HAVE LOST. — 
-^ WANT TO FIND STRAYED OR STOLEN ANIMALS. - 

— WANT TO ACCOMPLISH ANY*THI.^:G UNDER THE SUN, 

— YOU CAN DO IT EASILY THROUGH THE Vv'ANT COLUMNS OF 

THE EVENING HERALD dulutks leading paper. 





THE DITLUTH EVENING HERALD: MONDAY. JANUARY . 1. 1894. 













i 




' 










• 


» 










■' 



.t 111 ih. 




.ms on uiMilc 
-v \L Ch,uut- 



: J. 5S 
and 



i><>riimny 

■ :a 
■, the 

-u.i It will 

■. ttkr. 
' the 
.111 on 



TOF 





Special Met-tinp: of the City Council to Be 

Held Tomorrow Evening for 

That Purpose. 



In Order to Comply With the Ekciion Laws 

This Must Be Done at 

Ones. 



. 1- 



. l.av- 
A. K. 



- V, 



01 
TO- 



■ C- 






id 



'■,.uA i»V 



Tower People Will Confer With the County 

Board Regarding a Road to 

Rainy Lake. 



r.ithcr 



. .-rjr 



« 






T. 



.■ imperial 
.•au Jt 

. to get 
itic heavy 

readers of 
Cetiiury 

,\ on this 



■ la aii u}J- 

: never be 



man, oa tlie 

'--Its of dress 

:i <v ?*Ioe 

.. Thc^'cods 

- ioa of some 

.1 u tuuple of 

. ^. It oil tiom the 

■ /v. Ife- 
u. was 

Tf- 

p-ssociatioii was 
'.oday. 



Aidcrmr\n Co\ consider; ;t a cold day 
when he is cauirhl nappiii.^ It has Rcn- 
eralty l»eea fuijposed that the city coun- 
cil would, not meet agaia until next 
Monday nijjlit but Mayor dAutrcmont 
' Issued a call for a meetiiij:^ to be 
tomorrow night. Alderman Cox 
:: .- other dav was reading; the charter 
cction .as IS his daily 

and !aj fact suddenly 

, , , ., or wa-j pop[)C 1, into his head 
thai the different political parties must 
1:1c Acir selection of judges with the city 
cl-ik thirty days before election. That 
ca:nu;i he done until the city council ar- 
rani^es the precincts in the various wards 

so tor iliat purpose Alderman Cox 
called upiKi the mayor Saturday and re- 
minded his honor of the provision. 

The call as made includes the passage 
(f tlie monthly pay rolls as well as the 
matter of the arrangements of the pre- 
rts. Were ro meetipjj held until Jan. 
.■ precinct judges could not have 
1 1 : :i selected by law and the validity of 
the election probably would have been 
brought into nue stion. 

T lEY W4NT A ROAD. 



GOSSIP OF THE TOWN. 



!"irtS9NAL.. 




iiavc gdne 

:• ':sh on 
jr the 

, :..- to Portland, 

is the 

. •. . , .,s- 

;jcr have gone 

- .. rip. 

.:■{ trom NcV.' 

I! is here to spend 

I wo liarbors banker, 

ly visitin;:^ his mother, 
shing his 

. ring from 
. i' ti' ser. 
" sheep 
:<zw Mex- 

■:.-.udi- 

. :.ed to- 
-,,.., aw. 

: ' I'f'XpoIis, is at 



•■i;y 



lo gitef. 
who rc- 



Tower Psop'e Anxious for a Highway to the 
Rainy Lake Region. 
A letter was received by Secretary Bu- 
chir.an, of the jobbers' union, today from 
Chaiinian Kingston, of the citizens' com- 
mittee at Tower, which is engaged in 
looking up a practicable route for trans- 
' ^jupplies from Tower to some point 

us to the newly discovered gold 

iitids ua Rainy and Kabetogema lakes 
on the international boundary. In The 
Herald last week the necessity for a road 
starting from the iiiost northerly point of 
Vcrruilion lake to the most southerly 
point of Lake Li Croix, these two points 
being in a due north and south line 
one with the other, was presented. 
This route has been explored 
and tcuiorrow a committee of five will 
meet here with the county commission- 
ers and the transportation committee of 
the jobbers' union and endeavor to se- 
cure aid from the county in building it. 

The road, which will tun from a point 
it! township 63-17 to a point in section 6, 
(kj 16, and will be about twenty miles 
long. From Tower goods and passen- 
gers Will be taken by steamboat 
to the south end of the road, hauled 
to Lake La Croix and from thence 
there is a splendid water route clear to 
I'ort Francis, which is opposite town- 
ship 70 22. This includes all the new 
gold regions and the route has been tra- 
veled for many years by ail the miners 
a;i ' prospectors in the northern country. 
Ti.e county commissioners meet at 2 p. 
m, tomorrow. 

Hitherto al! supplies have been 
brought from Rat Portage via Fort 
Francis and many thousands of dollars 
have been left on the Canadian side that 
ought to have stayed right in St. Louis 
county, and to alter this incongruity this 
road is sought to be built. 



WILL MEET IN DULUTH. 



The State Teachers' Association Will Come 
Next Summer. 

The Dululh teachers who were attend- 
ing the slate teachers' association at 
Minneapolis, have returned home. The 
place of meeting for next summer as is 
customary, was left to the discretion of 
the executive committee, who will select 
the city to be honored by the assemblage 
and notify the members at a later period. 
U Is probable, however, that Duluth will 
be chosen, on account of the meeting of 
the national association here. The state 
association passed the following resolu- 
tion; 

That the association learned with plea- 
sure that our state is likely to be honored 
with the meeting of the national associa- 
tion rtt IJuluth next July, and that in 
1:1 it Lvciit we pledge our united efforts 
to secure this meeting the largest possi- 
ble attendance and support from the 
state, i-uipassi.ig if possible the records 
of the St.'Paul meeting. 



TO IMPROVE THE HARBOR. 



0(! 



•:ir- 

.-:e. 



Eviiv Una Altai I Ihcm. 



uKii! one or iiiore 
Chriaunas num- 



Co.'s ad., pjjjj 



:tJt al 



6. 
I 

The 
your 



Baldwin and Haugen Called on the War De- 
partment. 

Congressman Baldwin and Haugen 
called on the chief of engineers at the 
war department a few days ago to urge 
the appointment of a commission of engi- 
neers to ascertain the cost of deepening 
the Duiuth and Superior h.arbors to 
twenty feet. That is the depth of the 
new lock at Sault Stc. Marie, and the 
action is due to a resolution of the joint 
comniission for the mipioveroent of the 
harbors of the cities ot Duluth and Su- 
perior. 

Gen. Casey replied to the congressmen 
that he had no authority to detail any 
engineers for the putp-ise, and either 
lUtldwin or Haugen will introduce a res- 
olution in congress to authorize the ap- 
pointment of the commission desired. 



J X) XX . 



HONOFwS- 



-WOBLDS FAIR, 




PRICE 




The only Pure Cream of Tartar Powder. — No Ammonia; No Alam. 

Used iu Millions of Homes — 40 Years the Standard. 



What Other Pec;ild Have to Say oi Each Other 
and Things in General. 
"Do you sec that man passing through 
the lobby," said an ex-Gogcbic mining 
man at the St. Louis today. "That is the 
man who w.is the real discoverer and 

developer of the Gogebic. He tramped 
through and through that country, living 
on porcupines and whatever they could 
get but he stuck to it until he convinced 
people that he knew what he was about 
and then he made millions. He gave 
away two or three fortunes, but today he 
ii a rich man, I am glad to say, once 
more." The gentleman referred lo was 
Capt. N. D. Moore. 

• ♦ ♦ 

Some men were watching the arc-light 
cleaner at one of the hotels today. Said 
A. C. Hatchelor, "I wouhi not want that 
job. Kvery time that man touches one 
of those lamps he takes his life in his 
hand. A man ever so careful may make 
a slip. There are 2000 volts on that wire 
and if accider.tal contact were made that 
current would kill him fnstantly." And 
the audience held their breath until the 
man came down the ladder. 

* * * 

"The county raid between West Du- 
luth and New Duluth is a good one," 
said Farmer Jacob Nelson, of Fond du 
Lac township, "but beyond New Duluth 
it IS sadly cut up and blocked up by the 
cordwood men. In some places it is 
almost impossible to get a team through 
between the piles of wood. The county 
commissioners would do well to look to 
this." 

* * * 

"One method of advising Maj. Baldwin 
to listen to the iron interests of this dis- 
trict," said C. C. Prindle, "would be to 
get up a memorial or petition to him and 
put a copy ot it in every hotel or other 
public place and obtain all the voters' 
signatures possible. This surely would 
have a good effect upon our congress- 
man." 

• * « 

General Manager Harry A. Tuttle, of 
the North American Telegraph com- 
pany, was the first and only guest at the 
Spalding who arrived earlv this morn- 
ing. Mr. Tuttle said: "Our company 
has just closed the sixth prosperous year 
of its existence and we look forward to 
even a better business this coming year. 
I wish to thank the people of Duluth for 
the support that has been accorded to 
us in the past, which has been generous, 
as all generosity is typical of Duluth." 

♦ - 

Death of Charles S. Morrow. 
Charles S. Morrow died yesterday 
morning at his home. No. 214 Ninth ave- 
nue east, of peiitonitis after an illness 
which began only on Friday evening. 
He w.is 25 years of age. His death was 
so unexpected that the first reports were 
received by his friends with incredulity. 
He was employed in the office of the 
Duiuth, Missabe &"Northern railway and 
had lived in Duluth for a number of 
years. | He was a sou of the late Judge 
Paul D. Morrow, of Towanda, Pa., where 
his mother still lives and was a brother 
of John P. Morrow and Mrs. J. T. Hale, 
of ; Duluth. He leaves a wife and 
daughter, two and a half years old. The 
body will be taken today to Towanda 
for burial and will be accompanied by 
the widow and child and Judge Hale. 

The Gas Exploded. 

There was a gas explosion on the 
fourth floor of the Lowell, formerly the 
Pastoret-Stenson block last evening at 
5:30 o'clock in rooms 404 and 405, occu- 
pied by Mr. and Mrs. Edmondson and 
children. They were away in the after- 
noon and escaping gas filled the room. 
Mrs. Edmondson entered the room and 
struck a match upon her return. In- 
stantly the whole room was in flames. 
Two men ran out of an adjoining apart- 
ment and with the hose m the building 
tjuenched the flames. Everything in the 
rcom was badly charred. Tenants of 
the building complain that no watchman 
is kept there, although from 100 to 200 
people live in the block. 

Entertainment for the Poor. 

The entertainment for the poor given 
by the Scandinavian churches of the 
West End on Saturday evening at United 
States hall was attended by over 600 
people. There were addresses by Rev. 
E. B. Slattedahl, of Zion Norwegian 
Lutheran church. Rev. Mr. Alvin, of 
First Swedish Methodist church. Rev. C. 
Silene, of First Swedish Baptist church 
and Rev. J. Johnson, of the Swedish Mis- 
sion. O.Jodengusgavearecitation, Misses 
Alma Berg andLydia Pearson sang and 
the choirs of the different churches also 
g.-ive music. 

New Year's Service. 
The Temple opera house was well 
filled yesterday afternoon when the 
Young Men's Christian association held 
its annual mass meeting. Music was 
provided by the association orchestra 
and the First Presbyterian church quar- 
tet. Dr. Forbes, the speaker of the day. 
made a fine address. President G. W. 
Stevens also spoke. 




The Mayoralty Contest. 

Geo. W. Stcvena, m&naKor ('ranborry 

Lumber company 20,955 

HeuryHaskins 17,886 

W E. Hichardeon 4745 

K. A. Gray 2.S50 

A. M. Moixison 1730 

KohertLi. Knebel 653 

G. W. Cornell 6^7 

B. R Howard 460 

H. C. KondaU 183 

S. W. Clark 165 

F. V. Hartley J64 

\V. llouiberK 150 

UiM>r«e W.Huck 132 

J. b. Sntphin 120 

Scattoriii« 1272 



Deafness Cannot be Cured 

by lociil appl'catiouu. as they cannot roach tho 
disau^ed iMirtion uf the oar. There is only one 
way to euro (!oafno88, and that is by constita- 
tional roitiodips. Doafnoss is CHusod by an iu- 
fliimotl ctinfliticn of the riucous l)>)iD«r of the 
eustuchiau tubu. When this tube gets luflamed 
yon have a ruinbliut? ho'Jiid of imporfoct hcar- 
iu,r, and when it is entirely closed dtmfnoss i% 
tho reswU, and nnlous tho i::(1ammatiou can bo 
taken out and this tube restored to its uonnal 
Condition, hoaritiff wiJl be destroyed forover; 
nine caites out of ten are caused by catarrh, 
which is nothing but an inflameii condition of 
the luncous sarfacen. 

Wo will give one hundred dollars for any caeo 
of deafnes!) (canhod by catarrh) that cannot bo 
cured by HBil'a (Catarrh Cnre. Send for circu- 
lars, free. F. J. CnisNEy & Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
t£?"'Sold by druggists, 75c. 

Look Here. 
Will trade house and lot East Sixth 
street, mortgage S300, for corner lot on 
Second, Third or Fourth streets. East 
End. 

Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 

We have S»Scoo to loan on well im- 
proved real estate. 

MkNDENHALL & HOOPES. 

■ - ■ > 

'Twill do Duluth Good 
To mail your Eastern or Western friends 
(■ooies of The Herald's Lbristmas num- 
ber. 



^tu^M^^ 



A House of Solid Progress and True Merit. 








UTH'S 




DREW THE 



Valuable Hous 
And Lot 



,0 



-.vi- 



AND 

WAS HELD 

BY 




OF DULUTH. 



n. S. BURROWS & CO. 

PROMOTERS OF HONORABLE ADVERTISING. 



mm- 



WE WISH YOU A MOST 








AND \?ILL EMPHASIZE IT B7 OFFERING YOU 

PIANOS 
AT HALF PRICE 

With us this means a GENUINE REDUCTION on 
twenty-five Pianos of One-Half of the regular retail prices. 

It has been claimed for some time, and we had beg-un 
to think so, that I'.ier? is but little money at the head of 
the lakes. We now think different. 

Our larg-e Christmas trade proved to us that there is 
lots of money stored away ready to be broug-ht out when 
our people are convinced that GENUINE BARGAINS are 
offered. 

We now propose to give our people the 

CHANCE OF A LIFETIME 

To procure a new STANDARD PIANO at prices barely 
covering the cost of material and labor. 

8250 Pianos for 8125 

$300 Pianos for 8150 

8400 Pianos for 8200 

8500 Pianos for 8250 

8600 Pianos for 8300 

We have a host of customers to whom we refer as to 
the quality of instruments sold by us. No ''stencil" or 
"trade" Pianos, only standard, FULLY GUARANTEED 
FOR SIX YEARS by RELIABLE MANUFACTURERS. 

No such bargains have been offered during the past 
twenty years. 

"One man's loss, another's gain, 
Manufacturers' loss, now your gain." 

Now is Your Time. 



Century 
Piano Co. 

OF DULUTH AND WEST SUPERIOR. 

1 1 10 Tower Avenue. West Superior, Wis. 




$3.00— BEST SET Of TEETH 

PalDless D6Qt!st. 

Top Floor, 





OF UOUU£UOU> 
AND 

OTHBB GOODS 
At 306 West JficAi^an Htnet. 

DULUTH FEED & STORAGE CO., 

D. A. DUNLAP, Manacw. 



Shaving 

10 Cents, 

Sullivan's i 



White Front 
Barber Shop 



Great January 




1 \ 



Commences tomorrow, Tuesday, January 2. 





li 



ifcUs 



Must be converted into Cash at once. Money is what 
we are after. It is not a matter of profit, but a matter of 
how much our loss should be. We are willing to take it to 
raise the MIGHTY DOLLAR. 

Do you want two dollars worth of goods for one dollar .•' 
Come in and we will give it to you. 

Remember that almost our entire stock will be at your 
mercy during this sale. 

Bring your money tomorrow and get the best bargains 
you ever got. 

Here is an example of what we propose to do: 



1 
1 I 




Hall Price and Less 

Is the pric£ of any Garment in the Store now. 



Tea Qov/ns 

HALF PRICE— All our Silk and Wool- 
en Tea Gowns go at Half Price new. 

Calico Wrappers 

QC PER CENT discount on all Ca'.icc 
u%$ Wrappers in the house. 



Ladies' Waists 

500 Percale Waists sold at $1.00 /£ Qfk 
$1.25 go now at TE *?0 

Ladies' Cashmere and Flannel 
Waists regular price S2C3^fl ^Q 
cut to tp 1 1^ J 

Ladies' Knitted Woolen Skirts C%Qa 
worth $1.25 go now at v«7i/ 

ONE-QUARTER off on ail our Silks. 
Satetn and Mohair Skirts. 

$1.00 Skirts go at 75c« 

$1.50 Skirts go at Sl.lS. 

S2.00 Skirts go at Sl.aO. 

$3.00 Skirts go at $2.25. 

?5.oo Skirts go at gS.TS^ 



FursS Furs! 

Our entire slock will be slaughtered re- 
gardless of cost during this sale. Bor- 
row the money and buy your Furs now. 



Shoe Dept. 

A great offer=-30 per 
cent discount 

On our entire stock of fine Lidies', Chil- 
dren's and Misses' Shoes. 

500 Shoes go now at $3.50- 
300 Shoes go now at 82»10. 

200 Shoes go now at $l,.i-0. 
100 Shoes go now at TOc- 

Remember that our stock of shcci has 
no equal in Dululh and that prices will 
be less than manufacturer's cost. 



Blankets and 
Comforters. 

1-4 ofT 

From our low prices in this depaitmcnt. 



Gents' Underwear 

1-3 off 

On our entire line of Gents' Underwear. 



Ladies' 
Underwear 

1-4 off 

On cur entire stock of Ypsilanli and 
Lewis Knitted Underwear. 



Dress Trimming 

Half Frioe 

For all our fancy Dress Trimmings dur- 
ing this sale. 



Silks. 

Best quality colored Faille Fran- 
caise, never retailed at less QQa 
than §1.25; for this sale only. . 0«fl/ 

Si.oo quality colored^ Pengaline, I^Qn 
for this sale only D«9v 

50c quality colored Salines, for '^E^a 
this sale c:nly ^IjKt 

Si.oo India[Silks,all colors, for this ^Qa 
sale only £ 0\j 

50c China Silks, all colors, for QCm 
this sale only td^\j 

$1.50 fancy Silks, for this sale tf[ * A A 

$1.25 quality black dress Silks, QQ^^ 
for this sale «f G V 

S1.50 quality dress Silk, for this ^ | rt Q 
sale at ^iii^O 

$2 quality black dress Silk, ^ | MQ 
forthissale ^l,tO 

Cheney Bros, best quality print- 
ed Pongee Silks, choice styles *7Q.-i 
only i iJU 

Wool Dress Goods 

S1.50 quality Priestley's silk warp QQ^ 
Henrietta, for this sale at aOv 

$1.75 ['quality Priestley's silk 
warp Henrietta, for this (1* | « A 
sale only iPlal^ 

§2 25 quality Priestley's silk 
warp Henrietta, tor this ^fl Qty 
sale only $ 1 lO I 

12 pieces black Dress Goods, as- 
sorted weaves, regular price '^flA 
45c and 50c, for this sale only, u wU 

10 pieces black and white all 
wool Dress Goods, regular ^Aa 
price 95c, for this sale v «l V 

All our Priestley's black Dress Fabiics 
at greatly reduced prices. 

28 pieces imported Jaquards, 
Bengaiines, Whipcords, etc., 
regular price §1 and Si. 25, for ^70*^ 
this sale only fl Ov 

18 pieces imported fancy Dress 
Fabrics regular price Si. 50, go AO>a 
all at HOG 

Best quality 46-in German Hen- 
rietta, regular price Si, for this (^Qa 
sale only w «7V 

20 pieces all wool 38-in serge, 
regular price 50c, tor this Q'T!i|% 
sale only OCizXj 

6 pieces 54-in all wool Camel 

Hair Serge, $1.50 quality, for I7Qa 

this sale only f «f V 

12 pieces all wool Dress Suiting, 

regular price 62*4c, for this QQa 

sale only. OOU 

Drapery Dept. 

On our entire stock of Draperies. 

Carpets. 

Less than manufacturer's prices dur- 
ing this sale. 

Table Linens. 

?oc quality Table Linen goes QlTip 
60C quality Table Linen goes 6 C a 
75c quality Table Linen goes f|Qp 
Siooqijality Table Linen goes I7Qa 
Si. 25 quality Table Linen goes .it QAa 
Si. 50 quality Table Linen goes tf | | A 

Napkins, T.-ible Covers art! Bed Spreads 
at REDUCED PRICES. 



: I 



\ ' 




Prices Reduced in all Otiier Departments. 



This Sale Will 
be Strictly 
J for Cash 



And no Goods Will be 
Laid Aside for 
Anybody. 



215 West Superior St., 



I. FREIMUTH. 



■MtaKl' ^ ^ 











] 


















m .1 




























1 




' HISTOR 



(\<Hi. 



/ 



Fill out the Coupon in 
The Herald this evening 
and send it to this office. 



ELEVENTH YEAH 




DULUTH EVE NING HERALD. 

__- i s' ' 



Whoityourehoietfcr 
Mayor at tte coMiai oIm- 
ti«n T 



I ^SDAV, JAN U All V 'J, 1894. 



FIVE O'CLOCK EDITION 



THREE CENTS 



T*M MJir HHB K^* J2mL.J0m mmkJmML. sOtL-Wmk JBuk. JlSt JOUnUHQL^^B- J^k. 



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T\ 




Hi 

o 



For 
The-s 

Holi= 
days. 

We Will Sell 



Tu'ctity-livc Solid 
Oak Socrotarv Hook 

fur 



liko this cut 



$6.50 

Each, worth $13. 



TWENTY MORE. 

Same Style with bevelled plate mirror for 




IP 




Worth S13.50. 



TEN nORE 



Substantial Plain Book Cases, adjustable Shelves, for 




4-50, 



Worth $6,50. 

The above are from the BANKRUPT HUDSON FUR- 
NITURE COMPANY. No other firm in town has had 
g-oods from this company and we can prove it. 



Our Easy 
Payment Plan 



Commands the respect and atten- 
tion of ali. It enables people in 
every circunistance of life to com- 
pletely, comfoTtably furnish a home, 
and pay for the furnishings in 
small weekly or montly remittances 
wh;ch are no drain upon their 
finances, and leads to the posses- 
sion and enjoyment of comforcs 
they would not otherwise obtain. 



1^ 

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t 



L 



Fam, SOOARE ASD EQOITABLE. 



-— )-u — — — — q . g M a »M j| M j^ MM jr ywjt JMI Ml -^ y HpH^J^'i p'' 



Smith, 
Farwell & 
Steele Co., I 

COMPLETE HOOSE FORNISHERS, ^ 

222, 224, 226 and 228 West 
Superior Street, 

DULUTH, MINN. 



OFFICE SUPPLIES, 

BLANK BOOKS, 

LETTER FILES, 



WE HAVE VVKUYTHING AT PUICES TO 
sriT THE TiME^. 



New Year's Cards, 

See Our Display. 



Chamberlain & Taylor's Bookstore, 

323 West Supei'ior Street. 



Look Out for Auction Sale 
Early in January ! 



Parti 

•It verv earliest. 



having- 



g-oods to include in catalogue, send me word 



W. D. GORDON, Auctioneer, 

Office, 324 West Superior street, Duluth. 



MENDENHALL & HOOPES, /Employers Liability, 

District Manaoera, I ElcvatOr Accidcnt, 

miM liiaraiitee & Acciaeiit Co. workmen's collective, 

/Surety B-^nds, 

I Individual Accident 



{LIMITED), 
OF LONDON, ENG. 



Any Persons who buy an arti- 
cle in FURS before they visit our 
house must consider that they 
are cheating themselves. 

R. KROJANKER. 



EVERYTHINQ 
IN FURS. 




Holiday Gifts. 



GLOBE THEATER GOi 



One of the Handsomest Playhouses i n Boston 

Totally Destroyed By Fire This 

Morning. 



Two Adjoining Buildings, Owned By Man- 
ager Stetson, Also Burned and Total 
Loss Is $350,000. 



Hanlon Bros. Lost All Thefr "Superba" 

Scenery and Costumes The Theater 

to Be Rebuilt. 



Boston. J.in. 2. — Four alarms, the first 
one at 1:15 this mornin?:, were rung in 
rapid succession for a fire in the Globe 
theater on Washin;iton street. It was 
said to have started in the coal room on 
the north side in the basement. The 
roof of the theater fell in at i :45. The 
work of the lirenien was irupeded for a 
time by the trolly wires, which, however, 
were soon cut. Lines oi hose were car- 
ried over the roofs of the buildings which 
surrounded the theater and streams were 
poured down into the seething cauldron 
beneath, men with axes having already 
assaulted the doors guarding the Essex 
street and Hayward place entrances and 
as they were broken in the flames burst 
into their faces. From these openings 
the firemen directed streams into the 
furiously burning interior. 

By this iime the flames had eaten their 
way into the scenery room where were 
the tanks of compressed oxygen and 
hydrogen used by the HanJons m obtain- 
ing their calcium light effects, and when 
these exploded the fire spread into every 
liook ana cranny in the buildmg and be- 
fore 2 o'clock the roof of the main the- 
ater building fell with a cmsb. 

Shortly afterward the fire reached the 
j-story brick building on the Harrison 
avenue extension, in which are located 
the green room and the players' dressing 
rooms. In spite of the heroic efforts ol 
the firemen this building was also gutted, 
and costly wardrobes, properties and 
stage accessories were destroyed. 

Creepmg through an exit leading from 
the foyer of the theater to Hayward 
Place the flames soon reached the four- 
story brick structure. No. 17 Havward 
Place, formerly John Stetson's residence, 
on the upper floors ol which Hamilton 
Brock, the proprietor of the Globe cafe, 
in the adjoining building resided. On 
the street floor of this building was the 
entrance to the scenery room, and from 
this point the fire reached upward and 
consumed the entire interior of the 
structure. 

The cafe occupied the ground floor of 
the adjoimng building, No. 15 Hayward 
Pkce. The upper floors are the winter 
quarters of the Massachusetts Yacht 
club. Steward Willis and Caterer Roack 
were in the club parlor and they had no 
ticae to save either the club property or 
their own personal effects. This build- 
ing was also gutted. 

The fire was by this time rapidly 
reaching toward Washington street, on 
Hayward place, and it was then that it 
seemed impossible that the new build- 
ing of the Harvard trustees and the in- 
tervening buildings could escape. Be- 
fore it reached this point, however, it 
was successfully checked in the budding 
occupied by the yacht club, and by 4 
o'clock the fire was subjected and at 5 
o'clock totally extinguished. 

The two buildings on Hayward place, 
which were destroyed with the theater 
building, were owned by Manager and 
Proprietor John Stetson, of the Globe 
theater, and upon these he says there is 
no insurance. The theater is leased by 
Mr. Stetson and the bare property, in- 
cluding the land, is assessed at $160,000. 
The total loss is roughly estimated at 
$350,0000. It is estimated that the Han- 
lon Bros., who have had "Superba" on 
the Globe stage for the past v/eek, will 
lose ahout $25,000. 

The last theater fire in Boston was that 
which destroyed the Globe theater on 
May 30, 1873, and destroyed property 
valued at over $1,000,000. The theater 
was rebuilt the following year. This 
morning Mr. Stetson said he would re- 
build and he promises a theater in every 
way superior to that destroyed. 

The Hanlons were to have closed their 
engagement at the theater this week and 
"The Prodigal Daughter" was to have 
opened the coming week. Francis Wil- 
son in "P>minie" and Thomas Seabrooke 
in a new opera were also under engage- 
taAit to appear soon. In Mr. Stetson's 
safe in his private office ;,were contracts 
worth many thousands of dollars and 
also about $5000 in money. It is not 
known as yet whether these will be 
found intact. 



GREAT DAY FOR MANCHESTER. 



COSI^fESIdGTSUSU 



Black Bear and Seal Muffs, 
Ladles* and Gentlemen's Seal 

Caps, just the thing for this kind 
of weather. If we have not got 
what you want we will order itjfor 

you. We will furnish a seal Jacket or Cape at the wholesale 

price in New York, 

GATE Sc CLARKE, 

333 West Superior Street. 



Jumped Four Stories. 
New York, Jan. 2. — A disastrous fire 
occurred at 10:30 o'clock last night at 
548 West One Hundred and Twenty- 
Sixth street, by which a damage of $25,- 
000 was caused and the occupants ren- 
dered homeless. In addition to this a 4- 
vear-old child met its death and its 
mother, Mrs. Magnus Ahlberg, sustained 
internal injuries and may die. When 
the fire broke out Mrs. Ahlberg jumped 
from a 4-story window with the child in 
her arms. The fire started from a light- 
ed candle on the Christmas tree. 



Port of 



Opening of the Canal That Makes it a 
Entry. 

Manchestkk, Jan. 2. — The Manches- 
ter ship canal was opened to general 
trallk yesterday, .and Manchester there- 
by becomes a port of entry with all the 
benefits that accrue to such a port. The 
weather -vas fine, the sun shining 
brightly and, being a holiday, the banks 
were lined at many places by thousands 
of spectators anxious to witness the 
passages of ocean-going vessels to Man- 
chester. 

Fifty thousand tickets were issued, and 
these admitted the shareholders and 
iheir friends to points of vantage near 
Manchester. The procerision started at 
an early hour from Warrington on the 
Mersey, sixteen indes east of Liverpool. 
At the he.id of the procession was the 
steamer Norseman conveying the direc- 
tors. She was followed by other steam- 
ers i)caring the members of the corpor- 
ation of Manchester and Salford. A 
number of seagoing vessels decorated 
With flags and bunting joined these 
steamers at the Modewheel locks. 

The ceremony was performed with 
much eclat, and the procession was 
greeted with hearty cheers as it passed 
along in the direction of Manchester. 
Though yesterday sav/ the formal open- 
ing of the canal, it is hoped that the 
queen and prince of Wales will open it 
with elaborate ceremonies at Easter. It 
is estimated that the crowds collected 
along the banks of the canal numbered 
over 100,000 persons. 

There were twenty-five cargo laden 
vessels in the procession. Some of them 
were from the leading British ports, 
while others were from Mediterranean 
ports, Holland and Norway. The first 
cotton cargoes, consigned direct to Man- 
chester from the Southern states, are ex- 
pected to arrive on the steamers Ohio 
and Verango from New Orleans and the 
Glen Isle and Finsbury from Galveston. 



PERISHED IN A FIE 



This ConroQ counts for ono vote if sent 
to Tbo Horaid oWco provions to Jan. 4. 



My choice ^or Mayor 
at the ensuing spring 
election is 

Signature. 
January 2. 



IS CHARGED WITH MURDER. 



A Toledo Man Arrested For a Crime Done Nine 
Years Ago. 

Toledo, Jan. 2. — Nine years ago on 
Dec. 20, 1884, between the hours of 2 and 
4 o'clock in the afternoon, Mrs. Gotlieb 
Stahl, a wealthy and miserly old woman 
who kept a small saloon on Monroe 
street in this city, was murdered and 
robbed of $1100. Yesterday ,acdng on in- 
lormation received in a telegram from 
his divorced wife, George Kohler, a ped- 
dler and huckster living in this city, was 
arrested charged with the murder. 

A telegram from the wife contained a 
query as to the amount of reward ot- 
tered for the capture of the murderer. 
Chief Raitz replied that the offer 
of $3000, made eight years 

ago, still held good. The 

wife then wired to a confeder.ite in this 
citv whose name the police refuse to di- 
vulge, instructing him to give Kohler's 
name to the police. 

The latter did so and the man was ar- 
rested. He was overcome with fright 
but denied all knowledije of the case or 
having been connected with the killing 
of Mrs. Stahl. Last night the chief of 
police at Peru, Ind., was instructed to ar- 
rest the complaining witness, Mrs. 
Kohler, she having resided in that city 
for some time. She will be bi ought to 
Toledo and the truth of her story tested. 
The murder of Mrs. Stahl attracted a 
great deal of attention at the time it was 
committed. 



Two Lodecers in a Cheap Buffalo House 

Surned to Death and Others Badly 

Injured. 



The Building Was But a Rookery and Burned 

Like Tinder and Escape Was 

Difficult. 



Was a Regular Cubby Hole and the Inmates 

Were Caught Like Rats in a 

Trap. 



Buffalo, Jan. 2.— The cheap lodging 
house on Swan street between Main and 
Washington, kept by Lizzie Hackett,was 
destroyed by fire at 3 o'clock this morn- 
ing. Of the score or more of lodgers, 

two perished and all of the others were 
more or less seriously burned and in- 
jured. The dead are: Isaac Bradley, 
lodger; unknown woman, lodger, burned 
beyond recognition. 

. The injured: Mrs. Annie Hackett, 
proprietress, burned about head and 
arms; George Wright. bar tender, burned 
about bead, hands and arms; David E. 
Ward, negro cook, badly burned on 
head and hands; Louis Anderson, lodger, 
burned about head and legs; Charles 
Edwards, printer, left arm broken, body 
badly burned, jumped from the third 
story window and is prob- 
ably fatally injured; John 
Avery, of Palmyra, N. V,, legs bad- 
ly burned and bruised, also jumped from 
the third story window; George Fleming, 
arms and face burned; George Harring- 
ton, left shoulder dislocated, back 
burned; Edwin Cross, of California, 
very badly burned and in serious condi- 
tion; J. F. Russell, painter, Olcolt, N. 
Y,. burned about arms and body, seri- 
ously; William Sweeney, slightly tJurned 
about legs; Charles Van Ever (negro) 
private detective, left hand and leg 
burned. All the injured are at the hos- 
pital. 

The fire was discovered at 2:30 o'clock 
when flames were seen bursting from the 
windows. The firemen were speedily on 
hand but the building was a rookery and 
burned like tinder. Ladders were raised 
to the windows and the firemen bent all 
their efforts to saving the inmates. The 
second floor of the building was parti- 
tioned off into compartments, much in 
the same manner as horse stalls, and 
each stall held its quota of lodgers, 
packed in together like sardines, some 
said twenty, some said thirty in all. 
There was no register. 

Straw, shavings and other rubbish 
lormud the bidding and this furnished 
the necessary fuel with which the fire 
completed its deadly work. It was a 
regular cubby hole and the inmates were 
caught like rats in a trap. A number 
rushed down the stairway towards the 
rear, when warned by the smoke and 
heat, and were badly burned before 
being rescued by the firemen. 

Others were not so fortunate, or, per- 
haps, stupefied with drink, were paral- 
yzed with fear when confronted with 
their sudden danger and had to be car- 
ried out through the windows. The fire- 
men did heroic work, fearlessly entering 
the blazing rooms and rescuing those 
unable to move themselves. Four people 
were taken out in this condition, one of 
whom died before he reached the ground 
and the others seriously burned. 

When the flames had been fairly well 
subdued, a more thorough search was 
made through the stalls and the wom^m 
victim was found so badly burned that 
she cannot be identified. The loss on 
the building is about $10,000. 



SCANDAL AT GRAND RftPiDS. 



Fatally Scalded. 
New Orleans, Jan. 2.— At i o'clock 
yesterday while the tow boat Beaver, 
which had just come down from Pitts- 
burg with a tow of coal barges, was at 
Nine Mile Point just above the city her 
boiler exploded. Several men were 
engaged in cleaning out the main boiler 
at the time, Dan (iough, the fireman, 
was fatally scalded, and F. R. Saverain 
was slightly injured by the force of the 
concussion. The boat was only slightly 
injured. 

Killed by a Hog. 

Huntsville, Ala., Jan. 2.— James Dar- 
win, aged 12 years, was teasing a hog 
with a stick yesterday. The hog jumped 
on the boy, knocked him down and liter- 
ally ate his arm off, besides taking huge 
slices of flesh from his legs and breast. 
Rescuers finally came to Darwin's aid, 
but he died in a few minutes. 



TO BE NAMED TOMORROW. 

New Receivers of the Dulutli and St. Cloud 
Land Offices. 

Washington, Jan. 2.— [Special to The 
Herald.]— It is stated positively at the 
interior department today that Fred 
Ryan will be appointed receiver of the 
Duluth land oflire by the president to- 
morrow and C. F. Macdonald's nomina- 
tion as receiver of the St. Cloud land of- 
fice will also be sent to the senate. 

It cannot be definitely stated whether 
the United States marshal will be 
named tomorrow, but probably not. 



THREE MEN WERE KILLED. 



Premature Explosion of a Blast Caused Three 
Deaths at Boston. »ai 

Boston, Jan. 2. — Three men were 
killed and several injured by the prema- 
ture explosion of a blast at Townsend 
and Washington streets in the Roxbury 
district this morning. Those killed are: 
Thomas Hardeman, 50 years of age, fore- 
man of the gang of workmen and lived 
on Qunincy street; Thomas Black, 35, 
who lived on Dacia street; Patrick Case, 
38, who lived on Longwood avenue. 

The injured are: Cornelius Leary, 45 
years, living on Harrison avenue, prob- 
ably fatally hurt; Angus McDonald, 18, 
living at 3 Walnut court; James Gately, 
living at 19 Qumcy street. 

-» ■ - ■ 

Capt. Grummond Dead. 

Detroit, Jan. 2.-— Capt. Stephen B. 
Grummond, one of the principal vessel 
owners of this city, and one of the oldest 
and bett known vessel men on the great 
lakes, died at his residence here shortly 
before noon today, after an illness of 
several weeks, aged 59 years. Capt. 
Grummond was owner ol the Grummond 
line of tugs and the Grummond- Macki! 
nac line of passenger boats. He had 
served one term as mavor of Detroit, 
and at the time ot his death he was pres- 
. ident of the police commission. 



County Attorney Pratt and Mrs. Nisbett Furnish 
Material for Gossip. 

Grand Rapius, Minn., Jan, 2.— [Spe- 
cial to The Herald.]— The citizens of 
Grand Rapids are rolling a delicious 
morsel of scandal from their tongues at 
the present time. A regular Damon and 
Pythias friendship has existed for a year 
past between County Attorney Pratt and 
William Nisbett, the.jeweler. They were 
inseparable. Fishing and hunting trips 
were planned and carried out by the two. 
Social parties were gotten up by the 
pair, and in fact they were making life 
in the county seat extremely pleasant for 
each other and their associates. 

But the county attorney, who happens 
to be a divorced man, apparently tiad a 
deep design in all his movements. While 
he was making life pleasant for Mr, 
Nisbett he was making love to his best 
friend's wife. Christmas day the attor- 
ney was presented with a gold watch by 
bis altogether too confiding friend who 
the next day bad his suspicions aroused 
as to the relations between his wife and 
his friend. Wednesday he informed his 
wife he would start for the camps on a 
canvassing tour. He started but re- 
turned about ir o'clock the same night. 
He immediately went to his home and 
found his wife absent. The county at- 
torney has a house at the rear of the 
same lot. To this house the husband re- 
paired and demanded admittance. 

Mr. Pratt, who was within, asked for a 
few minutes time, which was answered 
by a few vigorous kicks which sent the 
door open. Then the husband's suspi- 
cions were confirmed. In his friend's 
bed was his faithless wife with just a 
little more clothing than Eve was sup- 
posed to have worn ere she went out of 
Eden to help her husband earn a living 
by the sweat of his face. A scene oc- 
curred, but no shooting. The husband 
left the guilty pair and proceeded to get 
on a glorious jag at the same time relat- 
ing the tale of marital intelitity to every 
barkeeper. It is expected that in the 
general cleaning up of soiled linen that 
will now follow, several others will be 
implicated. 

A Prisoner Escaped. 

JEFFERSONVILLE, Mo„ Jan. 2. — Joscph 

Rice, a convict, sent up from St. Louis 
for four years, yesterday scaled the peni- 
tentiary walls some time between 4 and 
6 o'clock and escaped. Rice was fire- 
man for the engine which runs the shops 
and was let into the engine room to get 
upjsieam, and during the abseii :e of the 
guard escaped. 



PANTON & WATSON 

GLASS BLOCK STORE, 

DULUTH, MINN. 



►♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



ALL COMBINED INTO ONE. 



41 GREAT SALES | 
^ ... ' A 



X 

♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



ALL COMBINED INTO ONE. 
■^ ■'F ^ ^ 




♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦» 



The entire month of January to be a busy one from beg-inning* 
to end at the Glass Block. The reasons why it shall be a busy one 
will be well demonstrated if you will read carefully our prices, then 
come and see the goods we are offering- for those prices. We take 
our annual inventor}^ January 31, hence the reason we beg-in the 
following- FOUR GREAT SALES. 

G reat Inventory Sale! 
Great Remnant Sale! 
^ Great Odd and End Sale! 

Great Clearance Sale! 



Everv^ department must be in tip top shape by Feb. 1st, when 
our buyers will begin to go to the market after spring goods. An- 
other important reason why we should take a big loss just now. The 
anticipated chang^e in the tariff may affect importers and commission 
houses to such an extent that g-oods will be cheap in New York, and 
houses who are prepared to pay cash for their purchases can have 
them at their own prices. 

During- the month of January the dry goods business is usually 
supposed to hibernate — g"o into its hole, as it were, and pull its hole 
in after it. NOT SO WITH US. We not only propose to stay out 
ourselves, but to offer such inducements on our goods as to bring 
YOU out also. We will retail stuff during- this sale — not at whole- 
sale prices — but at less than wholesale, or manufacturer's cost. You 
who know us know that we make no promises promiscuously with- 
out producing- the proof. 

CALAIVIITY HOWLERS, HIGH-PRICED GROWLERS and 
BACK NUMBERS must take a rest. The prices we quote "say" 
the trade of both Duluth and Superior is ours for the month of 
January. 

READ THESE BARGAINS CAREFULLY: 



Cloak Dept. 

The Entire Stock at Just 

Half Price. 

Some may say how can we sell at half 
price. Nevertheless we do and have 
done a great deal of it this year. 

FOR SIX YEARS 

We have made money. The seventh 
year has been a disastrous one to nearly 
everybody. We can a£ford to take a loss 

AND A BIG ONE 

If we have to, but our stock must be in 
shape for our eighth year's business. 
The live merchant says there is only one 
way to do business, that is, always be 
prepared for a rise and fall in the mar- 
ket. This is how we do it: 

Ladies' Jackets. 

$5.00 Jackets reduced to 82*50 

$6.00 Jackets reduced to $3*00 

$9.00 Jackets reduced to S4.50 

$10.00 Jackets reduced to $5.00 

S12.00 Jackets reduced to S6.00 

$15.00 Jackets reduced to S7.50 

S20.00 Jackets reduced to S 10*00 

$25,00 Jackets reduced to $12*50 

$35.00 Jackets reduced to 817*50 

Made of Cheviots, Claw, Beavers, 
Kersey's and Chinchillas, made in first- 
class shape, good styles and this sea- 
sons. 



Astrakhan 
Sacques. 

S50 32-inch now 825*00 
$60 34-inch now 830*00. 
$200 Persian Lamb Sacques 8100*00 
$275,00 Real Mink Sacques. . -8137*50 
Can you a£ford to miss an opportunity 
of this kind. Buy now for next winter if 
you have to borrow the money. 



Underwear Dep't. 

What a chance you will have to buy 
warm Underclothing at this Odd and End 
Sale. We have lots of broken lots that 
must be closed out, some of them in very 
fine and expensive goods. 

Low prices will sell them, 
and sell them quick. Chil- 
dren's tirst. 

CHILDEE&'S WHITE MEEIXO, 



Children's 
Gretchens. 

$5,00 Gretchens reduced to $2*50 

$7,50 Gretchens reduced to $3*75 

$9.00 Gretchens reduced to 84*50 

$12.00 Gretchens reduced to 86*00 

Ladies' 
Wrappers. 

At Exactly Half Price. 

Fur Dep^ 

All our Capes and Jackets at 

Exactly Half Price. 

$14.50 
$12.50 
$25.00 
$40.00 
$15.00 
$30.00 
$32.50 
$5.00 
$12.50 
$18.00 



S28.00 Baltic Seal Capes 

for 

J25.00 Baltic Seal Capes 

for 

S50.00 Baldc Seal Capes 

for 

$80.00 Baltic Seal Capes 

for 

$30.00 Brown Martin Capes 

for 

$60.00 Brown Martin Capes 

for 

$65 00 Brown Martin Capes 

tor 

$10.00 French Coney Capes 

for 

$25.00 French Coney Capes 

tor 

$36.00 French Coney Capes 

for 



Lot I. only 15c for your pick. 
Lot 2, only 20c ^o*" yo"' pick. 
Lot 3, only 25c ^o'' your pick. 
Lot 4, Ladies' and Boy's Under- 
wear, natural wool, only 

Lot 5. This is a lot of children's 
fine heavy ribbed Underwear 
in nearly all &izes, worth from 
$1 to S1.39; all go at 

Lot 6. Ladies' camel's bair 
and natural wool Shirts, we 
have no pants 

Lot 7. Ladies' French neck 
white Merino Underwear 
worth 75c; sale price 



50c 



75c 

Each. 



59c 

fOTth %. 

39c 

Each 



Lot 8. Children's combination 
Underwear in white and nat- 
ural, nearly all sizes, worth 
from $1.35 up to $2.50; your 

pick for 

Per Suit 

Lot 9. Children's Equestrian 
Tights, Black Phyllas, make 
the finest in America, worth 
$1.50 to $2.00, according to 
size; all sizes go at 

Ladies' knit Skirts, we have too * 
many of them and will offer 25 
dozen knit Skirts, formerly sold 17 R A 

Baoh 



$1.19 



$1.25 



for 95c and $1.25, at. 



Hosiery Dep't. 

One price takes them all in every 
odd pair or odd box of pairs 
for ladies and children will be 
put in this lot and the price | tkg^ 
will be 1 «f v 

For your Pick 



Kid Gloves. 

We have about 25 dozen pairs ot 
Kid Gloves in all colors and 
nearly all sizes. We want to 
close out; the price is 



49c 

Per Pair 



Sale Begins Tuesday, Jan. 2d, 1894, 

And continues until all our surplus stock is closed out. Be on hand 
early Tuesday morning. Positively nothing- reserved. 



i 



i 



\ 



' 



i 



w 











[} 




THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAT.^ JANUARY 2, 1894. 






further Details of the Proposed Canal to Be 

Cut Between Lake St. Clair 

and Erie. 



It Would Shorten the Trip From Duluth to 

the East B> Over Fifty 

Miles. 



The Canal Will Also Offer Relief From 
Dangerous Navigation of the 
Detroit River. 



the 



The Herald recently contained a short 
account of the plans of a company or- 
ganized by Duluth and other parties, 
with C. A. Towne. of this city, as presi- 
dent, to construct a ship canal between 
Lakes St. Clair and Erie, thus shorten- 
injf the trip from Duluth to the East by 
over titty miles. The idea is by no 
means a new one. It has been pro- 
posed at different times but not seriously 
until recently, but now there seems to 
he no doubt of the speedy accomplish- 
ment of the work. 

In order to understand just what this 
new canal is to achieve, and what it 
means to the Northwest, the geography 
ot the Detroit river should be looked op, 
says the Minneapolis Journal. By a 
glance at a map it will be readily seen 
that a vessel after leaving Port Huron 
must turn to the southwest and go a long 
distance out of its way before heading 
directly towards Bufifalo. Port Huron is 
about igo miles from Buffalo in an air 
line; by the river and lake route it is 
nearly twice as far. It would be unpos- 
sible, of course, for any artificial water 
way to follow the air line, or anything 
near it, but it has been demonstrated that 
it is quite feasible to materially reduce 
the length of the present route by cutting 
a canal from the southe:istern corner of 
Lake St. Clair through a strip of low 
ground which occupies the narrowest 
part of the isthmus. In fact, the geologi- 
cal and physical conditions suggest that 
waters of the two lakes were once con- 
nected at this point. 

Much of the distance is occupied by 
swamps and the deepest cut wijl not be 
more than thirty-two feet to the water 
level. At the southern end of the canal 
is a natural harbor at the village of Twin 
Creeks, which is almost exactly opposite 
Cleveland. Instead of following the tor- 
tuous course of the Detroit river, vessels 
will turn southeastwardly in Lake St. 
Clair and make almost a bee line towards 
Cleveland, This means a saving of 
from six to twelve hours, and the gain of 
at least one round trip for every steamer 
on the lakes each season. Just what the 
saving in freightage would be cannot be 
determined, out the saving of perhaps 
half a day's time and a run of fifty-six 
miles should effect a reduction of fair 
proportions. If it were only 5 cents per 
ton It would mean a saving of §1,300,000 
on the freight which passed through the 
Detroit river last year. 

Besides thefdirect saving of distance.the 
canal will offer relief from the danger- 
ous navigation of the Detroit river. The 
reefs at the Lime Kiln crossing below 
Detroit are a constant menace to vessels. 
The channel at this point is crooked and 
so shallow as to prohibit the passage of 
fully laden vessels. The improvement 
of this obstruction is a part of the pro- 
posed work of the United States govern- 
ment in opening the "20-foot channel 
from Duluth to Buffalo," but the work is 
by no means done as yet, and its success- 
ful completion will involve more drastic 
measures than have yet been undertaken. 
It is now said that the engineers have de- 
cided that the only way in which to ef- 
fectually remove the difficulty is to tun- 
nel under the reefs and blow them up 
with dynamite, after the manner of the 
destruction of the "Hell Gate" reefs in 
the East river, near New York. 

It is expected that work upon the canal 
will be commenced ea-ly next spring and 
pushed to completion in less than two 
years; this, notwithstanding the fact that 
the canal company has not yet secured a 
charter from the Dominion government. 
There is no doubt, however, that the 
Canadian parliament will grant the char- 
ter. The gentlemen interested in the 
project, including Minneapolis, Duluth, 
Chicago, New York, Canadian and Eng- 



America's Great Danger 



AH EMGUSH COHMEMTARf. 



Said an eminent English scientist recently : 
" The danger that confronts the great Ameri- 
can people to-day ia not the possible adop- 
tion of a wrong financial policy for the 
nation, or the spread of socialism, or the 
increase of corruption among public men. 
All these are bad enough, to he sure, but 
they are as nothing compared to the terrible 
naiional disease — I had almost said national 
crime— of overwork. The mad rush fur 
wealth is set at a killing pace, and thousands 
.'ill by the way every year. 

YoM are likely to be one of the victims I 

How do we know? Because it is the excep- 
.{on to find a man or woman of adult age in 
perfect health. Nervous Disorders ar« 
spreadicg with fearful rapidity. Among the 
symptoms, are — Backache, Biliousness, Cold 
Hands and Feet, Dizziness, Hot Flashes, 
Fluttering Sensation, Fainting, Headache, 
Hysteria, Irritability of the Heart, Melan- 
choly, Failing Memory, Palpitation, Bheu- 
raatism, Short Breath, Sleeplessness, Ner- 
vous Dyspepsia, Sexual Debility, Fits, etc. 

Key. C. a. Cabroll, pastor First Baptist 
Oliureh, Yellow Springs, (>., writes as follows: 
" 1 have used Dr. Miles' Restorative Nervine 
for the past six months. I find it acts like 
•\ charm on the whole nervous system. I 
have not found its equal in giving immediate 
relief. Dr. Miles' little Nerve and Liver 
Pills only need s trial and they will recom- 
mend themselves to be the beat pills in the 
market.'' 

" For five years I have suffered from Ner- 
vous Prostration, I was unable to work or 
Nleep. The first dose of Dr. Miles' Reatora- 
tive Nervine gave me relief, and one thou- 
sriiid doiJnrs would not cover tlie good it has 
done me."— JOHN iUNCUEJi, Youuga- 
town, Ohio. 

Dr. Miles' Restorative Nervine is un- 
equalled ia cinuKO Nervoiis Diseases. It 
contains no opiates or dangerous drugs. Sold 
on a positive guarantee by all druggigta^ or 
Dr. Miles M«dical Co-> £lkhart, Ind. 

FOB SAX^ BY ALL DBUQQISTB^ 



, \ 



Itsh capitalists, have secured the ap- 
proval of the parliament committee on 
raiU.iys and canals as well as the sup- 
port of the members from Western On- 
tario. But even had this not been done, 
there would have been no question of the 
outcome. 

Canada's canal policy has developed 
so strikingly within a few years, that 
there could be not the least question 
that the government would jump at the 
chance to secure a valuable pait of the 
lake waterway through its own territory 
and at the same time insure the expendi- 
ture of §3,000.000 or $i,ooo,oto on Cana- 
dian stiili The proposed charier has al- 
ready been drafted and will be finally 
approved by a committee which will 
meet in Buffalo on Jan. 3. The bill will 
be introduced later in the month and will 
be acted upon in February. 

That the canal company has extensive 
views of the possibility of its enterprise is 
indicated by the tollowmg advertisement 
of intentions which has appeared in Can- 
adian papers, as required by law, in that 
country: 

Notice is hereby given that application 
will be made to the parliament of Can- 
ada, at its next session, for an act to in- 
corporate a company to construct, main- 
tain and operate a canal or ship canal 
for navigation from some point on Lake 
St. Clair, in the township of West Til- 
bury, in the county of Essex, or in the 
township of East Tilbury or West Dover, 
in the county of Kent, to some point on 
Lake Erie between Point Pelee and Ron- 
deau harbor; to construct and oper- 
ate all works and struc- 
tures necessary or proper in 
connection therewith; to build, acquire, 
equip, maintain and operate for hire, 
and dispose of lands, terminals, water- 
lots, harbors, wharves, docks, dry docks, 
building and repairing yards, piers, 
breakwaters and other structures, locks 
and all works incidental thereto; to con- 
struct works for and to produce hydrau- 
lic, electric, steam and other power, and 
to furnish power, light or heat for the 
same, and to propel vessels in said canal 
by cable or other power, and to lease or 
otherwise dispose ot said works or power; 
to construct, maintain and operate a sin- 
gle or double line of steam or electric 
railway along or near the sides of said 
canal, and to construct, riaintain and 
operate branch lines thereot connecting 
all or any of the towns and villages in 
the said counties of Essex and Kent 
with the said canal; to construct, main- 
tain and operate telegraph and tele- 
phone lines and electric lines and elec- 
tric lines or wires lor the purpose of 
conveying or transmitting light, power 
or heat along the said canal, and from 
and between the towns along the route, 
etc. 

The projectors have further shown 
their faith in the undertaking by organ- 
izing two construction companies and 
several supplementary corporations for 
the operation of the industries which are 
expected to spring up in connection with 
the canal. The plans of construction 
must necessarily be made in advance. 
D. Farrard Henry, of Detroit, is chief 
engineer, and he has determined to use 
the most modern means of construction, 
and he believes that with the latest style 
of equipment the cost of excavation will 
not be more than 10, cents a cubic yard. 
It has already been said that much of 
the route of the canal is through swamp 
land. The disUnce from lake to lake is 
fourteen miles by the route selected. A 
route of twelve and a half 
miles was first surveyed as the very 
shortest possible, but it was de- 
cided that the longer route would be 
preferable as requiring less excavation, 
and as having the advantage of a natural 
h.irbor on the Lake Erie end. This har- 
bor of Twin Creeks is not silted up at 
the mouth, but is from twenty to fifty 
feet deep inside the bar. A few hundred 
feet outside the bar there are fifty feeUof 
water. A little ...dredging and a short 
pier will secure one of the best harbors 
on the lakes. 

At the St. Clair end, several miles of 
dredging must be done to secure a 20- 
foot channel, but the natural depth aver- 
ages better than over the route across 
the lake from the head of the Detroit 
river. 

The canal itself is to have a depth of 
21 feet and will be 115 feet wide at the 
bottom and 200 feet at the surface of the 
water. Above the water the banks will 
rise more abruptly, the engineers rely- 
ing upon the stiff clay soil to retain its 
position in spite of the wash ot the 
vessels. With the width and depth 
mentioned, the largest lake vessels can 
pass each other at any part of the canal 
almost at full speed. 

Steam shovels will be used in excavat- 
ion, and temporary railroads equipped 
with locomotives and dump cars will re- 
move the earth. It is expected that on 
this plan of construction the canal will 
be completed and opened for traffic in 
the fall of 1895. There seems no reason 
why this should not be done. No engi- 
neering difficulties suggest themselves, 
and little, if any, masonry is to be put in 
place. However there are six bridges to 
be built Four of these are railroad 
bridges and two are for highways. It is 
estimated that the cost of the construc- 
tion of the canal will be about as follows; 

Excavation ^•*S'95^ 

BridRee 240,000 

Other work .- 160.000 



IS LOCATED AT LAST. 



John W. Hillmon, WI10 Was Supposed to Be 

Murdered in Kansas, Found By 

a Detective. 



His Alleged Killing Was Part of a Scheme to 

Defraud Two Life Insurance 

Companies. 



Suit Against the Companies Has Been Tried 

Three Times— Hillmon Will Return 

and Confess. 



ODR POETS. 



Powerful Words and 
Thoughts. 



Noble 



How Closely Tbey Are Related to Oar 
Daily Lives. 



What One of Onr Foremost Ladies 
Tbinks About It. 



Chicago, Jan. 2.— The Tribune this 
morning publishes a dispatch from 
Paris, Idaho, in which is contained the 
intelligence that a detective reports 
from that place that he has located John 
VV. Hillmon, who, it is alleged, murdered 
a man and caused his body to be buried 
as that of himself for the purpose of de- 
frauding a New York life insurance com- 
pany. The suit to recover the money, 
which the insurance company refused to 
pay, owing to suspicion regardi ng the 
death, was instituted by his wife, and 
has had three trials, without result. 

It is states that Hillmon will return to 
Topeka, Kan., where the fourth trial is 
about to take place and end the matter 
by confessing. The dispatch says: 
About nine years ago John W. Hillmon, 
of Lawrence, Kan., who claimed to be a 
cattle man, but who was not worth S500 
and never had been, took out two poli- 
cies of insurance for $25,000 each, one in 
the New York Life and one in the Con- 
necticut Mutual. The first premium was 
paid in Lawrence, Kan., with money bor- 
rowed from a relative of his wife. 

Hillmon then started by wagon for the 
Indian territory, having for companions 
two men by name Henderson and Wal- 
ters. A few days later the party camped 
near Medicine Lodge and here, it is as- 
serted, Hillmon killed Walters and under 
penalty of death compelled Henderson 
to return to Medicine Lodge and report 
that he (Hillmon) had shot himself and 
wanted assistance. According to the 
story, which, it is said, was told in a Mis- 
souri prison by Henderson, the dead 
body of the man was found by the party 
of rescuers from Medicine Lodge and 
taken to the Lodge. Mrs. Hillmon was 
notified, but did not come to Medicine 
Lodge and the body, after an inquest. 
was buried as that of Hillmon. 

The insurance companies, having 
reason to believe there had been con- 
spiracy and a murder, refused to pay the 
policies. The result was a suit to re- 
cover in the United States court at 
Leavenworth. The trial lasted a month 
and resulted in a hung jury. During 
that trial the confession obtained by 
Senator Buchan from Henderson, while 
the latter was in a Missouri jail, was 
offered as evidence, but was ruled out 
because it was shown that it had been 
obtained under threats, and that Hender- 
son had afterward denied all knowledge 
of the supposed murder. Before the 
trial the body was exhumed and the re- 
semblance to Hillmon was so marked 
that the body was recognized by some, 
but |the identification was denied by 
others who had know n him for years. 
The widow accepted toe body as that of 
her husband, and she afterward married 
a man named Cook. 

The second and third trials were held 
in Topeka, one resulting in a verdict for 
the plaintiffs, and the other, a new trial 
having been ordered by the supreme 
court one error, resulting in a second 
hung jury. The case will now be tried 
for the fourth and, as many believe, the 
last time. After the third trial Hillmon 
was declared to be alive and Detective 
John Sawhan started on a hunt for him. 

Hillmon was finally located in a litt le 
mining cabin about a mile from this 
place. He is now 70 years of age and 
says he will return and end bis long 
tramp by giving himself up and confess- 
ing in open court. His story of the mur- 
der of Walters confirmed in every par- 
ticular the alleged confession of Hender- 
son, thus stamping it as 



Henry W. Longfellow has said in one 
of his most popular poems that "All 
things come round to him who will but 
wait." 

How true it certainly is that if we have 
but the patience to wait and struggle for 
that which we so much desire, the prize 
will surely be ours. It is not enough, 
however, to sit quietly down and remain 
inert, but if we would accomplish great 
results we must possess untiring perse- 
verance. 

At least one person appreciates the 
full significance of the great man's 
words. Miss S. Cohen of '554 South 
Sixth street, Camden, N. J., has for 
months been waiting, longing and striv- 
ing to regain that health without which 
life is at best but a dreary existence. 

She has been constantly treating with 
different remedies and physicians but 
never once lost courage, for she had 
made up her mind that there was a 
remedy which would cure her and was 
determined to find it. She succeeded so 
well and is so filled with gratitude and 
thankfulness that she wishes the whole 
world could know of her wonderful cure. 

The following is a letter written by 
her for the pubhc benefit: 

"I suffered for over a year with severe 
pains in my head and could not keep 



6REATSLAD6HTERSALE 



and 

As 



Bargains in Everything. 

For thirty days, our entire stock, Dry Goods, Shoes and Groceries, must 
will be Sacrificed. Thousands of dollars worth will be sold for less than half, 
space will not permit, we will only name a few articles in Groceries 

GROCERIES! QROCERIESI GROCERIES I 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL. 

21 lbs Granulated Sugar for $1.00, 32 lbs Rolled Oats $1,00, 32 bars best Soap 
$1,00, 25 lbs good Rice $1.00, 20 lbs choice Rice ?i.oc, 20 lbs choice Raisins $1.00, 
20 lbs Currants $1.00, 10 lbs choice California Peaches $1.00, 10 lbs choice Evapor- 
ated Blackberries Si.oo; 20 lbs choice Crackers $100, 8 lbs good Coffee $1.00, 5 
lbs choice Burnt Coffee Si.oo, 5 lbs good Java and Mocha Si. 00, 3 lbs choice Java 
$1.00, 5 lbs good Tea $1.00, 3 lbs choice Tea $1 00. Choice Hams 9c per lb. Best 
Hams 10c per lb. Molasses and Syrup from 25c to 50c per gal, good \'inegar 20c 
per gal, choice Apples $4.40 per barrel, choice Burbank Potatoes 55c. ioo<j bar- 
rels of our best Patent Flour at $1.70 per sack. 100 lbs choice Lard at 7,'^c per lb. 
Our best Lard loc. An endless line of canned goods, choice corn and tomatoes, 
peas and beans at loc per cAn. Large line of California Fiuits 15c a can, former 
price 20c. Dairy Butter 25c. Best Creamery Butter 30c. Choice Butterine i6c. 

Wholesale and Retail Department House. 

In our Wholesale Department prompt shipments will be made 
to all points in the Northwest. 

Prompt delivery in our Retail Department to all parts of the 
city and suburbs. 

203=205 East Superior St., Temple Opera, 

Telephone No. 509- J. '^/TTLSS^'ETT 



The 
the 



Best Shoeg 
.8t Money 



for 




$3 SHOE 



Phis IS THE 



4U 



L. DOUGLAS 

GENUINE 
WELT. 

Sciiitaklcss, nollom Waterproof. Best Shoe sold at the price. 

$6, $4 and 83.50 Dress Shoe. 

^ Ki|i.ul cubioin work, costing Iroiii j>6 to 1^. 

,$3.50 Police Shoe, 3 Soles. 

J Jest Walking bhoe ever inaiic. 

$2.60, and S2 Shoes, 

Unequalled at the price. 

Boys $2 & $1.76 School Shoes 

Are the West lor Service. 

LADIES' 
$3, $2.60 $2, $1.76 

iest Uongola, Stylish, Perfect 

FittiufCHiid Seivlc«able.lJe6t 

in the world. All Jityles. 

Insiitt upon having W. L.. 

Douglas Khoee. >an)o 

and price Btauipod on 

M. -^^>.^ bottom. Brockton 



IN 



sr)^|^/!^^ 



For sale by SUFFEI. & CO. 



true. 






Total $3,200,000 

An issue of $4,000,000 worth of bonds 
is to be made as soon as the granting of 
the charter is provided, and it is under- 
stood that the placing of these securities 
is virtually effected. At a recent meet- 
ing in Detroit, the representatives of the 
interested parties from New York and 
Washington are said to h^ve settled the 
money question. 

Indeed it would seem to be a rather 
enticing investment if the Canadian gov- 
ernment settles the rate of tolls for the 
canal at 3 cents per registered ton as is 
now probable. Fhe expense of opera- 
tion and maintenance will be light, and 
if only half the lake traffic would take 
advantage of the canal, a handsome 
revenue would be afforded on a 54,000,- 
000 capitalization. 

Fatal Explosion. 

Little Rock, Ark., Jan. 2.— At 5:30 
o'clock yesterday morning a boiler ot a 
locomotive exploded at Higgins, a small 
station on the Iron Mountain near Lan- 
sett, White county, instantly killing 
Brakeman David Foss who lived in this 
city. He was special conductor in 
charge of the train. Trainman Dooliss, 
also a resident of this city, was fatally 
inju.ed. W. J. Matthews, the engineer, 
who resides at Baring Cross, received 
painful, though not necessarily fatal in- 
juries. ______^_^ 

Every One Mail Them. 

No one should fail to mail one or more 
copies of The Herald's Christmas num- 
ber to disUnt friends. 

.^ 

Sixty cents a month will have The 
Herald delivered every night at your 
home. 




Both the method and results ^hen 
Byrup of Figs is taken; it ia pleasant 
and refreshing to the taste, and acts 
gently yet promptly on the Kidneys, 
Ldver and Bowels, cleanses the sys- 
tem efiectnally, dispels colds, head- 
aches and fevers and cures habitual 
constipation. S^wp 0/ Figs is the 
only remedy of its kind ever pro- 
duced, pleasing to the taste and ac- 
ceptable to the stomach, prompt in 
its action and truly beneficial m its 
effects, prepared only from the most 
healthy and agreeaUe substances, its 
many excellent qualities commend it 
to all and have made it the most 
popular remedy known. 

Syrup of Fim is for sale in 60c 
and $1 bottles b^ all leading drug- 
gists. Any reliable druggist who 
may not have it on hand vrill pro- 
cure it promptly for any one who 
wishes to try It. Do not accept any 
substitute. 

CAUFOBNIA FIG SYRUP CO. 

SAN FflA.KlSCO, CAL. 
lOWSVIUi. KY. tt£W YORK. N.f. 

PILES! PIL£SI 

Dr. Williams' ladian Pil» Ointmsut will care 
Blind, BloediiM Itohiotf «nd Ulcerated Piloaof 
ten years atiiBdiiMr. It abaorlM the t2inocs.«r 
laya the Itching at once, Mte ■; • pooltioe.jritee 
inatw>tt«U«f. Dr. WilttMie' ladUn PUe OlBtj 
meot U prepared oolr for Pile* and lt«>ln< ^ 



>ii.S!i s. roHKX. 

anything on my stomach. I w.-;s so 
nervous and weak that I could not hold 
a glass in my hand, and the doctors pro- 
nounced it nervous prostration. I 
changed doctors and found no relief. 
My friends advised me to try Dr. Greene's 
Nervura blood and nerve remedy, and 
after using four bottles I experienced a 
great change. I am now entirely cured 
and am anxious to recommend this valu- 
able medicine to everyone suffering from 
similar complaints. 1 hope it will do as 
much good to others as it has to me." 

What more beautiful interpretation of 
our beloved poet's remark, than to be 
suddenly restored, after long suffering 
from pain, to a life of happiness and 
usefulness. 

Have not all cause to thank Dr. 
Greene, who gave to the world this foun- 
tain of hope and health I 

Why indeed should we suffer with 
such a remedy at our command ! 

If you are sick with any form of nerv- 
ous or blood disease, indigestion, dys- 
pepsia, kidney or liver complaint, take 
this giver of health. Dr. Greene's Nervura 
blood and nerve remedy. Take it when 
the first symptoms appear. If the dis- 
ease is advanced delay no longer. It is 
purely vegetable and harmless. It is 
not a patent medicine, but one which the 
doctor has employed in his practice for 
years, 

Dr, Greene, of 35 West Fourteenth 
street, New York, is one of our most 
eminent physicians in the treatment of 
all nervous and chronic diseases. He is 
pleased to talk with any who wish to 
coi-sult him. 

If you live out of the city and cannot 
call, write him a description of your 
complaint and he will return an answer 
free of charge, advising you just what to 
do to get well. 

— > ' ■ ■ — 

Hood's sarsaparilla, the king of medi- 
cines, conquers scrofula, catarrh, rheu- 
matism and all other blood diseases. 
Hood's and only Hood's. 22 

Notice! 

The regular annual meeting of share 
holders ol the National Bank of Com- 
merce, of Duluth, for the election of di- 
rectors and the transaction of such other 
business as may properly come before 
the meeting, will be held at the bank 
Tuesday, Jan. gth, 1894. between the 
hoars of 10 and 12 o'clock a. m. 

E. W. Matter, 
Cashier. 

■ «- ■» -^ ~ 

Notice. 
The regular annual meeting of the 
shareholders of the American Exchange 
bank, of Duluth. Minn, will be held at 
their banking rooms In the Exchange 
building, Wednesday evening, Jan. 10, 
1894, at 7 o'clock p. m. for the election of 
directors and officers and such other 
business as may properly come before 
the meeting. James C 




Hunter, 
•Cashier. 



Duluth, Dec. 20, 1893. 



Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 

Have You Any Work? 
Are there any families in Duluth who 
would like a man to do odd work around 
the house, such as taking care of the 
fire«, carpenter work, etc., by the week or 
month? If so. the Associated Charities 
would h'Z gl.id to supplv their need. 
There are several men who have been 
ill, and are out of wrrk. who would be 
greatly helped in this way. Please send 
word to 415 Woodbridgc building. 

Gus Swendson, 106 First street, carries 
a complete slock of fresh roasted coff-^, 
roasted every day at th:; Eajflte Cbffje 
and Spice mills. 



The 

Coming 

Contest 



In the spring election for mayor will be the most 
animated that has ever taken place in Duluth. 
In order to simplify matters and arrive at the real 
sentiment of the people as to who is their popular 
choice for mayor, The Herald hereby inaugurates 
a voting contest, by printing in each issue of The 
Evening Herald a coupon which every person in 
Duluth is requested to cut out and vote as often 
as they please and mail or bring it in person to 
The Herald office. The popular contestant who 
receives the largest number of votes will on Jan- 
uary lolh, the day of the close of the contest 
receive his choice of the $125.00 Haviland China 
Dinner Set now on exhibition in Panton & Wat- 
soti's window, or a $100.00 Easy Chair. The for- 
mer valuable prize will also interest the ladies ot 
Duluth to take a part themselves in this enter- 
prise of determining who is the popular choice 
for Duluth's executive head. All you have to do 
is cut out the coupon '^ich appears on the first 
page of The Herald ton ^'ht and write on it your 
choice for mayor; every vote cast in De- 
cember counts three votes and each vote cast the 
first ten days in January will count one vote each. 
The China Dinner Set or the Easy Chair will be 
delivered to the fortunate winner on the morning 
of January nth, and he may also be successful 
nominee of the citizens* convention which will be 
held a few days later. Send in your votes. The 
outcome of this contest will be watched with a 
great deal of interest and the standing of the 
different candidates announced from time to time. 




Or. E. C. WMt't Nerv* aM Brala TreatmMl 
ia sold uoder poflittre written cnaraDtea, by antbor* 
icad aeeuts only, to cure Weak Memorr; Lom ol 
Brain and Nerve Power; Loet MaaboodtQui rka ee t ; 
Night Loeaee; Eril Dreams: Lack of Ooafideaoe; 
Kervoaan«M; Laaiitade; aU vntaw; homat Power 
yt the Generative Organa la either aez« eanaed by 
over-ezurtinn; YoaUifal Erron, or ITTrnetlTrt Use ot 
Tubiicoo, Opium or Uqnor, wlxlcti aoon lead to 
MlHor/ ConsamptloD, Insanltyaad Death. By mail, 
«1 a box; 6 tor fS; with written snarante* to core or 
refund nuinev. 

WltSTo 1.1 VKK PILL8 enm eick headache, 
billiuu8Dr>HH. lupr eomplamt, eonr stomaeh, dy»- 
Iiep«ia anil nout^tipation. 8. F. Uoiee Dmnlat, 
:f£, Went tiuperior streat. Dolatb. Minn. 

DULUTH INVENTORS, 

We are informed by 
MERSRR. MASON. FENWICK & LAWBEHCE. 

PATENT LAWYERS AND 80LICITOB8. 
Of 104 Palladio bnilding, Dalntfa. and of Waab- 
iugton D. C. that the following Dnlath inveit- 
toTB have recently been (TraDtedTpateiita by tiw 
United Btatee Patent office : 

Edward E. Fibwerald, Blvert B. Nilaon, Peter 
J. Caeaar, John ETBnnis, Alexander MoBoofall, 
Rdward C. Knde and John Opdaln. 

Ttie Celelirated French Gyrs, 

" APHRODITINE " 



Members of the Dnlntb Gtearing House Association. 

CAPITAL. aURPLDS 

First National Bank $1,000,000 «200,000 

American Exchange Bank 600.000 360,000 

Marine National Bank 250.000 20.000 

National Bank of Commerce 200.000 21.000 

etate Bank of Duluth — 100,000 40,000 

StKJurity Bank Of Duluth— - 100,000 40.00C 

ron Exchange Bank. — 100.000 



Warranted 
to cure 



or moDej 
refunded. 




GEfDRE 




I8 Sold cm a 

POSITIVE 

GUARANTEE 

to cure aay form of 

ncrvoufl dlseaM or 

anydisonierof the 

general] ve organa 

of either aex,^ 

whether arlBlnpJ 

froiu iheeic«'«6lve> - 

useof BtimnlantR, AFTuR 
r.ob«iCCi>orOpium, or through youthful indiscre- 
tion Of 0- iuQul^cDCC, <SI.'e.,cuch as !>«« of Bmin 
Power, WaitefulncBS, IJearinp: down Paini in the 
)iK''t, Sf minal Wf-akncsB, Hysteria, Nervous I^ds- 
rari.iU, Noitiirnal Emigsiong, Leiicorrhoea, Dl»- 
«lne s, Wc'fik Memor)', Loss of Power and Impo- 
'"n V, which If rcK)ecte<l often lead to premature 
>M n» • uud insanity. Price fl.OO a lx>x, 6 boxea 
or $5 fX). Pent V V Tnill on 'eceitt of price. 

A WRITTEN GUARANTEE ia given for every 

"■.00 ortlnr received, to refund the money If a 

'• rnian/^»i{ cure Is not effected. Via have thoa- 

iiiiU of I'Stinionials from oH and young, of 

o»ii Fex"8. who have been permanently cured 

jy theiisifor Aphroditiue. Circularfree. Ad<iMM 

THK AFtlK' BIKUICI>K CO.. 
^•^»»r . Branch. Box 27, Pokixasd, Da. 

Bold jnDulnt'i laxWirth and Selleck * 

Walbank. 



I 



F you wish to drink a choice 
Glass of Lager call (or 

Fitger's Beer. 

W^holeKome. PalatAblB and Nnnrlshlna 



NOTICE OF ANNUAL MEKTINQ-THE 
Becrotarj- of tlin Dulath & Winnipeg Rail- 
roatl company haviug omitted to give proper 
notice by publication of the annual iiieetiuK of 
paid railroad coiiipaoy, which aounal meeting 
is required by the by-laws of said company to 
bo held on the i-ecoud Thursday of December in 
each year, now therefore, we. the untiersigued 
directors of said railroad company, do hereby 
give notice that the annual moetin^r of the 
stockholders of the Dniuth & Winnipeg Bail- 
road company to elect directors for the onsaing 
year and to transact all such other baeinese aa 
may lawfully be transacted by said company at 
its annual meeting, will be held at the office of 
the company iu the Lyceum bnilJiue. in the 
city of Duluth. Minnesota, on the twelfth day 
of Janoary, 1804, at two o'clock p. m. 
Dated Dec. IS, 1S83. 

W. F. Frrcn, 

U. J. BOABDMAN, 

J. Hdoh Petebs, 
Directors of th3 Duluth & Wiuuipog Railroad 
Company. 

Dec 23 to Jan 12 inc. 



Tbe Nortlwesterii Line! 

C. ST. r. M. & O. R'Y. 

THE SHORT LINE TO CHICAGO 

And the Pnliman Car Line to 8t. Pacd 
atid Miunea|M>lie. 



For dt. PttOi 
and Mhineapolia. 



Lv Dniuth 

Lt Wfwt Superior 

Ar Stiilwator 

Ar«t. Patd. 

kr Ulnneapolia 



For Kan Claire, r>.»c«i«o 
and the Kaat and South. 

Lv Dnlnth 

Lv West Superior 

hr llilwaokee . 

At Chicago 



i>ny bsi- 
Kx. Hon ] 



to 00 am 

'.0 9rt am 

4 2iUpm 

SUUpiTi 

B40pm 

Day Exp 

Ex. Snn^ 



10 00 am 
lOaOaai 

"80b""m 



Nigui Ex 
Daily. 



1100 pm 

USOpm 

728 am 

awnm 

780 am 

(^bieaao 

Limited 

Dail7. 



S I^pm 
^ S.") pm 
7 so am 



Luxnrioas Parlor (?ars on day traixia. 

Direct connections in Union deixtt, St. 
Pa 1. for all poiuts^South and West. 

Pullman and ;Wiignrr finest buffet sleepers 
on the "Chicago Limited." 

Connections in Chicago with morning traia 
South and East. 

(iJ£0. M. SAUTH, B. W. SUMMERS, 

OeneraJ Agent. Cito.Tieket Agent. 

406 Weet Hnowlor fit 



THE DULUTH & IRON RANGE RAILROAD CO 



P.M. 



PAS8EN PE R TIME TABLE. 
P.M. 



A.M 



11 50 

10 50 

9 20 



8 35 
8 19 
800 



8 20 
7 30 



STATIONS. 



Ar Duluth Lv 
Two Harbors 
Allen Jnnction 



Biwakik 

McKinley 

Lt Virginia Ar 



Ar Tower Lv 
Lv Ely At 



I A.M. 



3 15 

4 15 

5 53 



e 40 
7 00 
7 30 



«47 
7 40 



DaUy except Sunday. ^ r. VIKLE. 

General Passenger Agent. 
Dnlnth, Minn,. Nov. 14. 18B3. 



IT 
PAYS! 

To give the People 
an invitation to trade 
with you 
The bt;t way 
is to advertise in 
THE HERALD. 

I'T 

PAYS! 

WISCONSIN CENTRAL UNES. 



r^fiLtest Time Oetrcl. 



4MlVpm 

7 :25um 
10:06ani 



Lv. Ar. 

l»ulntli 

...Ashland.... 
ArCitifMMo L* 



11:10am 
8:»am 
%'. upm 




17: . 
U:4&pm 



Tickets sold aud basga^« chocked tlirovivh to 
all p«ii!iU lu tMe UuitAMi Stat4fl« atid Canada. 

Clooe oonqeetkMis mode ia CUicano iti<Jb all 
train* going Eavt and Hoath. 

For fall inf<irv>MtK« apply to f>iu D«arMt 
ticket agent ot J.^t>C. PUND, 

««wt. Paaa. and Tkt. Agt., Chle«co. lU 





■- -^r iiiwiiiB II ' 1 \ 

, , . . ■ 



1 1 





•f .^v-~^'t. ■",■»-■•.■• ■■■•*-s'- 



¥> ^4^ . *• - * 



' niimmmtfi 



m 



THE DULUTH EVENING HEKALD: TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 1894. 






WEST DULUIH IM 



Some Changes in the Police Force Made Yes- 
terday By Mayor d'Autremont and 
Chief Hortcan. 



Chief Patterson Made a Lieutenant and Two 

Sergeants Appointed Other 

Changes Made. 



Some Street Names Will Have to Be Changed 

—Sad Death of Mrs. William 

Chesser. 





Yesterday afternoon Mayor d'Avitre- 
mont and Chief Horjjan noet the officers 
ot the West Duluth {police department 
by appointment and made the necessary 
changes to contorm to the new condi- 
tion of affairs. Chief Patterson was ap- 
pointed lieutenant, and Capt. Doyle and 
Sergt, Ronayne wetc named as ser- 
i;eants. No change was made with the 
remaining personnel of the department. 

This afternoon the fire commissioners 
were expected to appear and in like 
manner chop off some of the titles of the 
tire department. 

The municipal union will require a 
number of changes yet to be made in the 
village; for instance, there are four First 
avenues at present in Duluth and West 
Duluth which makes it probable that 
nearly all of the streets will have to be 
renamed and the buildings renumbered. 
Then a number of other little problems 
that will appear for solution from time to 
time by those in authority. 

Death of Mrs. William Chesser. 

The tirst shock that the new year has 
has brought to this community is the 
death of Mrs. William Chesser, living on 
First avenue west. The deceased had 
been suffering from typhoid fever for 
several weeks but it was only yesterday 
that hope gave way to despair and the 
physician said she could liot live. She 
was but 25 years old and leaves a little 
girl to mourn her loss. The funeral will 
probably take place Thursday afternoon ^ 

West Ouluth Briefs. 

The stockholders of the Manufactur- 
ers' bank are wreathed in smiles todav 
all on account of receiving checks which 
represent a 5 per cent dividend on their 
bank stock. 

Company H will hold a business meet- 
ing tonight for the election of a lieuten- 
ant and to fill any other vacancies that 
may occur. 

R. W. Mars, who has been associated 
with the Marinette company ina respon- 
sible capacity for fifteen years, has re- 
signed his position to enter into partner- 
ship with B. B. Pennell as manufactur- 
er's agents of mining machinery and 
mill supplies. 

J^Euclid lodge will hold a regular com- 
munication tomorrow night with work in 
the third degree. 

The anniversary exercises of the I. O. 
G. T. will take place tomorrow evening. 
A fine musical program has been pre- 
pared and Dr. Forbes will make an ad- 
dress. 

The junior class of the high school has 
planned a sleigh ride for Thursday even- 
ing which will include a trip to West 
Duluth and the partaking of refresh- 
ments at the home of Sumner Prescott, 
who is a member of the class. 

The fire department was called out 
yesterday afternoon by an alarm from 
Chabb's saloon on Grand avenue. The 
fire originated from a defective flue and 
was extinguished with no damage. 

The Great Western employes gave a 
New Year's ball at the Bennett last even- 
ing, which proved to be a happy inaugur- 
ation of the social pleasure of '94. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Phelps, of Ashland, 
are guests of James Alexander on Sec- 
ond street north. 

Miss Jennie Nichols returned yester- 
day from a week's visit at Tower. 

Miss Nellie Sargent is visiting in St. 
Cloud. 

L. T. Prescott and family returnea to- 
day from a holiday visit with relatives in 
Chicago. 

MOUNTAIN IRON MATTERS. 



For Colds, 

Coughs, 

Croup, Influenza, and 

Bronchitis, 

use 

AVER'S 

CHERRY PECTORAL 

the best 

of all anodyne 

expectorants. 

Prompt to act, 

Sure to Cure 



WHEAT DULL AND WEAK. 



Very Little Business on the Duluth Board and 
Prices Lower. 

The wheat market wa« dull, slow aud weak 
toilay. It openeil weak with buyere of May at 
*ie below Satnrdny'B close, but the first trading 
was at a farther decline of He. There were 
8<>iiie early sales uf cash at '4c bslow Saturday, 
after whicli it ruled dull. The market was 
heavy aad decliuiDir to the close which was *ie 
lower than Saturilay for cash ami ?il{ 'aC lower 
for May. Fi>llo*rluu were the cloeiriK prices: 

No, 1 hard, cash 61 '^c, December 60' .c, May 
64?kc. No. 1 nortlieru. cash tiUc, January 
5(l!4e. May 63Hc. No. 2 nortlieru, cash .'>6Mic. 
No. 3, .5mc. Kejected 46o. On track— No. 1 
northern to arrire. OO^c. Rye 42c. Flax $l.;{2. 
Barley. S4*g41c. No. 2 oats, 27V4c. No. 3 white 
oatii, 27c. 

<.'ar iuspection today— Wheat 93, barley 1, llax 
2. Receipts— Wheat, .'>5,4M1 bus; barley. M» 
bos ; tlaz, i>Sl bus. Shipments— Wheat, 6-'>0 bus ; 
barley, 18,292 bus. 

Weekly Statement. 
Showing the stock of i^rriiin iu store, by flrradee. 
At Duluth. at the close of bosiaoss on Saturday, 
Doc. au. IS93: 

Bushels. 

No. 1 hard wheat 4.473,077 

No. I uorthorn wheat 4,.'d,L'6i 

No. L' in>rtluTU wheat iW.'ilO 

.No. 3 spring wheat 1"^,.'>67 

No grade spriu^ wheat 3,"iv8 

Rejected aud condemned wheat 9,SSX 

Bpecial bin wheat 80,906 

Total in store ».177,361 

Wheat afloat in harbor 20e,«07 



Aggregate 

Increase for theweek 

Amount wheat in store correspoudlng 

date last year 

Increase last year 

Oats in store 

Decrease of oat» for the week 

Rye in store 

Increase of rye during the week 

Barley in store 

Decrease of barley for the wu«k 

ITlax seed in store.. 

Increase of flax seed for the week 



l»,38«,268 
153,670 

15,O0«.7>«2 

790,a't» 

8.913 

1,9S0 

23.337 

444 

:fl,i«7 

52.14U 

.'iO.552 

3,201) 



Cattle and Hogs. 
U. 8. Yaeds, (Chicago. Jan. 2.— Cattle: Ee- 
ceipta, 5000; market fairly active and prices 
5^: K>c higher. Hogs: Receiprs, 22,000; quality 
gt>od; market active and firm with prices V« luc 
higher ; light $5.10<a!.'5.40 ; rough packing, f.'ittn.ts ; 
mixed, i^.l0£l,5.45; heavy packing amd ship- 
ping lots. $r.T30e5.4r) ; pigs, $4 i:)fe:.5.25. Shoep : 
Receipts, 12,000 ; market steady. 

The Foreign Markets. 
London, Jan. 2.— The grain markets opened 
firmer. At Liverpool wheat was uuchangcd 
but in better tone ; com was firmer and a shade 
higher, and iu fair demand ; cargoes of Cali- 
fornia wheat were unchanged; floating car- 
goes of wheat and corn, no o!}'eriugH : wheat and 
ooru ou passage were firmer. The French 
coontry markets were unchanged. 

Th« Chicago Market. 

Chicago, Jan. 2.— (.'lose: Wheat: January, 
59X ; May. 65@iic ; July, 66»ife:4c. Com : Jan- 
uary, 34^c ; May, 3SH; July. 3Siic. Oats : Jan- 
uary, 28c; May, 30Vi@HiC. Pork: January. 
$12.72'/i; May, $12.»0. Lard: January. $7.8J: 
May, S7.65. Bibs: January, $6.47Kt; May, 

The Minneapolis Market. 

MiNNEAPo; in, Jan. 2.— The wheat market was 
weak most of He da v. May opeued at Gl'hc, 
Jannary nomio <. May fell to tiU'^c dnrmg the 
session. Receip ', !>54 cars, Bhipment« 4.S cars. 
The clos^ was: Jwauary, 58i4c ; May, CO^ic July, 
62'.iC. On track— <J1'4C No. 1 hard, 'M*ic No. 
1 northern, 5te No. 2. 



QUEBEC WINTER CARNIVAL. 

Extensive Preparations Ar« Being Madt for a 
Gala Time. 

t^uiiBEC, Jan. 2.— Quebec is making 
active preparations for a winter carnival 
that shall equal anyttiing ever done by 
Montrcal.and into which many novel feat- 
ures will be introduced. A large fund is 
alre.idy subscribed, and it daily grows. 
The utmost enthusiasm prevails among 
the citizens. Iiitluential committees are 
at work perfecting the many plans for 
the amusement and entertainment of 
visitors. A whole week is to be devoted 
to the many items on the program. The 
Chateau Frontenac hotel which has just 
been completed opens its doors on Jan. 
14. It has cost the Canadian Pacific rail- 
road people over $750,000, and will ac- 
commodate a large number of guests. 
As several other hotels have been re- 
cently opened, visitors to the carnival 
are assured of ample accommodation. 
The carnival opens on Jan. 29, and closes 
Feb. 3. 

Instead of an ice palace, as in Mont- 
treal, Quebec will erect a vast ice fort- 
ress on the old walls of the city, the 
same walls that were so unsuccessfully 
assaidted by Gen. Montgomery in 1775. 
And by the way a statue in ice to Ge.i. 
Montgomery in i.ic simile of the one in 
front of St. Paul's church in New York 
will be built on the spot, where the gen- 
eral's remams lay for forty years before 
removal to New York. 

On one night ot the week the ice fort- 
ress Will be assaulted by the combined 
snowshoe clubs, led by an experienced 
oOlcer. The defence will in all proba- 
bility be by troops now in garrison here. 
The illumination and pyrotechnic dis- 
play following will be a grand one. Gen. 
Herbert has signified his intention to co- 
operate with the committee, and a sham 
battle on the plains of Abraham, the 
troops on snowshoes, the artillery on 
traineaux will probably be decided on. 

Toboggan slides there are in numbers 
and all of them are to be open to visitors. 
The one to be erecttd on the Duflferin 
terrace will carry the sliders directly to 
the door of the Frontenac hotel. Snow- 
shoe races, hockey matches, curling 
bon-spiels, skating, all have their place. 
The grand ball will be given in the par- 
liament house which will accommodate 
1500 guests. A fancy carnival drive 
with many odd features of life in the 
North is among the list ot attractions. 
There will be about half a dozen ice 
structures, and some very beautiful ice 
statues. A sugar camp, a lumberman's 
shanty, and several Indian encamp- 
ments are also on the list. 

The Hon. Joly de Lotbiniere, ex-pre- 
mier of Quebec, is president, and Eric 
Dorion. secretary, the latter ot whom is 
prepared to give intending visitors all 
information. 



WHOLESALE KILLING IN TEXAS. 



Row at a Oance Rttultod in Threo Oealhi and 
and Many Casualties. 

Columbia, Tex., Jan. 2.— An account 
of a wholesale killing at Cedar about 
eight miles from here states that £. N. 
Williams, who held the floor at a dance, 
aroused the animosity of Lemon Gayle, 
who demanded that Williams surrender 
his place on the floor. 

Williams at first refused but Gayle be- 
came Ixjisterous and he started from the 
room. Then (iiyle, his brother, Louden 
Gayle, and Bob Ealy began firing at 
Williams and others. Louden Gayle 
shot through the window and killed a 
a boy named Eli Waddy, A small boy 
named Scott shouted: "Louden Gayle 
has killed Eli Waddy," whereupon Lou- 
den turning and saying: "What is that 
to you?" shot and killed him. 

A perfect fusilade followed and a wo- 
man was killed. Lemon Gayle was shot 
through Xhff body and will die. A girl 
was wounded in the face and another in 
the head. Others received slight wounds. 
After Lemon Gayle was shot, it is said 
his brother Loudon stooped over bis 
prostrate body, ritle in hand, and pumped 
cold lead into the panic stricken dancers, 
who were unable to get out of the house 
iu time to avoid his awful vengeance. 

Ihree arc dead, a fourth fatally wound- 
ed, two seriously, and about halt a dozen 
received minor injuries. Loudon is in 
jail and it is reported that Ealy has been 
captured. 

NEW YORK LEGISUTURE. 



A Reform Wave Struck the Town and Closed 
the Gambling Houses. 

Mountain Iron, Minn., Jan. 2.— The 
dance at the Exchange hotel last Tues- 
day was well patronized and a very en- 
joyable timewas had by all present. 

This town is getting a reform wave. 
Last Wednesday the august body of vil-^ 
lage trustees issued an edict to the effect 
that all gambling rooms be closed. 

The Christmas entertainment given 
under the^u^p"*^ ^' the Methodist 
Episcopal church Christmas day was a 
popular success, and nothing but praise 
IS heard for the children who took part 
in the singing and rectiniions. There 
was a pres"-* '"n th. ;.c. tor every child 
in attendal.^.o. 

The weather for the pait week has 
been very fine, averaging 12 degrees 
above, with no snow. 

The men that were laid off at the 
mines here have made up their minds to 
seek a more congenial climate and the 
town is nearly deserted. 

"Joe." who rents a house here, had two 
men "batching" with him and held them 
up until he got tired of tooting the bills. 
He went home one night without the 
usual supply of food and. on the (juery 
of "where s the grub" he told them he 
was tired of feedtng them, thereupon 
they threw him out. Of course he want- 
ed to get them out, so up to the justice 
he went. After hearing the case as 
stated above, the justice decided to give 
him a week of replevin. The marshal 
served it and as the two "star" boarders 
could not read it "wont." 

Dr. J. hid a call from a patient the 
other day, and on seeing the m in asked 
to see his tongue. The patient replied: 
'Better look at my wife's tongue; that's 
what ails me." 



New York Breadstufls. 

New York. Jan. 2.— Flour: Keoaipts. 69,- 
334 ; sales, 21,600. Mtate and western quiet and 
easy. Wheat: Receipts, ai,3^>; sales, 650,U(iO. 
No. 2 red '/ifejgc lower; foreign weak; west, 
steady, fairly active; January. 65?iitjtt6 l-liJc; 
Febrnary, 67fe'«tc; March. 70 7-U6'ic. (^orn: 
Receipts, 505.750 ; sales, 220.000; No. 2,H@^c, 
lower, dull. weak. No. 2, 42!«i@43'4c ; January, 
42@Mc; February, 42c; March. i3%; May, 
44'ig?sc. Oats: Receipts. IOh ,000; sales, 10,000 
No. 2, duU,easier;May,34\; Western, 34^40c 



CHILE WILL NOT AGREE. 

The Existence of the Chilean Claims Commis- 
sion Nearly Ended. 

Nf.w York, Jan. 2.— The Heralds 
Valparaiso, Chile, cable says: The 
Chilean government has refused to agree 
with the proposition submitted by the 
United States for the extension of the 
existence of the Chilean claims commis- 
sion, now sitting in Washington. 

It is said the Chilean government was 
led to refuse by the fact that most of the 
claims filed with the commission were 
against that government, and under Ar- 
ticle 9 of the existing treatly all claims 
covered by the treaty are to be consid- 
ered as finally settled, concluded and 
barred, whether or not t'.iey have been 
laid before the commission. 

The effect of this will be that many ot 
the claims brought against the Chilean 
government will not be adjudicated upon 
by this commission, and under the terms 
of the treaty will be barred from ever 
again being considered. 

THEY WERE COOKED ALIVE. 



New York Stock Exchange. 

N»w York, Jau 2.— Money on caU is ea<>y at 
l@l/4 per cent ; prime mercantile paper 4w,4V4 
per cent. Sterling exclianee Is easier with 
actual business in bankers' bills at 4. 8:iV.i^)i 
for sixty days and 4.85^i<f!)£ for demand. 
P.ieted rates 4.8t@4.86V4 ; commercial bills 
4.8264 Ji-iJi for sixty days and $4.S4}*@5^ for 
demand. Government bonds steady ; state 
bonds dull; railroad bonds lower. The 
stock market continued weak after 11 a. m. aud 
the lowest prices of morning were touched. At 
noon speculation was quiet, but somewhat 
Btoadior. 



SUICIDE OF A BRAKEMAN. 



Order at Once 

The number of copies of the Christmas 
Herald you want. They can he bad at 
Tlie Herald counting room. 



Cigarette Smoking. Drinking and Jealousy 
Made a Bad Combination. 
Glean, N. Y., Jan. 2. — Edward Gal- 
lagher, aged about 22, formerly a tele- 
■gFaifSh- opera tor fop-UieJ^ostal Telegraph 
company at Sisterville, and brakeman on 

the Rochester division of the Western 
New York & Pennsylvania railroad, 
while partly under the influence of 
liquor, called at the house of Hattie Ben- 
nett on Barry street, this city. 

After some conversation, Gallagher 
pulled a revolver from each hip pocket 
and asked Miss Bennett if she cared 
enough for him to die with him. She 
said: "Ed, for God's sake don't shoot 
me." He started to go into an adjoin- 
ing room, but when near the door he 
placed one of the weapons close to his 
head and fired. The ball entered his 
head just below the right ear and he died 
almost instantly. 

Gallagher was the youngest brother of 
the members of the firm of Gallagher 
Bros", oil producers, and P. J. Gallagher, 
an old time telegrapher. Excessive 
cigarette smoking and drink, coupled 
with jealousy, was probably the cause of 
the rash act. 



THE PANAMA SCANDAL. 



The Associated Charities would like to 
know of a place where those who have 
no homes could be sent for a night 
or two. ChII at the office, 415 Wood- 
bridge building. 



Two documents Published That May Re- 

vivo It. 

Paris, Jan. 2.— The Figaro publishes 

two documents, one of which it claims is 

an acknowledgment made by the late 

Baron de Rcinach thathewas indebted to 
Dr. Cornelius Herz in the sum of 2,000,000 
francs and promising to pay the amount 
in eight installments of 250,000 francs 
each, together with interest at the rate of 
3 per cent. 

The other document, alleged to have 
been written by Baron de Rein.ach, is an 
admission that Dr. Herz owed nothing 
to him. If these documents are genuine 
they will cause a revival of the Panama 
scanaal. 

Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 



The Awful Death of Two Boilermakers in 
Chattanooga. 
Chattanoogo, Tenn., Jan. 2. — Two 
men were fairly cooked alive in a terri- 
ble boiler explosion that occurred at 10 
o'clock yesterday morning in the round 

house of the Cincinatti Southern railway. 

Charles Eckert, a Iwilermaker, was en- 
gaged in repairing an engine which 
came in with a leak in the steam flue. 
He was standing in the fire box with 
Jesse Lang, a colored assistant. Mis- 
taking a screw plug for a driving plug 
he gave the screw a careless tap, driving 
it in. 

The steam burst through the small 
aperture with a loud report. Both men 
were horribly scalded and the flesh 
dropped from the bodies in a sickening 
manner. Death was instantaneous. The 
bodies were taken to Sharp's morgue 
where a verdict of death from careless- 
ness of Eckert was found by the coro- 
ner's jury, 

IT WILL SOON DEVELOP. 



The Result of the Northern Pacific Must be 
Speedily Reached. 

St. Paul, Jan. 2. — The engineers 'fin- 
ished telling their side of the case to the 
Northern Pacific officials, for the second 
lime, last evening, and the firemen be- 
gan their formal conference this morn- 
ine at II. The conductors, trainmen 
and switchmen will follow in turn, and 
it is altogether likely that the supple- 
mentary proceedings will fill out the 
week. 

E. E. Clark, of Cedar Rapids, a grand 
officer of the Order of Railway Conduc- 
tors, arrived in the city last night and 
has held a conference with the men. 
Grand Master Wilkinson, of the train- 
men, has gone home. As the case 
stands, there appears to be no hope in 
the final appeal to the receivers, and the 
men must either accept the situation or 
use the alternative. The result will de- 
velop shortly. 



Worth a Guinea a Box. 



Stubborn tendencies | 
to digestive troubles! 
m c/nldren will always! 
yield to a mild dose 
of 

Beecham's 
Pills 



(Tasteless) 
•s cents a box. 




oS 



George R. Malby, Republican. Was Elected 
Speaker This Morning. 

Albany, N. Y., Jan. 2. — The New York 
state assembly of 1S94 was called to 
order at 11:25 o'clock this morning. The 
nominees of the Republican caucus last 

right were duly declared elected, from 
speaker down to the minor positions. 

The first ballot was for speaker. Geo. 
R. Malby and Speaker Sulzer were put 
in nomination by their respective parties. 
The vote was: Malby, 67; Sulzer, so. 
Mr. Malby was declared elected. 



SHORE LEAVE STOPPED. 



Seamen and Marines Not Allowed Ashore at 
Rio. 

Rio Janeiro, Jan. 2.— Capt Picking, 
of the cruiser Charleston, who is in com- 
mand of the American naval squadron 
here, has issued an order to the com- 
manders of the vessels of the Jfleet in- 
structing them to cut off the shore leave 
hitherto given to the seamen, marines 
and others of the crews. 

This curtailment of shore liberty is 
due to the fact that the yellow fever sea- 
son is approaching, and Capt. Picking is 
determined to keep the warships free of 
the disease, if possible. There is little 
danger of anyone on board the warships 
contracting the disease, so long as shore 
leave is stopped. 



Robbed the Mint. 
New Orleans, Jan. 2. — The case 
against Cashier James M, Dowling, of the 
United States mint, who is accused of 
robbing the government of $25,000 and 
then lighting a fire in the vault to cover 
up his deficit, has been on trial before the 
United States circuit court for several 
days and evidence was heard for three 
hours yesterday, but the prosecution is 
not near finished. 



An EITectlTe Protest. 

A man api>arently laboring nndcr 
strong excitement stepped into an insur- 
anco office on La Salle street yesterday 
meming and asked: 

"Do yott give away calendars for 1894 
here?" 

"Yes, sir," answered the agent, 

"Printed in big black letters, with red 
letters for Sundays?" 

"Yes." 

"With a string tied to them so they 
can be hung up in front of you?" 

"Yes." 

"Got plenty of them?" 

"We have any quantity of them, sir. 
Want one?" 

"Mottoes at the bottom telling yon 
about watching out for fires and where 
to get insured and all that?" 

"Certainly." 

"How many companies do you repre- 
sent?" 

"Six or eight. There's the old relia- 
ble" 

"Never mind. Do all of them send out 
calendars?" 

"Yes, sir; all except one, but" 

"All except one? Have you one that 
doesn't issue any?" 

"Yes." 

"Then that's the one I'm looking forP 
exclaimed the other feverishly. "That's 
all I want to know about it! I want to 
insure $10,000 worth of property in that 
company. I've had 27 calendars for 1894 
from 27 different insurance companies 
stuck on my desk since the first of De- 
cember, and the worm has turned, sir — 
the worm has turned." — Chicago Trib- 
une. 

Poor Fellow. 

A fast young man was standing in 
front of a saloon when his little brother 
came running up' almost out of breath 
and exclaimed: 

"Come home quick, Jack!" 

"What's the matter?" 

"Mother has got a fit." 

"Is that all? Merciful heavens, how 
you scared me! When you first spoke, I 
thought sometliing had happened to that 
$75 pointer of mine." — Texas Siftings. 

All Fixed. 

"Well, young man," said old Mr. 
Breezy, "while you are at my house I 
hope you'll feel just like one of the fam- 
ily." 

"Thank you. I'm sure I have every 
reason to." 

"What do you mean?" 

"Y'^our daughter has jnst said she 
would be a sister to me."— Washington 
Star. 

A Tale From Boston. 

An absentminded man boarded the 
express for Boston, and in a half reverie 
greeted a young man who sat in front of 
him: 

"Good morning, W^illie. How's your 
father?" 

It was his own son. — Harper's Bazar. 



Chicago's Welcome to lAbor. 

On behalf of the Chicago trades as- 
sembly W. C. Pomeroy delivered an ad- 
dross of welcome at the opening of the 
recent codveution of the American Fed- 
eration of Labor. Among other things 
he said: 

We would wish to bid you welcome to a pros- 
perous city, but truth will not Justify the as- 
sertion. Tilings are here as they arc, but not 
as they should be. We bid you welcome in the 
name of lUO monopolists aud W.OUO tramps, here 
where Mammon holds high carnival in palaces, 
while mothers are heartbroken, children are 
starving and men are looking in vain for work. 

We bid you welcome In the name of a hun- 
dred thousand idle men. In the name of those 
edifices dedicated to the glory of God, but 
whose doors are closed tonight to the starv- 
ing and poor; in the name of the ministers 
who fatten from the vineyards of God. forget- 
ting that God's children are hungry and have 
no place to lay their heads; in the name of the 
pillars of the sweating system, of the million- 
aires and deacons whose souls are endangered 
by their appetites lor gold; in the name of the 
wageworkers who sweat blood which is coined 
Into golden ducats; in the name of the insane 
asylums aud poorhouses packed by people 
crazed by care in this land of plenty. 

We will show you exhibits of Chicago that 
were not shown at the fair grounds— of her 
greatness and her weaknesn. Tonight we will 
show you hundreds of men lying on the rough 
atone in the corridors of thie very building— no 
home, no food— men able and willing to work, 
but tot whom there is none. 

It is a time for alarm— alarm for the contin- 
uation of a government whose sovereign states 
are delivered to railway magnates, coal barona 
and speculators. 

When the speaker concluded, the ap- 
plause continued for several moments. 

Wor»« Than In Russia. 

W. T. Stead, editor of the English 
magazine The Review of Reviews, said 
to a Chicago reporter the other day: "I 
have seen prisoners in one of the worst 
prisons of St. Petersburg, but they were 
better housed than your unemployed in 
the Harrison street police station. The 
Russian criminals were nt least provided 
with a plank bed on which to rest, and 
they were not driven together as your 
unemployed are, so that one could not 
tuiTi without disturbing his neighbor. I 
have seen nothing like the scene at the 
Harrison street police station." 

Trades Unions and the Militia. 

The Hexagon Labor Club of Tile Lay- 
ers' Helpers of New York instructed 
James Hurley, its delegate to the Work- 
ingmen's State Trade assembly, to vote 
for a resolution forbidding members of 
organized labor to enlist iu the natioQal 

guard. 

_., ■ I . . .... 

Central Discharging 8fen. 

Since Dec. 1 the New York Central and 
Hudson Hiver Railroad company has dis- 
charged nearly 1,000 men at New York 
and Buffalo points, 800 of whom were on 
the Hudson river di\i8ion. Some of the 
men had been in the employ of the com- 
pany 30 years. The laid off men include 
trackmen, bridgemen, laborers, etc. One 
of the discharged men said that as fast as 
the pay car moved along section bosses 
told this one and that one that he wa« 
relieved from further duty. "This is the 
third cut," said the man referred to, 
"and I hear that there is to be another 
aud a larger cut ou Jan. 1." 



Hope Deferred. 

Clevorton— When do you expect to be 
married, old man? 

Dashaway (gloomily)— I don't know. 

Cleverton — Why, hasn't she set the 
day? 

Dashaway— The day? Why, she hasn't 
set the year yet!— Puck. 

lAbor. 

Blinks— So you didn't call all that com- 
plimentary talk you've t)een giving Miss 
Plainface flattery. 

Jinks— Flattery? No. 

Blinks— What do you call it? 

Jinks— Hard work. — Chicago Inter 
Ocean. 



SYPHILIS 



A Writlra Guarantee to 
CURE EVERY CASE OR 
MOfiEY REFUNDED. 

Oar oore is permanent and not a patching np. 
Cases treated eight years ago hare never seen a 
symptom since. By describing case folly we can 
treat you by mail, and we give the same strong 
goarantee to core or refnnd all money. Thrse 
who prefer to come here for treatment can do so 
and we will pay railrocul fare both ways and 
hotel bills while hare if we falltoonre. We 
challenge the world for a ease that oor MAQIG 
REMEDY will not cnre. Write for fall partica- 
lars and get »h e ovidance. 

We guarau lee to cure or refond every dollar, 
and as we have a reputation to protect, also 
financial backing of $500,000, it is perfectly safe 
to all wbo will try the treatment. Heretofore 
yon have been pntting up and paying oat your 
money for different treatments and although 
you are not yet cured, no one has paid back 
your money. Do not waste any more money on- 
til you try as. Old chronic, deep seated cases 
cored in 15 to 40 days. Investigate our financial 
standing, oar reputation as bosinesa men. 
Write us for names and addresses of those we 
have cured who have given permission to efor 
to tbem. 

If your symptoms are sore throat, macooa 
patches in month, rheumatism iu bones and 
joints, hair falling oat, eruptions on any part 
of the body, feeling of general depresolon, pams 
in bead or bones— you have no time to waste. 
TLuee who are constantly taking mMvnry and 
potash shoold disoontinae it. 

Don't fail to write. All correspondence sent 
sealed in plain envelopes. We invite the most 
rigid investigation and will do all in oor lowsr 
to aid you in it. Address, 

COOK REMEDY CO., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Room 307 Masonic Tempi*. 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE & 
ATLANTIC R. R. 

Atlantic Limited (Daily) 

Leave Duluth — 5 45 pm 

Arrive Marquette 4 45 am 

Arrive Sault St«. Marie 10 SO am 

Arrive Detroit (2d day) 9 10 am 

Arrive Toronto (2nd day) 6 30 am 

Arrive Montreal (2nd day) 8 20 am 

Arrive Boston (2nd day) 8 85 pm 

Arrive New York (2nd day). 8 60 pm 

W«»et bonnd train arrives Dnlulh 10 3.5 am 

Wagner Buffet Bleeping Car between Dalntfa 
and BauItSto. Marie. 

Direct lino and lowest rates to Toronto, Mon- 
treal. New York, Boston. Saginaw, Qrand Rap- 
ids, Detroit and all points East. 

Lowest rates for Bmigrant Tickets via this 
line to and from Earope. .._„„ 

T. H. LARKE, 
Commercial Agent, Dolath. 

Ticket offices 436 SpaddiBg House and Union 
D«pot. 




THE 

EVENING 
HERALD 



You Don't Get 
The News. - 



A MONTHi 60c Hi 



The Evening Herald, 

THE PEOPLE'S PAPER, 

Is fearless and independent and stands first 
among the evening papers of this country. It 
is by all odds 

T/ie Best 
Advertising Medium 



-IN- 



DMluthl 



And if your ad. is not in it you are making the 
biggest business mistake of your life. 



The Evening Herald 




-HAS- 



THE LARGEST CIRCULATION 



OF ANY PAPER IN DDLDTH. 



Your business languishes because you adver- 
tise in dead newspapers that are read by people 
who are dead and don't know it. The newspaper 
for you is 

THE EVENING HERALD, 

A Live Newspaper, 
Read by Live People. 

You do not advertise enough. You are asleep 
and want your business to run itself. A standing 
advertisement in 

The Evening Herald 

Commands confidence. The man who for a year 
lives in one community and leads a respeetble life 
will grow in the confidence of the people. On the 
same principle an advertisement in The Evening 
Herald becomes familiar to the eyes of the readers. 





•' V-^^*-*^w\JA XtiJui^t 



Wlk^Wi 



EuUy.QiloUy, 



R6Storcd. 




^air the tra in 

irtj^«rwrsor 

k^ty W M«w» ^^w««lte ot 

eto, Fuhatreagtb^vel* 
eptaeat Mudtaas pna to 

Mft ttid POTtioa 

ly. a tiMl«,i»t» 



fine. 



Eai« IIEOIOIL 00., fiiiiUo. II. Y. 



If You Don't 
Take. 




THE 

EVENING 
HERALD 




You Don't Get 
The News. 




Tiiiir 




1- 




r'' 



■«>l| 





■>■ '* 




THE DULUTH EVENING HBKALD; TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 1894. 



bniltltnii. i20 W»st Sat>erlor atroet. TaKn'lioiJp 
—Hndiui'se office, 324. two rintn ; editorial ro^u, 
XU, tiirop rtii4i». ' 

SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

Daily, per j»ar »^-* 

Daily, {Mr tkreo mouthfl l-* 

Dally, pctr month ^ 

Waekly. per year *-8« 



URGEST CmCCLATIOK IX DULUTH. 



Knt«rt».i at the i^wtoRice at Dulnth, Mliui., aa 
■ecoDil-oldaa mail matter. 




The Weather. 

U. S. WiiATIIKR RlKKAU. DfLUTll, MlSN.. 

Jan. -2. A tn>u«h of low t.MiiiH>ratiiri> extouds 
from the upt-r lnk« rc«iou soiuhwvstwur.l t.> 
tVilorado. Tho banmic't-r is high iu»rtli of 
Moiitaiiu ami over rhc South Atlautic statet. 

Th.< t.«inperariir*>lin« fallen M to :»» th»Kri>o» m 
Montaitu aud the western portion of North l>a- 

kotii. 

Fait w«!vther has prevaiU'il. pxc(>i>t snow in 

Mimtaui* anil sleet or huow ou the s«nitht«ru au.l 

w.^sterii co;i!«ts of liUVt' Siu'erior. 

IHiInUi temperature at 1 a. m. ttKlay. i". 

-. abi»veiiero: maximum jesierUay,--' iJe- 

.lK>ve: miniiuum for twentj -tour liours. 

DrM-rn. Jan. 2. L<H?al forecast nntil S p.m. 

\ Snow. fi.Uowtvl toniirht liy eli^ariiisr; 

Li.i^ K.ckiu< this tvenitii,' tt> cohUir, 

...fair and nitjcli coUler Wednosdai. 

rthwcst winds. 

J.VME9 KkNE.\».T, 

Local Forecast Othcer. 

The Pioneer Fnel company sells th<> beat jrrades 
of CO il, au.l from the low prices now lu effect 
iliv." litwal tliscomus for cashaad make prompt 
deliveries. Oflico. -2»» West Superior street. 

WvsHivoTox, Jan. 2.— Forecast until S p. m. 
tomorrow: For Wisconsin : floudy with snow, 
colder, with a cold wav^ ; fresh and brisk north- 
erly winds. For Minnesota: Suow. foUowo<l 
by fair; colder ; cold wave tonight; northwrly 

wiude. ^ 

_ » ■ * — 

Work for the Unemployed. 

The Herald publishes today the stories 
of a number of men who are 
out of employment. practically 
destitute, with families that are 
feeling the bitter pangs of pov- 
erty, and who are ready and anxious to 
work, if they could obtain the opportun- 
ity. It IS not a pleasant fact that such a 
state of affairs exist here, nor does it af- 
ford The Herald any satisfaction to 
^ive publicity to it, but the situation is 
so desperate that the general public 
should know the whole truth, so that the 
necessary steps can be taken tado some- 
thing to relieve such terrible distress. 

The measures of organized relief that 
are being actively prosecuted by the 
county superintendent of the poor and 
the various charitable societies of the 
city are inadequate to meet the emer- 
gency. These strong, able-bodied men 
do not ask charity. What they 
want is work at tair wages. Given 
steady employment, they will be pre- 
pared to support their families without 
further assisunce. Bat where can they 
get work? In these times of depression 
and in the winter months there is little 
orobability of private enterprise enter- 
ing upon undertakings that will furnish 
work for many men. The case is urgent. 
These men who are on the verge of star- 
vation cannot wait until times improve 
and the spring revival of business starts 
the wheels of industry moving again. 
They must have work or other aid now, 
or they and their families will perish.. 
Naturally the majority of these people 
are averse to becoming objects of char- 
ity, and their intense desire is to obtain 
employment. 

The Herald would urge upon the com- 
mon council and the county commission- 
ers the necessity of taking united 
action to provide work for these 
people. Many have come here from 
other parts of the county, ow- 
ing to the closing of mines and other in- 
dustries, and they should not therefore 
be a charge upon the ci\y alone. If these 
two bodies will act together there is no 
reason why work should not be provid- 
ed for hundreds of men. Why not do 
as they are doing in other cities? Let 
the city and county make arrangements 
so that these men can be given work 
cutting firewood at Si or Si. 25 a day. 
The fuel can be readily sold or it can be 
distributed to poor families that ai:e im- 
able to purchase fuel and are not being 
supplied by the county. The citv coun- 
cil should act tonight on the question. 
Immediate action is needed. 



Must Look to the Senate. 

Those who are fighting the new tariff 
bill, or any of its provisions, are prepar- 
ing for a long siege. There is little or 
no prospect of amending the bill in the 
house. The debate which will begin to- 
morrow will last probably three weeks, 
possibly four, when it will pass practical- 
ly as it comes from the committee. The 
conditions under which a measure, es- 
pecially a political measure, are consid- 
ered in the house are such that opportu- 
nity for amendment is slight, and whca 
the bill comes to a vote under the terms 
of the order under which it is considered, 
those who are dissatisfied with any of its 
provisions are confronted only with the 
alternative of voting for or against it in 
its entirety. The Republicans propose 
to pursue the policy of refusing to aid 
the Democrats in modifying some par- 
ticular schedule, unless the latter agree 
to vote with them to amend the bill all 
along the line, and at the end against it 
as a whole. 

This will effectually preclude amend- 
ment in the lower branch as at most the 
Democrats now opposing the bill are di- 
recting their efforts, not against it as a 
whole, but against certain schedules 
which they deem inconsistent with the 
Chicago platform or illogical. But none 
of them go so far as to oppose a bill for 
tariff revision. With the general scheme 
of the Wilson bill they agree. 

It is ill liie senate, however, that the 
bill will be modified, perhaps entirely 

remodeled and possihly completely de- 
feated if any of these things are to occur 



at all. It 1.-. to the senate, therefore, th.'.t 
those who are opposing the measure, in 
whole or in part, all look and where their 
efforts will be concentr.-ited. Conditions 
iu The Heraldyj" there arc totally different from in the 
house. Everything proceeds with the 
utmost deliberation. There is no party 
whip, no caucus spur to drive or coerce 
men against their will. 

It IS a fact which any careful student 
of congressional legislation understands, 
that it is in the senate, not in the house, 
where the laws of the American people 
are made. Measures originate m the 
house— all revenue measures must orig- 
inate there- and go through with more 
or less of a hurrah after a more or less 
limited debate, oftentimes with their in- 
consistences exposed but uncorrected, 
the leaders preferring to send an imper- 
fect bill to the senate for correction there 
rather than to stop and run the risk of 
defeating the bill in the house by 
attempts at amendment. In the senate, 
with more careful methods, infinitely 
more deliberation .and unlimited debate, 
the bill goes through a long and labori- 
ous process and ctimes out at the end 
sometimes so changed that its own father 
would not recognize it. 

The great fight when the bill reaches 
the senate will be against the raw ma- 
terials, coal, iron and lead ore, lumber, 
and the other great staples, which the 
Wilson bill places on the free list. Raw 
materials are made the backbone of the 
Wilson bill. The interests involved in 
the production of these raw materials, 
capital and labor, are so enormous and 
cover such a wide range of territory that 
a combination of them would be ex- 
tremely powerful. The men, too, who 
arc urging the return of these articles to 
the dutiable list occupy this coign of 
vantage that they claim that their trans- 
fer to the free list is not only illogical, 
but is out of harmtmy with the tariff 
plank in the Chicago platform. It is un- 
just, they declare, for the bill to dis- 
criminate against the producers of these 
raw articles, and at the same time place 
a duty on the article as manufactured 
therefrom, which affords the latter inci- 
dental protection at least. 

Iron ore is cited as the best example 
of what they mean. Iron ore is placed 
on the free list, while pig iron, ir which 
there is a less percentage of labor, goes 
on the dutiable list at 22 ji per cent ad 
valorem. In other words the miners 
and shippers of ore, whose capital is 
many times greater than that of the fur- 
nacemen who reduce the ore, and who 
employ in mining and transporting many 
limes more men than work at the fur- 
naces, have no protection at all, while 
the latter have 22 Jj per cent. Those in- 
terested in the production of these raw 
materials therefore claim, first, that a 
revenue tariff demanded by the Demo- 
cnitlc platform should leave their pro- 
ducts on the dutiable list as revenue 
articles, and secondly, that not to do so 
and at the same time place there the 
crude articles, like pig iron, which is 
raw taateriai for the manufacturers, is 
unjust discrimination. They invoke the 
old Democratic slogan, "equal rights for 
all; special favors for none." 

In working for the remodelling of this 
feature of the Wilson bill, they will also 
have another peculiar advantage. It is 
now practically certain that an income 
tax to meet the deficit will be levied by 
the bill. While the income proposition 
is popular in the house, it is looked on 
with anything but favor in the senate. It 
is also understood that an income tax, at 
least an individual income tax, is dis- 
tasteful to Mr. Cleveland, Mr. Carlisle 
and the balance of the administration. 
If this feature of the house plan of tariff 
revision is to be eliminated, as those best 
informed regarding the situation believe 
it will be, the $40,000,000 which the house 
proposes to^yaise from this source must 
be foiUKi somewhere else. And those 
j»?h6^want raw material and sugar^ to go 
back on the dutible list are firm in the 
belief that that revenue will be raised 
from those articles. 

Should the bill be greatly amended in 
the senate, or should certain of its un- 
amended features alienate three Demo- 
cratic senators the bill may fail alto- 
gether. With party I'nes strictly drawn 
the Democratic majority is but three. 
With these facts in mind, it is easy to 
understand that the tariff bill still has a 
long and difficult hill to climb before il 
finally reaches the White House for Mr. 
Cleveland's signature. 



-OLE OLSON 
He Can M:tk« Other Feilowi 



NUMBAR 297." 

Respect His 



ONli IKICE, 
ANI)thatKU;HT 



Wagon Wheels. 

The last number nf the Northwestern 
Lumberman contains .1 picture of Fred 
W. Stevens, of thiscity,in "lumber jack" 
costume. Accompanying it is the fol- 
lowing description: 

As a white man can out-"nigger" a 
"nigger" in minstrelsy so it has been 
proven that a man not a Swede can out- 
bwcde a .Swede when it comes to writing 
Swede dialect. If there is a Swede who 
can write as taking dialect as G. Fred 
Stevens can he has not come to the sur- 
face. Stevens is "Ole Olson, Niimbar 
297." whose articles have appeared in the 
columns of the Lumberman. He has a 
way of his own of so constructing the 
dialect as to make it irresistibly amus- 
ing. It ir one thing to write dialect and 
quite another to incorporate dialect with 
humor. Fred Stevens does the latter. 

Mr. Stevens is a resident of Duluth, 
and son of the mana>;er ol the Cranberry 
Lumber company. You will not miis. 1 
know, the face of this .Swede dialectician. 
No photographer ever trained his instru- 
ment on full-grown features more inno- 
cent and child-like, and freer from guile 
than those. It is a face the owner of 
which, one might think, had been housed 
within walls built of chrysanthemums 
and blocks of suiibhinc, with occasionally 
a wasp buzzing around: and who is un- 
acquainted with the wiles of the wicked 
world, and who in his simplicity thinks 
that even the moon is his lor the asking. 
Stevens has recently taken to the local 
stage, and should he go further than that 
in the line of dramatics, other qualifica- 
tions being favorable, that face ought to 
make him a fortune. I can recall none 
other on the st.-'ge like it except that of 
poor Fritz. 

Last fall Stevens was down in Menom- 
inee, and just for fun, by way of intro- 
ducing himself, went into the office of 
one of the big concerns and applied for 
a "yob" in the woods. 

"Yob!" echoed the man in attendance, 
fastening his eyes on the face of the sup- 
posed Swede, "young feller instead of 
looking for a 'yob' in camp you had bel- 
ter go down to Chicago and join a beauty 
show." 

If Stevens were to play the part of a 
Ssvede lover I can't imagine how he 
would avoid having every Swede girl in 
Minnesota at his heels. 

He is the quiet, unassuming, compan- 
ionable gentleman that from his por- 
trait you would take him to be, yet don't 
think on that account that when out on 
life's highway he is unable to make the 
other fellow respect his wagon wheels. 

A Peep at the Baby. 

ILinoa dodicafed to (Charles O'Doimell, bom 
Duluth. Dec. i\ 1S93.J 

I stoody bf'i'ido a cosy crib wliore slopt 

A tiny new-born bibn. .-Ml wrapped was ho 

In KHrmpnts swift of texture delicate. 

Which u>viiiff hands ia happy hours had 

wroutiht I 
I>»it softer and more delicate than these — 
More dainty far than pot.il of the rose— 
The cheeks of that sweet boy to me appeared. 
A titfnl llii>*h the cherub face o'crsproad 
And brightened fair the pallid counteuacco, 
Ab when the son's first Tdya ths hills iilumo. 

Ho slept— and oh, so peacefully ho slept— 

Kis slumber wa« the dream of innocence. 

The dniwse which but the anijols o'er enjoy. 

luteut 1 looked and marvelled, thinking that 

lji)on a day so once was 1 I'ko Lim, 

The tender themp of idoUziojf sirej. 

Rat 1 have felt the thorns of time t<iuce then. 

And tasted of the rue of sinfulness 

And all the griefB that sorrow's goblet fill. 

tiod 'i;rant thoe, lad, thy fragile baric now 

lanncbed. 
Mid brightest auspices of hoptj and love, 
May nevtr feel the storms ot worldly etrifo: 
Ihit Koitied by a power divine, may sail 
To blistful realms of nevL^r-ecding joy, 
And anchor in the port of paradise. 

—Michael Joseph Donnel.;-. 




Amkrican 



Stor k. 



"^^ ~^JV' ^ff^ 



THESE SMALL ADVERTISEMENTS A8E MONEI-MAIERS M TIOSANDS. 

EVERYBODY SHOULD USE THEM. 



The Modern Society Girl. s 

A maiden, diaipledpretty, 

\V ith wealth of Kolden hair, 
ller eyes lit up with pitj-. 

Her face o'ercast with care. 

"Her heart is sore grief-la<len." 

The kindly llorist thought, 
Then deeply sighed fho maiden 

And told him what she sought : 

"A bcriuet, pli'ase. sir. fashion 

Of ro;-es white ni- snow, 
Tlie red, red rose of pas.sion 

No place in this mtist know. 

"The whitest of white rose?. 

Of that, please, »ir, be sure ; 
I want the simplest posies. 

The tymbol of the pure.'" 

"Some little child is dying," 

The florist murmured low ; 
Then to the maiden, sighing: 

"Where wish you this to go?" 

With sobs her voice was broken, 

'My father's barn." she said; 
"It's just a little token ; 

My poor, dear pug ia dead." 

— Clucago Post. 



Money 

Talks 

Here 



And has a goodly audience, 
because our statements in 
the newspapers are made 
with extreme care, and un- 
swervedly mean just what 
they say. 

We have pushed the prices 
below the qualities of a sea 
of merchandise in order to 
reduce the surplus stocks 
previous to inventor}*. If you 
■want the best, this is an ex- 
ceptionally rare opportunity 
to secure it easy. 

The finest Underwear, the fin- 
est Hosier}^ the most stylish 
and trustworthy Cloaks, the 
most famous Gloves, stand- 
ard Linens, the most desir- 
able Comforts and Blankets, 
exquisite Furs of all kinds, 
fine French Millinery, Silks, 
Woolen Dress Goods, Laces, 
Ribbons, of the best, at the 
most diminutive prices, to 
close all surplus stocks. 

This Means 
WHAT IT SAYS. 



ONE CENT A AVOEI)! 
Herald Wants, 

Popular Because Enectivc. 

One oent a word ; 75 coiit.s a line pir month. 
No advertisement l.ikAu for looa than 15 coats. 
Payments mast be maJ^i in ad^'ance. 

SITUATIONS WANTED. FREE. 

Allperoons wanting sltnatione can use Tbo 
Httrald want colomua tor three insertions free 
of charge. 

This doofl not iuclnde agents or employment 
otUoes. 

Parties advertising in thoeocolnmns may have 
answers addressed in care of The Herald and 
will bo given a chock to enable thom to got 
answers ti« tiioir advertisenients. All answers 
should bo properly unclosed in ouvelopoe. 



61 i-ti.-irioys irAKi-r/ki: 



I ^ lUL WANTS A SITUATION" FOU (iEN- 
VT oral house work. I'loasecall or address, 
732 Twenty-third avonuo wost, Duluth. 



ANTKD-I'OSITION BY 
u storo. fit 
speaks Swedish. 



VV clerk in storo. t'ity refcrcncos. Expor- 



ionceil aud 
Herald, 



A LADY AS 

f>nco8. Expor- 
Addrosa U 2<i, 



ONE CENT A WORD. 



R 



T(>^llKKT -inns K^i. 

ENT YOCfu HOUBESrFL.4^T8 AND 8TOHES 
of Alexander <fc Speyers, 216 W. BDi>erlor et. 



A HOUSE TO RENT 
free. Oall on U. 
Third avenue west. 



FOR THE 
A. Taussig 



WINTEH 
& Co., 17 



ONE CENT A WORD! 



FBATKRNITlEti. 



^ 



tary. 



PALESTINE LOIXIE No. 7», A. F. A 
A. .M. Upgiilar mooting tirstand third 
Mondiy evoaiugs of overv moath at 7 :30 
o'clock. Next meeting Jan. 1, 1^91. W. 
ii. Patvoi., V\ . M., Edwin Mooen. socre- 



■ TO JftKUT- UOi/MS 

FOUR SMALL ROOMS WITH CITY WATER, 
suitable for small family, at 2i East .Sec- 
ond street. Apply at l>i(il West Superior street. 



F 



OR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM. IN- 

quire 13 West Hecoud street. 



'UHNISIIKD ROOMS 



light 
street. 



houeekoepiug. 



FOR RENT. FOR 
431 East Superior 



l.-'OR KICNT-FURNlsHEl) ROOM WITH 
X^ lx>ard. 120 First aveune west. 

T.^OR RENT. TWO PLEASANT ROOMS. 
r brick house, hot waUsr heat. gas,bath. two 
blocks from tSpalding. 2Vi Fifth avenue west. 



ICELY FUUNISHED 
modern coi 
oronces required 



NICELY FUUNISHHI) ROOMS, EVERY 
modern conveiiieuco, at the Lowell. Ref- 



^ 



IONIO LOIXiE No. 186, A. F. A A. 
RAgolar meoti'j.iBReooud and fourth 



Monday nvfininge of every uioEt*i. Next 
mc-etinjsr Dec 27ih, 7 :ltt p. m.,— Installa- 
tion— '4. L. Fraeor, W. ii., U. W. 
Cheadle. t-orretary. 



KEYSTONE CHAPTER No. ao, U. A. M. 
Stat'd coin.-nnnications second arid fonrth 
Woonosdhy evenings of oarh n.outh at 7 :3U 



o'cloeV. Next meeting I>ec. 
— election of otlicers. iJtiO. 
J. Hmitor. secretary. 



y.i, aimital meeting 
A. Fiack H. P., T. 



1 POSITION WANTED-BY A YOUNG MAN 
of 2i ye.irs, m ollico, will work for board, 
lirst class penman. Address lieorge Brown, care 
Merchants hotel, t'ity. 



SITUATION AS PA&TRY COOK BY A COM- 
petent woman or would cook for a family 
of ten or twelve. Address H ft. Herald oflico. 



8^ 



S 



ITUATION WANTED BY THOROUGHLY 
competent young man asstenogrsoher, two 
.v ars' experionco iu lirst-ciass law office: nia,- 
. iiKio furnished; references. Address M 125, 
Duluth Evening Herald. 

WANTED-PERM*NENT POSITION BY 
competent l)0(.kkeei)er of five years' ex- 
porioDco. Address Boi>kkoeper, Herald oiBce, 
Dnluth. 

WANTED-.SITUATION BY AN EXPnE- 
ioDc'.d baker. Acidress F 62, Herald. 



WANTED-WASHING 
All work tirst class. 



TO TAKE HOME. 
2.5 West First si reet. 



WANTED-TWO MEN OF GOOD APPKAK- 
once to canvass and collect. 4U3 Chamber 
of Commerce. 

VyANTED-AN INThLI.iaENr, HCSTLING 

paper. Address .11, Herald. 




The Ishpeming Iron Ore is again at- 
tacking the quality of the Mesaba ore, 
claiming that owing to its fineness no 
furnace can afford to work as high as 
20 per cent of the ore. The Ishpeming 
paper has never lost any opportunity to 
malign the Mesaba, and it is needless to 
say that this statement is not any more 
correct than its previous stories. 



Duluth is getting considerable adver- 
tising out of the bifurcated iron ore 
meeting. It is free advertising also and 
that is better than free ore. 



The Most Dangerout Feature. 
Iron Trade Review: The free ore 
feature is one of the most unjust and 
dangerous provisions of the bill, and rfo 
stone should be left unturned by the in- 
terests, b )th North and South, which it 
threatens, to secure its defeat. 

Exceptional Prosperity. 
Iron Trade Review: A very credita- 
ble holiday and industrial number of The 
Duluth Evening Herald comes to us— 
twenty-four pages of specially prepared 
matter printed on pink paper. With 
manufactured products totaling a value 
of $13,000,000 in the year, nearly 7000 
people given employment and $3,000,000 
paid out in wages, as The Herald's figures 
represent, the position of Duluth is one 
of exceptional present prosperity and of 
abundant promise. 

... ■♦■ — ■ ■ ■ - 

He is a Good Authority. 
Appleton Crescent: Ex-Senator Doo- 
liltle, of Wisconsin, cKaims to have dis- 
covered that the United States fulfills 
the fifth part of the Biblical vision of 
King Nebuchadnezzar and will ultimate- 
ly become mistress of the world. Judge 
Doolittle has been a close Bible student 
for hfty years. 

A Royal Amusement. 

Qneen Lili knelt by'r wicket gale, 

Uo-kalani! Kaiulani! 
Art musing o'er affairs tif state. 

Sail saddle-colored queon? 
Fr( in her lips, like words from heaven, 

t'omes soft yulaca for mishaps - , 

Li«t, she whi'tlep ! "Pest, cmno seven !" 

tiueenie's shooting craps ! 

—Chicago Times. 



W7.ANTED-MAN TO WORK FOR HIS 
VV board and room. 16 First avenue eabt. 

WANTEi>— PORTER TO WORK FOR ROOM 
and board. Addrcs<; G S7, Herald. 

WANTED-MEN OF FAIR ADDRESS OUT 
of einployinent to know they can make 
big money at wi>rk lor us here in the city. Call 
at once Tha Singer Manufacturing company, 
t'ii5 West Superior street. 

CALK6MENTO SELL BAKING POWDER. 
O We pat imr goods in Glass Rolling Pins. 
4<"iO month and expenses, or cijmmission. Chi- 
cago Baking Powder Co., 767 Van Buron street, 
Chicago. 

n^WO GOOD HUSTLERS, SALARY AND 
A commission to sell- goods ou instalment. 
i'lS West Superior street. 



RENT 

lis for I 
month. Apply 120 First avenue west 



ii^OR RENT - THREE UNFURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping, rout S5 per 



FOR RENT— FIRST FLOOR FL.\T OF 
live ro!)m?, h.'irdwood finish, centrally lo- 
cated. Apply 120 First avenue west. 



LADIES-IF YOU LIKE TO KNOW THE 
way through married life troubles, send 
2-ceut f-tamp and got a pass. Address £ ^, 
Herald. 

MARRIED LADI?:S-SEND 10 CENTS FOE 
"Infallible Safftgnaid" (no medicine, no 
deception ;) jnst what yoa want. Ladies' BaEar, 
Kansas City, Mo. 



AUCBITRGT3. 

ALBERI BRYAN, SloluiHROWB. WARE 
houses and heavy buildings a specialty. 

TBAPHAGEN k PITZPiTKlCK, ARCtU- 
tecix. R<iom£ 911 and !»17, Torry building, 
Dnlath, MUm. 



TniltW/X'K. 



DULUTH COUMANDERY No. 18. 
K. T. Stated coticla?e at 7 :aO 
o'clock first Tnesday evenings of 
every month. Next conclave will 
held ou Tnesday. Jan. 2, ls94. W. 
G. Tan Brook, E. C. ; Alfred LoRichenx. secre- 
tary. 




tCMFLOVMKNT OFFICB. 

rpHE MO.ST REfiiPECTAiiLE UCENBED 
X c8ico in Dnluth, f!«e of c.'iarge to all girls, 
also have a foD ILce of hair switches, chaiua, ote. 
Mrs. M. C. Beibold. 22f> East Snperior street. 



f3RlVATE HOSPITAL-MRS. L. BALDWIN, 
i Midwi'o. Full graduate of German o(>]le»i" I 
of accouchement. Cupping and vaccinating j 
done. 609 East Third street. 



^^^^^jrr.43TK«^rT.sc^r>iyyrEor^^ 

WANTED-A COUPLE OF ROOMS NICE- 
ly locateil, for the winter Rent must be 



I reasonable. Address U ■'iO, Herald. 



n^'uTKU 



^EtiAi.K HKhh 



WANTED-A FIRST CLASS MEAT 
pastrycook at Midland hotel. 



AND 



WANTED-A WIDOW 
caro of young child. 



ahl. 



LADY TO TAKE 
Address, H 49, Uer- 



rorsn. 

L-^OUND-POCKEIBOOk. OANER CAN 
J? Lave it by proving property and paying for 
advertisement. No. li3 West First st-ect. 



1-OR (f.i.l.K- Jl ISCt'L L XS£:i-( S, 



For 5a le or Rent. 

The bnilding sitnate at lOG West Michigan 
htreet, now occupied by the Dulnth Kloctrio 
Light and Power Company, with central steam 
iieating apparatus. 
For further information enquire at 

HAETMAN ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., 

Boom 3, Exchange Baildinp. 
^iyj. iyi...tmfun.«)ijw./MBmTWwaw«»gng«tM 



HUTELS. 



A Washington dispatch states that 
Maj. Baldwin has declared to close 
friends that he may be a candidate for 
re-election to congress next fall. 



The population of Duluth has; increased 
10,000 since Sunday. 



Many good resolutions will be broken 
before the end of the week. 



Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 

-~- — ■ - ■ ■ ■ » — 

You can rent your rooms, or houses 
quickly through The Herald want 
columns. 



BEWAREi^HrGRIP 

Of. Edson fears another epidemic, 
and sounds the alarm. 

In Itinfr and chest pains, coughs, colds, 
hoarseness and pneumonia, no other 
external remedy alTord.s prompt preveu- 
tion and quicker cure than 

BENSON'S PORODS PUSTER. 

Indorsed by over 5,000 Physicians and 
Chemists. Be sure to pret the ponuino 
Benson's, may be had from all druggists. 

SEABURY & JOHNSON, Chemists, N. Y. City. 



Hawaii. 
The Hawaiian Islands are twelve in 
number, only eight being inhabited. 
They were discovered in 1778 by the 
celebrated Capt. Cook, who, on his re- 
turn the following vear, was murdered 
by the natives. Cook named the group 
the Sandwich islands, in honor of the 
earl of Sandwich, who was at that time 
tirst lord of the British admiralty. 
Hawaii is the native name of the largest 
island, and the appellation favored by 
the people for the whole group. Hono- 
lulu, the capita!, is situated on Hawaii, 
and is 2100 miles from San Francisco, 
3440 from Yokohama, and 4484 from 
"Sydney. The succession of the native 
dynasty has been: Kamehaq^eha I., 
Kamehameha II., Lunalilo, Kalakaua 
and Liliuokalani, the depo.sed queen. 
Kamehameha II. and his i^ueen visited 
England in 1824, and died there of 
measles. King Kalakaua, who died two 
years ago, made a tour of the world in 
1881, from which he returned with very 
extravagant ideas. He erected a palace 
at a cost of $1.000,000, becameindettod to 
Claus Spreckeis $750,000 for money ad- 
vanced for current expenses. He came 
under the influence of one 
Gibson, who visited the island as an 
agent for the Mormons (then contemp- 
lating removal from Utah). Instigated 
by Gibson, the king brought forward a 
project for a loan of $io,o«)0,ooo and a 
tax levy of $4,500,000. How heavy a 
burden was proposed may be seen from 
the fact that the population in 18S4 was 
only 80,000, and the property on which 
the tax was to be laid was almost wholly 
in the banc's of 4000 or 50J0 whites. In 
18S7 the white inhabitants rose in revo- 
lution, and Kalakaua was obliged to 
sign a new constitution. Twice before 
the present troubles the islands have 
been briefly under foreign domination— 
once a British officer tuck possession arid 
formed committees of government; again 
French officers .ibrogated the laws, dic- 
tated treaties and established the Cath- 
olic faith as the state religion. This was 
previous to the independence of the 
kingdom being guaranteed by the United 
States, Great Britain and France in 1844. 
Hawaii is a most interesting spot to visit, 
and many round-the-world travelers 
h.ive spent a month there, the mij-wity 
of whom have returned via San Fran- 
cisco and the I'nited States, taking the 
Burlington Route east Jrom Denver. 
For tickets, maps and inform.ition re- 
garding the Burlington lines, address 
W. J. C. Kenyon, Gen. Pass. Agent, St. 
Paul, Minn. 

Read Century Piar.o Co.'s ad,, page 6. 



"POTEL BENNETT, WEST DULUTH, CA- 
Xx tors to social clubs aud sleighing parties; 
b.inqnet and dancing hall ; all modern con- 
veniences. P. F. Smith, proprietor. 



AUCTIOVEEB. 



W. 



D. GORDON, 324 WEST 8UPEHIOB ST. 



UAH^AOE. 

DR. JOHN GREENFIELD — MASSAGE 
treatment ; satisfaction to all guaranteed, 
liooms 1 and 2 Max Witth block, IS West Sui-e- 
rior street. OHice hours, 11 to 1 a. m-, 4 to 6 p. m. 



jeTjfAJfcr.^^ 

MONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS, 
watches, jewelry, etc., Standard 
.1 cwolry and Loan Office. 324 W. 8np. 
St. BnBinoss strictly conndential. 



lONEY TO LOAN IN ANY AMOUNT 05 

horses, wagons, bonsehold ftimitnre, pi 
anoc. diamonds, jewolry and all kinds of cor- 
eoual property, on "hojt notice and a lower rate 
that yon can possibly got it elsewhere. InQnire 
of Wm. Horkau, manager, Dnluth Mortgage 
La^kc company, rooi.. 430, Chamber of Commerce 
baUding, Dolnth. 




MONEY TO IjOAN ON 
jdwslry. G. A^ Kloln, only lioionoed pawn- 



DIAMONDS AND 
inly lioieuued \ 
broker in DolnUi, 17 West Superior street. 



WANl'ED-THE USE OF TWO LARGE 
wood heating stoves for the winter, by 
the Associated Charities, 
bridge bmldimr. 



OF TWO 

for the 
Ajjply at 415 Wood- 



CHARLES F. HOWeT SPECIAL .ITTEN- 
tioQ givHu to the examination and reports 
ing on mineral lands. Iron lands bought and 
sold. AmUyses of all klrds made on short 
rotiee. 6i<l (yiiamDer of Commerce. 



k'XAIitJB.lNii. 



w. 



W. MoMlLLAN COMPANY. 
HEATING AND PLUMBING. 

215 Weet Snperlor street. 



Cheriff's execution SALE.- 

Under and by virtue of an execution issued 
out of aud under the seal of the district court 
of the state of Minnesota, in and for tbo 
Eleventh judicial district, nnd county of St. 
Ltmis, on the 2!lth day of December. 1S93. upon a 
judgnii-nt rendered aud docketi.'d in paid court 
and county in an action therein, wherein Leroy 
Coons was plaintiff and Jolm Lemiue 
defendant, in favor of said plaiutiif and against 
said defeodant, for the sum of rwelve hnudred 
thirty-eight and 24-K'O dollars, which said execu- 
tion iias to n-.e, as sLerifl'cf taid St. Louis County, 
been duly directed and delivered, I have levied 
upon and wi.'l sell at public auction, to the 
highest cash bidder, at the front door of the 
court liouse in the city of Duluth. in said county 
of St. IxTiuis, on Thursday, tbo 1.5th day of Feb- 
ruary. IRti, at ten o'cl<>ck in the forenoon of 
that day, all the right, title and interest that 
tho aoove named judgment debtor h."id in and 
to tho real estate hnreiuaftor described on tho 
iSth day of April, l.Sii3. that being the date of 
the rendition of said judgment, the description 
of the property beiug as follows, to-wit : 

Lot nine (9;, block seventy-four (74), West 
Dnluth, F.mrth Division. Lot seven (7), block 
forty-four (44), 'West Dulnth, First Division. 
J-ot seventeen (.17), block e'ght (8>, and lots 
tliirtoen n.1) and fonrteen (14). block eigliteon (18) 
of Stewart's Addition to West Dnlath. Lota 
e^ght (8). nine (9), ten (10) and eleven (11) of 
block fourteen (14), MacFarlano's Grassy Point 
Addition to Dulnth. 

All according to the recorded plats thereof on 
file in tho office of tho register ofde-ds in and 
for the county of St, Louis and all of said prop- 
erty being situated in St. Louis County, Minno- 

"oatod Doluth, Minn., December 30th. 1SP3. 

PaulShakvt, 
Sheriff Bt Louis c<)nnty, Minn. 
O. J. Klippen, 
Deputy Sheriff. 
Jno. Jenswold. Jk., 

Attorney for Judgment t'reditor. 
J 2-9-1C--23 30 F613 

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THE DUIiUTH EVENING HERALD: TUESDAY, JANUARY 2,1894. 




Fift^ Men Called at The Herald Office Today 
and Told a Sad Story of Hard- 
ship. 



They Sleep at the "Friendly Inn" and Must 

Depend on Charity For What 

They Eat. 



All Claim That They Want .Work But Posi- 
tively Cannot Find Employment 
of Any Kind. 



This has not been a merry Christmas 
and a happy New Year for some people 
in Duluth. There are those in humble 
homes, and those on the streets because 
they have no homes, who are cryinjj for 
bread. They have no money, no friends, 
no abiding place. Cold and hunger are 
their unwelcome companions. They 
have willing hearts and strong arras, 
but not a day's work can be secured. 
They are. against their choice, placed in 
the position of alms, seekers and vag- 
rants, and most keenly do they feel their 
positions. 

This morning John McDonough. ac- 
companied by nearly half a hundred 
others called at The Herald editorial 
rooms. "We come up," said he, "to see 
if you can tell us what to do. I have lived 
four years in Duluth, and at present have 
my home with a wife and two children 
313 East Fifth street. I don't want to go 
to go to jail nor 1 don't want to become a 
crank, nor do I want to go to St. Peter. 
It has been three and one-half months 
since I have had any work. When the 
brass foundry at West Duluth closed 
down 1 went to the wheat fields in Da- 
kota. When the harvest closed I came 
home but I cannot get enough to sup- 
port my family. Early in my trouble I 
mortgaged my furniture and now I am 
in worse shape than ever. If a fellow 
cannot get work I see no way for him to 
live unless he has help. 

"It is true that Mr. Clark will give or- 
ders not to exceed $5. Some get $3. 
That helps and is appreciated but how 
long will such a sum keep a family. The 
county has a limit to what it will do. 

"I want right here to speak a word for 
m>self and the rest of the boys in behalf 
of iMessrs. Fitger and Anneke for the 
generous manner in which they have 
given out Bethel meal tickets. There 
has been no limit with them. All who 
came were helped. If there was a family 
of ten all got tickets and three times a 
day. too. l>ut last Saturday these kind 
gentlemen placed a restriction upon 
their issue of tickets, so that source of 
aid is no longer open. 

"Some time ago a friend loaned me 30 
cents to buy some nails. Yesterday 1 
secured that amount and was going to 

{)ay it back when, on my way to the 
letbel, I met six of the boys who had 
not eaten for a couple of days. I gave 
them the 30 cents and then borrowed 25 
cents more to buy food for my own fam- 
ily. Last evening, with a single dollar 
which had been handed me to put where 
it would do the most good, I fed thirteen 
of the boysjat the Bethel. They can get 
a meal there for q cents. 

"I have charge of the sleeping quar- 
ters lately opened up in the basement of 
the Christian church. Fifty-three bunks 
have been put in and more will be as ne- 
cessity requires. Those bunks were all 
filled last night and all these boys here 
with me helped fill them. Many of those 
out of work and money have lived here 
for years and don't like to make their 
distress known to the public but they 
have to come to it." 

The crowd with Mr. McDonough was 
composed chiefly of single men. Nearly 
all had good faces and seemed to be 
representative workingmen. Some had 
lived in Duluth for years, while others 
have been here only a few days. Most 
of the latter class come here to go into 
the woods, fail to find a chance and soon 
are "dead broke" among strangers. All 
ages, sizes, trades and nationalities were 
included, but laborers predominated. 
Several told their stories. Albert Grey 
said: 

"I am from the Dakota wheat fields 
but my old home is in Chicago. I got 
twenty days work at harvesting in South 
Dakou and then went to North Dakota 
where I worked six weeks more. Then 
work stopped. I came here about six 
weeks ago expecting to get work in the 
woods. The tact that I am here in this 
shape shows that I failed to get such a 
job. ' 

John Johnston related the following: 
,'I have lived in Duluth for two years. 
I was out in one of Mitchell & McClure's 
camps as sawyer. I worked seventeen 
days at the rate of $14 per month. There 
were about 100 men in that camp and 
when the snow got too deep six gangs of 
sawyers were laid off. I had S9.02 com- 
ing. That's all gone and no more work 
can be found." 

Mike Breikel, a large, intelligent, hon- 
est faced man, related his experiences: 
"I was a silver miner in Montana," he 
said. "I was one of the 20,000 men 
thrown out of work by the shutting down 
of the mines in that state. I stayed 
around two months, hoping things would 
resume, Hut was disappointed in that. I 
then decided to make a break for the 
woods. I came here six weeks ago with 
fig cash but could find no work. A few 
days ago 1 heard that work could be 
found in the iron mines on the range. It 
took my last cent to buy a ticket sixty 
miles out from here. When I got there 
not a single man was needed. I then 
walked back, having nothing to eat dur- 
ing the whole tramp of sixty miles. I 
was staggering and just ready to drop 
when I found Mr. McDonough last 



night. I was one of the thirteen who got 
suppers out of that $i he told about. I 
am a miner but am willing to do any- 
thing I can find." 

J. I>. Johnson, a broad shouldered, 
strong limbcil fellow stepped up as the 
boys were leaving and said: "I have 
been here three years, 1 was working a 
short time ago for Scott eS: Holston 
about fifteen miles north of the city. 
Last Friday several of us were laid off- 
had more men than they needed — and I 
came into the city. 1 got $133 month 
and lK)ard. While in camp I bought 
some new clothing and my time checic 
called for only §2. That was last Fri- 
day. I slept at 'Friendly Inn," .is the 
Ixiys call the basement of the Christian 
church, last night, and here I am, out of 
cash and unable to find a thing to do." 

Mr. McDonough said that he could 
bring up 200 men who are out of money, 
work and food. He said that some are 
members of the Y. M. C. A., others are 
bricklayers, woodsmen, common labor- 
ers, mechanics, in fact, almost any trade 
or class conceivable. 

"I don't know what to do," said the 
spokesman of the crowd as it passed 
down the stairs, "but we cannot starve, 
and if we cannot get work it seems as if 
some means of help must be found. For 
one thing, the city or county might start 
a woodyard. Suppose a tract o? timber 
was secured and cordwood cut. That 
would be saleable in time and all the 
city or county would have to do would 
be to advance the wages and get back 
the money when the product was sold. 
If anyone, however, can solve this ques- 
tion of bread and butter, I wish he would 
do so as soon as possible." 



SOME WHO WERE THERE. 



-The Other Side" Gives its Version ot the Iron 
Ore Meeting. 

To the Public: The labored explana- 
tions of the protectionists' committee, 
appointed by the Temple opera meeting, 
in its statement of "Just how it was," 
need corrections in several particulars, 
and the additions ot other current history 
in order to make it harmonize with the 
truth. 

Were the Democrats of St. Louis 
county justified in their conclusion that 
the object and purpose of the promoters 
of the meeting, except E. C. Gridley, 
Henry Truelsen, A. E. Humphreys ynd 
his clerks, and the four or five good 
natured Democrats who signed the call, 
was to place the Democracy of St. Louis 
county in a false position before the 
Democracy of the state and country? 

Let us examine some of the current 
history. For more than four weeks past 
the News Tribune and Duluth Herald 
have strenuously endeavored to work up 
a sentiment in this community against 
the Wilson bill in general and against 
reducing the duty on iron ore in particu- 
lar. Democrats did not object to this, 
but they did object to the statements or 
assumption repeatedly made in these 
same papers that the great majority of 
the Democrats in Duluth were opposed 
to the Wilson bill and to placing the 
great staples of raw materials on the free 
list, for the reason that they were untrue 
and that these papers had the means of 
ascertaining that they were untrue. 

For the past two weeks such Republi- 
can politicians as J. H. Tames, Monroe 
Nichols. S. F. Snively ana several others, 
who have some iron mines, and who, as 
would appear from their conduct at 
least, can see no interests in this country 
but their iron interests, have been devot- 
ing a great deal of time button-holing 
Democrats to sign a call for this meeting. 
That they were repulsed in nearly every 
case will not be denied. That in some 
instances some of them attempted to 
abuse Democrats who refused can easily 
be shown. This certainly ought to have 
been sufficient to indicate that the Dem- 
ocrats were Tnot very much opposed to 
the Wilson bill. 

On Sunday Morning, Dec. 24, the News 
Tribune in large head lines stated "Du- 
luth to Protest," "Democrats here do not 
like the Wilson Bill," Citizens Mass- 
meeting Called," "It will be non-parti- 
san but only Democrats have been 
asked to sign the Call." And in the ar- 
ticle appeared the following, after men- 
tioning the call for the mass meeting: 
"The action, however, has been taken by 
the Democrats and only members of that 
party have been asked to sign the call," 
and further on in speaking of the Wilson 
bill states with reference to the meeting, 
"that it will at lease show that the policy 
of that majority (referring to the Demo- 
cratic majority in congress) is not favored 
by the rank and file of the party." 

This certainly looked as though the 
object of the promoters of this meeting, 
whose views the News Tribune and Her- 
ald voiced, was to have this meeting 
called under Democratic auspices, to 
have the resolutions passed by iron ore 
protectionists, under the guise of non- 
partisanship, and to herald it throughout 
the country in the newspapers as the 
opinions and sentiments of the Demo- 
crats of St. Louis county. If there was 
any doubt about this conclusion it was 
dissipated by statements made by some 
of those same promoters in public places 
in Duluth during the forenoon of Dec. 28, 
the day of the meeting, to the effect that 
"they bad laid a trap for the Democrats 
and were going to put them in the hole 
in the afternoon's meeting." The 
public now knows who were "put in the 
hole." 

It is true, the Democrats resented this 
contemptible scheme as it appeared to 
them. It is true that many Republicans 
attended the meeting in good faith not 
knowing the questionable methods and 
purposes of the real promoters of the 
meeting and who now condemn such 
despicable methods and purposes as do 
the Democrats. It is true that the Dem- 
crats commenced to fill the city ball at 
about 1:30 p. m. on the day of the 
meeting, and that a few minutes before 
2 o'clock of the 250 men who were 
in the council chamber, not more than 
fifty belonged to the protectionist crowd. 
Whatever Mr. Gridley's purpose was 
prior to calling the meeting to order can 
only be judged by his actions. At two 
minutes bewre 2 o'clock, Mr. Gridley 



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was heard to whisper to Mr. Snively "to 
hurry out and get in their crowd before 
the meeting was called to order, as the 
crowd in the city hall was strongly 
against them," or words to that import. 
Did Mr. Gridley intend to wait there ten 
minutes, or fifteen minutes, or half an 
hour until his crowd got in and then call 
the meeting to order? 

At a minute and a half past 2 o'clock, 
(and the time was marked by not less 
than fifty men present.) T. T. Hudson, as 
any other man piesent who was inter- 
ested in the matter to come before that 
meeting had a perfect right to do, alter 
the time had .arrived for the meeting to 
begin, called the meeting to order, nomi- 
nated C. O. Baldwin for chairman, and 
after the nomination was seconded, put 
the motion to the house in the usual 
manner, (and there was not even a call 
for a division on the vote) and declared 
Mr. Baldwin elected. Several protec- 
tionists who were present have since ad- 
mitted that the free ore men in the city 
hall were in a large majority when the 
meeting was called to order. Even afttr 
Mr. Gridley and his allies left, the city 
hall continued to be well filled with Du- 
luth citizens. 

Will R. S. Munger, who signed the re- 
port that states that the meeting was 
called at two minutes before 2 o'clock, 
deny that he was with Z. D. Scott seve- 
ral blocks from the city hall at the time 
the meeting was called to order, and then 
told Scott that they were having a big 
time at the city hall and that he immed- 
iately went to the city hall and reached 
the council chamber as late as twenty 
minutes after 2 o'clock? 

Will Mr. Chester, who also signed said 
report, deny that it was after fifteen min- 
utes after 2 o'clock when he first reached 
the meeting ? Mr. Gridley was repeated- 
ly called to order and not permitted to 
speak, tor the very good reason that he 
refused to recognize the duly elected 
chairman and declared that he would 
not recognize the organization of the 
meeting. 

If there was any revolutionary or dis- 
orderly conduct at the city hall meeting 
it was on the part of those, who, after the 
citizens assembled there had organized 
the meeting by electing a chairman by 
majority vote, persistently refused to 
recognize the organization which had 
been perfected by those present, and 
boisterously attempted by mob force to 
override the will or the majority and or- 
ganize another meeting in the same 
place. It is a matter of common sense 
and of common parliamentary law that, 
when a number ot citizens have been 
called together to hold a meeting at a 
particular time and place, that at the 
time stated in the call, it is properly 
within their power to organize bv elect- 
ing a chairman and other officers. This 
was done at the city hall meeting.* 

It certainly was not improper for indi- 
viduals comprising this meeting to be 
unwilling to allow Mr. Gridley and his 
cohorts to override the perfected organi- 
zation of the meeting by speaking with- 
out recognizing the chairman or without 
being recognized bv the chairman. The 
chairman repeatedly ;.told Mr. Gridley 
that it he would recognize the chair he 
would be permitted to speak. It was 
not disorderly for those present to call 
for order and manifest their displeasure 
at the unwarranted attempt of Mr. Grid- 
ley Bnd some of his associates to disre- 
gard the will of the meeting and its or- 
ganization. 

Will any of these non-partisan gentle- 
men pretend to say that the selection of 
Mr. Baldwin as chairman of the meeting 
indicated a purpose to convert the meet- 
ing into a partisan demonstration? In 
order to make it non-partisan was it ne- 
cessary to choose a Republican protec- 
tionist to preside? If the promoters of 
this meeting and this self-constituted 
committee were really non-partisan in 
their aims, why did they not recognize 
the chairman and remain and participate 
in the meeting instead of bolting and or- 
ganizing another meeting? The very 
fact that they incontinently withdrew af- 
fords almost conclusive evidence that 
the men who promoted the meeting did 
so for partisan purposes, and the fact 
that a few so-called Democrats joined 
the bolters does not relieve them from 
that imputation. 

Morris Thcmas, 
W. H. Tripp. 
E. P. Alexander, 
John Rustgard. 
Austin N. McGindlev, 
C. J. Moore, 
Alfred Jacques, 
George L. Spencer, 
John C. Hollemback, 
H. J. Grannis, 
C. M, Parkhurst, 
T. T. Hudson, 
Charles T. Abbott. 
Frank Crassweller, 
C. O. Baldwin. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



'•Lost in New York." 
"Lost in New York," presented at the 
Temple yesterday afternoon and evening 
was as good as the average thrilling re- 
alistic drama and as usual depended 
more on the scenic and spectacular 
effects than the abihty of the company 
presenting it. The cast was fairly good. 
Nat Willis' tramp specialty was clever 
and Miss Lilly Sinclair, the soubrette, in 
her specialties was bright and pleasing. 
The steam launch and tank of water 
were decidedly realistic as was also the 
Madison Square garden scene. 

In Torment. 

Surely if there are any unhappy suf- 
ferers on earth upon whom the angels 
look down in pity it is people agonized 
with rheumatism. They are in torment 
the year around with little or no respite. 
Now, there is no evidence to which pub- 
licity has been given in behalf of Hos- 
tetter's Stomach Bitters more concurrent 
and convincing than that in behalf of its 
efficacy in incipient rheumatism. And 
since rheumatism and rheumatic and 
simple gout are among the most obsti- 
nate complaints to which this admirable 
remedy is adapted, and since they all 
have a fatal tendency to attack the vital 
organs, the advisability of the early use 
of the bitters, when they manifest tnem- 
selves, must be apparent. Efficacious, 
and most signally so, are the bitters, too, 
in malarial diseases, kidney and bladder 
inactivity, constipation, dyspepsia, liver 
complaint and nervous ailments. 

Notice o( Stockholders Meeting. 
Please take notice that the annual 
meeting of the stockholders of Lakeside 
Land company will be held at the office 
of the company. No. 506 First National 
Bank building, Duluth, Minnesota, on 
Wednesday, the third day of January, A. 
D., 1894, at 2 o'clock in the afternoon, 
for the purpose ot electing a board of 
directors for the ensuing year and trans- 
acting any and ;«ll other business that 
may properly come before said meeting, 
Wm. C. Sargent, 
Secretary. 




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ed to married Iiadi<is. 

Ask for 2)B. MOTT'S VSOXYnOYAX, FZIiIiS and take no other. 
'ijtr Send for circular, rrice 1JI.OO per boXt » boxe» lor $5.00. 

UK. MOTT'S CirEMilCAL CO., - Cleveland, OMo. 



PENNYROYAL PILLS. 



For Sale by 8. F. Boyce and Max Wirth. 




is made from the best leaf, 
in the best way, and by 
th best skill— that's why 



ITS AidCH THE BEST. 

Sold ever>"vvhere. Made only by the Oldest Tobacco 
Mfr's in America, and the largest in the world — the 

P. LORILLARD CO. 



Bt; 



Sold in 



MANHOOD RESTORED^^a:fs^-^ 

uervo'tis (T^feftMs, such as Weak Memory, lo«s of Br»iii Pawcr.Heud. 
uche. 'Wukefulnes*, Loat Maali*«(l, N)grhUrKiiiiasiob8.Qalclui«88. 
Kvil Droarnn. Liuck or CouOdenec, Kfsrroaanea*. »tl dralnaand loss 
of power In OncratlveOr-'aiis of eltber aex caawd br overeterUoti. 
yoathful error*, exce^sir(> uso Of tobaCCO, opium or •Umolaota wbicu 
k'ao loItiHrujltv, Consumption and Insanity. Conrenlent to carry In 
vi"<t p<» !((>t. bV mi:ll ptepaiil In plain box to any addtvM for SI each. 
<irO lorlW. (With every t$S order wofiire wrl«(«av«ar*iite« to 
cnrecrrL-liinri ibc money.t Sold by all dnidKlsta. Aakfor Hand accept 
no other. Write for free Medical Book »«nt Maled In plalA wrapper 
l> AKii: a tSI.\(i. Address *i:KVIi «E£J> CO., MmobIc TempU, CUc«co, IU 

Duluth, Minn., by S. F. BOYCE and by MAX WIRTH, Druggists. 




SAVED FROM A LIVING GRAVE. WEAK MEN CURED 

THE ELIXIR OF YOUTH. ^Zli^V^t^.^'^J^.^^T^t^tSl 

the Dames of tboee cured by thit 
Kreat remedy, or addr«6s with 
stamp, and we will send them to 
yon. We gnarantee this elixir to 
cure Spermatorrhea, or Nerrooe 
Debility, Lose of Power, Ni^bt 
Bmisxionn, and all Seminal weak- 
nees of any nature, arisinx from 
disease, orer-indalgence or abase 
of any kind. It effects ' peedy asd 
>pernjaDent cnree in old and 
yoan« of either sex, renews 
i<trenelh and restores the vicor of 

Prepared Only by THE GERMAN HOSPITAL REMEDY CO. S^.f^ty'.tf&iSdSSfcS*'^' 

GRAND RAHIDS. MICH. D«r bottle. 8ix bottleafor ». 

For Sale.By MAX WtRIH, Druggist, 13 West Superior, Street. 





LEGAL NOTICES. 



M 



OBTUA<iE HALK- 



^yhoroall default lias Immiu uiado iu Uio c<jt.- 
ditii)D« of a certain iiiurt^ratfeKiviti) tu Mtciiro a 
part «if Ihi! idirciiawj price of the proniiiies 
therein dn«cribn<l. duly executed and delivered 
by John K. Duil, murtgatfor, to Aoder» Ped«r- 
aon, inort«HKee, bearing date the second day 
of November. A. 1>. 1«»1, and with a bower of 
Bale tiierein otiutained, duly recorded in the 
office of the re«iiit«r <if dee.ls in and for the 
counter of St. Louis and state of UiuuesotA, on 
the lull day «>( Novtinl»«r. IS91, at four u'cl<x:l( 
in the aft.eruoou of naid (lay, in book (S7 of 
niort^a^es, on page I7U thereof ; 

And whereas eaid mortgage contains a pro- 
vision that if defanlt he made iu any of the 
pruvi8i<.nti of foid mortgage the mortgagee may 
thoriMi|Kin ileclare the whole sum srcurerl by 
Buid itiortffage to be due; 

And whereas default was made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of one thousand dollars 
($1000), which, accordini? to the provisions of 
said mortgage, became due and payable on the 
second day of November. ISOi. and raid default 
still continue!*, by reation whereof the under- 
signed tnort^agee has heretofore declared, aud 
does htreby declare, the whole sum secured by 
said mortgage to bn now due; 

And whereas therf is therefore claimed to be 
due, and there is actually due, upon said mort- 
gage debt at the date of this notice the sum of 
eight thousand seven hundred and seventy-five 
dollars ($8775) principal and interest, and one 
hnndred dollars (."^IfXi) attorney's fee stipulated 
for iu said mortgage in case of the foreclosure 
of said mortgage; 

And whereas uo action or proceeding at law 
or otherwise has been instituted to recover the 
debt secured by b&id mortgage or any part 
thereof : 

Now, therefore, notice is hereby given that by 
virtue of the power of sale contained in said 
mortgage, which has become operative by 
reason of the default above lueutioued, aud pur- 
suant to the statute in such case made aud 
provided, tlie said mortgage will be foreclosed 
by sale of the premises described in and 
covered by said mortgage, vix. : Au undi- 
vided one half (H) interest in lot one hundred 
ninety-four (194). block twenty-three (23), Du- 
luth Proper. Second Division, according to 
the recordefi plat thereof on lile and of rec- 
ord in the oiiice of the register of deeds in and 
for said cotinty of St. Louis and state of Minne- 
sota; which said premises, with the heredita- 
ments and appurtenances, will be sold at public 
auction, to the highest bidder for cash, to pay 
said debt and interest, and the taxes (.if any) 
on said premises, and one hundred ($100) dollars 
attorney's fee, as stipulated in and by said mort- 
gage in case of foreclosure, and the disburse- 
ments allowed by law; which sale will be 
made by the sheriff of St. Louis County, 
Minnesota, at the front door of the court 
house in the city of Duluth, in the state of Min- 
nesota and county of St. Louis, on the Ist day 
of Febrnary, 1894, at ten o'clock a. m. of that 
day, subject to redemption at any time within 
one year from date of sale as provided by 
law. 

Dateu at Ooluth, Minnesota, December lltb. 
1893. 

Akdebs Pbdbsson, 
Mortgagee. 
McMahon & Mitchell, 

Attorneys for Mortgagee, 
120 Chamber of Commerce building. 

Dnluth, Minnesota. 
Dec 19.26 Jan 2-9-19-23 

•VrOTICE. 

U. 8. Land Office, Duluth, Minn., ? 
Nov, llth, 1893. J 
Complaint having been entered at this office 
by William Lorouz against Angus McNeil for 
abandoning his homestead entry No. 8^69, dated 
May 3rd, lMt3, aix>u the nw^* of ne5i and uV4 
of nwH and 6e\ of uw?.i sei'tion IS, township 
68 N., range 30 W., 4th P. H ., in St. Lop.s 
County, Minn., with a view to the cancellation 
of sain en ry, the said parties are hereby sum- 
moned to appear at this office on the 12th day 
of January, 1894, at 10 o'clock a. m., to respond 
and furnish testimony concerning eaid alleged 
abandoumcnt. 

A. J. Tavlob, 

Kegister. 
Mee & Sharp, 

Attorneys for Contestant. 

Tyf OBTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE- 

Default having been made In the payment of 
the sum of $9J0 principal and $138 interest, total 
S1038, which last named sum is claimed to be 
due and is due at the date of this notice upon a 
certain mortgage duly executed and delivered 
by John J. Wheeler, mortgagor, to J. Geo. Scar- 
lett, mortgagee, bearing date Oct. 11, 1^*S. and 
with a power of sale therein contained recorded 
in the office of the register of deeds of St. Louis 
Co., Minn., on Oct. 12, 18S8. at 9 o'clock a. m., in 
book K of mortgages, on page 131; which 
mortgage, together with the debt secured 
thereby, was assigned by said J. Geo. ticarlett 
to Francis H. Barnard by written assignment 
bearing date April 9, 1»89, recorded in said regis- 
ter of deods office on April 10, 1S89, at 9 o'clock 
a. m , lu Ixjok 34 of mortgages, page 215 ; which 
said mortgage, together with the debt secured 
thereby, was assigned by eaid Francis H. Bar- 
nard to Hannah B. Smith by written assignment 
bearing date April 11, 18S9, recorded in said reg- 
ister of deeds oHioe on April 12. lgS9, at 2 o'clo»nc 
p. m., in book 34 of mortgages, page 221 ; and 
no action or proceeding having been instituted 
at law or otherwise to recover the debt secured 
by said mortgage, or any part thereof; 

Now, therefore, notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of the power of sale contained lu said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such 
case made and provided, the said mortgage will 
be foreclosed by a sale of the premises described 
in and conveyed by said moitgage, viz : ijots 
Ave (5) and six (6) in block for^r-six (4t)) , West 
Duluth, First Division, according to the re- 
corded plat thereof on file in the office of the 
register of deeds of said St. Louie Co., Minn., 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances, 
which sale will be made by the 8h«riff of said 
St. Louis Co., at the front door of the court 
house, in the city of Duluth, in said cnunty and 
state, on the '26th day of January, 1894. at 10 
o'clock a. m. of that day, at public venaul, to 
the highest bidder for cash, to pay said debt 
and interest, and STiO attfirney's fees, as stipu- 
lated in aud by said mortgage iu case of fore- 
clotiure, and tlie disbursements allowed by law, 
subject to redemption at any time within one 
year from the day of sale, as provided by law. 

Dated December 11, iS93. 

Uaxnah B. Smith, 

Assignee of Mortgage. 
Scott Bex. 

Attorney for Assicuee of Mortgage, 
102 Torrey Buihiing. 

Dalnth, Minn. 
Dec-12 19-23-Jan-2 9-16 



ORDER FOR HEARING APPLICATION 
FOR APPOINTMENT OF ADMINIS- 
TRATOR. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, ( „ 
CotJNTY OF St. Louis, f 

In Probate Court, Special Term, December 
18 th, 1893. 
In the matter of the (state of Robert Welsh, 

deceased : 

On receiving and filin<r the petition of John 
Welsh, of the county of Clark, Wisconsin, repre- 
senting among other things that Robert Welsh, 
late of the county of St. Louis, in the state of 
Miunesota, on the I'lth day of i eccmber, \. D. 
1893. at the county of St. Louis, died intestate, 
aud being an inhabitant of this county at the 
time of liis death, leaving gootlf^, chattels, and 
estate within this counry, and that the raid peti- 
tioner is a brother of ssid deceased, aud praying 
that administration of said estate be to Frank 
Hicks granted ; 

It is ordered, that said potitiim be heard be- 
fore said court, on Monday, the 15th day of 
January, A. D. 1>*94, at ten o'clock a. m , at the 
probate office in Duluth, in said oouotv. 

Onlered further, that notice tliereof he given 
to the heirs of said deceased aud Ut all persons 
interested, by publishing this order once in 
each week for three 8ucc«ssive weeks prh)r 
to said day of hearing, in The Duluth 
Evening Herald, a daily newbpai>«r printed and 
published at Duluth. iu said county. 

Dated at Duluth, the ISth day of December, 
A. D., 1893. 

(Seal.] By (be Court. 

Phineaa Ater. 
Judge o( Prubate, 

Dec 19-26 Jan 2 



DR. L. A. FAULKNER 

King of 
Specialists. 

Treats successfully 
all forms of Blood, 
Ne Tou« and Orinary 
diseases. 

NEEVOCSDKBlL- 
ITV, with Its many 
gloomy syraptoEs, 
cureo. 

LOST VITALITY 
perfectly end p^rsa- 
nenrly r( stored. 

BLOOD POISON care^ tor life withont m«r- 

COtT. 

URINARY DISEASES cored qnicklr and 
thoroughly. 
CONbCLTATION FREE. 

Office Room 4, Over 19 East Superior Street. 




LEG-AL NOTICES. 

/ fcFFK E OF TnK WAUKION IRON COS! 
»/ I'Huy. Duluth. Mint)., December JO. V^%i. 
Notice IS hereby givefi thai «.lic annual meeting 
of the stock hoi lerK of th« Wabigon Iron Com- 
paiiy for tho oloctiou of directors aud the trans- 
action of such other hasiuess as may bo brought 
before it. will l>e lield at the ofHce of the oom- 
oany. 407 Lycetim building, in the city of Du- 
luth. state of Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, UM. at two o'clock p. m. The trau•- 
f'=r bookswill beclosed at uf>on on December 
%th, 1NH3, and reopeue<l on Janaary 11, 1M94, at 
ten o'chick a m, W. U. Fihheb, 

Sec'y. 



OFFICB OP THR NIBIWA IRON ( OM 
puny, Duluth, Minn., December '£), l"'.!.}. 
Notice is hereby given that the annual meetiu*; 
of the tt<6ckholiIers of the Nibiwa Ir«»n Com- 
pany for the election of directors and the trans- 
action of such other bueinetie as may be brought 
before it, will he held at the office of the com- 
pany. 407 Lyceum building, in the city of Du- 
luth, state of Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, 1S94. at two o'clock p. m. The trans- 
fer books will be closed at nocn on December 
80th, 1893, and reopened on January 11. 1891, at 
ten o'clock a. m. W. U. Fisreb. 

Secy, 



OFFICE OF THE MINIWA IRON COM- 
pany, Dninth, Minn.. December i.9, isftj. 
Notice is hereby given that tlie annual meeting 
of the stockholders of the Miuiwa Iron Corn- 
pauy for the election of directors and the trans- 
action of such other bvisinesh as may be brougtit 
before ir, will be held at the office of the coim- 

f)aiiy, 407 Lyceum building, in the city of Du- 
nth, state of Minnesota, on the tenth day ol 
Januarv, 1894, at two o'clock p. m. The traui. 
fer books will be closet] at noon on Decentk»er. 
30th, lb98, and reopened on January 11, 1894. at 
tdu o'clock a. ni. W. H. Fisheb, 

Becy. 



OFFICE OF THE WENONA IRON COM- 
pany, Duluth, Minn., Doceniber 29. lf*a. 
Notice is hereby given that the annual mf-etiui: 
of the stockholders of the Weuona Iron Com- 
pany for the election of directors and tne trans- 
action of euch other business as may be brought 
before it, will be held at the office of the com- 
pany, 407 Lyc«nni building', in the city of Du- 
luth, state of Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, 1694. at two o'clock p, m The traas- 
fer books wUl be closed at ncx^n on December 
30th, 1893. and reopened on January 11. 1694, at 
ten o'clock a. m. W. U. Fishee. 

Secy. 



OFFICE OF THE MINC81N IRON COM- 
pany, Duluth. Minn., December 29. 1SK3. 
Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting 
of the stockholdi rs of the Mioosiu Iron Com- 
pany for the election of directors and the trans- 
action of snch other business as may be bronght 
before it, will be held at the office of tLo com- 

fiany, 407 Lyceum building, in the city of Du- 
uth, state of Minnesota, on the tanth day of 
January, 1894, at two o'clock p. ni. The trans- 
fer books will be closed at noon on December 
30th. 1^93. and reopened on January 11, 1^94, at 
ten o'clock a. m. W. H. Fishes, 

SecV. 



DULUTH M1S3ABE & NORTHERN RAIL- 
way company's annua! meeting of stock- 
holders— Nutice is hereby given that an annual 
meeting of BU>ckholders of the Dnluth. Missabi- 
& Northern railway company will be held at the 
office of the companv. No. 514 Lyceum bnihliug, 
iu the city of Duluth. Miunesota, on Tuesday, 
the 0th day of February, A. D. 1894,at 12 oclock, 
noon, for the election of directors and the 
transaction of such other bu^ines as may prop- 
erly come before said meeting. 
Duluth. Dec. 19, 1893. S. R. Payne. 

Secretary 
Dec 19-26-Jan 2. 



M 



ORTGAOE FORECLOSURE SALE. 



Defanltbaving been made in the payment of the 
sum of one thousand one hundred and eight> 
(SUSO.OO) dollars, which is claimed to be due at 
thedateof this notice upon a certain mortgage, 
duly executed and delivered by Charles H. Eld- 
ridge, mortgagor, to Archibald A Beebe, mort- 
gagee, bearing date the twentieth day of Octo- 
ber, ls92, and, with a power of sale therein con- 
tained, duly recorded in the office of the regis- 
ter of deeds in and for the c«)unty of St. Lonis 
and state of Miunesota, on the twenty-second 
day of November, l.'>92. at eight o'clock a. m., iu 
book CS of mortgages, on page 429, and no action 
or proceeding having been instituted, at law or 
ctlierwise t*) recover the debt secured by said 
mortgage, or any part thereof: 

Now, therefore, notice is herel y given tliat 
by virtue of the iKiwer of sale 
contained in said mortgage, and pursuant 
to the statute iu such case made and provided, 
the said mortgage will be foreclosed by a sale 
of the premises described in and conveyed by 
said mortgage, viz. : Lot one (1) of block sixty- 
four (64). Endion Division of Duluth, and lot 
one (1) of block ten (10). New Endion Division 
ofDnluth. according to the recorded jilats tliereof 
iu St. Louis t 'oimty , aud state of Minnesota, with 
the hereditaments and appurtenances; which 
sale will be made by the sheriff of said St. 
Louis County, at the front door of the court 
house in the city of Dnluth, in said county 
and state, on the 19thdsyof January, 1894, at 
10 o'clock a. m. of that day, at pnbhc vendue, 
to the highest bidder fur cash, to pay said rlebr 
of one tliousand one hundred and eighty 
($1LS0.00) dollar?, and interest, and the t.axe!i, 
if any, on said premises, and seventy-five dollan. 
attorneys' fee, as stipulat«>d in and by said 
mortgage in cAse of foreclosure and the dis- 
bursements allowed by law; subject to redemp- 
tion at any lime within one year from the day 
of sale, as provided by law. 

Dated Duiuth. December 5th, A. D. 1893. 
Archibald A. Beebe, 

Mortgagee. 
Cash, Williams & Chester, 

Attorneys for Mortgagee. 
Dec5-12-l»20-Jan2-9 



M 



OETGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE- 



Defanlt having been made in the payment of 
the sum of three thousand one hundred and 
eighty-two and 40100 ($3182.40) dollars which is 
claimed to be dne and is duo 
bt the date of this notice, upon a certain 
mortgage, duly executed and delivered by Jam<»s 
Billings, of St. Louis County, Minnesot,i. mort- 
gagor, to William ('. .Sherwood, ofDulnth. 
Minnesots, mortgagee, bearing date the 
2nd day of March, 1892. and with a power of 
sale therein contained, duly recorded in the 
office of the register of deeds in and for the 
county of St. Loni.s and state of Minne«ot.a, on 
the 23ti day of Maich. 18H2. at 8 o'clock a. m., 
in book 91 of mortgages on page h. which 
said moitgage. together with the debt secured 
thereby, was duly assigned by faid William ('. 
Sberwood, mortgagee, to Sarah B. Wilson (who 
is now the owner thereof) by written assignment 
dated the 29th day of March 1892. aud recordoi 
in the office of said register of deeds, on tho 
4th day o( December lfH3, at 9 :50 o'clock a. m., 
in book 107 of inoi tgagei* on page '29 and no 
action or proceeding having been instituted, at 
law or nth-rwise, to recover the debt secured 
by said mortgage, or any part thereof. 

Now therefore, notice is heroby given that by 
virtue of the power of sale contained in eaid 
mortgage anrt pursuant to tlio statute in such 
case made and pn>vidcd. the .said mortgage wilJ 
be foreclosed by a sale of the premises de- 
M;ribc<l in aud conveyed by said mortgage, viz. : 

The east half of the southwest quarter <'.' 
section four /4) township fifty-one (51) north of 
range twelve (12) west, also the north west 
(inarter of section thitty-two (..il) townshii' 
fifty-two (52) north of range twelve i.l2) west all 
in St. Louis County, and state of Minnesota, 
with the hereditaments and appurtenances ; 
which sHle will be made by the sheriff of 
said St. L<mis tkiunty, at the front door of the 
court house, in the city of Duluth, in uitl 
C4>onty aud state, on the 17th day of Janaary 
1894. at 10 o'clock a. m. of that day. at public 
vendue, tc the highest bidder for cash, to oay 
eaid debt and interest aud fifty dol- 
lars nlt<iruey's fees, as rtipnlated iu and by 
said mortgage in case of foreclosure, and the 
disburtidmeuts allowed by law; subject to re- 
demption at any time within one year from the 
day uf sale, as provided by law. 

Dated Duluth December 5th A. D. 1893. 

SAtAH B. Wilson, 
Assignee of Mortgage. 
S. T. Jt Wm. Harrison, 

Attorneys for ARsigneo of Mortgage, 
Rooms 0C>9-611, Torrey building, 
Duluth, Minn. 

Dec^Vl2-19-28 Jan-2 9. 



CURE YOURSELF! 




fte»o.y »^*M«Jr5ila«..ecure lor CONORIIH(EA. 
lu«>l[tier sex. A Mtettdy Cure »> thf n>ost obMln&tu 



\ 







«i 




THE DXILUTH EVENING HERAliB: TUESDAY, JANUARY 2. 1894. 



Try Your 
ivcy 

TOMORROW 



He Took His Seat on the Bench Today and 

Proceeded to Open Court at 

Once. 



CITY BRIEFS. 



Culhim. Dentist, top floor Palladio. 
Smoke Endioji cifjar. W. A. Foote &Co. 

Imperial Flour the best in the world. 

Good applicatioiis for loai\s on inside 
property war.ted at once. S. M. Chand- 
ler, 404 Palladio bldg. 

Kxtra copies of the 24-page Christmas 



AROUND THE CITY. 



Evcr>- 



JuJ^e Liisigii Will Clear Up Accumiilafcd 

Work and Not Sit in Open 

Cuurt. 



Court Cases of the November Term Taken 

Up and a Number Disposed of 

Today. 



in any ilo- 
tvo\ . ami 



h 



.11 
kcv 



. ss Cora Williams, of 
this city, held ticket No. 
25*,)i7, which drew the 
■"house and lot. 



FINE 
SHOES. 



m 



\-i ,i 



iiiiti »-■ 



'^2.'»" I'V 



C^ 01 U 



viynig- 

.. Wo 

Patent 



Ci 



Sol 



C'.> 



line in fmnwear. 



.--' h/\ 




Juil.i;e S. il. Mi'cr w:i!ked into court 
room No. 2 this nioruins: ami took his 
seat in the judicial chair and proceeded 
to open court as though he had been in 
the harness for ir.<inths. There was no 
ceremony of any kind or anythintj to 
mark the event. Judge Moer took the 
oath of office some time ago and Hon. 
t >. r. S-.carns is liO !oir::jer judt,'c in the 
Klevenlh judicial district. 

judgp Ensign will now endeavor to 
catch up on back work of which he has 
quite an amount before huo. F or the 
present only two judges will hold court, 
the third attending matters in chamber. 
This morning Judges Lewis and Moer 
took np the court cases ot the November 
calendar. Before Judge Lewis the fol- 
li)vving disposition oi case was made this 
morning: 

John D. Koyd vs. R. C. Elliott et al., 
settled and dismissed. 

James Dougan vs. James Turner et al., 
stipulation for judgment. 

In the matter ol the assignment of 
Simon Clark c\: Co.. appeal of Harvey 
Kicker from disallowance of claim; 
judgment for appellant. 

John .Simpson vs. C. A. Krause et al., 
stipulation for dismissal. 
qW. H. H. Stowell, assignee, vs. West 
Superior Iron and Steel company, con- 
tinued. 

Two cases are being tried together be- 
fore Judge Lewis and were still on at 
noon. They bear the same title, Ameri- 
can Exchange bank of West Superior 
against R. F. Wi'son et al. They are 
suits to collect on notes and involve 
some matters connected with the Simon 
Clark & Co. affairs. 

Before Judge Moer, in the case of 
Jonas Miller vs. Herman E. Long there 
was no appearance of the plaintiff and 
the defendant's demurrer was sustained. 
At noon the case of Miah T. Hulett vs. 
H.innah Hamiltcn was on. Some time 
ago in the case of Hannah Hamilton vs. 
M. T. Hulett, the plaintiff, judgment was 
2ivcn against Hulett. The latter now 
claims that it was obtained under false 
representations and seeks to have it set 
aside. 

— .I—I....I- — #1 -i "— " I— 

PROTESTS HIS INNOCENCE. 






O 



THE MYSTIC SHRINE. 



Brill ant Reception and Entertainment Yester- 
day Afternoon. 

t' ere was a jolly time at Masonic hall 

■IS' tday atternoon, the reception of the 

■ Shrine, and the rooms were 

-;:0on. Everybody was 

a: u c. vfy Shriner was present 

jd in enterlaining the guests. 

" -stra was present and played 

the "Renowned 

.0^, assisted by a 

. li and. salt were offered 

Arab custom. As the 

I .eiving committee and 

sely inspected and 

., rded as somewhat 

vas sprung which was 

a.-, an electric shock. 

,1 ccirner out of view was a 

..ef in all the glory of red 

i and buckskin coat. As 

.ired the spot, this buck 

, the air with a wild 

.: 1:1 f; Amos Shephard yell and 

: ' ' ' :d red toma- 

^ innocent's 
was usually all that 

.. in one of the ante- 

..rncli' milk, pomegranates, 
» -UP were served under the 

tior celebrated Geor Gefre 



V 



dirt 
1> 






Si 

h! 



re 



V. s the crown- 
, and was in charge 

. .<c:i a Iwi /cr and the 

O Ley. The bur- 

lac and everything 

:. the Ferris wheel, 

ic to Hagenback's 

- - ^ illery was amusing 

some t vcccdingly clever 



Joseph Miner Pleads Not Guilty to a Charge 
ot Attempted Rape. 

Joseph Miner, who is charged by Mrs. 
Georgia Robinson with an indecent as 
sault on Cora Brock, a ii-year-old col- 
ored girl, was arraigned in municipal 
court this morning and pleaded not 
guilty. The preliminary examination 
was set for Jan 8, and in default of $300 
bonds, the defendant was committed. 

Louis Nelson, who is charged with 
stealing three valuable bolts of dress 
goods from Johnson & Moe, the West 
End merchants, was arraigned on the 
charge of grand larceny in the second 
degree. He pleaded not guilty and his 
examination was set for 10 a. m., Jan. 6. 
Not being able to furnish ;?200 bail, Nel- 
son will await his hearing at the county 
jail. 

Emma Zigler, charged by her mother, 
Barbara Epple. with incorrigibility, was 
arraigned this morning and her hearing 
will come otf Jan. 10. In the meantime 
Emma will repose behind the iron bars. 
Her mother alleges that her daughter, 
who is 15 years old, will not stay at home 
and that she is much given to thieving. 

Gus Johnson, Jack Matson,John Huno. 
up for drunkenness, pleaded guilty and 
secured suspension of sentences. Moses 
Johnson, guilty of the same offense, went 
up for ten days. James Ryan pleaded 
guilty to disorderly conduct and sentence 
was suspended. The charge of vagrancy 
against Mike Broderick was dismissed. 



number of The Herald can be had at The 
Herald counting room. 

Tremont hotel now open. Board, $? 
per week; board and room, ^7:50 and 
upwaiiU per week. 

Subscribers of The Herald receiving 
the beautiful New Year's Carriers' ad- 
dress, "(iems of Thought" from the car- 
rier, and who do not have an opportunity 
to see the carrier personallv, may leave 
any little offering they'see tit to make to 
their respective Herald carries, at the 
counting room of The Herald, and it will 
be turned over to the proper c.trrier. 

T.ake supper and hear the concert at 
I'ilgrim church Friday evening. 

A grand ball will be given by the 
Knights of Pythias this evening at Hun- 
ter hall. All are invited. 

The St. Vincent de P.aul society at its 
last meeting passed a resolution of 
thanks to Messrs. Panton iS: Watson and 
to the American Exclwinge bank for their 
very liberal and kind donation to the 
cause of charity. While donations to 
this society are always welcome, there 
has never been a time when needed so 
badly as the present, which make the 
above gifts doubly welcome. 

The city council meets this evening 
ior the purpose of dividing the wards 
into precincts and for passing the 
monthly pay rolls. 

The hnes and fee in the ofTice of the 
clerk of the municipal court for Decem- 
ber amounted to $117.: 35. 

Tomorrowjmorning at q o'clock at the 
Central High school an examination will 
be held for the benetit of such teachers 
as have not passed the required examin- 
ation. 

The Unity club meets tonight. "Mar- 
ble Faun" will be the subject of a paper 
by C. F. Johnson and the discussion fol- 
lowing will be led by Mrs. F. C. South- 
worth. • 

A. E. Humphreys entertained about 
thirty of his friends last night in the 
Hotel St. Louis parlors. The Glee club 
was in attendance and regular refresh- 
ments were served. The affair was 
thoroughly informal but none the less 
delightful. 

Capt. Bidwell, of Comprmy A, held an 
informal reception yes*'.irday afternoon 
at the rnilitia club room, which was at- 
tended by the present officers of Com- 
pany A and the ex-officers of Company 
K and many others. The Glee club vis- 
ited the boys and entertained them with 
several of their famous selections. 

Births as follows have been reported 
to the board of health: O. G. and Amelia 
Traphagen, 1511 East Superior street, a 
son; Samuel H. and Margaret Irvine, 
Duluth Heights, a son; Anton and Rosa 
Seberskv, Eighth street west, a son; 
Mack and Lizzie Hoggart, 2510 West 
Second street, a daughter; John and 
Anna Carlson, iSiS West Second street, 
a daughter; John and Mary Schultz, 120 
Lake avenue south, a son; Erkhi Hottra 
and Lizz-ie Ylenoma, at Maternity hos- 
pital, a son. 

Sunday, while playing on a neighbor's 
porch, bennie, the 5-year-old son of 
Alderman J. W. Nelson, jumped off and 
fell in such a*way that he broke his leg. 
The little fellow suffers considerable 
pain but the injury is not thought to be 
unusually serious. 

Henry Holden, a 14-year-oId boy, 
while skating on the bay yesterday morn- 
ing, slipped and sprained his ankle. 



Sayings and Doings of People Whom 
body Knows Well. 
S. L. Smith returned home yesterday 
after a prolonged absence. He said, 
'•Where I was in Iowa at Tipton, Cedar 
county, the people and banks are loaded 
with money which they would invest it 
they knew where it would be safe. 1 
preached Duluth to them and sjnt off a 
large number of the special editions of 
the Duluth papers to my friends there, 
as soon as I arrived home. While at 
Tipton I met my t>ld friend Jud,;e Roth- 
rock, chiwf justice of the supreme court 
of Iowa. I used to read lavr with him 
and he is coming to Duluth shortly and 
will form a partnership with me in the 
law business." 



WE WISH YOU A MOST 



FBEI 




GREAT JAHOARY 





» * * 

Col. D. H. Stevenson said today: "In 
spite ot everything I am beginning to 
feel good. The situation in the real 
estate market is decidedly imjiroved. I 
have done some business during the last 
month and am going to do more. We 
arc again commencing to hear from old 
friends who have m;ide money here be- 
fore and believe that they can again. If 
we can get together and elect a mayor 
who is progressive, yet reasonably con- 
servative, a gentleman and a man of 
character as well as a property owner, 
Duluth real estate will soon feei the good 
effects of such a choice." 
* * * 

"There will be a iob for the coroner 
shortly," said a First ward property 
owner today, "down around the canal. 
The people now arc crossing on boards 
laid loose on the ice. There is a lifeline 
stretched across from pier to pier, but 
that is not sufficient to insure the safety 
of those crossing. There should be life 
buoys with twenty to thirty feet of heavy 
line attached to them at each ferry house 
so that if the ice gave way some effort to 
save life could be made." 



PERSONAL. 





l.U. 0. F. 

T . !\-l!ows will hold a public 

• ; Thursday even- 
,..^ ,. ■' No. 28, Cent- 

ral ank ' :*.h Eticamp- 

ajf;cilicr and all 
ly invited to be 
les and friends. 
jere will be a 
clreshraen'.s served. 

C-'M^ . . : . . 

tl'.c Congrc- 

. acstra ot the 

vviil give a supper antl 

;rch parlors on Friday 

t .\n attractive program 

}. arranged, and all are invited to 

a: 



Have Heavy Grades. 

The clerk of the board of public works 
this morning received a letter from the 
city engineer of San Francisco stating 
that he considers a 7 per cent practi- 
cable for electric cars. In San Fran- 
cisco the heaviest grade is 11, !j per cent 
and runs for a distance of 550 feet. On 
one street there is a half mile of track 
averaging 9 per cent in grade. 

— ii — i- * ' ■ — — 

Want A. M. Miller For Mayor. 

A petition extensively signed will be 
presented to A.M. Millertodayasking him 
to accept the nomiration for the office ot 
mayor of the city. The petition is signed 
by a large number of representative men 
of all classes in the city irrespective in a 
great measure of politics. 



Ocaincss Cannot be Cured 

l.y local apolicatioui. a» tliey caunot roach the 
ilinoaseU poitiiiu of tliftcar. There i4 only ouo 
WAV to euro (loarui s?, ;iiul tbat is by_ constitu- 
t otial rfrat'Hief. iJoafuesp is c«uiied by aa in- 
flamed c«>urlitioa of tlie mucons lioiuR of the 
' ichiau tube. Wbi-n tliiu tube i?ot* uiflani'jd 
, iiiivo a riunbling fonnd of imi>orfoct hear- 
) .^. iiud wlicn it io .ntireiy r!ose<l (i«!afue«s ia 
,;i. ri.-sult, auil uii'OBC ibo ir^Haounation cau bo 
la.'ifii out Bud tliis tnho rostoroci to ita normal 
coiKiition bearing will be dnstioyM forever; 
nine casus oiif of ton are <^au»ad by catarrh 
which i» m)thiii« but an inflaiuoti condition 
the inncf>us nnrfaces. . , . „ 

Wo will Kivo ono hundrod iloJlars for any case 
of deiifinsf (caased by catarrh) that cannot be 
cuMd by Uall's Catarrh ("nro. Sond for circu- 
larn, frep. F. .J. CHKXny ii Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
;*" 'Sold by draggi^ts. 75c. 



W. B. Gardiner, traveling salesman for 
the Wells-Stone Mercantile company, is 
seriously ill. 

Capt. John Pengilly, of the Chandler 
mine at Ely, is at the St. Louis. 

Capt. Alexander McDougall and Hon. 
H. B. Moore, ot the Duluth-Superior har- 
bor improvement committee, will prob- 
ably leave tonight for St. Paul to con- 
sult with J. J. Hill upon the subject of 
the improvement of the harbors of Du- 
luth and Superior. 

Superintendent Bisland, ot the Ma- 
honing mine, near Hibbing, is at the 
Spalding. 

Frank F. Grant, the largest wholesale 
grocer at Watertown, S. D.. is in the city 
looking after a large quantity of goods 
belonging to him that were burned at the 
Union dock fire. 

Mrs. E. S. Upham leaves next Mon- 
day for Tampa, Fla., over the Omaha. 

Neil Mclnnes and daughter Maggie 
were in the city today. 

John Owens, of Virginia, is at the St. 
Louis. 

Messrs. Flynt, Barrett, Kingston, 
Bonbam, and' Eaton are the Tower del- 
egation interviewing the county commis- 
sioi\ers today. 

Will be Continued. 

The chamber of commerce meeting 
set for 10 o'clock today did not material- 
ize as usual. President Johnson and 
al)0ut half a dozen more were all who 
showed up. Mr. Johnson said: "We 
must call a special meeting some lime 
this week as there are many matters that 
must be fixed up. We have decided to 
carry on this organization and we pro- 
pose to do it. We have money enough 
to pay nearly all our debts and we should 
be remiss in our duty to the city if we 
should fail to continue the existence of 
the Duluth chamber of commerce." 



YESTERDAY'S SHOOT. 

Central Gun Club Shot Of! a Series of Ten 

Events. 

The Central Gun club shoot was well 

attended yesterday. It was held on the 

bay front at the foot of Twenty-first 

avenue west. Ten single targets were 

in each event and the entrance fee was 
$1.10, contestants to receive 10 cents for 
each target broken. The balance re- 
maining was divided into thiee equal 
purses. The following was the score: 

First event — Day, Carey, 8; Holmberg, 
7; Moore, Green, 5; R. Little, Pastoret, 
Nelson, 4; Pearson, McDonald, L. Mc- 
Donald, 3; Stevens, 2. 

Second event— Green, q; Carey, Nel- 
son, 6; K. Little, Holmberg, Pearson, 5; 
Day, McDonald, R. Little, 4; Pastoret, 
Moore, 3; Tileson, 2. 

Third event— Day, 9; R. Little, 7; 
Carey, Pearson, Nelson, 6; Greene, 5; 
Pastoret, Tileson, McDonald, -R. Little, 
4; Moore, Holmberg, 3. 

Fourth event — Carey, Green, Day, 6; 
Stevens, Coons, 5; Pastoret, Moore, Mc- 
Donald, 4; Holmberg, Pearson, Tileson, 
R. Little, 3. 

Fifth event — Carey, 8; Pearson, 7; Day, 
6; Stevens, 5; McDonald, Moore, Pas- 
toret, 4; Greene, Holmberg, 3; Coons, 2; 
Tileson, R. Little, i. 

Sixth event — Day, 6; Greene, Mc- 
Donald, 5; Moore, Carey, Greene, 4; 
Stevens, 2; E. Nelson, i. 

F. L. Carey, president of the Livings- 
ton, Mon., gun club was present. 

■• — 

A Joint Reception. 

The joint reception by the Young 
Men's and Young Women's Christian 
associations yesterdav afternoon and 
evening was delightful in every way and 
a large company was entertained. Misses 
Palmer, Gray, Twomey, Mattocks and 
Marvin, Mrs. J. E. Wieland and Messrs 
Black and Upham received. The lunch 
table was presided over by Misses Todd 
and Noyes. 

It was a varied entertainment. From 
3 to 4 there was music, from 4 to 5 read- 
ing and recitations, from 5 to 6 a conver- 
sational, in which given topics were dis- 
cussed during five minute intervals, from 
6 to 7 refreshments were served and in 
the evening there was music and general 
conversation. 

Duluth Rinks Won. 
Two curling rinks from the Duluth 
Athletic club went to Superior yesterday 
afternoon and curled there during the 
afternoon at the East End rink. They 
came off victorious, the score being as 
follows: 



m ^ILL EMPHASIZE IT BY OFFERING YOU 

PIANOS 

AT HALF PRICE 

With us this means a GENUINE REDUCTION on 
twenty-five Pianos of One-Half of the rej^vtlar retail prices. 

It has been claimed for some time, and wc had begun 
to think so, that there is but little money at the head of 
the lakes. Wc now think dilTerent. 

Our larjrc Christmas trade proved to us that there is 
lots of money stored away ready to be brouj^ht out when 
our people are convinced that (GENUINE BARGAINS are 
offered. 

Wc now propose to jrivc our people the 

CHANCE OF A LIFETIME 

To procure a new STANDARD PIANO at prices barely 
covering- the cost of material and labor. 

8250 Pianos for S125 

8300 Pianos for 8150 

8400 Pianos for 8200 

8500 Pianos for 8250 

3600 Pianos for 8300 

Wc have a host of customers to whom we refer as to 
the quality of instruments sold by us. No "stencil" or 
"trade" Pianos, only standard, FULLY GUARANTEED I 
FOR SIX YEARS by RELIABLE MANUFACTURERS. ' 

No such barg-ains have been offered during the past 
twenty years. 

"One man's loss, another's gain, 
Manufacturers' loss, now your gain." 

Now is Your Time. 




NOW IN PROGRESS. 



$50,000 Worth of Merctoflise 

Must be converted into cash 
at once. Money is what we 
are after. It is not a matter 
of profit, but a matter of how 
much our loss should be. Wc 
are willincr to take it to raise 
the MIGHTY DOLLAR. 

Cloaks, 

Half Price 
and Less 

Is the price of any Garment in 
the Store now. 



Century 
Piano Co. 

OF DULUTH AND WEST SUPERIOR. 

1 1 10 Tower Avenue. West Superior, Wis. 





Tea Gowns 

HALF PRICE— All our Silk and Wool- 
en Tea Gowns go at Half Price now. 



Calico Wrappers 
25 



PER CENT discount on all Calico 
Wrappers in the house. 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 

Thrwo 16x60 Otis Stool Boilers. 

Three 183C64 Otis Steel Boilers, Bntmftn Scttln«, 

Oqo 50 borso-power Kice Antoniatic Oct Olf Kngina. 

One 140 horee-power Buckeye Engito. 

One 4u liorse-power Westinpbonse F.iwriiie. 

One 80 horse-powor Westinglionno Kni^ine. 

All m flret-clase conditioD. ,,,,._.,. ^ ^1. # . 

Also the old power hone-^ building of the Hartman General Eiectric (. o. at the foot 
of Fifvh avenue east, on lake front, and a miacoilanoous lut of Piping and bteam 
FiUiu«8, Pnmps, Hhafting, Pulleys, etc. 

ENQUIBE 



ONE-QUARTER off on ail 
Sateen and Mohair Skirts. 

Si. 00 Skirts go at 75C' 
S1.50 Skirts go at S1.13- 
$2.00 Skirts go at Sl.50- 
$3.00 Skirts go at S2.25- 
$3.00 Skirts go at S3.75- 



our 



Silk?, 



of 



AWARDED HIGHEST H0N0R3-V/0RLDS FAIR. 



\ 




Tlie only Pure Cream of Tartar Powder. — No Ammonia; No Alum. 

Used in Millions of Homes — 40 Years the Standard. 



A Bullet Through His Heart. 

About noon yesterday the body of a 
man was found on the boulevard near 
Third avenue west. Beside the corpse 
lay a revolver of the bull dog pattern, 44- 
caliber, two chambers empty. A bole 
through his heart told the tale only too 
well. The body was taken to the morgue 
and was not identified until this morn- 
ing. It proved to be Charles Peterson.of 
Fourteenth avenue west. He leaves a 
wife and several children. 

Dr. Eklund decided to hold no in- 
quest. He has known the man for a 
long time and says he was a little light 
in his head. He thinks he was out of 
his mind when he killed himself. 



Dr. Johnson Arrives. 
Dr. Henry Johnson, of South Bend, 
Ind., arrived in the city by the Omaha 
morning passenger. He was met by a 
delegation of the prominent members of 
the First Presbyterian church, of which 
he will be the pastor, and escorted to the 
Spalding, where he is domiciled at pres- 
ent. The doctor is a gentleman of rather 
striking personality and pleasing ad- 
dress. He looks like a man who is natu- 
rally (juick and decisive. Dr. Johnson 
comes here with a fine reputation as a 
preacher and worker. 




HARTMAN GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, 

ROOM 8, •F.XCHAKG-E BUILDING- 



More Bread ! ^ ^ 
Better Bread ! 

Is made from a sack of 

mPMEMk 

Than from any other similar amount 
of Flour in the world. It is the best 
and sold everywhere by all dealers. 

ASK YOUR GROCER! 



Furs! Furs! 

Our entire stock will be slaughtered re- 
gardless of cost during this sale. Bor- 
row the money and buy your Furs now. 



Shoe Dept. 

A great offer- =30 per 
cent discount 

On our entire stock of fine Ladies', Chil- 
dren's and Misses' Shoes. 

500 Shoes go now at $3.50- 
300 Shoes go now at $2.10- 
200 Shoes go now at $1.40- 
100 Shoes go now at TOc* 



Blankets and 
Comforters. 

1-4 off 

From our low prices in this department. 



ip)-12 

ell. 



DULUTH. 

A. McRae, 

E. H. Palmer, 

8. F. Fullerton. 

K. J. McLeod(8kip)~18 

(Jeo. Dinwoodie. 

Thomas (iibeon, 

Ronald Smith, 

K. liurdon (skip)— 17. 

After the match the curlers enjoyed a 
dinner at the Euchd. On Saturday three 
rinks from the Superior curlers will come 
over and there v/ill be a match at the 
Glen Avon rink. 



8UFEE10K. 
R. C. Uauua. 
B. D. Merrill, 
Jas. Ctiisholm. 
Neil Smith (skii . 
James Campbell 
L. R. Hnrd, 
W. N. Anderson, 
K. M. Todd (»kip)-9 



The Superiors Won. 
The North Stars, ol Uuluth, went down 
before the Badgers, of Superior, at polo 
yesterday at the Fifth avenue rink. Only 
one goal was scored and the contest was 
a pretty one. The teams lined up as 
follows: 

North Stars. Badgers. 

Callionn right rush Lachaa 

Maloney loft rush Lemon 

Mitchell riKht back Newton 

Edson left back :„BodRer8 

lieiiton ptUDt cover... Frazer 

Huse... goal cover Bruno 

Trumbel ffoal McLaueton 

extra Hudson 



It Was a Beauty. 

The Mesaba Range: The Duluth 
Herald's Christmas edition was a beauty 
and a credit to the publishers. It does 
seem as though the people of Duluth are 
beginning to appreciate their newspap- 
ers better than they used to. But per- 
haps this is because their newspapers 
are better. 



A Timber Cutting Suit. 
F. W. Hartman and Henry Schoen- 
field have brought suit against Charles 
A. Peterson, Charles Gasper and Oscar 
A. Peterson to recover $5400. Plaintiffs 
claim that defendants cut timber to the 
value of S1800 from their lands. B. C. 
Rude is attorney for plaintifiTs. 
Other papers filed were as follows: 
Answers in cases of Charles A. Chase 
vs. Moses Stewart Jr. and Horace Wil- 
liston et al vs. T. P. Mathews et al. 



Disastrous to the Horse. 
Last Sunday, Chief of Police DanHor- 
gan loaned his buggy mare to a friend. 
The animal took advantage of the event 
to run away, and not only did she smash 
the sleigh all to kindling wood, but she 
scratched herself up to such an extent 
that she will not be fit to use for fully a 
month. 



TESTING A CHEMICAL. 

Fire Commissioners Viewing a Hand Engine 
This Aiternoon. 

The board of fire commissioners met 
at Engine House No. i this afternoon to 
test the Miller hand chemical fire engine 
with a view to placing the same in each 
police box in the city. This extinguish- 
er is said to be the only one th.it will not 
freeze. After that test, the members of 
the board proceeded to West Duluth to 
make final arrangements with the men 
there for becoming members of the Du- 
luth force. As it takes an average fire- 
man some time to learn to read a fire 
alarm signal accurately, a couple of old, 
experienced hands will be located at 
West Duluth and a couple of the newer 
men down there placed in the older 
houses. 

Commissioner Hart said that he anti- 
cipated that few actual changes would 
be made, but that the commissioners 
think that the department needs a sec- 
ond assistant chief and have made a 
move in that direction. Mr. Hart also 
remarked that Chief Jackson is meeting 
with great success in carrying out the 
changes that are necessary in the depart- 
ment. 

- • — ' 

The Mayoralty Contest. 

Geo. W. SteveiiR, mana;^or Crauberry 

Lumber company ^'^'''} 

H )Dry Haskins ^^'PJ.\ 

\V li. RichardBon *;*^ 

li. A. Gray ^^. 

A. M.Moiriflon I'-*' 

Robert L. Knebel «W 

G. W. Comoll 6.^^ 

B.F.Howard *«« 

II. C. KpndaU \^ 

ri. W. Clark JfS 

F. C. Hartley ]f^ 

W. GomhorR J^" 

<ie«.r«re W. Buck }*=, 

J. B. Sutpliiu 1^ 

Scattoriwr ^^^ 



was elected chairman of the board for 
the ensuing year. 

— • ■ ^ 

City Treasurer's Report. 

The report of City Treasurer Voss for 
the mouth of December shows the fol- 
lowing balance of the various funds on 
Jan. i: 

General fund $2lC.p 94 

Library fuud 9,s^ 'S? 

>-arkfund 1.752 18 

Interest fund ».39S 99 

The following funds were overdrawn: 

Permanent improvement fund $127,P(J:1 (K) 

Fire deparlmoat fund 22,554 10 

Ocean Steamships. 

Gibraltar— Sailed: Pulda, New York. 

Naples— Arrived; Kron Prinz Freid- 
rich Wilheim, New York. 

London— Passed the Lizard: Dub- 
beildam, New York for Rotterdam. 

Hong Kong — Arrived noon: Cana- 
dian Pacific Railway company's steamer 
E.Tipress of China, Vancouver, via Yo- 
kohama, etc. 



Gents' Underwear 

1-3 off 

On our entire line of Gents' Underwear. 



> 



-EXCELLENT LIBRARY 



AND 



170 R SALE 
^ rrtablislied liiw busidess. Rare opportun- 
ity. C F. Lamb, West Uuluth. 



S. GELHAAR 

DULUTH'S 

PRACTICAL FURRIER, 

Makee and repairs all kinds 
of FUU GARMKNT8. Sealaliin Sacqnes re- 
dyed and ro-ait«d on the promises. PLDSll 
COATS STEAMED. 

209-21" WEST SUPERIOR ST. 




tiiiiUshcil 7*117. 



These Will Read Papers. 
At the second state conference of cor- 
rections and charities to be held in St. 
Paul on Jan. 10, 11 .ind 12 papers will be 
read by Duluthians as follows: Jan. ti al 
II a. m., "Management of County Jails" 
by Paul Sharvy; 8 p. m., "Juvenile 
Crime, its Origin and Preventives" by 
Rt. Rev. James McGolrick; Jan. 12 at 11. 
a. ra., "Legal Aspect oi the Child Oues- 
lion" by C. P. Magimiis S p. m., "Work 
of Relief Societies," Mrs. A. M. Miller. 



Camille Poiricr Chairman. 
At the meeting of the board of county 
commissioners which opened .ibout 2:30 
o'clock this afternoon, Camille Poirier 



$8.00— BEST SET OF TEETfl 




l».A.L»JL.A.r)IO 



Top Floor, 



UF UOUS^IlOl^ 
AND 

OTHER GOODS 
At 30€ West Michigan fitrtiet, 

DULUTH FEED & STORAGE CO., 

D. A. DUNLAP, Manacw. 



Dress Trimming 

Half Frioe 

For all our fancy Dress Trimmings dur- 
ing this sale. 

Wool Dress Goods 

S1.50 quality Priestley's silk warp QQ a 
Henrietta, for this sale at ilOu 

$1.75 [quality Priestley's silk 
warp Henrietta, for this tf< | | ^ 
sale only iplalM 

$2.25 quality Priestley's silk 

warp Henrietta, for this tf | Ol7 
sale only IplaOl 

12 pieces black Dress Goods, as- 
sorted weaves, regular price QKa 
45c and 50c, for this sale only. OWV 

10 pieces black and white all 
wool Dress Goods, regular RQa 
price q5c, for this sale V «f U 

All our Priestley's black Dress Fabrics 
at greatly reduced prices. 

28 pieces imported Jaquards, 
Bengalines, Whipcords, etc.. 

regular price $1 and $1.25, for I70p 

this sale only I WW 

iS pieces imported fancy Dress 

Fabrics regular price $1.50, go QQa 

all at ilOw 

Best quality 46-in German Hen- 
rietta, regular price $1, for this RQ|\ 
sale only W «9w 

20 pieces all wool 38-in serge, 
regular price 50c, for this QQ^a 
sale only WU2W 

6 pieces 54-in all wool Camel 

Hair Serge, $1,50 tjuality, for 'jQfi 

this sale only I «lw 

12 pieces all wool l">ress Suiting, 

rcguLar price 6:,'ic, for this OQa 

sale only wO W 



Prices reduc'cd in all other de- 
partments. This sale will be 
strictly for cash and no goods 
will be laid aside for anybody. 



I. 




PROPRIETOR 



t 


























1 






1 














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if 






















































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IBB II Mil - ■ - ifl-WK- -MX. 


■ — . ^— ^ — 




.-, 


.. -. _ ,. ^ _» -.-^M^^B^IH^ 







Fill out the Coupon in 
The Herald this evening 
and tend it to this office 



IDUIiUTH EVENING HERALD. 



WM It ywir ehelet for 
Mayor It Um coning eltc- 
Uon? 



ELEVENTH YEAR 



\ved:nesday. jaxuahy 3. 1894. 



FIVE O'CIOCK EDITIOI^. 



three cents 



i Heme Institution Owned and Controlled by Dolntb len and not Trlbstary 
to any Eastern Management. Establislied in Dalntb in 1881. 




^/KDiim 



AT 



HALF PRICE 

Tie Greatest Qyercoat Sale of tlie Year ! 

We Place on Sale this Week our En= 
tire Mammoth Stock of our 




Worth of rien's Overcoats at 1=2 Price 

This includes all Ulsters, Storm Coats, Fur Trimmed Overcoats, 
our handsome Tailor-made Double and Single-Breasted Meltons, 

Ker-^ovs. Beavers, etc. 



Our $4000 Ones 
Our $3000 Ones 
Our $25.00 Ones 
Our $2000 Ones 
Our $15.00 Ones 
Our $10.00 Ones 
Our $8.00 Ones 



go at 
go at 
go at 
go at 
go at 
go at 
goat 



$20.00 

$15.00 

$12.50 

$80.00 

$7.50 

$5.00 

$4.00 



Our entire stock of Boys' and Children's Clothing 
Selling at 20 Per Cent Discount, or 

OKE-FIFTB Off tie REGOLAR PRICES 



f w 



ILLIAHSON* 



M; 






/ 



Complete and Trnstworthy Ontfitters for Men, Boys and Children. 

FOR SALE CHEAP. 

Three Vixt/i Otis Sfs'ol Boilera. 

Three l^xM (vjo Ste?! Boi]Trg. Bntmaa Settfng. 

Geo 50 horsb-powcr Hice Aatomatic Cut Off Kugiae, 

One IW hor8<vjK)wor Bnckaye Engine. 

Oue 40 horpo-iK>wer Westinghonse Rogine. 

One 80 horse-p<jwer Westinghouse Eugine. 

All in firbt'clai'8 condition. 
AUo *h«» old power iione" baildinar of tbo Hartman General Electric Co. at the foot 
of Fifth aveuuH east, ou lalie frout, ami a miscollaueooa lut of Piping and Steam 
Fittings, Pamns, Hhaftlng, Pulleys, etc. 

ENQUIUK 

HARTMAN GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, 

ROOM 3, EXCHANGE BUILDING 




More Bread! 
Better Bread ! 

Is made from a sack of 



^ ^ 



IMPJ^RIAi; 



Than from any other similar amount 
of Flour in the world. It is the best 
and sold everywhere by all dealers. 

ASK YOUR GROCER! 



Meirbers of tbe Dolotb Clearing Honse Association. 

CAPITAL. SURPLUS 

First National Bank «1, 000,000 $200,000 

Am«rlcan Exchange Bank 600,000 3,50,000 

Marine National Bank 260,000 20.000 

National Bank of Commerce _ 200,000 21,000 

i'tate Bank of Dulnth 100,000 40,000 

Sticnrlty Bank of Dulnth 100,000 40,000 

MENDENHALL & HOOPES, /Employers Liability, 

District Ma^mu^s, I Elevator Accident, 

LoMaj Girautee & AcciSeil Co. workmen's collective, 

(LIMITED). y Surety Bonds, 

OF LONDON, ENG. ( "^ t j- j i a -j *. 

^= « A ^^Tr,-B,T^ -. ««» \ Individual Accident 



Must Reduce Stock 

And turn it into Cash. 

$33.00 and $35.00 Sack Suits, now $23.00. 
$38.00 and $40.00 Sack Suits, now $28.00. 
$45.00 and $48.00 Sack Suits, now $33.00. 

These prices are for CASH ONLY. 



J. S. LANE, 



MERCHANT TAILOR, 
430 SPALDING HOUSE BLK 




The War Between Nicaragua and Honduras 

Begun in Earnest and Honduras 

Has Been Invaded. 



Bonilla Captured the Towns of Corpus and 
Yuscaran and Set Up a Provi- 
sional Governnient. 



Made a Desperate Attempt to Tal<e Cuvartel, 

Which Was Successfully Defended 

by Gen. Villela. 



New York. J 5" 3-— The Herald's 
cable from Man; " , Nicaragua, says: 
The war berweei. 5 ^aragua and Hon- 
duras has begun ~ good earnest. Al- 
ready Policarpo ^ niUa, leader of the 
the Hondurian S urgents, {has invaded 
Honduras fror •* icaraguan soil, has 
captured the tcV of Corpus and Yus- 
caran, has set i . provisional govern- 
ment in the fo'^ place, and President 
Zelaye, of Nic.*y fua. has recognized his 
authority. 

This provisional government had been 
set up in the town of Corpus Dec, 30, the 
day on which that place was captured by 
Bonilla after a 5-hours' siege. Presi- 
dent Vasquez's losses in that engage- 
ment were twenty-three killed and five 
wounded. The invaders had two killed 
and several wounded. 

Bonilla's men are now surrounding 
Cholutca and cutting off communication 
with the interior. They made a despe- 
rate attempt to take Cuvartel, which was 
successfully defended by Gen. Villela. 
Gen. Rosas was killed in this engage- 
ment. 

A VERY RARE COIN. 



An Eighth Dollar of the Coinage of 1804 
Found. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 3.— The belief 
that only seven of the 1804 silver dollar 
were in existence has been an error for 
the eighth one has turned up. Rosen- 
tbol Bros., dealers in old iron, had a 
debtor in Virginia from whom thev tried 
vainly for some time to collect a bill of 
S500. 

Recently the Virginian sent the firm 
one of the much sought for 1804 dollars. 
He stated that he sent the coin in pay- 
ment of his bill, and if Koscnthol Bros. 
could sell it for more than the total of 
the account they could keep the balance. 
In explanation of how he came into 
possession of the dollar, the Virginian 
wrote that he had bought it for $30 from 
an old negro, who was ignorant of its 
rarity and value and in whoje family it 
had been for a long time. 

The Kosenthols took the dollar to the 
mint here and it was pronounced gen- 
uine. A coin collector has offered them 
$350 for the dollar, but they refused the 
offer, as at an auction sale of coins here 
one of the 1S04 dollars sold for $1000. 



ARRESTED FOR ROBBERY. 



A Baseball Pitcher Held on a Serious 
Charge. 

Cleveland, Jan. 3. — James F. Galvin, 
pitcher for the Pittsburg league base- 
ball tear, last season, was arrested in 
Clara Palmer's place early this morning 

on a charge of robbery, preferred by H. 
VV. Hubbard, a tailor. 

Hubbard claimed to^ave been robbed 
of a ?;2^o diamond pin and a watch 
worth $125 and gave a description of the 
man. .\bout 3 o'clock Galuin was found 
at Palmer's and, with three others, ar- 
rested. All denied their guilt. No trace 
of the missing jewelry was found. 



A Railroad Sold. 
Victoria, Tex., Jan. 3.— The Pan 
American railway was sold yesterday 
under executions by the sheriff of Vic- 
toria county. The sale covered all ma- 
terial on the right-of-way of the railway, 
including eleven miles of finished road 
constructed at a cost of about $150,000. 
The road was purchased by J. J. Sullica, 
treasurer of the Pan-American Railway 
company, for $11,000. Nothing can be 
learned as to the company's future in- 
tentions. 

Waite Wants to be Senator. 

Di.NVER, Jan. 3. — The Evening Sun 
says: "'The appointment of A. G. 
Rogers as a member of the fire and 
police board of this city is practically the 
first move of Governor Waite toward the 
senatorship to succeed Wolcott. The 
fire chief and chief of police will be de- 
posed to make room for more of the 
governor's henchmen and the entire ma- 
chinery of the municipality will soon be 
under his exclusive control." 



Was Probably Lynched. 

WiLKESBAKRE, Pa., Jan. 3.— Evidence 
has been discovered which leads to the 
suspicion that John Subolda, whose body 
was found hanging in the woods Sun- 
day, was a victim of lynchers. He was 
suspected of the murder of a man in 
Brodrick a month ago, and it is thought 
the vengeance of his countrymen over- 
took hi hi. 

■ - > 

Poisoned Cheese. 

Birmingham, Ala., Jan. 3.— Daniel 
Webster, his wife and three sons ate of 
hogs head cheese last night. At midnight 
the elder Webster was dead, his wife dy- 
ing and his three sons desperately ill. It 
is thought the cheese was poisoned by 
remaiiung too long in a zinc vessel. 



Consul Savage Dead. 
DuNOEK, Jan. 3.— George W. Savage, 
the American consul at this place, died 
this morning after a lingering illness. 
For two months he had been incapaci- 
taticd by age and increasing feebleness 
from performing the duties of his office, 
but it was only recently that he devel- 
oped alarming symptoms. 

Rushed With Woric. 
Elvkia, Ohio, Jan. 3.— The Western 
Automatic Machine Screw company 
began running twenty-four hours a day 
yesterday. A large influx of bicycle 
work is the cause of the rush. 



TROUBLE AT KEY WEST. 



A Sirilie In a Cigar Factory Asiumei Serious 
Proportions. 

Jacksonville, FIr., Jan. 3.— A spe- 
cial from Key West, Fla., says: The 
strike in Seidenburg's cigar factory has 
assumed serious proportions. Fifteen 
Spaniards came over Monday night and 
certain Cubans have threatened to do 
them bodily harm. 

A mass meeting was held yesterday 
and protection to the Spaniards guaran- 
teed. A committee of fifteen leading 
men of Key West, including the mayor, 
sheriff, police justice, county judge, ex- 
Lieutenant Governor Bethel, leave for 
Havana to bring over 300 or 400 Span- 
iards. 

Fifty special police and deputy sheriffs 
are on duty. The entire city is aroused 
and prompt vengeance will be visited on 
anyone who attempts to interfere with 
the Spaniards. 

HAD A VERY CLOiE CALL. 



Two Tramps Nearly Given a Horrible Death in 
Indiana. 

MuNCiE, Ind, Jan. 3.— Two tramps 
had a close call from a horrible death 
Monday night. Just east of the city they 
had held up a Belgian glass blower. The 
foreigner, after escaping, found a crowd 
of his companions, chased the robbers 
and made them surrender. 

The Belgians took the men to the 
window glass works. It was proposed to 
give the tramps a ducking in the hot 
glass that filled the big continuous tank 
in the factory. • 

Alter a terrible fight the half dozen or 
more Belgians succeeded in securely 
binding their prisoners' hands and feet, 
and ttiey were about to drop one of the 
men in the tank when two policemen 
arrived on the scene and hostilities 
ceased. 

— — ■ — ^ _^iv 

TO PURCHASE THE GLOBE. 



Rumor That Ex- Manager Scott of the Chicago 
Herald Will Buy It. 

St. Paul, Jan. 3.— There is a story 
afloat that J. W. Scott, for years man- 
ager of the Chicago Herald, is likely to 
purchase the St. Paul Globe. Rumor 
has it that he is backed by W. C. Whit- 
ney, Cleveland's ex-secretary of the 
treasury, who has the presidential bee 
buzzing in his bonnet. 

fudge Flandreau, receiver of the Globe, 
is in Chicago attending to a law suit, and 
H. P. Hall declares he knows nothing 
about it except what he heard on the 
streets. It is known, however, that Mr. 
Scott retires from the Herald with the 
new year, and as he has heretofore had 
his eye on the Globe, the report is be- 
lieved to be well founded. 



This Coapoa ooonts for one vote if sent 
to The Horold office proTious to Jaa. 5. 



My choice ^or Mayor 
at the ensuing spring 
election is 

Signature. 
January 3. 



SHOT HIMSELF DEAD. 



Suicide of a DetaulUng Cashier While Under 
Arrest. 

New York, Jan. 3. — A special from 
Hartford, Conn., to the I^Ierald says that 
Charles Hamilton, aged 25, the default- 
ing cashier of G. W. Sloan & Co, gro- 
cers, of that city, committed suicide last 
night on the Springfield train. 

Hamilton was in charge of Policeman 
Smith, who was bringing him from Tews- 
bury. Mass , where he had been arrested. 
They were in the smoking car and Ham- 
ilton asked the officer to go to the end of 
the car with him. The officer released 
his hold on Hamilton for a moment, and 
the latter drew a revolver and shot him- 
self in the right temple. 

DULUTH. PIERRE & BLACK HILLS. 



General Manager Ward Preparing to Iron the 
Road. 

Ai'.KRDEEN, S. D., Jan. 3. — The Du- 
luth, Pierre & Black Hills road at pres- 
ent partially graded from Aberdeen to 
Pierre, looks like a go. Hon. James A. 

Ward, the general manager, was here 
last week attending to nearly a dozen 
condemnation cases in circuit court, 
which cleaned up the last particle of the 
right of way. 

Judgments aggregating $1000 were 
awarded in this county and Edmunds 
county against the road, and the money 
will be paid without delay. Over $30,000 
has already been paid out in permanent 
surveys, grading, etc. Mr. Ward is ne- 
gotiating with a New York syndicate for 
the means to iron and operate the line, 
and expects to have the cars running in 
time for the next session of the legisla- 
ture, a year hence. 

Captured By Insurgents. 

London, Jan. 3.— A dispatch from 
Buenos Ayres says: The insurgents in 
Rio Grande do Sul have captured Bage 
after a month's siege. Admiral Mello's 
fleet continues to bombard Rio Janeiro. 
Advices from Pernambuco are that the 
government cruiser Nictheroy is ready 
to proceed and will sail southward at 
once, accompanied by the America to 
seek the insurgent vessels. 

Oue to Falling Receipts. 
CLr:vELAND, Jan. 3. —The street rail- 
way lines have announced a cut of from 
10 to 20 per cent in the salaries of offi- 
cers and wages of shop men receiving 
more than $1.50 per day. The wages of 
men operating cars will not be affected 
by the cut. The reason given is a fall- 
ing off in receipts on all lines of $200,000 
per month. 




SOF 




Once More the Lawmakers Assembled and 

Mr. Wilson Ready to Open the 

Tariff Debate. 



Little Prospect That the Bill Can be Called 

Up Today, Owing to Republican 

Filibustering. 



Mr. Boutelle Wants His Resolution as to 

Hawaii Considered, But no Quorum 

Has Voted. 



Washington, Jan. 3.— Mr. McCreary, 
chairman of the foreign affairs commit- 
tee> offered a resolution in the house set- 
ting apart next Friday and Saturday for 
the consideration of the Hawaiian report. 
Mr. Hitt seconded the request, but Mr. 
Boutelle rose to a matter of privilege 
and endeavored to call up his resolution 
relative to Hawaii offered before the re- 
cess. 

Mr. Turner held that the Boutelle re- 
solution was not privileged and made a 
point of order against it. The chair, 
after hearing Mr. Turner, held that Mr. 
Boutelle had a right to call the matter 
up. The resolution was then load, and 
Mr. McMillin raised the question of con- 
sideration, stating that he wished to go 
ahead with the tariff bill. 

Mr. McCreary then made another 
effort to have Friday and Saturday set 
apart for the consideration of the Haw- 
aiian matter. After some discussion a 
vote was demanded on the question of 
the consideration raised by Mr. McMil- 
lin. A rising vote resulted: Yeas, 57; 
nays, 176. 

Mr. Boutelle demanded tellers, pend- 
ing which Mr. McCreary demanded the 
yeas and nays. The la:ter motion was 
agreed to and the clerk began the roll 
call. 

The yea and nay vote on considering 
the Boutelle resolution resulted: Yeas, 
3; nays, 135— showing that filibustering 
had begun. Mr. Boutelle made the point 
of no quorum and Mr. McMillin moved 
a call of the house. This was ordered. 

At 1:15 there is a possibility that the 
tariff bill cannot be called up today. The 
Republicans have determined to fili- 
buster in the effort to secure considera- 
tion for the Boutelle Hawaiian resolu- 
tion and have stated their purpose to 
force an adjournment of the house be- 
fore the tariff bill is taken up today, un- 
less they can prevail. So far no quorum 
has voted and no business can be done 
until it appears. 

The call of the house disclosed the 
the presence of 203 members — more 
than a quorum, but the latter disap- 
peared again when it came to the voting 
point andf the house, at 2 p. m., ad- 
journed without taking up the tariff bill. 

The Senate. 

Washington, Jan. 3.— A resolution 
was offered in the senate today by Mr. 
Frye and laid on the table for the pres- 
ent, declaring that during the investiga- 
tion as to Hawaiian affairs there should 
be no interference on the part of the 
United States government, by moral in- 
fluence or physical force for the restor- 
ation of the queen, or the 
maintenance of the provisional govern- 
ment, and that our naval force there 
should be used only for the protection of 
the lives and property of American citi- 
zens. 

After the transaction of some impor- 
tant business, the senate, on motion of 
Mr. Gorman, proceeded to the considera- 
tion of executive business. At 1:20 p. 
m. the senate adjourned until tomorrow. 



FIVE WERE DROWNED. 



Sad Accident to Children Skating on the 
Spree. 

Berlin, Jan. 3. — A sad accident oc- 
curred today at Cottbus, Brandenburg 
While a large number of children were 
skating on the Spree, at that place, the 

ice gave way and twenty-five of them fell 
into the river. 

Assistance was rendered by many of 
the other skaters and by persons from 
the shore who heard the cries for help, 
and twenty of the children were rescued, 
little the worse for their ducking. 

The other five, however, either sank 
before assistance could reach them or 
were carried under the sound ice by the 
current, where they perished. 

NEW PHASE OF THE CASE. 



Jacl(Sonviile Council Passed an Ordinance 
Licensing Glove Fights. 

Jacksonville, Fla., Jan. 3.— Manager 
Bowden, of the Duval club, went to St. 
Augustine today to get Mitchell to sign 
articles allowing the club the privilege 

of naming any place where the contest 
shall be held. If Mitchell does not sign, 
the club will announce the affair to the 
world. 

The passage by the city council last 
night of an ordinance licensing glove 
contests, the club claims, gives them a 
case for damages against the city if po- 
lice protect' m is not given to stop any 
interfere' .; with the fight. ,This is a 
new phase of the case. 



A Generous Offer. 
Chicago, Jan. 3.— Prince Soust- 
cheffski. imperial commissioner from 
Russia to the World's fair, tendered to 
the postoffice department, through Post- 
master Hesing yesteiv'^y, the postal ex- 
hibit made by Russia. "The exhibit was 
an interesting and valuable one. The 
offer of the commissioner will be trans- 
mitted to the authorities at Washington. 

A Receiver Named. 
Chicago, Jan. 3.— Erastus P. Marsh 
was yesterday appointed receiver of the 
American Building and Loan Invest- 
ment company, the concern which was 
recently investigated and its officers 
scored by Attorney General Moloney. 
The receiver was appointed on a bill 
filed in the United States circuit court 
by the president of the company. 




PANTON & WATSON 

GLASS BLOCK STORE, 

DULUTH, MINN. 



4 

WW www 



ALL COMBINED INTO ONE. 



GREAT SALES 

ALL COMBINED INTO ONE. 




The entire month of January to be. a busy one from beg-inning- 
to end at the Glass Block. The reasons why it shall be a busy one 
will be well demonstrated if you will read carefully our prices, then 
come and see the gfoods we are offering- for those prices. We take 
our annual inventory January 31, hence the reason we beg-in the 
following- FOUR GREAT SALES. 

Great Inventory Sale ! 



Great Remnant 5alel 

Great Odd and End Sale ! 



Great Clearance Sale! 



Shoe Dep't. 

Every pair of Shoes must be sold pre- 
vious to Feb. 1st. A complete new stock 
already bought for spring. 

Ladies* Shoes. 

Our $5.00, $5.50 and $6.00 qualities 
fine Kid Button or Lace, turned 
and welt seams all go at tfQ I^Q 

The Bargain of Your Life. 

Our Misses' Straight Goat and 
Dongola Kid Shoes, sizes 11 to 
2, B to £ width; closing out di | QC 
price IP 1 lO V 

200 pairs Child's Shoes, spring 
heel, Dongola Kid, 8 to 10^, B 
to £, worth $1.75, Only A | | A 

Hard Times, Gentlemen, 
Make Prices Low. 

Our entire stock of Hanan & Son 
fine handmade Shoes for men, 
formerly sold for $7.00 and 0! j^ QQ 
$8.00, all go at ip4i«f «f 

Why buy cheap Shoes when you 
can buy handmade ones for less. 
Our entire stock of Hanan & 
Son Shoe for men at $5.00 tf Q C A 

PKE PAUJ 

Stop Throwing Your 
Money Away 

And buy your Rubbers from us. We can 
save you money. 

Children's Rubbers 23c, worth 35c. 



Misses' Rubbers 25c, worth 40c. 

Ladies' Croquettes 2gc, worth 45c. 

Boys' Rubbers 45c, worth 60c. 

Men's Rubbers 55c, worth 75c. 

Men's wool-linea Alaskas 89c, worth 
$1.25. 

Ladies' wool-lined Alaskas 69c, worth 
90c. 

Boys' Lumbermen's ti.io, worth $1.50. 

Men's Lumbermen's $1.29, worth $1.65. 

Boys' wool-lined Boots $1.15, worth 
$1.50. 

Misses' wool lined Boots S1.29, worth 

Ladies' wool-lined Boots S1.50, worth 
S2.00. 

BIanl<:et Dept. 

Tremendous cutting in nearly every 
make. Now is the time to replenish your 
home, your hotel, your camp, or lay in a 
stock for next winter. 

BLANKETS. 

25 pairs Crib Blankets, worth $1.50; 
go at 75c a pair. 

100 pairs White Blankets, 10-4 size, 
cheap at S1.50; go at this sale for 99c a 
pair. 

75 pai :s fine Gray Blankets, large size, 
1 1-4, worth $4.50; go at $2.99 a pair. 

50 pair extra fine Gray Blankets, extra 
large size, worth $5 to $6; sale price 
1^4.25 a pair. 

All our fine all wool white, red and 
gray Blankets at a big reduction from 
former'low prices to reduce stock. 



SUFFOCATED BY SMOKE. 



Three Women Lost Their Lives- In a New York 
Fire. 

New , York, Jan. 3.— A fire in which 
two lives were lost occurred last night in 
the 5-story brick building on the corner 
of Pearl street and Coentis slip. The 
building was occupied by a saloon, a 
shipping office and three families num- 
bering about fifteen persons in all. After 
the fire had been extinguished with but 
slight loss, the police found the bodies of 
Miss Florence Mulvey, aged 21, and 
Merty Moore, aged 60, on the fourth 
floor. Both were tenants and had been 
suffocated by smoke. 

Later — It was discovered this morning 
that three lives instead of two were lost 
in the fire which occurred last night in 
the building on the cornerof Pearl street 
and Coentier slip. The dead are: Flor- 
ence Mullaly, 21 years old; Merty Moore, 
60 years old; Florence Deegan, 21 years 
old. All were suffocated by smoke. 
There were about fifteen persons in the 
building when the fire was discovered. 
The fire was put out in half an hour. The 
loss is small. 

A POINTER FOR DONNELLY. 



The Discoverer of the Baconian Cipher Sues 
For Damages. 

Detroit, Mich., Jari. 3.— Dr. Orville 
W. Owens, of this city, who claims to be 
the discoverer of a cipher which proves 

Sir Francis Bacon to be the author of 
Shakespeare, and who has edited a book 
entitled ."Sir Francis Bacon's Cipher 
Story," the latest contribution to the 
Bacon-Shakespeare controversy, has 
hied suit against the Detroit Sunday 
Ne»vs-Tribune for $50,000 damages for 
editorially denouncing him as a "literary 
fraud." Papers were filed yesterday 
afternoon. 



Will be no Compromise. 
Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 3. — In the case 
of the Catholic Knights of- America 
against the bondsmen of M. J. O'Brien, 
the defaulting treasurer. Judge Key 
struck out the plea of accord offered by 
bondsmen on the motion from the plain- 
tiff that it be quashed. This ends all 
hope of compromise. The case goes 
over till the next term of the federal 
court. 

Defaulted on Interest. 
Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 3. — The Consoli- 
dated Street railway defaulted the inter- 
est on its bonds yesterday. The bond 
holders have agreed not to apply for a 
receiver, if the shareholders here raise 
$17 per share to pay off the floating debt. 
The bonded indeotedness is $2,000,000. 



OPIUH SMUGGLER CAUGHT. 



Donald Kennedy Arrested After Ten Years' 
Vigilance by Detectives. 

Detroit, Jan. 3.— Donald Kennedy, 
one of the most notorious opium smug- 
glers in the country, was arrested at 
West Detroit last night by United States 
Inspector Carter. Kennedy has been 
engaged in the business of smuggling 
opium across the border for nearly ten 
years, and during that time has managed 
to elude the vigilance of the brightest 
men in the secret service. 

Inspector Carter was assigned to look 
after Kennedy some time ago and has 
never lost sight of his man since. Ken- 
nedy started from Toronto yesterday 
with an ordinary looking trunk, passed 
customs at Port HuYon all right and 
came on to West Detroit. There Ken- 
nedy consigned the trunk to a Chinese 
firm in San Francisco. Carter, who had 
accompanied* Kennedy from Toronto, 
then made the arrest and seized the 
trunk. Packed away beneath a false 
bottom were found 100 half pound tins 
of opium. 

It is estimated that during the last 
year alone Kennedy smuggled an aver- 
age of 500 pounds of the drug every 
month and thus cheated the government 
out of $72,000. His brother, Al Kennedy, 
who used to be associated with him in 
the business, is now serving a term in 
the Detroit house of correction. 



AGAINST FREE IRON ORE. 



Seven Years' Sentences. 
Madrid, Jan. 3. — Juan Marie Del- 
berehe and Manuel Ferreira, anaitrhists 
who plotted to blow up the parliamentary 
buildings, in April, i8g2, and the alleged 
police agent, whom the police disavow, 
were found guilty yesterday and con- 
demned to seven years' penal servitude. 



Petitions from Duluth Presented to Conqress 
Today. 

Washington, Jan. 3.— [Special to The 
Herald.]— Representative Baldwin today 
presented petitions from the board of 
trade and tne stock exchange of Duluth 
against placing iron ore on the free list, 
and also a petition from citizens of Du- 
luth against any reduction of the duty on 
barley. 

Maj. Baldwin is endeauoring to get the 
Minnesota delegation to consider bis 
new customs district bill tomorrow. He 
thinks he will get a favorable report, but 
this is doubtful as there is decided oppo- 
sition to it. 

Representive Baldwin is in receipt of 
a letter from Judge Nelson, of Minne- 
sota, advising that in view of the in- 
creased business of the United States 
courts another district should be created 
embracing the counties included in the 
fourth, fifth and sixth divisions of the 
present district. Maj. Baldwin may in- 
troduce a bill to this effect. 



. Peace Restored. 
Liver TOOL, Jan. 3.— Dispatches re- 
ceived by mercantile firms here from the 
Cameroons say that peace has been re- 
stored in the colonies and the German 
officials have restored to the owners all 
the buildings captured by the native mu- 
tineers. German marines drove the 
natives from the English factories which 
had been seized during the mutinv. 
Trade on the Cameroon river is proceed- 
ing as usual. 









il 



.• 




2 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 3, 1894. 




Dayton, a Small Mining Town in Iowa, 

Was a Scene of the Wildest E\- 

citment. 



Two Hundred Miners From Fraiier Tried 
Wipe it From the Face of the 

Earth. 



to 



Fierce Battle Took Place and Many of 
the Men Were Literally Cut to 
Pieces. 



\Vi KSTKR City, Iowa, Jan. ;,.— When 
the sun set at Dayton, a small mining 
town near here, last night, iiwason a 
scene of the wildest excitement. Two 
hundred miners from the little town of 
Frajtier two miles away had been there 
to wipe it from the face of the earth. 
Thev had lelt on the field Monday night, 
when a ti< rce battle took place, wounded 
men and companions who were literally 
cut to pieces. 

For the past five years a feud has ex 
istcd between the towns of Dayton and 
Frazier. The conllicts between the citi- 
/fiis of each place have been wordy and 
often resulted in personal encounters. 
Monday night at a dance which was in 
progress in the village hall at Dayton 
neatly half of the people wtre pre- 
sent. The a mce was at its zenith when, 
with loud halloing and making noise 
enough to frighten a regiment of sol- 
diers, a great crowd of miners from 
Frazier entered the hall. 

Their companions were on the outside, 
and once the> had entered the women 
present were driven terror stricken from 
the rcom. The men, as soon as they 
could leave their tormentors hastem d 
home, and secured their VVin( h.^ters. 



TRIED TO COMMIT SUICIDE. 



An Anarchist Tried to Shoot Himself and The* 
to Take Poison. 

Mai'KU), Jan. 3. An anarchist named 
Santajo Salvador, alias Jacques Salvador, 
was ajrrested yesterday at Saragossa, 
capital of that province. As soon as the 
police placed their hands on him he 
drew a revolver and aitcmpti'd to kill 
himself. He succeeded in jpllictinir a 
s.evcte wound in his right side, but it is 
not supposed that this injury will ptovc 
fatal. 

While one of the officers ran for medi- 
cal assistance the others stood guaid 
over the prisoner, whose revolver had 
been taken from him. Salvador was 
lying upon the floor of his lodgings, and 
the officers thought he would make no 
further attempt upon his life. In this 
they were mistaken, for Salvador drew 
from his pocket a small packet that was 
found afterward to contain a deadly 
poison and aitempttd loswallo*' its con- 
tents. The officers took the packet from 
him before he could get the contents into 
his mouth. 

After a physician had dressed his 
wound he was taken before a magistrate, 
to whom he confessed that he had b-cu 
concerned in the plot to blow up the 
Lyceum theater in Barcelona. 

THREE MEN WERE KILLED. 




The English Channel Visited by a Severe 

Snow Storm, With Heavy Wind and 

Furious Sea. 



Three Vessels Displayed Signals of Distress 

and Two Disappeared Before the 

Lifeboat Got Out. 



Believed by Many People That Ihey Found- 
ered, But They May Have Gone 
Out to Sea. 



L.\WRENCK, 

Island freight 
rear end of a I' 



Gathering m the public square they met i ioierpally injured and badly injured ex- 
to devise the best way for driving the ....„„n.. —m -^^^...., k.,» ...iii k» ,-,;r^. 



A Freight Train Crashed Into Another in Kan- 
sas. 

Kan.. Jan. 3.— A Rock 
train crashed into the 
nion Pacific freight ten 
miles east of here about 6 o'cloL-k yester- 
day morning. The Union Pacific ca- 
boose, a passenger coach, a car load of 
lumber and a car load of hogs were 
burned. 

The dead are: Herman^Smize, stock- 
man, of Clay Centre, Kan.; - Martin, 
stockman, of W^akeficld, Kan.; James 

Atwood, conductor; Johnson, of 

Tescoit, Kan. 

The injured are; William 
Randolph, Kan., spine and 
hurt, will probably die; B. 
Hill Centre, Kan., head and 



Haskivs, of 

back badly 

F. Posten, of 

back badly 

injured; T. M. McLray. of Tescott, Kan., 



miners from the town. City Marshal 
Dawson was laboring with a gang of 
miners in Tucker^) restaurant. He was 
begging them to be quiet and go home. 
Someone drew a revolver and fired, the 
bullet entering the oriicer's stomach and 
killing him. 

In a moment the news of the shooting 
was carried to the public square. They 
hastened to the restaurant and there out- 
side in the dark, a bloody battle took 
place with knives and revolvers. Frank 
Loud, deputv Inited States marshal un- 
der President Harrison, was horribly in- 
jured. John Gustafson, a prominent man 
of the town, was htcrallv cut to pieces 
He was in the thick ot the riot and men 
were falling around him all more or less 
injured when he went down. 

The battle was furiously fought for 
half an hour, the two factions, Dayton 
folks and the miners, swaying back and 
{orth as first one side made a rally, then 
the other. When the f-ay was over a 
half dozen persons on each side were in- 
jured and one was killed. In the morn- 
ing a number of the miners returned to 
their home at Frazier and only about 
thirty remained. 

They were quarrelsome and to guard 
against future trouble from them an 
armed guard of twenty men patrolled 
the streets of Dayton. They all carried 
Winchesters and revolvers, lust before 
the train on the Rock Island pulled in 
last evening at 5 o'clock the leaders of 
the armed patrol decided to arrest eight 
of the ring leaders of the miners who 
still remained with the thirty in the city. 
This came near precipitating another 
battle. 

Every miner was 'armed, and it was 
only by the formation of a solid phalanx 
around the miners that they were able to 
get them safely to the cars. The people 
ot Dayton would have lynched the eight 
men it they could, it is thought, and the 
miners, companions of the prisoners, 
were determined to try and rescue them 
The armed patrol finally hustled the 
prisoners, against each of whom charges 
of riot and murder will be made, to the 
cars and following them Started to Fort 
Dodge. 

The people of Dayton had their homes 
barricaded nearly all day. The excite- 
ment which commenced with the dance 
Monday night, continued without abate- 
ment until the sun went down last night. 

— -^^ 

Every One Mail Them. 

No one should fail to mail one or more 
copies of The Herald's Christmas num- 
ber to distant friends. 



but will be crip- 
of Clyde, Kan, 



ternally, will recover, 
pled; G. M. Spencer, 
head and body injured, 

When Atwood saw the collision was 
inevitable he went into the combination 
coach and bapKaf^e car at the end of the 
train toward the passengers. The crash 
came before he could accomplish his 
purpose and he was killed. Two stock- 
men are missing, and it is believed they- 
were killed and their bodies burned. 



A WHOLE BLOCK BURNED. 



in an Indiana 



Fire Does Heavy Damage 
Town. 

PoRTL.wi), In'l.. Jan. 3.— At i o'clock 
yesterday morning fire broke out in Link 
& Hanling's grocery at Red Key, and 
burned a'whole block before its course 
was stayed. The following firms were 
burned out: 

Smith & Holmes, grocery, $3000; 
George Horn, grocery, S3000; Link & 
Harding, grocery, $3000; Hale & Geis- 
ler, meat market, $1000; Fowler Taylor, 
$1000; Clawson C\: Co, meat market, 
Sioco; Charles Walker, drug^, $3000; 
Odd Fellows and Knights ot Pythias 
building, $3500; John Hall's residen~e, 
S1200; George Fdger. building, $1500; 
Nelson & Blymer's restaurant, Siooo; 
Emerson McGriff, building, $3500. The 
full los5 will run < lose to $30,000, with 
about $20,000 insurance. 



MITCHELL STANDS FIRM. 

Rorida's Governor Will Stop the Corbett- 
Mitchell Fight. 

Tallah.vssek, Fla., Jan. 3.— In reply 
to a question yesterday Governor Mitch- 
ell said: "The Corbett-Mitchell prize 
fight will not take place in Florida un- 
less the supreme court of this state de- 
cides that there is no law prohibiting 
such a fight. It will not be necessary to 
proclaim martial law to prevent such a 
fight, but were it necessary, I should not 
hesitate to proclaim it, as I am deter- 
mined to prevent this hght by any and 
all means within the reach of the execu- 
tive. 

"There can be no doubt as to mv posi- 
tion, and people who come here with the 
expectation ot seeing the la«s of the 
s>tate violated by two thugs and their 
aiders and abettors, wiUbe disappointed. 



London, Jan. 3— A blinding snow- 
storm, accompanied by a heavy wind 
and furious sea, prevailed on the Kng- 
lish channel la-.t ni.^ht. Tlie packet 
service between English and French 
ports was interrupted, and some of the 
steamers suffered damage. The packet 
from Ostend was unable to 1 ind at 
Dover owing to the tremendous sea, and 
put out into the channel again to await 
hi)ih water, when it was thought the 
storm would abate somewhat. 

A disp.itch from Broadstairs, on the 

east coast of the Isle of Thanet, county 

of Kent, says that three vessels off that 

I coast displayed signals of distress late 

last evening, and that the Broadstairs 

I feboat put out to render assistance. No 

I headway cou!d be made against the gale, 

1 and the boat was compelled to stand ofl 

I and make for Kamsgate, two iiiles 

south of Broadstairs. Here the assist- 

I ance of a tug was procured, and the life- 

; boat was towed to one of the disabled or 

wrecked vessels. 
! In the meantime, so tar as can be 
learned, two of the vessels that had sig- 
I nailed for as.sistance had disappeare<l, 
j and it is believed by many persons that 
I they foundered. It is possible, however, 
I that they managed to claw off shore and 
j stand out to sea. It is thought that the 
lifeboat stood by the remaining vessel 
and that she took off the crew this morn- 
ing. At the time the dispatch was sent, 
! the lifeboat had not returned. A fishing 
smack that had lost its bearings ran 
ashore at Broadstairs. All on board of 
her managed to reach shore safely. 

The (ierman ship George, Capt. 
Scholz, from Bremen for New York, 
which was towed into Dover roads Jan. 1, 
disabled, was seen to be drifting on thi 
shore at Dover during the gale. Tug 
boats went to her assistance and it is 
thought that she was taken out of 
danger. 

A Gem Expert Dead. 

New York, Jan. 3 — James D. Yer- 
rington died yesterday morning at his 
home in Cresskill, near (F.ngicwood, N. 
J., of pneumonia. He was born in Provi- 
dence sixty years ago. Mr. Yerrington 
was called one of the best gem experts 
in the United States. He was called iti 
as an expert by a syndicate of English 
capitalists to determine the value of the 
Montana sapphire mines» and the final 
conclusion of the syndicate as to the pur- 
chase of the property was based upon 
his report. 

■ » - ^ 

To Sue Maj. Hambrough. 

London, Jan. 3.— Alfred John Mon- 
son, who was recently tried at Edin- 
burgh for the murder of Lieut. Ham- 
brough, and who was discharged from 
custody, the jury returning a verdict (;f 
"not proven," will shortly bring an 
action against Maj. Hambrough, father 
of the lieutenant, m connection with the 
charges on the Hambrough estates. 
Totenham, the money lender, who was 
one of the witnesses in the murder trial, 
will also bring suit against Maj. Ham- 
Hrough to recover money advanced to 
Lieut. Hambrough. 

A Shortage Found. 

Indianapolis, Jan. 3.— The state 
lioard of agriculture is in session here. 
A^year ago, when Lean O. Bagley, uf 
Huntington, the retiring secretary, turned 
over his books to his successor a dis- 
crepancy was found. An auditing coin- 
mittec of three was appointed and they 
will make a report to the hoard Wednes- 
day, showing a shortage in his accounts 
of about S250. The ex-secretory has 
promi.sed to come here and face the 
charges, but has not yet showed up. 



INGENIOUS AND NOVEL SCHEME. 

Walter Campbell Worked Eastern and West- 
ern Men lor Large Amounts. 

Cii!(A(i«>, Jan. 3 Walter Campbell is 
president of the Illinois Electrical Forg- 
ing companv. Indeed he is more than 
that, for he is the only thing in connec- 
tion with the company that is not dead. 
Above all, however, he is the safety de- 
posit vauU of the company and the 
stockholders have placed $200,0 X) in 
liiui. 

Mr. Campbrli's scheme is not only in- 
genious bat novel. The Bo^ton Electri- 
cal Forging comptny had an exhibit at 
the World's fair of a method of welding 
metals by the means of an electrical 
current. Campbell approached the offi- 
cials of lh:j company with a view of pur- 
chasing the state rights ot the patent for 
Illinois. The proposition was enter- 
tained and incorporation papers were 
drawn up in Chicago for the Illinois 
Forging company. Campbell himself 
was named as one of the incorporators, 
the others being mere business acquaint- 
ances used as tigurehead?. 

Under the terms of the negotiation 
with the Boston firm, the latter was to 
receive 25 per cent of the stock in the 
new concern for the Illinois right. Camp- 
bell himself was t.) be the principal 
stockholder, his claim being to 50 per 
cent of the stock. 

Campbell's method was similar in all 
main features wherever it was exercised. 
He was gootl looking, faultlessly dressed, 
and it was easy to credit the fact that he 
was a millionaire, as he said be was. So 
artistic was his mendacity that even Cali- 
fornians credited him. President Bush, 
of the Bank of Yolo. Woodland, Cal., 
purchased stock in the forging company 
to the value of $20,000. Hiram J. Thomp- 
son, of 84 Wabash avenue, this city, pur- 
chased $10,000 worth of stock in lae con- 
cern. 

Altogether Campbell collected at a 
conservative estimate fully $100,000 
East and West, for men in Boston and 
New Yoik subscribed liberally to his 
enterprise. But bdyond that sum and in 
addition to it, he conducted a successful 
operation in Lewiston, IHs., which netted 
him at least as much as his transactions 
in the rest of the country. Oliver Rice, 
a hard-fisted farmer, purchased $20,000 
worth of stock in ttie electrical com- 
p:iny. 

A merchant. Phelps, and his son Will- 
iam Phelps were induced to pay $115,- 
000 in notes for the worthless stock. 
Campbell showed them a bogus draft for 
$6000 purporting to be his monthly re- 
ceipts for his interest in a California 
mine. Now Phelps is a bankrupt while 
his store, the larjjcst in Lewistou, has 
passed into other hands. From Lewis- 
ton Campbell went East where he suc- 
cessfully discounted the notes given by 
Phelps and Rice for something over 
Sioo.ooo. Since then nothing has been 
known ot bis mov«:ments. 



ARCUSED HIS SUSPICIONS. 



Why 



SEIZED BY MASKED MEN. 



Several Large Stills Taken by Revenue Offi- 
cers Recaptured. 

Calhoun, Ga., Jan. 3.— Fifty masked 
men took possession of the town Monday 
night, recovering several large stills 
which had been seized by revenue offi- 
cers, and disappeared into the woods 
with their prisoners in triumph. Mon- 
day • a raid was made by Deputy Mar- 
shals Bat Thompson, Josh Bailey and 
Frank Ward, and two big illicit distill- 
ery plants were captured in the lower 
edge of Murray county, six miles east of 
Tilton. 

The officers located the two stills in an 
isolated community in the deep woods. 
Three men, Tom Higgins, John Dean 
and Amos Jenox were arrested. The 
stills were put on a wagon and brought 
to Calhoun and delivered to the Western 
& Atlantic railroad here for shipment to 
the revenue head(iuarters in Atlanta. 

Shortly past 11 o'clock Monday night. 
Night Agent Ransom heard the door of 
the freight car open. He found the car 
surrounded by fifty disguised men, who 
ordered him to get back ius'.de and em- 
phasized the order by covering htm with 
Winchesters. In a few seconds the 
stills were loaded into wagons and for- 
warded by the crowd of masked men 
who drove rapidly toward the hills. 
No trace of the course taken could be 
found but it is supposed that they suc- 
ceeded in reaching the hills of Murray. 



a <iii<minn lliirkpoper and IIU Irish 
Cuatuuier Arc SlraiiRer* Now. 

There Is II certain Oirman barkeeper up 
town who is nui-Hing a vijcoroUH wralh and 
a puilicular kuotty bliickthorn, because of 
Hii unknown person with au Irish accent 
and au engacinK addreiw. 

One night the stranger stepped up to the 
bar and a«ked for h quart of gin in a black 
bottle which he placed on the bar. Tlie 
barkeeiier tilled the Inittle, and the muo 
wAlked toward the door. 

"Here!" yelled the barkeeper. "You give 
me no money.s for dot chin!" 

"Ah, mark it down on the slate, will 

yer?" 

"We heft no slet; you give me back dot 
chin or give me my money." 

"Not. a cent, not a cent; take back your 
stufT if y«m won't hauK it up." 

So the man handed back the Ixjttle to the 
barkeeper, who poured the contents of the 
l)ottlc into the cask. 

A week later, almost at the same hour, 
the door blew in again. "Hey, Dutch, give 
us a. quarto' gin, will yer?" The unsus- 
pecting barkeeper poured the liquor iato 
the bottle, handed it over the bar and, as 
before, the man took the bottle and started 

off. 

'Here, you, give me my moneys or my 
chin. What you ^o, hey? Flim flem me? 
Give me dot chin!" 

"Ah, mark it down on the slate." 

"We don't kip no slet— giveme dot chin!" 

"Ol right. Take your dommed old gin 
and be cussed wid yer!" 

The bottle was handed tmck across the 
bar, and the man again disappeared into 
thf night. Again the liquor trickled down 
nto tlie cask. 

Four more times, on as many nights, the 
same incident was enacted. Then the liar- 
keeper bfcame suspicious. 

"Dot man buys him no chin," he sotilo- 
»iuized, "but alretty he comes Lim beck six 
nine. I find out dings." A week later the 
man appeared again, with: 

"Hey, Dutchy, flU this in a hurry, will 
yer?" 

"lliif you got any moneys dis time, hey?" 
Let us look at some of dot money, hein?" 
The man showed a neat roll of bills, and 
the barkeeper filled the bottle and handed 
it {icross the bar. 

"Suv, Dutchy, just mark that on the 
slate, will yer!-". 

"Here, you, yust give me l)eck derchin! 
Vat you vani, bey?" Once again the bottle 
l):;i>.sed back iuto the barkeeper's possession, 
Hud ayam the man went away. But this 
tiuie the bottle was not emptied into the 
cask. 

liaising the bottle to his lips, the bar- 
keeper ta.sted its contents. Then he smashed 
1 hi; iKittle till the floor and the air wiis thick 
with liis invectives. A policeman, hearing 
the noise, poked his head inside the door 
and saw a raving barkeeper, who was say- 
iujr: 

"Dot swindler. I brek 

his fc'ss! Where he isT' 

And then it was all e.xplaine<l. The man 
with the Irish accent and the engaging per- 
sonality had cuuie each liuie with two l)ot- 
tk-.<. One wa.s empty, the other full of 
water. When ht turned to thesidc door, he 
dexterously changed the bottle of gin for 
the bottle of water and gave the latter to 
the barkeeper instead. Six times he prac- 
ticed the deception successfully, but if he 
ever returns there may be a cji.se for the dis- 
trict court to pass on.— New York World, 



Old Time Counterfeiters. 

A miner operating on Miller's ranch, near 
Latrolx-, while following up a "pocket" 
lead uneartbe<l au iron pot coutainiiii; 61,000 
iu what appeared to be gold coins. They 
turned out, however, to be counterfeits. 
Some old miners tell that about 1833 there 
was a lively ramp near the spot where the 
bogus coin wa.-5 foaiul. Two young men 
lived near the camp, and they always were 
well supplied with money, which they 
spent freely. They bad the very best of ev- 
erything going. 

As thcjse young fellows were never known 
to do any work and as they never gambled 
any and consequently could not have won 
the money they speut so freely, it soon Ije- 
j.'an lo be whispered about that they were 
counterfeit money makers. From this cir- 
cumsLance the place became known as 
"CdUiiterleil lim:" The suspicion against 
the young men became so general that they 
were alarmed and disappeared from the 
camp, and all traces of them were lost, and 
they were forgotten until the incident nar- 
rated above brought them to miud again. 
— Folsom Telegraph. 




COL. C. W. DKAN. 

SUNSTRUCK IN BATTLE I 

I)B. MILKS MEDICAL fit. Kikhart. 
Tnd -I rau.it sav the Kestoratlve Nervine 
»ud Nprvw and liver i*ili» have done iu« 

*rO^^YEARS I HAVE NOT FELT AM 
WEXL AS MOW. 

The starting point of my discMo waa • 
unnrtroke received in batlU* t'Clore Port 
Huilson, Louisiana. June lUli. l^**-"-. rp to 
tin? time of beginning to take l»r. Mil*'*' 
1 1 m ^^ K«tii«!die!* 1 had had a eon 
1^14^) tinual diitrartioit |.i»iu In nny 
dead- also, wealt spells, and the i-asl four 
years 1 have had to give up «»Terythil>K 
of an active cliaracter, and »tuy In Uio 

liuuie for^llQri^ "">'?*.'" "J 
m t I in e: ^\/ rl bi L/ could not 

walk acroAs tie •trt-et. I KNO>V VOIIR 

RE.nEDIKS H.WK CIRKD »IK, and Hiat 

the curf will b*i perniani'ijt. Several 

;^;.KTHOUSANpS 

liere are using your remedies, and all speak 
well of them. Youi^tnil^^^,^^ 

National Military Homo, Dayton, O. 

DB. mLES'^TEBVTPrE 5« the most cer- 
tain <-ure for He»<*»che. NcnrAlfcla, HeVT' 
ou» Proa»r»tion, Dizzineiis, Sp«»m8, Sleep- 
leannesa, IHillaeBH, Blues, and Opium 
BaUt. CODtalaa oo opiates or diuiticrous druga 

Sold on • PosiUve Oa*nuitee. 

pB^Ml Le,9' PI LLS.60 Oou»26C-ra 
WOSL SAUB BY AM* DRU0018TB. 



THE COUGHLIN JURY. 

It is Said to be Packed in the Prisoner's 
Favor. 

Chicago, Jan. 3 —Rumors of impend- 
ing trouble with the Coughlin jury are 
nt coming more and more prevalent. It 
is now reported that one juror whcbwore 
on his examination that he did not know 
the detendant, has been shown to have 
been one of Coughlin's intimate friends. 

The report is not openly given credit 
by the state, but it is certain that the 
police are making a searching inrpiiry 
into the past life of the suspected man. 

Died at a Concert. 

Mink II, Jan. 3 Baron Truchsess- 
VValdOourg, tor some time envoy at St. 



Started on Full Time. 

Plvmouth, .Mass.,' Jan. 3.— Last night 
the Plymouth Cordage company's mam- 
moth mill started on full time, the night 
gang, which had been laid off for some 
months, resuming its labors. This calls 
for 250 more employes. In securing 
these preference will be given to the ola 
hands. Binding twine will be the main 
production. 

Cut In Wages. 

Cleveland, Jan. 3.— Notices were 
posted in the shipyard and shops of the 
Globe Iron works company notifying the 
emploves of 10 per cent reduction to 
take place yesterday. The Globe com- 
pany has kept a large number of hands 
at w-ork all winter, but found it was 



Petersburg, died suddenly Monday even- | necessary to make the cut to keep all of 
iog at a court concert. The whole court ; their hands at work, 
was present and the death of the baron 



caused i onsiderablc excitement. The 
regent immediately ordered the concert 
io stop. The baron's death was caused 
by heart disease. 



For Smuggling Opium. 

St'OKANL, Wash, fan. .;.— Charles 
Bodman, one of the best- known en- 
gineers in the Northwest, has been ar- 
rested here by Special Agent McCoy on 
the charge of smuggling opium, Bod- 
man has been chief engineer on one of 
the boats on Kootenai lake. His home 
ii Portland. He protests his innocence. 

Scandal in Belgium. 
Ukussi-.i.s, Jan. 3 -A great sc.tnd.al 
has been caused at Zele bv some sacri- 
ligious thief, who despoiled the statue of I 
the \ irgin in a grotto there ot the jewels j 
which adorned it. The robber also took i 
the votive offerings deposited near the | 
siatue. Altogether his booty is valued 
at 1 2,500 francs. 

A Bridge Opening. 
I.EAVENWoKTii, Kan., Jan. 3.— Fifteen 
thousand people in addition to the^o.ouo 
living here, cele'»ralcd yesterday the for- 
mal opening of the new steel draw bridge 
across the Mifsouri river. The parade 
was over a mile long. 

Thin and impure biood is made rich 
and healthful by taking Hood's Sarsa- 
prilla. It braces up the nerves and gives 
renewed strength. 23 



The Italian Finances. 

LONl>ON. jail. {. — The Daily News cor- 
respondent in Koine says: "There arc 
rumors that the government is attempt- 
ing to farm out the tobacco monopoly to 
a group of bankers. If this scheme fails, 
an increase of the tax on rents to 18 per 
cent will become a necessity." 



In Pursuit of Evans. 

1- Ki.s.Nt), Cal.. Jan 3. No word has yet 
been received from the sheriff's posse 
now in the mountains in pursuit of the 
outlaw Evans and his companion .Mor- 
rell. Mrs. F.vaiis is siill in jail. .She is 
unable to give the bond required for her 
release. 

His Body Cremated. 
Ldndon, Jan. 3. In .tccordance with 
his expressed wish the body of Sir 
Samuel White B^tker. the African ex- 
plorer, who died on Saturday last, was 
cremated at Woking today. 



Will Go lo Melilla. 

Tangier. Jan. 3.— It is reported here 
that the sultan of Morocco will start twu 
months hence from the city of Morort o 
lur xMclilla. He will bj accompanied by 
a large number of troops. 

-^ — - — . • 

Uncle Sam's Balance. 

, WASHlNiiTON. Jan. 3.— Net balance in 
I the treasury today as shown by the pub- 
i 1 cdebt statement issued this afternoon 



Bishop McNierney Dead. 

Alhanv, N. Y., Jan. 3. Rt. Rev. 
Francis McNierney, bishop of Albany, 
died at 7:30 o'clock last night at the 
episcopal residence in this city from ty- 
ptioid pneumonia. The bishop cele- 
brated pontitical mass at the cathedral 
on Christmas, and on the afternoon of 
that day was taken with the illness which 
ended in his death Bishop McNierney 
was born in New ^■ork city, April 25, 
1829. He was ordained priest in St. Pat- 
rick's cathedral. New York, Aug. 17, 
1855, and was appointed private secre- 
tary to Archbishop McCloskey. In 1872 
he was appointed titular bishop of 
Phesina and coadjutor bishop of Albany 
and was consecrated in .St, Patrick's 
cathedral. New York city, on April 21, 
same year. 

Is Hopelessly Insolvent. 
Keokuk. Iowa, Jan. 3. -Judge Bank 
of the superior court, last evening ap- 
pointed H. C. Renier receiver of the 
Gate City Klectric Street railway, 011 the 
application of the Central Trust com- 
pany, ut New York. The trust company 
holds first inortg.agc l>on<ls for SS5.o<.>o tin 
which the railway company defaulted in- 
terest. The railway is hdptlcsvly insol- 
vent, with a doaUiig debt uf aJxiut f.12,- 
000. The operation of the line ceased 
some weeks ago. 

Nis Neck Broken. 
East St. Louis, 111.. Jan. 3.— Roy 
Lowry, an exercise boy, was thrown from 
a horse at the race track yesterday and 
fatallv injured, his neck being broken. 
He died a short time after the accident 
occurred. He came here a short time 
ago from Dodge Cjty, Kas., where his 
parents reside. 

Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page f>. 

Have You Any Work? 
Are there any families in Ihiluth who 
would like a man lo do odd work around 
the house, such as taking care of the 
fires, carpenter work, etc., by the week or 
muntb" l: so, the Associated Chanties 
would be "rlad to supply their need. 
Thfrc arc iscveral men wliu have bctii 
ill. and are out of woik. who would be 
greatly helped in this way. Please send 
word to 415 Woodbiidge building. 

Gu8 Swen l.son, ir/t First street, carries 
a. complete stock of fresh roasted coffee, 
roasted every day at the Latfle Cotfee 
and Spice mills. 



Tlio PljyMcian In the Kitchen. 

In sooth, the physician i.s expected to 
know all of some things and .noiue uf all 
thiiifis. The physician knows it is not suf- 
ficient to give the very vaguest instructions 
as to what a patient may or may not eat 
and trust to the ordinary kitchen mechanic 
to produce the desired results. He must, if 
nece.ssary, be able to give for the prepara- 
tion of food directions as specific as he gives 
the pharmacist for the preparation of medi- 
cine. 

This does not necessarily mean that every 
physician must i|iiitlify as a chef. It will 
be siidicient for practical purposes if everj' 
physician will study the food stuffs in com- 
mon use in the locality in which his work 
lies and learn so that he can teach the 
modes of preparation l)y which the nutri- 
tive values of the various food stuffs may 
be developed. 

The physician iu the kitchen is no longer 
a joke.— kedical and Surgical Reporter. 

Music For a Butcber. 

A music teacher undertook to coach up 
the young ami beautiful daughter of a 
\vealthy biitthcr iu the art of cmtcliets and 
quavers, and having iu» due course brought 
her to perfection in one or two easy show 
pieces, such as "Taimhaifter" and "Lohen- 
grin,'' sent her home io her pa. 

But the master of the marrowbone and 
the cleaver was far from satisded. "I 
wanted yer to teach her somethin appropri- 
ate,"' said he, "somethin as she coiild play 
when we gives a party. Ain't there a com- 
poser named Choppin? Well, that's the 
bloke to write a bito' music for a butcher.'' 
—London Tit-Bits. 



Hypnotism a« a Care. 

Dr. Biawley of the English Harveian so- 
ciety claims that he and other si>ecialists in 
hypnotism have cured or beneficially treat- 
ed by hypnotic .«;uggestion oases of neural- 
gia, nervous prostration, insomnia, seasick- 
ness and dipsomania (drunkenness). Dr. 
Wettersbrand contends that hypnotism is 
particularly l>eneficial In epilepsy and dip- 
somania. Dr. Bramwell considers hypno- 
tism not as a rival to ordinary medicine, 
but as a iriedical weapon to be used io con- 
nection with other treatments,— New York 
Ijcflger. 

Tbe lli^hor lAteruturc. 

"Hullo, rhimnjy. Isdey nny more books 
in de Young Terrors' iibery?" 

"I dunno, but I hear tell about a story 
by George Eliot what deycall 'Daniel de 
Rounder.' Shouldn't wonder if dat might' 
be oretty 4rood.''— Brookbrn Ea^le. 

Sixty cents a month will have The 
Herald delivered ev«ry night at your 



The 

Coming 

Contest 







In the spring election for mayor will be the most 
animated that h.as ever taken place in Uulutb. 
In order to simplify matters and arrive at the real 
sentiment of the people as to who is their popular 
choice for mayor, The Herahl hereby inaugurates 
a voting contest, by printing in each issue of The 
Evening Herald a coupon whl h every person in 
Duluth is requested to cut out and vote as often 
as they please and mail or bring it in person to 
The Herald office. The popular contestant who 
receives the' largest number of voles will on Jan- 
uary loth, the day of the close of the contest 
receive his choice of the $125.00 Haviland China 
Dinner Set now on exhibition in Panton &. Wat- 
son's window, or a $100.00 Easy Chair. The for- 
mer valuable prize will also interest the ladies ot 
Duluth to take a part themselves in this enter- 
prise of determining who is the popular choice 
for Duluth's executive head. All you have to do 
is cut out the coupon which appears on the first 
page of The Herald tonight and write en it your 
choice for mayor; every vote cast in De- 
cember counts three votes and each vote cast the 
first ten days in January will count one vote each. 
The China Dinner Set or the Easy Chair will be 
delivered to the fortunate winner on the morning 
of January nth, and he may also be successful 
nominee of the citizens' convention which will be 
held a few days later. Send in your votes. The 
outcome of this contest will be watched with a 
great deal of interest and the standing of the 
different candidates announced from time to time. 




YOU 



WANT A COOK. 



WANT A SITUATION, - 
— WANT A SALESMAN, 



"— WANT A SERVANT CxlRL. 



- WANT TO HIRE ANY" HELP. - 

WANT TO RENT A STORE 

WANT AN AGENT OR PARTNER, 



— — — WANT TO BUY OR SELL A FARM. — ^— — — — — 
— — . WANT TO BUY OR SELL A HOUSE. . 

— ~- WANT TO HIRE OR RENT A HOUSE. — — — 
— — W^ANT A GOOD BOARDING HOUSE, — — — ^— 

— WANT TO BUY OR SELL A CARRIAGE, -^— 

— WANT TO GET BOARDERS OR LODGERS, - 
-WANT TO LEND OR BORROW MONEY, 
WANT TO TRADE OR EXCHANGE ANYTHING. 

— WANT TO FIND ANYTHING YOU HAVE LOST, m i 

— WANT TO FIND STRAYED OR STOLEN ANIMALS, — 

— W\NT TO ACCOMPLISH ANY-TKING UNDER THE SUN. — 

— YOU CAN DO IT EASILY THROUGH THE WANT COLUMNS OF — 

THE EVENING HERALD duluth's leading paper. 



r! 



i 



IT 
PAYS! 

To give the People 
an invitation to trade 
-with you 
The best way 
is to advertise in 
THE HERALD. 



IT 
PAYS! 



Faber's 



Female Pills 

Kelieve Soppressed 
Itlciutrtutlou. Used 
BBceemhilly by thous- 
ands of prominent la- 
dies -monthly. Thor 
oiighly reliable and 
sale. Worth twenty 
times their weight in 

gold for female irrfg 

ularitics. Never kuowu 
to fail. 

Sent by m*!! •calot' 
{orS2> Addreu 

The Iphro Mediclnr 

>^ OOKPANY, 

TTeatem Bnuieh. 
Box ST. Portlttnd. Orevon. 

Bold in Onlnth Inr Mm WIrth wid SellNk « 




Tbe NorlMenLi&i! 

C. ST. P. M. A O. E'Y. 

THE SHORT LINE TO CHICAGO 

And tlie PuDniRn ( ar Lina to St. Paul 
and MinD^apoliii. 



t i 



For St. Paol 
and MtnnaapoHi. 



Lw TMnth 

IirWaat Superior 

Ar Stillwater 

4r8t. Pan! 

\T M<T;n«»^poUB.. 

Kor H*ii t?Iat»» ' » •■~- 

Lv Dolnth 

Ltv Weov Dui#«<iur ... 

Ar Milwankee . 

Ar Cblcaan . 



Ex. ^an^ 



lOilOam 

lOaOani 

430 pm 

bUOpir 

540 pm 

uaySzp. 
,Ex.8aD^ 

UoOOar 
I 10 » a.n 

rVflO'"m 



tiigti Ex 
Da 



>ail>. 



11 00 pm 

liaOpm 

7 28 am 

6iS0am 

730 am 

iChleiur^ 

I Limited 

i>aii>'. 

5 !'< im 

7 fjt' «ni 
9 .** tro 



l.uxuriouB fi»rlorl'ar#«nday train*. 

Direct c uueciions in Uuioti d«>pi>t, St. 
Pii 1. for all . r.in«p^s<mtli afd W.^t^t. 

rnlhuan aud;.W«Korr finest bnffpt eleepetf 
.tn the ■ Cliic»r«> I.imiu-d." 

t'onnections in Cliicairo with morning tran 
Soutli and Yismt. „„. .,„„„ 

.JiiO. M. SMITH, B. W. BUMMKBB. 

Hnnm^l Air<wi«. City TicOn-t k,te>ut. 

iV, Wo«t Hnvierinr Pt 



THK UlILU IM 4k. IKUN ItA.NGK RAlLKO.Ui CO 
PAS8ENGF.B TIMR TAPI..K. 



A. te. 

11 W 

10 50 
9 £0 

8 3^1 
8 IS 
800 



STAllONS. 



\t I'tilutb Lv 
Two Haiborv 
Ali-'D Jiutciiou 



3 I& 

4 15 

5 13 



MrKiuIf'V 
l,v Viiirnia Ar 



g 20 IVr Tower (.▼« 47 

7 SO It Vlv 4. - ■ 



P.M. 



A.M. 



f. 40 
7 OU 
7 30 



40 



General Poaaeotpu A^eoti 
IMttth, Miaiki Nov. liiidtt. 



' 










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I. 


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I 


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J 


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1 




Official Records of the Village Removetito 

Duluth Yesterday by the City 

Officers. 



Some 



of the Employes of the Village 
Given Places in the Duluth City 
Government. 



Company H Elected a First Lieutenant and 

Civil Offlcers Last Evening— Odd 

Fellows' Installation. 



The ohicial records of the village of 
West Duluth were taken to Duluth \es- 
terday by T. W. Abell, clerk of the 
board of public works, and City Clerk 
Richardson. I! x- Recorder Borgstrom 
has accepted a position in the comp- 
troller's office .uu! Deputy Recorder H. 
B. VVallace expects to start tor Uiali 
soon where he will probably locate in 
the newspaper business. 

Miss Maud Stevens has accepted the 
position of clerk of the municipal court 
vacated by Mr. Borgstrom. 

City Engineer Reed visited the de- 
partment here and appointed ex-\"iilage 
Engineer Cruikshank as an assistant city 
engineer. Instructions were left to 
make a record of ail the streets and ave- 
nues with the subdivisions in which they 
are located with a view to renaming the 
thoroughfares in virder to avoid conflict 
with the names of Duluth streets. 

The tire department was also visited 
hy Chief Jackson, who left the necessary 
instructions for the boys. He stated that 
110 changes would be made until the 
alarm system was completed, when two 
experienced men would be sent from 
the down-town departments to remain 
until the new system was thoroughly un- 
derstood. 

P. R. Haley, street co.nraissioner, still 
retains his position under the direction 
of the board of public works. Members 
of the board were looking over the 
streets this morning in company with 
the commissioner. 



Company H Election. 

Company H held an election of civil 
ofticers last evening and also chose as 
first lieutenant C.C. Salter. The ofhcers 
elected were: S. Field, secretary: P. 
Kowen. treasurer; J. W. Wallinder, fin- 
ancial secretary; .M. Riggin, C. Gunder- 
son and H. L. Thompson recruiting com- 
mittee. A J. Cirey was made an honor- 
ary member of the company, A resolu- 
tion was passed appropriating $50 of 
company funds to purchase medals for 
best attendance, and for every new mem- 
ber obtained a months dues are to be re- 
mitted. The one getting the most re- 
cruits into the service will b: rewarded 
by the remission of a year's dues. Maj. 
Braden presided at the raeetine. 

Odd Fellows Installation. 
Tlie Odd Fellows entertained a full I 
house at the installation services last 1 
evening, the local lodge being increased 
by a number of visiting members of the 
fraternity. K. E, Patterson, deputy 
grand master of the state, conducted the 
ceremonies. The following are the offi- 
cers: Silas Buck, N. G.; Neil McKin- 
non, V. G.; W. B. Hartley, recording 
secretary; T. A. Scarlet, financial secre- 
ta.-y; Charles Hendricks, treasurer. Re- 
treshments, speech-making and general 
sociability followed the ceremonial exer- 
cises. 



ll.vKKisiJURt;, Pa., Jan. 3.— The Re- 
public.ui state convention met hero to- 
day and nomin.'\tcd Galusha A. Grow for 
coiigrci.suian-.iti.irge by atclamalion. 
The following resolutions were adopted: 

Rcsolvcf], that the Republicm con- 
vention of Pennsylvania, called to nomi- 
nate a candidate for congressman at- 
large. need not lo be reminded ol the 
fact that this is a representative office, 
that the situation in Washington gives it 
not only state but national importance, 
and that it invites the fullest possible cx- 

?ressioii of the public view on Tuesday, 
eb. ::o next, to the end that all our land 
may know the tenor of current thought 
upon the most immediate and vital issue 
presented in the Wilson bill. 

The simi'lc anticipation of this meas- 
ure has closed thousands of workshops. 
It has reduced to idleness 2,ooo,(XX3 of 
workers, and soup houses now displace 
fo.aier hivcsof industry. Jt has reauced 
values to an amoiint greater than the 
national debt. 

It will enlarge the free list only upon 
productions which employ the greatest 
number of American workmen. It will 
strike with equal cruelty the fanner, the 
miner, the lumberman, the ironworker, 
the glass blower, and the textile worker. 
It will transfer work from cur own mills, 
mines and workshops to those of foreign 
countries. 

It is sectional in its authorship and is 
all too plainly aimed at Northern indus- 
tries. It strikes Southern industries only 
where the same blow reaches greater 
Northern industries. It fosters the plan- 
tation system and destroys the farm. 
That is an attempt upon the part of the 
free traders of the South to reduce the 
industries of the North to the level of 
those of the South. 

It is vicious in its change from specific 
to ad valorem duties, the latter inviting 
foreign undervaluations and leading to 
constant and cumuIativS frauds upon the 
revenues. It is vicious in reducing in- 
stead of Hu reasing revenues. It will re- 
duce the revenues many millions of dol- 
lars, and the reductions will grow with 
time. It is vicious in compelling the 
government to make up these deficits by 
means of increased internal and direct 
tax. It is doubly vicious in compelling 
its supporters to resort to the moat ser- 
ious war taxes or borrow money. 

It is wholly erroneous in the theory 
that the less work there is to do in this 
country, the higher will be the wages of 
the workman. The protective policy 
conveys the opposing thouijht and says 
that the policy which secures the 
largest amount of work at home is the 
one which secures the be-.t wages to the 
home workman. 

if the Wilson bill does all of these 
things in the threats which it 
conveys, what will it do in its 
fruition? The Republicans of Penn- 
sylvania, and the people of our 
great commonwealth as well, declare 
war upon it, unceasing war.in house and 
senate, and its senators and representa- 
tives in congress, including thecongress- 
man-at-large, nominated today, are re- 
<iuested to make this warfare felt in every 
wise and patriotic way to the end that 
by the defeat of the VVilson bill Ameri- 
can workingmen, producers and manu- 
facturers may resume that prosperity 
which the country had but a single year 
ago. 

Kesolved, that Pennsylvania's recent 
majority of 131,000 was a most emphatic 
endorsement of our party's national and 
state platforms, both of which are now 
reaffirmed with the additional declara- 
tion that the Republican party favors 
the long-established policy of our re- 
public to encourage sister republics, 
howsoever weak, and foster the spirit of 
liberty wherever its fires are lighted, so 
long as this can be done without pro- 
moting or encouraging "dangerous for- 
eign alliances" and in this connection we 



Couglis, 

Croup. Influenza, and 

Bronchitis, 



use 



AVER'S 

CHERRY PECTORAL 

the best 
of all anodyne 
expectorants. 
Prompt to act, 

Sure to Cure 



A COMPROMISE PREDICTED. 



The Claims of the Northern Pacific Employes 
Being Presented. 

St. Pa I I., Jan. 3.— The grievance com- 
mittee of locomotive firemen occupied 
all of yesterday in renewing their claims 
against the Northern Pacific for an ad- 
justment and it is expected will conclude 
this afternoon. Next will come the shop- 
men, then the switchmen, after which 
will come the conductors and trainmen. 

There is no hope of a conclusion this 
week, as it will take the conductors and 
trainmen two davs to supplement what 
they have already said. The men .nre 
treating the claims as a matter of form, 
seeming to entertain no hope that the 
receivers will accede to their request. 

On the other hand, it is freely pre- 
dicted in legal and '.ther circles outside 
of railroad affairs that the manifesto of 
Judge Caldwell will result in a com- 
promise of the existing dififercnces. 

WILSON BILL CONDEMNED. 



The Eight industrial Associations of Indiana 
Oppose It. 

I.NDiANAPOLis, Jan. 3 —At a joint 
meeting of the eight industrial associa- 
tions of the state, headed by the dele- 
gates trom the agricultural board, held 
here toJay, the following resolutions were 
adopted: 

\V hereas, it is proposed in the Wilson 
bill now pending in congress, to place on 
the free list twenty-nine of the finished 
products of the farm which are now pro- 
tected by e(juitable duties, and 

Whereas, the same bill gives m.any 
manufacturers 40 per cent protection; 
now, therefore, be it 

Resolved, that we condemn the gros5 
and unjust discrimination against the 
farming interests manifested in that bill 
and we call our congressmen and sena- 
tors to oppose said measure. 

A copy of the resolutions will be for- 
warded to Washington. 

■ ■ ' - • — 

IS INSANE FROM GRIP. 



West Duluth Briefs. 

The funeral of Mary Nelson, aged C>} j dtTuounce the unpatriotic foreign policy 



years, who died of typhoid pneumonia, 
took place at the Norwegian Lutheran 
church this afternoon at :: p. m. 

The funeral of Mrs. William Chesser 
will take place tomorrow at <) o'clock 
sharp, at the Catholic church. 

T. Carroll has returned from a visit .it 
Chippewa Falls. 

Id. Melette is down from Hibbing. 

Miss Georgie Chesser and Mrs. John 
Chesicr are down from the range to at- 
tend the funeral of Mrs. William Ches- 
ser. 

A fife and drum cor[>s is licing organ- 
ized among the employes of the Great 
Western Manufacturing company. 

W^illiam Haley, tie and pile inspector 
for the St. Paul & Dulutb, has returned 
from Bismarck. 

Prayer meeting services are being held 
at the Congregational church every night 
this week. 



of the Democratic national administra- 
tion in the Hawaiian matter. 



The Sad Caso of a Man Who Shot His 
Wife. 

Medi.x, Pa., Jan. 3. — Friends of Pro- 
fessor Swithin C. Shortlidge, who shot 
and killed his wife Sunday, while insane 
from grip, have applied to Judge Clay- 
ton to appoint a commission in lunacv 
to inquire into the unfortunate man's 
condition. 

Professor Shortlidge's mental unsound- 
ness was more pronounced yesterday 
than at any time since the shooting. He 
raved in his cell and tore at the bars of 
the doors continually and at • the same 
time he kept up a crying and a moaning 
lh.it was piteous to hear. A constant 
guard is kept over him to prevent him 
dcing himself any harm. 



PECULIAR BUSINESS METHODS. 



A Large Amount of Money Loaned on Worth- 
less Securities. 

CHrf.\GO, Jan. 3.--At the instance ot 
the present board of directors of the Na- 
tion. d Building, J-oan and Investment 
company, an investis^ation into the af- 
fairs of th:.: :.K...^... . „3 been made and 
a report will be submitted to State Audi- 
tor (lore Saturday. Acco.ding to this 
report f 75,000 has been loaned on worth- 
less securities, anH n-.v.,ar business 
methods K' I u ;. r....iled among the 
former officer j of the C(>mpany, some of 
whom have resigned. 

At tor the investigation into the affairs 
of the .Xmericau, State .Auditor tiorc sent 
his < httf examiner, William 1- rie^, i<' ii.- 
spect the books <>[ the Natioiiai, I'his 
was done a! ibc ip/" tal rei|iie;/. -.f r. 
cnfr.il (;inr!r«= H. Aldricb. 
I' rctaiiH .1 .1 . (lun-cl liy the 



^ollMt'T 
wh" 11. 1 

5o'Jir:tv, 

Ml. 
phot' 
house 



r'l 



found a < lev cr si r u .1 
whirh :,bowcd ,1 number ol 
her inipro' rmrut-. on land 
III Wisfonsm su|.p4»sed c been 

uiorlgaged to the society i jr tne ;t.7>.oo>). 
He also learned that a former secretary 
had made peculiar statements in a re- 
turn made to the stale auditor. 

The result of the investit :it;oii will he 
that unless two in-rt >\ ■' fn Siuitli, ot 
kiiisas < av. .-Mii - • Kneale.' of 

n < \pi itj.iticii to State 
will ill .tirnip lfif;il pro- 

/*■; 
1 .1 



MUCH GORE SPILLED. 

An Actress Used a Whip on an Advertising 
Agent. 

Dknvi.k, Jan. ;,.— ^liss Annie Allt, 
who was last .Saturday discharged from 
the People's theater before the termina- 
tion of her contract with Manager Sac- 
kett, assaulte<l Harry Hanaford, adver- 
tising agent for the theater, on the street 
at a late hour last night, using a whip 
with cruel effect. 

Hanaford resisted, when Frank Sheri- 
dan, an actor, came to the rescue of the 
actress, and much gore was spilled. Miss 
Allt, whose husband, Alexander Kear- 
ney, is playing in Philadelphia with the 
"Alabama" company, came from Chi- 
cago three weeks ago. She alleges that 
Hanaford reflected upon her character. 

Slashed His Throat. 

Shkm'.vv ii.i.i;, Ind., Jan. ;,. — David 
Loudon, acting justice ot the peace, for 
eight years county recorder of Shelby , 
county, and at one time member of the 
city council, committed suicide last 
night. When found this morning he was 
lying in his office wth his throat cut 
from ear to ear and his body completely 
nude. He slashed his throat three years 
ago, but was saved by the efforts of a 
physician. The cause is unknown. 

Declined the Reduction. 

Bi 1 i.Aii 1 , Ohio, Jan, 3. V estcrday 
about one-half the coal mines in this part 
of Ohio valley closetl down on account 
of the uiiuers' refusal to accept the rc- 
diictn>n of 10 per cent demanded by the 
operator>. They are waitint: the action 
ol the .'-tatc convention at Columbus 
fjh (j. Twelve hundred employes arc 
,]l ■ ] Aorl:. 

Wages are Reduced. 

TimiijO, Jan. 3, The Coluinbiis, 
Hocking Valley & Toledo railway has 
announced a u percent reduction in 
the wages of all employes receiving more 
than S50 a month, to go into effect Jan. 15. 
The men wil! not strike. 



THE DEMOCRATIC CAUCUS. 



I • 

c 

P:.., 

was 



tiii-,t iii.--rii. J he National 
Lii ;i:id i i:ivc:'< tro' nt snrjt ly 
nfofpora:-d undT thel.ivisof the 
stale of Mmois in rSjo wiiri a capital 
stock of f ro.Dooooo. 



Ocean Steamships. 

N.>v \()ik Arrived. Wcstci iilaiid, 
.•\n twerp. 

Havre Sailed; V\ eiiand irom ilam- 
burgi New \ ork. 

London— Passed the Lizard; Aller, 
New York for Bremen via Southampton. 

Rcail Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 



It Will be Held Friday Night t« Consider the 
Tariff Bill. 
WAsiiiNfiTON, Jan. 3. The Demo- 
cratic caucus to consider what changest 
if any, shall be made in the Wilson tariff 
bill, has been postponed until Friday. 

It is the intention of the majority, if not 
.all the Democratic members of the ways 
and means committee, to attend the cau- 
cus, and as Chairman Wilson will be un- 
.able to be present either tonight or tomor- 
row night, it has been decided that Fri- 
day night is the earliest date on which it 
can be satisfactorily held. 

The Death Roll. 

B0.ST0N, Jan. 3. — Gen. John L. Steven- 
son died at his residence in this city to- 
day. 

3.— Col. Floya Clark- 
yesterday afternoon 
He w.as commander 
of the G. A. R. of the state of New York. 
Adolph L. Sanger, a prominent law- 
yer and rx-president of the board of al- 
derraen,diea at his residence here today 
of pneumonia. 



Ni;\v Y«)UK, Jan. 
son died suddenly 
from heart failure. 



HREMbN EAT 

QUAKER OATS 



i'oaclieii aa<l W'liirliowtcs. 

Tin; oldest, carria-^e.* usc-d hy Knglii^h la- 
di(;s were eallfd wLirlieoU's, and King Rich- 
arrl Il's mother rode in one when her son 
fled fr«)m his rebellions subjects toward 
the end (d the foftrteenth cputury. Rich- 
ards qnet-n subsequently intro<lucctl .side- 
saddlo*;. ;ind then whirlicotps went out of 
fa,sbion. Coaches were introdiued to Eng- 
land from (ifrmany in 15Sfi by Fitxallen, 
enilof .\rundel. bat they were not regarded' 
.T5 proper for men to ride in, .iiid for some' 
yp*r» afterward the excuse that a gentle- 
nian w.Ts iiiiH))Je to mount a horse owing to 
ill health was considere<l a k<km1 rta.sonior 
abspiict: from court. For niuny ye.ars Ger- 
niuny led in the matter of coaches, and aji 
invintnryof thr^ efjuipaue of Hyik*' Krnest 
of llnnover in HWl ineliulcs JO xill eojtches, 
with six lu>i--o-j eaeh. Tlit- Fhike of Bin Ic- 
iiighani intnidiiced nix h<»rsf it-ains to Kng- 
laud in tUl'J. and lh»' Fart of Xorthuintier- 
land iniuiediutely si--^. up an eight horse 
Goueh out of «leiision.— Detroit Fit* Pie.«s. 

Deafness Cannot be Cured 

!»• lo'vil iit>'>|ie<iri(in«. BK tdpy ciinnof r'^.-^cli the 
flis'-a-tvl iiortJon rtf thf rnr. Tlii're i^ lUiJy oao 
w.ty to I'u'o ilpafnff!?-, .'111(1 rliiif in hv conf^titu 
t 'oii.t' ri'iu^ditJii. .OonfuosH is c <ii«oil l>y ni\ in- 
(Iflmid roti liri.')!! iif ihe ircrrti^. Mrititi,' of thn 
<'iisi..t>-Jiiiiii hibn. Wln-u thi^ tcbc- jr^'ts >ri(':im>jd 
vi.ii Iiiiv ■ ;i iifiibliii;; »<>>iti<l uf imiM'rfrci Ihmt- 
!•• - 'i|i| WiixM t( i> I'Klirxfv rl<i <-.| itr«fi>i>-f in 
:'i" ■ -i<i: ■, nii.l llnlr^,^ Ml" i: lt'U)i!ii'iliiiii r.'iii !»<• 
IhUoii mil. xnil titin fnh' rf<»r«»r<-«l in if.« notiniil 
conilitt"!) !ii'.trir.({ ^vil) !>.( •l>'-tri.viM| for^-vfr; 
nine rii>ii!.4 i>ni iif t»u ii'** •>nii!rn<l hv cntarrh. 
wh*rh i.« rii.thiD;: hut nil MiflHtiieil cinrfltina »'f 
t(i'» u:"i>-'in'" riiirfnc* 

\Vi' will (jivmiao luindroil itu'Iirn fj,r «n.v c«»e 
nf (teafuet*-. (I'SiQMwl by r^HtMrrlti timt, cHuuot Im 
cim«l hy IIu'i'h '"atiUrU Can' Siinil for rirca- 

jArr fr~n 1' .T. I.'H^N>^ i t'o., ToleOo, Vlli<». 

^" iola by dcUiitfiMU*) 'iMi. 



What It Nfluos to Italy — Career of a Ur- 
niarkablt) Man. 

The return of Stgnor Crispi to power as 
premier of a new ministry was one of the 
eignilleant events of modem Italian poli- 
tics. It may l>e taken for gjranted that it 
would not hare occurred if King Humlwrt 
bad .seen any other way qutiof the vexatious 
dilheultie.'t that beset his reign. Crispi has 
never been persona grata to the king, and 
(.}ueen Margherita despihes him for bis 
extraordinary marriage complications. 
Though state policy required the royal pair 
to keep up a semblance of cordiality during 
Crispi's former ministry, it was generally 
believed after his downfall that be would 
never again be sent for, except as a last re- 
sort. 

Francesco Crispi is an absolute, intoler- 
ant, irascible old man. Advanced age ha^ 
seemingly done little to soften thfe tire of 
his temper or modify the faults of his char- 




^'•m 



FRAKCESCO CRISPI. 

acter. He is slippery as an eel, too, and 
knows how to play the urbane courtier for 
policy's sake. He is still a handsome man, 
for all his 74 years, and undoubtedly has a 
genuine love for Italy, though it has often 
been doubted whether that love included 
the Italian people, who have lampooned 
him sufficiently to make an ordinary man 
detest his species. His flilelity to his friends, 
however, has always betii accounted one of 
his strongest characterijities— as strong in 
its way as his hatred for the Roman church, 
than which nothing could be more remark- 
able. 

Born at Ribera, in Sicily. Oct. 4, 1819, 
Crispi received a thoromdr classical educa- 
tion, which he augmented by studying law 
at I^alermo. His family is an old one, but 
he smiles at the claims of long descent and 
says he is of the people and does not believe 
that a man can ennoble his descendants. 
The Crispis of Ribera came into Sicily from 
Albania and were thought to be of Greek 
origiu. Francesco's grandfather was a prie.st 
of the Greek church, and Francesco himself 
was baptized in that faith and educated in 
one of its seminaries, though be is now an 
avowed atheist. 

He was a prominent organizer in the rev- 
olution of 1848 and was one of the deputies 
in the Sicilian iiisurrectionary parliament 
and secretary of war in its provisional gov- 
ernment. On the failure of that revolution 
he fled to Paris, where he remained for sev- 
eral ycars.keepiup; up a con.staiit correspond 
encti with Maxzini, who was then in Eng- 
land. Napoleon's police drove him out of 
the French capital, and he went to London 
and with Mazzini concocted the plot that 
eventually resulted in the litieratlon and 
unification of Italy. He was With Gari- 
baldi in his famous expedition to Sicily in 
l>^) and is said to be entitled to some of 
the glory for the succe.«s of that enterprise 
that has been acconled to the prestige of 
the red shirted "Lion of the Apennines." 



A SELF MADE MAN. 



Uow flohn P. Hopkins Advanced From a 
I..unihrr Shover to Mayor of Chicago. 

John P. Hopkins is the youngest man 
ever elected mayor of Chicago. He is a na- 
tive of New York and was born in BuflTalo, 
Oct. Ul), 1858. and received his education in 
the public schools of that city. His father 
was a poor man and had a large family, so 
John was obliged to <|uit school early and 
go to work. His lirsjt j^b was in an iron 
foundry, heating rivets, and he kept it till 
he got a better one at Kvans' elevators. He 
went to Chicago in 1H7U, after the death of 
his father, ond his first employment there 
was shf)viiig lumber in the Pullman crtm- 
pauy's yards. 

His mlvancement was rapid, ami in three 
years he was paymjuster ol the eoiupauv, a 
position he held until 18SH, when he organ- 
ized the Arciide Trading company, a gen- 
eral merchandising concern, which did busi- 
ness in PuIUnan for a year and then changed 
its name to the Secord-Hopkins company 
and moved to Kensington, where it has 
since continued to do business. 

During all this time Mr. Hopkins had 
taken considerable interest in local p<ditics. 
In 18!S.j, wliile p.aymaster of the Pullman 
company, he was also treasurer of the town 
of Hyde Park, which had not then been an- 




.lOHN I». HOPKINS. 

ne.KiHl to ChicJigo, and for fiw year.-> he was 
tn'.^surer ot the schiKil board of Hyde Park' 
and Caluiner. In IHSM. wlun the auncxa- 
tion fever was epidemic. Mr. lki|)kins was 
chairman of the anne.xatlon eotnmitteeand 
the .^iicce^s ot^the movement was largely 
attributed to hi-i endeavors. 

J'lnce that time he has been influential in, 
Dernocratfe councils. He was a delegate to 
the last Democratic national convention 
and eliairmau of the ChieagD campaign 
committee during the canvass. He has havti 
president of the Cook County Democracy 
for several years and is a member of, the 
InMjuois club, the "silk stocVring" Demo- 
cratic organization. I>ast .July Comptroller 
Fckelsappoiutod himreceiverof theChemi 
cal National bank. Mr. Hopkins is a well 
to do man. His money is all iuvu&ted in his 
business, where it has been mode. The 
only real estate he owns is the lot in Ken- 
biogton OD which bis store stands. 



Miss Nicholson, modiste, 308 West 
First atreet, French & Bassett buildiog. 



The tloxviM-M are dead, the trees are hare, 

TliR cock is Kiill at morn-- 
Bo frosty ttow.s ih'^ winter nir 

He dare not wind his horn. 
But thoush tlio time is cold, my love. 

My heart Is wurni for thee. 
What borrow eau it hold, wy love. 

If tliou bo true to roe. 

If thou be trne to me'/ 

The dead are. frozen in the mold. 

The rime if on llie tomb. 
And blow it hot or blow it cold. 

They'll know tlie day of doom. 
But thoHKh the frost Is low, my love, 

My lieart is warm for tbe^; 
What sorrow can It know, my love. 

So tliou he true to me, 

So tliou be true to me? 

I met my friend ui>on the beath, 

I craved his I'avor hij{h; 
But up his sword spranf; from Its sheath. 

And anger from tils eye. 
But what though friends forget, my love. 

My heart remembers thee. 
And can nor fear, nor fret, my love, 

Whilo thou art true lo me. 

Wlillo ihoii art true to nicl 
—Louise Morgan Sill in New York Sun. 



Pride and Its Fall. 

The fact that pride goeth Ix^fore a fall 
was amply flemtuistrated the other day on 
I he rear end of a .Spring Garden street "bob- 
tail" car. • When the car reached Broad 
street, its only occupant was a demure 
young normal school miss, and when a 
flashily ilres.sed, would be swell got on he 
immetliately selected her as a .subject on 
which to display his charms. Instea<l of 
entering the car, however, he remained on 
the rear platform, where, by sundry poses 
and numerous fits of alleged coughing, he 
endeavored to attract the attention of the 
fair one. In oi-der to show to the best ad- 
vantage his easy grace, he perched upon 
the dasher and allov.ed his legs to dangle 
down. Just then the car gave a sudden 
jolt, and with a shriek of dismay the mash- 
er lost his balance and toppled over back- 
ward. But he had presence of mind enough 
to catch with his knees as he wept over, 
which saved him from a bad fall on his 
head. In the meantime the car was bowir 
ing merrily along, the driver being uncon- 
scious of the catastrophe, and it was not 
until the school miss pulled the strap and 
stopped the car that the giddy youth could 
extricate himself from his perilous position. 
He didn't get on the car again.— Philadel- 
nhia Recnrd. 



NOTICE.-PER80N8 HAVING GOODS IN 
pledge with me mngt redeem earns within 
ninety days of time stated on ticket or they will 
t>« sold for charffee. G. A. Klein, Collateral 
Loan Bank, 17 Webt Bnparior street. 



M 



OllTtiAGE FORECLOSURE SALE- 



Default liavin;; been made in tho payment of 
the bun\ of six hundred flfty-ono and WlOO 
(*cril.8j) dollars, wliich la claimed to be dae, 
and is dae, at the date of this notice, upon a 
certain mortj;a(;n duly executed and delivored 
by Frank W. DeVoy, niort^aeor, to David Offil- 
vie, inort*apee, IwariuK date tho ."ith day of Aug- 
ust, IN'9. and with a power of sale tJierein con- 
tained, duly record'vl in the oHice of the re- 
gister of deeds in and for the couaty of 8t. 
Lonis 8ud Kt«te of Miiii-.esota, on the 14th day 
of Au«u)t, pjiti*. at 8 o'clock a. m., in Book 41 
of mort<jni?(*«, on i>n«re 95, which said mort^a«o 
locether Willi the debt pecnred thereby was 
duly asHi^noii by said David O(filvie,mortira*,'»o, 
U)]irankR. Webber by written aesigament, 
dated the i:tth day of Autnist, A. D. 1SS9, and 
recorded in th^otlice of »aid registerof deeds on 
the aist day of AupOBt, A D. 18sy, at 11 :15 a. m., 
in Book a2 of morfffaRi^. on paRO 148 1 and 
no action or procoeding having been msti- 
tuted at law or otherwise, to recover tho debt se- 
cured by said mortfjaiifo, <.r any pnit therefd : 

Now, therefore, notice is lioreby given, that by 
virtne of thoiiower of sale contained in said 
tnortt'a^je, imd pnrsu.mt t'> the s-tatntc in gwch 
case mad« and providt.-d, iho B.od morttraKe will 
be foreclosed by a sale of the promises des- 
cribed in and c<.)rveyed by paid mortgage, viz. : 
Tlie niirthexst quarter (ne}4) of the eouthwtat 
qnart^r (sw>%> of soctioo thirty-five (35). town- 
ship Cfty (5e; noith. range fifteen (15) west, ac- 
cordi"g to tho Unired Status survey thereof, tho 
s<me being in the county of St. Louie and Ptate 
of Minnesota, with the hereditaments and ap- 
pnrtenances: which sale wilj be made by the 
sheriif of said St. Louis (bounty, at the front 
door of the court house in the city of Duluth, 
in said coniity and state, on the 16th day of 
FebruHfy, 18td, at 10 o'clock a. m. of that day, 
at. public vendue to the liighest bidder for cash, 
to pay said debt of six bnndred fifty-one and 
NVlOO dollars, and interest and the taxec:, if any. 
on said premises and fifty (.'iO) dollars, attur- 
ne) 's fees, as stipalatcd in and by said mortgage 
in case of foreclosure, and tho disbursements 
allowed by law ; subject to redemption at any 
time within cno year from the <lay of sale, as 
provided by law. 

Dated January :ird, 1n91. 

Frank R. WEnBER, 
.AttEignoo of .llortgagoe, 
.lAgcKS & HensoN, 

.Attorneys for .AsslKnee. 
.Tan-»-10-17-24-31.Fob-7. 



M 



OUTGAGE FORECLOSURE 8ALE- 



Default liavmg be^en made in the payment of 
the sum of three hundred twenty-five and 94-10<l 
dollars which is claimed to be due and is duo at 
the date of this notice upon a certain mort^'ai^e 
executed and delivered by Frank \\ . DoVey of 
Du nth, Minn., morfKagor, to David Og'dvie, 
mortgagee, bearing date the !>th day of August, 
A. D. !»>«, and with a power of sale therein 
contained, duly recorded in tho oUice of register 
of deeds in and for the county of Bt. Louis 
and state of Minnesota, on the 14tb day of 
August, A. 1.). 1SS9, at 8 o'clock a in., in Hook 
41 of mortgages, on page 94, which said mort- 
gage together with the debt secured thereby, 
was duly assigned by said David Ogilvie, mort- 
gagee, to Frank K. Webber, by written afsign- 
mcnt dated ou the 18th day of August, A. D. 
1HS9. and recorded in the office of said register 
of det>ds on the 21st day of Augutt, A. D. 1S>9, at 
11 -.Vt a. ni., in Book 32 of Asbt. mortgages, page 
149 : and no action or proceeding having been 
instituted at law or otherwifco to recover the 
debt secured by said mortgage, or any part 
thereof : 

Now therefore, notice is hereby given, that by 
virtue of the power of sale contained in 
said mortgage, and pursuant to the statute 
in such c&^e made and provided, the said 
mortgage will bo foreclosed by a sale of the 
premie«'8 described in and conveyed by said 
mortgage, viz. : The northwest quarter (nwU; 
of tne southwest quarter (sw.U) of .sectiou 
thirty-five (3,'ii township fifty (50) north, range 
fifteen US) west, according to the Uuit'd States 
mrvey thereof, tho same beiiir; iu the couaty of 
St. Louis and slate «.f Minnoeota, with tho here- 
ditaments and appurtenances; which sale will 
ho madi> by the sheriff of said 8t. Louis 
( 'ounty, at the front door of tho court house, 
in tho city of Duluth, iu said county and state, 
on the 16th day of February, 1191, at 10 o'clock 
A. m. of that day, at public veiidno, tn the 
highest bidder for chsIi. to pay said debt of 
thr<>e hundred twenty-live ana 91-100 dollars and 
iiitereet, and tho taxps, if au.v, on B.aid prem- 
ises, and fifty (fiCi) dollars as attorcey's fere, ai 
stipulated in and 'by said mortgage in easel 
of forecloEure, and the disbnr8i.<meate allowed 
by law; subject to rndeniptiun at any time 
within one year from the dny of skle as t>ro- 
vidod by law. 

Dated .Jan'y ard, IVJI. 

Frank R, WKspiiR, 
A- signee of Mortgagee. 
jAgiEs & HrosoN, 

Atterueys for Assignee. 

J :M() 17.21-31 F 7 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE & 
ATivANTIC R. R. 

Atlantic Limlti.^d (Daily) 

Leave Dulnfh -. - r»4hpin 

Arrive Marqnetti> 4 45 am 

Arrive Haulr Sii;. Marin losnaro 

Arrivo Detroit (M dajr) 9 1(1 am 

Arnvi-i Toronto (2uil day) 69Uam 

Arrivo Mocr.i>^al i2iid day) 8 20 am 

Arrive lJo«ton (2nd day) ■. 8 H") pm 

.\rrivc Nrw York (2nd .lay).-..-. S .v» pn, 

\V'«'Kt. b«>iipd iTnin Hirivi ii Dniilfb _ ... KlS'iHirt 

\Viu:iii>r Iiull. I Slu^i'Uig *''ir tK>t'w,ion I'ulntli 
and ;*nnlr «t.e. Marie. 

Direct lin>» and lowt»t rales to Tttrooto, Mou 
Ireal. New York, Boston, Hagiuaw, Grand Uiii> 
idn. Detroit and all jioiutb I'.ast. 

lyoWHHt rateii tor Kmigrent Ticket* via thb 
liiiu tu arid froiri Karope. 

T. H. LARSFh 
Comninrcial Agent, Dnlath. 

TirVnt otfiesp i'M SivUdi^ g IluOce and Duioi^ 





60c SH 



The Evening Herald, 

THE PEOPLE'S PAPER, 

Is fearless and indepe'ndent and stands first 
among the evening papers of this country. It 
is by all odds 

T/ie Best 
Tidverttstng Medium 



-IN- 



Duluth! 



And if your ad. is not in it you are making the 
biggest business mistake of your life. 



The EveniM Herald 



-HAS- 



THE LARGEST CIRCDLATION 

OF ANY PAPER IN DDLOTH. 

Your business languishes because you adver- 
tise in dead newspapers that are read by people 
who are dead and don't know it. The newspaper 
for you is 

THE EVENING HERALD, 

A Live Newspaper, 
Read by Live People. 

« 

You do not advertise enough. You are asleep 
and want your business to run itself. A. standing 
advertisement in 

The Evening Herald 

Commands confidence. The man who for a year 
lives in one community and leads a respectble life 
will grow in the confidence of the people. On the 
same principle an advertisement in The Evening 
lierald becomes familiar to the eyes of the readers. 



V 




SOc Piii 



If You Don't 
Take 




liiiliii 



ft rJi 



W 





"'I*' 



I 
1 




TKB DULXJTH EVENING HBBALD: WEDKESDvVY. JANUARY .$, 1894. 



EVENING HERALD. 



PCBM8H«D BT THB 

DULVTH PBINTINU A PUBUBHINU CO. 



I^ainaM ami editorial ettotat la TLe> Herald 
bnildloc. WO W set Siu't^rlor etT»t>t. Taloi.liono 
— Biwlu«MoaiM, a*, two rui»» ; •aitoriai «ioiu«, 
U4. three rixtss. 

aUBSCRIFTION RATMa: 

I>aily, I>er year W^O 

Daily, per three moatha l-* 

Daily, per muQth •* 

Weekly, per year ^^ 

LIRGEST ClRCOLATIOlT II DOLDTR 



Entered at the vH>«toffice at Dalath, Minn., at 
■ecou(i-clad« mall matter. 



The WeatiMr. 

U. 8. Wblvthbk BrREvc. Dri-CTH. Mini*.. 
Jan. 3,— A sUiriu of mo«l<»rat<» intensity UJ cou- 
tnil this morQinj? over Lake MichiRan. 

The barometer is lowest t»» the north or Mon- 
tana. whort» it has fallen mx tenths of au mch 
•iticu yesterday. .... , -, . 

floudy weaiher with liKht snow liaa prevailed 
in I'pper Michigan and Miunew>*a. 

The fcniperature has fallen 2U decrees since 
yesterday in ;>ortions of the Dakota* and Mon- 
taaa. Iti* below zen> in Northwestoru Miune- 
•wta. the l»akota9 rtud Montana. 

Bnluth temperature at i a. m. today, -t) 
il«««r«MM above aero ; maiimum yesterday. -^ do- 
gnm above: minimiuu for twenty-four hoan>. 

Bun TH. Jan. 3.-Local forecast until S p. m. 
toworn^w: t'ontinne<i cloudy weather and 
snow ; decidedly colder this eveniuij and to- 
ni«ht ; ui-rtheast to northwest winds. 

James Kenealy, 
IxKal Forecast Oflicer. 



Republicans do not give ofticial "pap" to 
their party newspapers in preference to 
other papers does not do it credit. Its 
argument would lead people to believe 
that such newspapers .ire Republican firr 
the sole reason of securing party patron- 
age. There may be some Republican 
papers of that sort, but The Herald 
would not do all the injustice of including 
them in such a list. It believes the ma- 
jority are Republican because they be- 
lieve in the principles of Republicanism. 



W vjUHiM.ToN. Jan. :3 -10 p. m.-Obaorver Du- 
hith; Coatmue cold wave sisnal. The tempe- 
r:itiire will fall 20 degrees or |iuore by Wednes- 
day tvouiujj. llARKlNaiON. 

The Pioneer Fnel isompany sells the beet grades 
of coal, and from the low prices now in eflect 
Itive lineral discounts fi>r cash and make prompt 
delivcrioa. Office. ZH> Wast Superior street. 

W*siHniQTON, Jan. 3. -Forecast nntil S p. m. 
tomorrow: For Wiseonsin: Fair, precede*! by 
smiw Hurries: colder tuuifiht; colder in eastern 
ptwtion Thursday; northwesterly winds, be- 
coming variable. For Minnesota: fair: 
colder in eastern portion tonight; warmer 
Thursday ; variable winds. 



The City's Finances. 

According to the city treasurer's state- 
ment submitted to the council last night, 
there was a net balance of $87.4 17-58 in 
the treasury. That is, it should be in the 
treasury, but the fact is that it is locked up 
in a defunct bank and is unavailable. 
The city pay rolls for December had not 
then been passed. The treasury is there- 
fore bare, the city taxes are being paid 
very slowly and the assessments are 
away behind so far as their payment is 
concerned. 

On every hand merchants and private 
citizens are reducing their expenses to 
the smallest amount possible. Re- 
trenchment is the order of the day. 
Economy is the watchword in every line 
of business. There are hundreds of peo- 
ple who are almost destitute, and the 
city should vote a few thousand dollars 
at least to aid them. Yet there are some 
aldermen who, in the face of these facts, 
are proposing; to increase the city's debt 
by 1800,000 to build a water main 
that will begin at Lester river 
and end nowhere and which will not pro- 
duce any revenue for three or four years, 
necessitating a further demand on the 
general fund of $36,000 a year, with the 
probability that the expenditure ot $400,- 
000 will be necessary before the system 
can earn a cent of revenue. 

Would any one of these aldermen 
pursue such a reckless policy in the con- 
duct of their own business? Would not 
their creditors expect them to become 
bankrupt? Is there not some man in the 
council who, seeing the folly and the ex- 
treme danger of this proceeding, will try 
to put a stop to it? 

A new council will be elected next 
month. To it should be left the decision 
of this question. The aldermen then 
elected will be fresh from the people 
and will more nearly represent their 
present views. Why, then, should the 
present board of aldermen make haste 
to commit the city to an increased bur- 
den of taxation that will raise the tax 
levy another notch, when already the 
rate has been increased in one year from 
26 mills to 29.5 mills? 

^lost people believe it is time to call a 
halt. The aldermen should heed the 
warning. 



Will They Stand Firm? 

Democratic Representative Cadmus, 
of|Paterson, N. J., is opposing the Wil- 
son bill, and gives the following reasons: 
"1 shall not vote for the Wilson bill un- 
less there are great changes. I shrill not 
oppose it because of the sugar bounty, 
though 1 am against that, but because 1 
believe in protecting home industries. I 
am satisfied that there will be great 
changes in the senate; I have assurances 
from several senators that there will. I 
do not believe that the bill will pass at 
all in arything closely approaching its 
present form." 

Mr. Cadmus is not the only Demo- 
cratic congressman who has talked in 
this strain, and if they all live up to their 
promises the majority for the bill in the 
house will be small. But will they stick 
to their present resolves? There's the 
rub. Already the administration lash is 
being used to whip the recalcitrants into 
line. Take Maj. Baldwin's case. At 
first h" W.1S ready to oppose free iron 
ore, if the people of Duluth desired. The 
party lash descended, and he qualified 
this remark by the proviso, if the Duluth 
Democrats so desired. Then he aband- 
oned that position, and when the city 
hall meeting split in two he found an 
excellent opportunity to say he would 
vote for free ore— just as the administra- 
tion desired. 

Whether the other Democratic con- 
gressmen who have stated their opposi- 
tion to the bill will have more backbone 
and remain true to their first professions 
remains to be seen. The chances are 
more favorable for the revision of the 
bill in the senate, where a change of 
three Democratic votes could defeat it. 
With proper effort, those interested in 
iroa ore should be able to get sufficient 
Democratic support in the senate to re- 
store it to the dutiable list. 



wrote the works credited to Shakespeare 
has sued a Detroit paper for damages 
for calling him "a literary fraud." That 
other distinguished ISaconian, Ignatius 
Diinnelly, could give his Detroit lival a 
few valu'ibk points on the poor results 
of libel suits. However, if the Detroit 
man can get enough ciphers attached to 
a verdict he will no doubt be satisfied. 



The Chicago Times says it is difficult 
to estimate whether Illinois Democrats 
have derived the greater encouragement 
from Mr. CuUom's declaration that he 
will be a candidate for United States 
senator or Mr. Morrison's promise that 
he won't. 



The wealthiest people in the world are 
the Csage Indians. Their average per 
capita wealth is ;Ji6,77i. There are 
many white people who would gladly 
exchange places with them today. 



ONE PRICE, 
ANDthat RIGHT 




THESE SMALL ADVERTISEMENTS ARE MONEY -MAKERS FOR THOOSANDS. 

EVERYBODY SHOULD USE THEM. 



Charles A. Dana, of the New York 
Sun, says his maxim for 1894 is "Obey 
God and Nevei Fear the Devil." Mr. 
Dana has never shown any disposition 
to fear the ilevil or anyone else. 



Governor Waite, of Colorado, wants to 
succeed Mr. Wolcott in the United States 
senate, but it is hardly likely that his 
wish will be gratified. 



The fight between Governor Lewelling 
and Mrs. Lease over the Populist corpse 
in Kansas is interesting, if not import- 
ant. 



Those who are proposing to tax 
comes should hasten or they will 
find any incomes to tax. 



in- 
not 



To Provide Work. 

The city council followed The Herald's 
advice last night and appointed a com- 
mittee to confer with the county com- 
missioners regarding the condition of the 
unemployed men, with a view of provid- 
ing work for them during the v/inter. 
There should be little difficulty in devis- 
ing some plan that will give employ- 
ment to many men who are now anxious 
to earn some money to support them- 
selves and their families. Th^y would 
rather have work than become dependent 
upon charity. 

The adoption of such a system of relief 
would also put an end to a large amount 
of the imposition that is practiced upon 
jhe public and upon charitable societies 
by those who would rather live on the 
charity of others than work. By placing 
the wages at $i a day the funds at the 
command of the authorities will provide 
work for a larger number of men than if 
greater wages were paid, and at the 
S3XDC time it will offer no inducement 
for men to come here from other cities to 
secure work. 



The Herald has been designated as 
the official paper ot St. Louis county for 
the ensuing year. 



The next dispatch from Cape Town 
will announce that Capt. Wilson is chas- 
ing King Lobengula, or that King Lo- 
bengula is chasing Capt. Wilson. And 
one report is as likely to be as true as 
the other. Cape Town seems to be as 
great a factory for news rumors as is 
Superior. 



Judge Norton's Death. 

A picturesque figure at Republican 
national conventions for many years past 
was removed by death last Sunday. 
Judge A. B. Norton, of Dallas, Texas, 
who was well known to many people in 
Duluth, was one of the most notable 
men in the country by reason of his long 
white hair and flowing whiskers, which 
were the result of unswerving fidelity to 
a vow made fifty years ago. 

The Chicago Inter-Ocean relates that 
Mr. Norton was fifty years ago one of 
the ardent followers of Henry Clay in 
Ohio, and, like taauy other men since 
that lime, his faith in his idol was so 
strong that he made a careless vow that j 
he would never allow a razor to touch 
his face nor shears his hair until Clay 
was the president of the United States. 
His enthusiasm over Henry Clay 
was simply a feature of that 
remarkable following of the 

great Whig leader— a following 
such as no other public man in America 
has ever had. But when Hecry Clay 
failed in his ambition Mr. Norton re- 
garded his vow with the sacredness that 
sm rounded an oath, and he kept it with 
the same fanatical loyalty that other 
men keep more important vows. He 
went to Texas just before the war of the 
rebellion, and he remained a Union man 
surrounded by tho bitterest enemies of 
that sentiment. He began the publica- 
tion of Norton's Intelligencer at Dallas, 
and in its columns preached Unionism 
and later Republicanism with such vigor 
that it continued to live in a country 
where few Republican papers have ob- 
tained a foothold. Judge Norton will be 
missed when the next national conven- 
tion meets. 



A Detroit roan who claims to have dis- 
covered a cipher showing that Bacon 




Give the Men Work. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 
The Herald has not put too strongly the 
case of the unemployed of our city. It is 
the question of the hour. Cannot ihe 
combined wisdom of the city and county 
authorities do something, and that 
quickly to solve this problem? Private 
parties and manufacturers will not do 
much to meet this call till spring. Winter 
is upon us. Industrious, capable men, 
some of whom have at command a good 
trade, are walking our streets despair- 
ingly and listlessly, and wondering how 
they can face this winter, with no pros- 
pect of earning a cent. 

To simply evade the point by granting 
these men a sleeping place and some 
meal tickets is poor policy. This en- 
courages the chronically shiftless and in- 
dolent to become worthless feeders upon 
charity , and worst of all it threatens 
faithful and industrious men 
with a loss of manly respect. 
It is at best a cruel necessity to compel 
men to accept a charitable dole when 
they would gladly work tor a small com- 
pensation. Our authorities need not fear 
that the city will be flooded with men 
from other places in search of work. The 
pav would necessarily be so small as to 
offer litile inducement for such an inva- 
sion. . 

Please then, for heaven's sake, for the 
sake ot honorable men, whom we are re- 
ducing to the position of pauperism and 
mendicancy, put your heads and hearts 
together and see if thereis not something 
to offer these unemployed men for the 
next two or three months, something that 
will drive away the mere idle vagrants 
and that will save the manly and 
those willing to work from dis- 
credit and a cruel dependence. 
The Friendly inn, through the liberality 
of the Christian church and the labor of 
the Associated Charities offers decent 
lodging; the Bethel offers abundant 
meals at very low rates. But neither the 
inn or the Bethel should be put to the 
necessity of housing and feeding those 
who want no work, it such there should 
be proved to be by the work test. 

There are mountains of rock to be 
cleared away and reduced to material 
for pavine our streets; there are roads to 
be opened and improved in all parts of 
our county; theri are forests to be 
cleared. Can the county and city fail to 
meet the emergency? Let them not 
wait. Some things are best done by 
doing them. Necessity knows no nice 
quibbles. Work, work, give us work! 

Citizen. 
Duluth, Jan. 3. 

Never Sleeps Long. 
St. Louis Republic: Toe Coptic pat- 
riarch ot Alexandria is never allowed to 
sleep more than fifteen minutes at any 
one time, and if the attendant should 
allow the holy one's nap to extend be- 
yond the alloted time the penalty is de- 
capitation. Upon being aroused at the 
end of each quarter hour, the patriarch 
arises and spreads his rug upon the 
floor, kneels upon it, bows his head three 
times to the East and then again retires. 



American Store. 



"^^ "^^ "^^ 



Money 

Talks 

Here 



And has a goodly audience, 
because our statements in 
the newspapers are made 
with extreme care, and un- 
swervedly mean just what 
they say. 

We have pushed the prices 

below the qualities of a sea 
of merchandise in order to 
reduce the surplus stocks 
previous to inventory. If you 
want the best, this is an ex- 
ceptionally rare opportunity 
to secure it easy. 

The finest Underwear, the fin- 
est Hosiery, the most stylish 
and trustworthy Cloaks, the 
most famous Gloves, stand- 
ard Linens, the most desir- 
able Comforts and Blankets, 
exquisite Furs of all kinds, 
fine French Milliner}^ Silks, 
Woolen Dress Goods, Laces, 
Ribbons, of the best, at the 



ONE CENT A WORD! 
Herald Wants, 

Popular Because Effective. 

One sent a word ; 75 oents a line per month. 
No adTertlaemeot taken for leMtuau 15 eents. 
Payments mnst be made in advance. 

SITUATIONS WANTED. FREE. 

All persona waDtiiut Bitnationa oan use The 
Herald want oolamna for tliroe insortlona free 
uf charge. 

Thifl doee not include agents or employment 
oflioos. 

PartioB ndreirtifinj? ia those colnmns may have 
answoru addrebsed in care of The Herald aud 
wUI be Kiven a chock to enable tht)m to get 
auawere to their advertipemonts. All answers 
phonlil be properly enclosed iu eu velopea. 

bixuatioss y.^r.y/>-^^^ _^^_ 
yRBB. 

1i>IR8T-rLA88 DRESSMAKER DEblRES 
sewing in family by tho day. Address D 60. 

G1IKL W.iM'S A SITUATION FOR GEN- 
f eral honso work, fleaso call or address, 
73i Twenty-third avenue wet.t, Duluth. 



ONE CENT A WORD. 



TO JtK\T—nOfrSKS. 

RENT YOUil UOU3EB, FLATS AND 8TOBB8 
of Alexander it Speyora, 216 W. Boperior st. 

Ir»OR RKNr-ELEVENROOM HOUSE. 
' stenm heat. SOri Eust Third street. Half 
rate till May. See Sherwood, Torrey building. 



A HOUSE TO RENT 
free. t;all on H. 
Third tivonae west. 



FOR THE WINTER 
A. Taussig ic Co., 17 



TO jKKA'2 -JftOOMS. 



N 



TICELY FURNISHED ROOM FOR KENT 

1821 West 



WANTED-P081TI0N BY A LADY AS 
clerk in store. City references. Exper- 
ienced and speaks Swedish. Address U ti, 
Herald. 



POBITION WANTED-BY A YOUNG MAN 
of 22 years, in olHco, will work for board, 
first class penman. Address George Brown, caro 
Mercliauts hotel, City. 

SITUATION AS PAbTRY COOK BY A COM- 
O petont woman or would cook for a family 
of ten or twelve. Address H 9, Herald office. 

QITUATIO.N WANTED BY THOROUGHLY 

O competent young man as stenoRrapher, two 
years' experiftneo in first-class law office : mft- 
rhine fnrnished; references. Address M 125, 
Duluth Evening Herald. 

_ ir^ jV TKn—M ALB ^^J^l^^^ 

AGENTS MAKE $5 A DAY. GREATEST 
kitchen utont>il ever invented. Retails 
:5.'>ct8. 2 to 6 sold iu every house. Sample, 
postage paid, 5 cents. Forshea & McMakin, 
I'Lncinnati, O. 

USOr; HA TO $50.00 PER WEEK USING AND 
^^'J.UU seiling Old Reliable Plater. Every 
family has rusty, worn knives, forks, spoons, 
etc. Quickly plated by dipniug in melted metal. 
No exx'erionce or bard work ; a good situation. 
AddrPFs W. P. Harrison & Co., Clerk No. 14, 
Columbuf , Ohio. 



cheap ; electric light and bath. 
Second street. 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM. IN- 
quire 13 West Second street. 



ONE CENT A WOfiD! 



FBATERIfJTIKS. 



M..Biw 

4^ 



PALK8TINK LODGE No. 79, A. 
A.) 



F 



OR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM 
board. 120 First avenue west. 



WITH 



»0R 
re 
month 



RENT - THREE UNFURNISHED 
us for light housekeeping, n 
Apply liiO Firbt avenue west. 



rooms for light housekeeping, rent $5 per 



FIRST 

iardwo< 
catad. Apply 120 First avenue west 



IpOR RENT-FIRST FLOOR FLAT OF 
live rooms, hardwood fluii^h, centrally lo- 



FKKSOlfAL. 

LADIES-IF YOU LIKE lO KNOW THE 
way tlirough married life troubles, send 
2-cent stamp and get a pass. Address £ '£i, 
Herald. 



Al/ANTKD-TWO MEN OF GOOD APPEAR- 
T T once to canvass and collect. 403 Chamber 
"f Commerce. 

WANTED-AN INTELLIGENT, HUSTLING 
man to represent a leading insurance 
paper. Address .1 1, Herald. 

ANTED-MAN TO WORK FOR HIS 
board and room. 16 First avenue eaut. 



w 



MARRIED LADIES-SEND 10 CENTS FOR 
"Infallible Safeguard" (no medicine, no 
deception ;) just what yon weuit. Ladies' Baxar, 
Kansas City, Mo. 



ARCHITECTS. 

ALBERT BRYAilTsiO^HURROWS. WARE 
houses and heavy bniliiiugs a specialty. 



. F.4 

_ M. Regular meeting first and third 

Monday eveulngfi of every month »♦■ ' •*0 
n'eloek. Next meetin* Jan. 15, 1894, 
Work, Third degree, W. E. Covey, Wi 
M.iBlwiu Mooere. aeeretiry. 

IONIC LODGE No. 188, A. F. & A. M 
Regular meetings seeoud and foortb 
Monday evenings of «verv montV". Next 
meetIn«Jan.8tT), l•5!^4. Work. E A. de» 
We. b. U Fraser, W. M.. H. W. Cbeadl 4, 
secretary, ^^^^^ 

KEYSTONE CHAPTER No. 20, B. A. M. 
Stated commnoicatioas second and fonnh 
Wednesday evenings of each month at 7 :30 
o'clocl'. Next meeting Dec. 13, annual meeting 
—election of olBcers. Gteo. A. Flack H. P., T. 
J. Unnter, secretary. 



DULUTH COMMANDEBY No. 18, 
K. T. Stated oonctave at 7:30 
o'clock first Tneeday evenings of 
every month. Next conclave will 
held on Tnesday, Jan. 2. 1^94. W. 
G. Ten Brook, £. C. : Alfred LeRichenx. aecr»- 
tary. 



^i 



EMFLOYMEUT OFFICE. 

THE MOST~^E8PEcfABLE~^CEN8ED 
office in Dnluth, free of charge to aU girls, 
also have a full line of hair switches, chains, etc. 
Mrs. M. C. Beibold. 225 East Superior street. 



'l^RAPHAGEN & FITZPATBICK, ABCHI- 
L tccte. Booms 9U aud 917, Torry boildiug, 
Dnlnth, Minn. 



MIDWJFM. 

TJRIVATE HOSPITAL- MRS. L. BALDWIN, 
L Midwi'e. Full graduate of German college 
of accouchement. Cupping and vaccinating 
done. 609 East Third street. 

1 

WANTED-A COUPLE OF ROOMS NICE- 
ly located, for the winter Rent must be 
reasonable. Addrees H 50, Herald. 

~ OF TWO LARGE 

the winter, by 
Apply at 415 Wood- 



WANTED-MEN OF FAIR ADDRESS OUT 
of employment to know they can make 
big money at work for us here in the city, ('all 
:it once. The Singer Manufacturing company, 
(;25 West Snjjerior street. 



S^ 



most diminutive prices, 
close all surplus stocks. 

This Means 
WHAT IT SAYS. 



to 



SALESMEN TO SELL BAKING POWDER. 
We put our goods in (ilass Rolling Pins. 
S60 montli and expenses, cr commission. Chi- 
cago Baking Powder Co., 767 Van Buren street , 
Chicago. 



rpWO GOOD HUSTLERS, SALARY AND 
X commission to sell goods on instalment. 
723 West Superior street. 



WANTED A 'GOOD NURSE GIRL ABOUT 
15 years old. 2025 East First street, 

ANTED-COMPETENT GIRL FOR GEN- 
oral housework. Must bo good cook. No. 
?21 East Fourth street. 



WANl'ED-THE USE 
wood heating stoves for 
tho Associated Charities, 
bridge building. 




JttlSCELLAXEOrS. 

STAMP INK OF H. E. G. 



»f^ ET RUBBER 
VT Adsit, 103 Herald building 



WISCONSIN CENTRAL LINES, 



Xja,test. Tim© Osirci. 



4K)5pm 

7 :25pra 

10 K)5am 



Lv. Ar. 


I 


....Dnlnth.... 


11 :10am 


...Ashland 


8:20am 


Ar {/hicago Lv 


5 : Opmi 



i 7:SSpm 

8;30pm 

11 :45pm 



WANTED— A WIDOW 
care of young child. 



aid. 



LADY TO TAKE 
Address, H 49, Her- 




Jfra. S. A. Morrow 

Doud's. Iowa. 

H i v_e s 

Llk« All Other Blood Diseases, An 

Cured by Hood's Sarsaparilla. 

" I have been a sufferer for several years with 
hlTCS, and have tried mwewjthiug I ceald 
h«*r mtf from friends, or ordered by physicians, 
but nothing cured. In fact, I 

Seemed to be Getting Worse 

Finally I read abont hires being cured by 
Hood's SarsaparllKi, and decided to try this 
medicine. Before half a bottle waa gone I was 
ftlmost cured, and now, being on the stecoad boW 



No More Monkeying. 
Kansas City Journal: The senate 
ought to have the courage of its con- 
victions ou the Hornblowerappointment, 
and either confirm or reject without any 
more monkeying. 



SUGAR iS NOW VERY CHEAP. 

Prices Have Touched the Lowest Point on 
Record. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 3.— The recent 
declining tendency in sugar prices cul- 
minated yesterday in a cut ot one-quar- 
ter of a cent a pound in granulated, 
which brought the net price below the 
lowest quotation on record. The price 
was fixed at 4 cents, less a rebate of 1-16 
and 2 per cent discount to cash buyers, 
so that the net cost to jobbers was 3.74 
cents per pound. 

The lowest previous price was 4 cents 
less the cash discount, in the fall of i8gi, 
shortly after the reujoval of the duties on 
raw sug;ars and at the time ofSpreckle's 
competition with the local refineries out- 
side of the sugar trust. At that time, 
however, there was no rebate, such as 
now allowed under the terms of the 
agreement, between the refiners and the 
wholesale grocers; and the current price 
is, therefore, the lowest ever touched on 
refined su^ar. 



FOJl SALE—lUtStjmVL'iNKOriS. 

FOR SALE-EXCELLENT LIBRARY aND 
established law busidess. Rare opiwrtun- 
ity. C. F. Lamb, West Duluth. 



For5a le or Rent. 

The building situate at 106 West Michigan 
btreet, now occupied by the Duluth iilectric 
Light and Power ('ompany, with central steam 
Ideating apparatus. 
For further information enquire at 

HAETMAN ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., 

Room 3, Exchange Building. 



HOTELS. 

IXOTEL BENNETT, WEST DULUTH, CA- 
X ters to social clubs and sleighing parties; 
liiinqnet and dancing hull; all modern con- 
veniences. P. F. Smith, proprietor. 



W. 



D. GORDON, 324 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



MASSAGE. 

DR. JOHN GREENFIELD — MASSAGE 
treatment; satisfaction to all guaranteed. 
Kooms 1 and '2 Slax Wirth block, 13 West .Supe- 
rior street. OKico hours, U to 1 a. m-, 4 to 6 {>. m. 



n 



The whine of the News Tribune that 



Hood's 

Sarsaparilla 

Cures 

fie. ■ AM •mlMl? c«r«i4 and take crest p1«M- 
ure in recommending Hood's Sarpaparllla to all 
who suffer from this dlstresslnsr aflllotloo. 
Hood's Sarsaparilla has also helped me in 
many other ways. It is a good medicUie.'' 
Hits, a A. MORKOW , Doud'a, Iowa. 

Mood's Pills cure all Liver Ills, Billow. 
■MS, J»aadloot InUseetiOB, Blck fieadMhe^ 



Sawed With His Mouth. 
Washington Post: Governor Lewell- 
ing's admission that he was at one time 
a tramp clears up one mystery. It will 
be recalled that Lewelling never did 
saw wood with a say-nothmg accom- 
paniment 

Behaving Like Fools. 
Milwaukee Sentinel: The people who 
are writing anonymous abusive letters to 
Chairman Wilson are behaving like ill- 
mannered fools. There are plenty of 
reputable and effective methods of at- 
tacking him. 

Not an Issue. 
Savannah (Ga.) News: Col. J. Hamp- 
ton Hoge has been misled if he believes 
he is an issue with the administration. 
The colonel had better sit down. 



Howard Found Guilty. 
Jackson, Tenn., Jan. 3.— "Kev." How- 
ard, alias John Lord Moore, the interna- 
tional swindler, who had been on trial 
the second time for violating United 
States postal laws, was found guiltv this 
morning on twenty-two counts of the 
indictment. 

'Twill do Duluth Good 
To mail your Eastern or Western friends 
conies of The Herald's Christmas num- 
ber. 



South Carolina Prosperous. 

Charlk.ston, S. C, Jan. 3.— Replies 
to a circular letter sent by the News and 
Courier to all parts of South Carolina are 
to the effect that short crops and low 
prices had a depressing effect on busi- 
ness, but the worst is dver; the manu- 
facturing industries have prospered in 
spite of hard times; the mills have run 
on full time all the year round ; labor is 
abundant; the counties are well to do and 
the people are living at home; bread and 
meat are in plenty and to spare. 

To Destroy Derelicts. 

London, Jan. 3.— A petition signed by 
a large number of captains of British 
vessels employed in the trans-Alhmtic 
trade, is ready to be presented to Mr. 
Gladstone, urging that Great Britain join 
with the United States and other powers 
in sending warships to destroy derelicts. 
The petition points out the danger to 
navigation presented by these floating 
wrecks. It is signed by most all the cap- 
tains of steamers in the passenger-carry- 
ing trade. 

Power Station Burned 
Atti.khuko, Mass., Jan. 3.— The elec- 
tric power station of the Interstate & 
Attleboro, North Attleboro & Wrentham 
Electric Street Railway companies, lo- 
cated at Farmers, on the Wrentham 
branch of the Consolidated road, was 
destroyed by fire with its contents, ma- 
chinery, dynamos, etc., yesterday morn- 
ing. Loss #7!;, 000; partly insured. 

Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 

■ ■■ ■ ■ ■ s . ^ 

You can rent your rooms, or houses 
quickly through The Herald want 
columns. 



MONEY LOANEJ* ON DIAMONDS, 
watches, jewelry, etc., Standard 
Jewpiry and Loan Office, Sil W. Sup. 
St. Business strictly confld^ntial. 



M^ 



ONEY TO LOAN IN ANY AMOUNT 05 
horses, wagons, honsehold furniture, pi- 
anos, diamonds, joweiry ai\d all Icinde of per 
S'lnai property, on short notice and a lower rate 
tiisfj yon can iK)»sibly get it elsewhere. Inquire 
of Wm. Horkan, mannger. Dnlntli Mortgage 
Loan company, room 430, Chamber of Conuneroe 
building, Dnlnth. 

I,OAN ON DIAMONDS AND 

4. A, k: 

brt/ker iu Dnlnth, 17 Weat Superior street. 



Tickets sold and baggage checked through to 
all points in the United States and Canada. 

Close connections made in Chicago with all 
trains goiig East and South. 

For full information apply to your nearest 
Hcket agent or „ JA8. C. POND, 

Gen. Pa«). and Tkt. Agt„ Chicago, IU 
• 



liis Gslebrated French Curs, 

''■■J,'?^?'' " APHBODITlHi " ^',„?S' 

Is Sold ov a 

POSITIVE 

GUARANTEE 

to c'lre aay form of 

nervous disease or 

any disorder of tho 

generative organs 

of either eex.^ 

whether arising' 

from the excessive / • - _ _ 

UFe of t<timn!.".nt8, A F T u R 

jb;iccoorOpium,orthrough youthful indiscre- 

m over iuuulfjence. &c.,6uch as Lfisa of Bruin 

'iwer, Wakefulness, Bearlni:: down Pains In the 

.:n!i;, Bominal Weakness, Hysteria, Nervous l*ros- 

u'ion. Nocturnal Emissions, Lcucorrhcca, Diz- 

i'lo 8, Wepk Memory, Loss of Power and Impo- 

•n y, which if rcglectod often lead to premature 

■|.| Rge and Insanity. Price fl.OO a box, 6 boxes 

or Pf) 00. Pent bv md'l on receipt of price. 

A WRITTEN GUARANTEE is given for every 

' 01 .ird'^r roreive'i. to refund tho money if a 

rwawfnt cure Ik not effected. Wo have thou- 

,udi4 of tcsiimonials from old and young, of 

(k:i fexts, who have been permanently cured 

> tht- is'Of AphroJitlne. C'ircularfree. Adareea 

'/HK AFHB'l MEDI* I>E CO.. 
*'»»iitern Branch. Box 27, Pobti.u<d, Ob. 

Sold hiDnlntb i ax Wurth and Selleck & 

Walbank. 





A year's subscription to Scrib- 
ner's Mag-azine will bring- into 
your home twelve monthly num- 
bers, ag-greg-ating- over 1500 pages 
of the best and most interesting 
reading, and more than 600 beau- 
tiful illustrations. 

Announcements. 

GEORGE W. CABLE will begin in the January 
number a romance entitled "John March, 
Southerner." 

T« o other important serials have been engaged : 
J. M. BAEEIE, authorof the famous "Little 
Minister," has written a new novel, the first 
since that famous story. GEORGE MERE 
DITH, the great English novelist, has in 
preparation a novel entitled "The Amazing 
Marriage.'' 

SHORT STORIES will be abundant. 

W. D. HOWELLS, MISS ELLIOT, W. H 
BISHOP. LUDOVIC HALEVF, PAUL 
BOUBGET, JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS 
and many new writers will contribute. 

STUDIES OF AMERICAN LIFE will be an im- 
portant feature, including Newport, Bar 
Harbor, Lenox, etc., and the West. 

THE ILLUSTRATIONS will be even more 
numerous and beautiful than ever. A series 
of Frontispieces chosen by PHILIP GIL- 
BERT HAMEKTON will be especially not- 
able. 

Complete Prospectus Sent on Request. 

Special Offer. Fo^/x^T^" 

a subscription for 1S94 $4.50 

The same, with back numbers, bound 

in cloth $6.00 




NBV 
LIFE 



TV,fONKY TO 

i»l jewelry. G. A. Klela. only licenaod pawn 



MININO RNGINEERS^^ 

CHARLES F. HOWE. IgPEClAL ATTEN- 
tioD given to the oxamiuatlou and report- 
ing on mineral lands. Iron lands Ixinght and 
eold. Analyses of all kinds made on abort 
Dotlee. &A1 Chamoer of (k>mmerce. 



FLVUBIKO. 



w/ 



MoMILLAN COMPANY. 
HEATING AND PLUMBING. 



215 West Snporior street. 



STOVB RKFAlJtnfG. 



HEATING STOVES. COOK STOVES AND 
ranges cleaned and repaired on short no- 
tice, caatings furnished for any kind of etovea 
made ; American Stove Repair Worka, 118 Eaat 
Superior street. 



Dr. E. C. West's Nerve and Brain TreatmenI 

is sold vndftr positive written gnarantea, by author- 
\.:->^. ngentfl oniy, to care We.it Memory; Lops of 
i;; ..in an<l Nerve Power; Lost Manhood; Quickne? s; 
K;;;!'-* I-<'P"Op; Evil Dream";: Lack of Confidence; 
Kc'ivoae^Doss; Lusfltude; all i>ratnt<; Loss of Power 
r.f tlie Geiierfttlvo Orrrans In either sex, caused by 
r.vpr-rsertlou; Youthful Errors, or Excessive Use of 
Tobacco, Opium or Liquor, which soon lead to 
Jfit'sr/ Cortfumptlon, Insr.mty and Death. By mall, 
51 a box: 6 for f5; with written miarantee to cure or 
rf f nnd tiionev. 

WESTS LlYiCR PILLS cures sick headache, 
billioiisnpf f, liver complaint, sour stomach, dys- 
p<»l)«i a and constipation. H. F. Roice Druggist, 
33j West Superior street. Dulutli, Minn. 




©illtlERii 






IS THE ONLY LINK RUNNING THROUGH 
CARS TO 

St. Paul, Miieaplis anil CMcap 

TO 

HELENA BUTTE SPOKANE 
TACOMA, SE ATTL E. PORTLAND 

PuUman Sleeping Cars, Elegant Dining Cart 
on all Through Trains. 

TIME SCHEDULE. . 



Dining Cars on Pacific 
Express. 



CiriL XHOIlfKBBa. 



ICE A MoQILVRAY, CIVIL ENGINEERS 
and Burreyors. 521 Chamber of Com- 
merofl. 



R' 



M.";*" 



H. C<X)K, nURVEYOBS AND 
civil eugineern. 306 West Fourth street. 



GOLD. 



LD GOLD AND SILVER BOUGHT FOR 
V cash by Uirscfay & Regli. manufacturing 
jewelers, 105 W, Sup, st. Rooms 5 and 6. upstairs. 



DYEIKO AND CLE AS I NO 

1' l^lRsfTHlABslD^NGlSjDCLiANINQ OF 
' of all sorts of ladies and genta crarmonts. 
at tlie Lake Superior Steam Dye Works, 32 
West First street. Mrs. A. Forster, Prop. 



PaciXlo Kxpreiss for all Min- 
nesota and Dakota points, 

Winnipeg. Yollowstoue 

Park, Helena, Butte, Spo- 
kane, Taconia, Seattle, 

Portland, Alaska, San 

Francisco and all Pacific 

coast points .1.-45pm 7.-65am 

Chicag<i Limited for all Wif» 

cousin Cent.TAl & Mil wan 

kee. Lake Shorn & West- 

ern points, Milwaukee, 

('hicago and beyond 4K)5pm llaOan} 

Wisconsin Ontral Local 

Kxpreas for all Gogebic 

RaKge and Wisconsin Ccn- 

tial points and Chicago... 

t Except Sunday. All other trains daily. 

Rates, mapp. or other pamphlets ancl mfornia- 
Hon wiii be oLeerfnlly furnisned on anplieatloi! 



Leave 

Dnlnth 
Daily. 



Arrive 

Dnlnth 

Daily. 



Sample Copy, 10 Cents. 

Charles Scribner's Sons, 

743 Broadway, New York. 

DaMii, South Shore S 
Atlantic R'y. 

Boston, Nk, 

Montreal, BuSUo, 
PhUtdelphift, Pittsburg:, 
Clereland, Detroit, 

All points in Miehigfati, 
The East and South 



horter than any ether 
and all New Englaad 



Over 100 miles 
lino to Bosto 
Points. 

Over 70 mile tho shorfest line to all 
Points East oi Mackinaw or Detroit 
Mich. 

WAGNER SLEEPING CARS 

ON ALL TUEOUGH TKAINB. 



to 



F. E. DONOVAN. 
City Ticket Agent, 416 W. Superior St., 
Or CHA8. S. FEE, „ , 

Gan. Pass and Tk't. Act.. St Panl. 



For tickets, sleeping car acoommodatlona an4 
full information, apply to 

T. H. LARKE, CJoxcmerclal Asent. 

426 YItMt Superior Street, DULUTH, ttUI? 
BDaldinglTota Block 



D., M. & N. RAILROAD TIME TABLE. 
Daily, except Sunday; in effect Doc. IS. ISW. 

Train No. 1, northbound— 

Lv Dulutli (Union depot) R.fRam 

Ar Virginia 11^0 am 

Ar Biwabik 12«lm 

Ar Mountain Iron llr.'ttam 

Ar HibbiDg U:Xpai 

Train No. 2, southbonnd— 

Lv Virgmia - 150pm 

Lv Mountain Iron... 1:40 pm 

Lv Biwabik • - ^i^ pm 

Lv Uibbing I2i5pm 

ArDuIntb (Union depot) 5:05 pci 

G. C. QILFILLAN, 
D. M. PfllLBIN, Geo'l Pass. A«t 

tian'l Manacer. 




II 



f 



I 



1 



! i 

' ! 

• I 
I 



j I 



7 T 

t 

I 









- 



DULTJTH EVENING HERALD: WEDNESDAY, JANUARY y. 1894. 




Division of the New Wards Made at 
Evening's Meeting by the Cit> 
Council. 



Lst 



Boundaries of the Precincts as Established 

by the Ordinance— Thirty-One the 

Total Number. 



Committee Appointed to Confer With 
County Board Regarding Giving Em- 
ployment to Idle Men. 



the 



The city council met in special session 
last evening and, all hein^ present ex- 
cept Alderman Dingwall, passed the de- 
partment pay roils for December and 
then established voting precincts in the 
eight wards as follows: 

First Ward. 

First precinct: All that pan of said 

ward lying east or northeast of the line, 

beginning where the north line of section 

32-51-13 intersects the west line of said 

section, thence by a straight line s^uth to 
the north line of Summit street, in Lon- 
don addition of Duluth, thence east, fol- 
lowing the north line of Summit street 
to its intersection with Spencer avenue, 
thence following the center line of Spen- 
cer avenue to us intersection with Like 
Superior. 

Second precinct: All of said ward 
lying west of the First precinct and 
bt>unded on the west by the line begin- 
ning at the northwest corner of secuon 
Ji-St-ij, thence south by a straight line 
to the intersection of said line with the 
north boundary line of the plat of Kast 
Duluth, thence due east to the west 
Ixjundary line of the plat of London 
addition, toenco south to Lake Su- 
perior. 

Third precinct: All of^saidjward west 
of the Second precinct and south of the 
south line of section 10- 1 1 and 12-50-14, 
and bounded on the weit by the line bo- 
ginning at the intersection of Sixteenth 
avenue east with Lake Superior; thence 
on the center line of said avenue to its 
intersection with the center line of 
Seventh street; thence east to the center 
line of Seventeenth avenue east: thence 
north by a straight line to the south line 
of section 11-50-1 {. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward ly- 
ini; west of the Third precinct, and south 
of the south boundary line of sections 10 
and 11-50-1 \. 

Fifth precinct: All of said ward lying 
north of the south boundary line of sec- 
tions ID- 1 1 and 12 50-14, and west of the 
west boundary line of the Second pre- 
cinct of said ward. 

Second Ward. 

First precinct: All of said ward 
bounded on the north by the center line 
of Fourth street, on the east by the cen- 
ter I.ine of Sixth avenue east and Wash- 
ington avenue and from the intersection 
of the center line of Washington avenue 
with the center line of Superior street; 
thence and by a line drawn from said 
last mentioned point at right angles with 
the center line of Superior street to 
Lake Superior, on the south by Lake Su- 
perior and on the west by the west 
boundary of said ward. 

Second precinct: All of said ward 
east of the First precinct, south of the 
center line of East Fourth street. 

Third precinct: All of said ward de- 
scribed as follows: Beginning at the in- 
tersection of Fourth street with Eleventh 
avenue east, thence west on Fourth 
street to its intersection with Sixth ave- 
nue east; thence north on Sixth avenue 
east to its intersection with the north line 
of Duluth proper. Third division; thence 
west by a straight line to the center of 
section 1-50-14; thence north bv a 
straight line to the northerly city lirnits; 
thence east on said north boundary line 
to the center of the north boundary line 
of section 3-50-14; thence south by a 
straight line to the interse* lion of said 
line with Eleventh avenue east: thence 
southerly on Eleventh avenue east to the 
place of beginning. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward 

north of the center line of East Fourth 

street and west of the west boundary 

hue of the Third precinct of said ward. 

Third Ward. 

First precinct: All of said ward 
bounded on the north by the center line 
of West Fourth street, on the east by 
Lake avenue, on the south by Michigan 
street, and on the west by Third avenue 
west. 

Second precinct: All of said ward 
north of West Fourth street and west of 
Lake avenue and of Lake avenue pro- 
longed to the north boundary of said 
ward. 

Third precinct: All of said ward 
lying north of the center line of East 
Fourth street and east of the center line 
of Lake avenue and the same prolonged 
to the center of section 21-50-14. 

Fourth Ward. 

First precinct: All of said ward 
lying southerly of the ship canal. 

Second precinct: All of said ward 
between the ship canal and Sutphin 
street and the same prolonged to the east 
and west boundaries of said ward 

Third precinct: All of said ward 
north o* the north boundary o( the 
Second precinct .aid south ol .Superior 
street. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward 
between Superior street on tlie south .ind 
Fourth street on the north. 

Fifth Ward. 

First precinct: Bounded on the north 
by Lakeview ttrrace. 011 the west by 
Filth avenue west and the same pro- 
longed to the do< k line on the south and 
east by the south and east boundaries of 
said ward. 

Second precin t: Bounded on the 



nofth oy Lakeview terrace, on the south 
bv the dork line, and on the west bv 
Eighth avenue west and the same pro- 
lonj^ed to the dock line. 

Third precinct: Hounded on the north 
by L:«kevicw terrace, on tiie east by the 
west boundary of the Second precinct.'on 
on the south by the dock line, and on 
the west by the west boundary line ot 
said ward. 

Fourth precinct: All vl said ward 
north of Lakeview terrace. 

Sixth Ward. 
First precinct: Ail that part of said 
ward north of the center line of Railroad 
street and bounded on the west by the 
line bejjinning at the intersection ot the 
center line of Gartield avenue and the 
center line of Railroad street following 
the center line of Garheld avenue to its 
intersection with the center line of Pied- 
mont avenue; thence following the cen- 
ter line of Piedmont avenue to its inter- 
section with Twentieth avenue west; 
thence by a straight line following the 
center line of Twentieth avenue west 
and the same prolonged to us intersec- 
tion with the north and south center line 
of section 29-50-11. 

Second precinct: All that part of said 
ward lying south of Railroad street. 

Third precinct: All of said ward north 
of Railroad street and not included in the 
First precinct of said ward. 
Seventh Ward. 
First precinct: Ail that part of said 
ward east of Twenty-fourth avenue west. 
Second precinct: All that part of said 
ward between Twenty-fourth avenue 
west and the corporate limits of the city 
of Duluth as the same existed on Dec. 
31, 1893; also includes so much of sec- 
tions 2C). 30, 31 and 32-50 14, as lie within 
the limits ot said ward. 

Third precinct: All that part of said 
ward, bounded on the north by the south 
line of sections 31 and 32-50-14, on the 
east by the corporate limits of the city of 
Duluth as the same existed on Dec. 31, 
iSq3. fjn the south by the dock line, 
and on the west by the center line of .Si. 
Croix avenue according to the plat of 
Oneota, and the same prolonged to the 
north and south limits of said ward. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward ly- 
ing west of the west boundary line of the 
Third precinct and east of Central ave- 
nue. 

Eighth Ward. 
First precinct: All of said ward boun- 
ded on the north by the south line of 
section 31-50 14, and section 36-5o-i5, on 
the east by Central avenue and tne tame 
prolonged to the southerly line of said 
section 31, on the south by the center 
line of Grand avenue and on the west l>v 
Monroe avenue and the prolongation of 
the same northward to. the south line of 
section 36-50-15, 

Second precinct; Bounded on the north 
I'y Grand avenue, pn the cast by Central 
avenue, and the same prolonged to the 
channel of the St. Louis river, on the 
south by the channel of the St. Louis 
river, on the west by Monroe avenue and 
the same prolonged to the channel of the 
St. Louis river. 

Third precinct: IJoundeil on the north 
by the south line of sections 35 and 36- 
50-15, on the east by Monroe avenue and 
the same prolonged in a straight line to 
the north to its intersection with the 
south line of section 36-50- 1 ^. and also 
following the prolongation ' of Monroe 
avenue to its intersection with the chan- 
nel of St. Louis river, on the west by the 
east line of sections 3, 10 and 15-49-15, on 
the south by a straight line beginning at 
the southeast comer of section 
15-49-15; thence following the 
south boundary line of said section 
I5-4VJ 15. to the southeast corner thereof; 
thence by a straight line to the west 
boundarv line of Hunter &' Markell's 
Grassy Point addition; thence south to 
the channel of the St. Louis river, thence 
following said channel of said St. Louis 
river to the east boundary of said pre- 
cinct as before given. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward not 
included in the first three precincts above 
described. 

Before the meeting adjourned, Aldei- 
man Cox arose and moved that Presi- 
dent Spencer appoint a committee to 
confer with the county commissioners re- 
garding employment for idle men. That 
motion met with favor and Aldermen 
Cox, Sorensen and ( Me were designated 
for the committee. The establishment 
of a woodyard is not improbable. 



A Natural Food. 

Conditions o f 
the system arise 
when ordinary 
foods cease to 
build flesh — 
there is urjent 
need of arrest- 
ing waste — assistance must 
come quickly, from na/ural 
food source. 




Scott's Emulsion 

is a condensation of the life 
of all foods — it is cod-liver 
oil reinforced, made easy of 
digestion, and almost as 
palatable as milk. 

Prepared by Scott A Bownc. W Y. All dmeiticU. 



THE COUNTY BOARD. 



A BIRTHDAY PARTY. 



Miss Kathleen Moore Entertained Her Friends 
Yesterday Afternoon. 

Capt. N. D. .Moore's residence was yes- 
terday the scene of much innocent child- 
ish mirth and enjoyment. The occasion 
was the fifth birthday of Miss Kathleen 
Moore. I rora 3 to 6 o'clock the parlors 
were entirely given up to the enjoyment 
of the little ones, the majority of whom 
attend the kindergarten of Miss Alice 
Butchart. who, wiih Miss Mamie Mc- 
Ferran, her assistant, did much to add to 
the pleasures of the afternoon. Music 
was furnished bv Hoare's orchestra, and 
a kindergarten drill at the optning was 
pretty in the extreme. The drill b'ling 
over, the children danced until they were 
tired, and after enjoying a dainty supj.er 
were taken home. 

The children present were: Kathleen 
.Moore, Ethel, Edna and Edith Scoville, 
Isabel, Rosamund and Marjorie Patrick, 
Myrtle and Gertrude Butchart, Arthur 
Michaud, Agi es and R. Bayard Mc- 
Ferran. Helen Stevenson, Mildred West, 
Eunice Smith, Frances Frazer, May Pul- 
ford, Thomas Manley, Mamie, Antoin- 
nette and Herbert d'Aiitreniont. Harry 
and Charlie McEachron. Maggie Coxe, 
Nellie Moure, Nat Moore. |r., Ethel. 
Gracie and Clyde larnier, Ihdlie Hib- 
biug, Sophie Parkei, Aiin.i anil Clara 
Frcaeiick, Carlolt.i and Franci:i Sagar, 
Fred F.lston, jolui Tiiussig. Afia Burke. 

Mrs Moore w.ts assisted by Mesrtanies 
Mel a< hron atid Scoville and l)y Misses 
Alice Bulcburt, Ivosc l>ut<:tiatt and 
Mamie, Florence and Parker McKcn.in. 



Or. Fullcrton Resigns—The Herald Made the 
Officai Paper. 
After the election of Camille Poirieras 
chairman yesterday, the board of county 
commissioners proceeded to general 
business. Dr. Fullerton, county physi- 
cian, presented his annual report at the 
bottom of which was his resignation. He 
complained of not having received the 
support of the commissioners. He also 
made some recommendations in refer- 
ence to the office and the care of county 
patients. His resignation was received. 
The Duluth I'vening Herald was 
unanimously elected the official paper of 
the county and will print the official 
proceedings, financial statement and tax 
list during the coming year. 

The following committees were named 
by the chairman: 

Highways and bridges— All commis- 
sioners. 

Poor and poor farm — Miller, Swenson 
ani^ Butchart. 

Court house and jail— Butchart, Swen- 
son and Miller. 

Claims and .accounts— Swenson, Butch- 
art and Miller. 

Taxes and assessments— Butchart, 
Miller and Swenson. 

Supplies and purchasing — Miller, Bon- 
ham and Butchart. 

Legislation -Bonham, Miller and 
Butchart. 

A committee of Tower people ap- 
peared ami asked the board for aid in 
building a road from Lake Vermilion 
into the Rainy lake region. The com- 
missioners favored the idea but the road 
fund is exhausted now. As soon as the 
funds are available and the proper legal 
proceedings have been taken, an appro- 
priation will probably be made. 

An adjournment until Friday morning 
was then taken. 

This Morninjg's Meeting. 
At the meeting this morning a county 
physician was elected. There were 
seven applicants, Drs. Sherwin, G. W. 
Davis, Walker, Bakke, MacKenzie, 
Speier and Krogstad. I'pon the fir^t 
ballot Dr. Sherwin received 3 votes and 
Dr. Davis 2 and the former was de- 
clared elected. Assistant physicians, 
they to act also as assistant superintend- 
e;its of the poor, were named as follows: 
At Tower, Dr. J. B. Noble; at Biwabik, 
Dr. Erench; at i:iy. Dr. Shipman: at 
\irginia. Dr. Brown; at Hibbing, Dr. 
Rood; at West Duluth, Dr. John Pearson. 

Thomas Clark was re-elected superin- 
tendent and P. O. Noben as assistant. 
Their salary remains as it is this year. 
A. Poirier will not continue as superin- 
tendent of the poor farm, Dr. A. F. Rock- 
well receiving 4 votes to his 1. The lat- 
ter will take charge ot the poor farm on 
March 1. Henry Smith was re-elected 
overseer of the county roads and the 
watchmen, janitors and ftrenien in the 
county buildings were reappointed. 

The committee from the city council, 
consisting of Aldermen Cox, Sorensen 
and Oie, appeared before the board in 
rci^ard to devising some means lor giv- 
ing employment to idle men. The mat- 
ter was referred to the committee on 
poor. Commissioners Swenson, Butchart 
and Miller. They were given power to 
act. 

J. \V^ Marvin apjjcared before the 
board and offered his abstract books to 
the county for 1S50C0. No action was 
taken. 

The board adjourned to Jan. 20. 



fords to the needy and unfortunate of 
this city. The feature that commends it 
most to my mind is that a small amount 
of money is made to relieve a great 
many wants, ^ou can lely upon me to 
pay »25 the cumin >,' \ear. 1 iiujt I shall 
feel able later to increase that amount." 

A SWEuToiMNER. 

An Exclusive Social Affair in Colorod Circles 
Given Last Evening. 
A very swell banquet, the most exclu- 
sive affair ever given in the colored so- 
cial circle in Duluth. was given last even- 
ing at the home of Mrs. H. J, Shelton, 
17 East Fourth street, by the Chrysan- 
ttiemum club, composed of five young 
men: W. B. Richardson, president; E. 
A. Banks, vice president; J. Arthur 
Banks, secretary; W. E. (}assaway. cor- 
responding secretary; H. C. Richardson, 
treasurer. The house was profusely 
decorated with chrysanthemums, smilax 
and roses. The guests were received by 
W. B. Richardson and .it (^:3o o'clock sat 
down to the tables. The following was 
the menu: 

Hlue Point on Half Shell. 

t'elpry. Olives. 

("on'omino ' lenr. 

KoiliMl (oIuDibiti KiviT Salmon. 

Sauce liollnndaitto. Prum or Potatoes. 

Pontet CRuot. 

Iloast MallanI IJiick. 

('rab Api'lf Jolly, 

Fried .Swoet Pot toes. 

(J. M. Mutnni's Extra Dry. 

Chicken Salad. WaferH. 

Salted AIni<>nd8. 

Noapolitau Cream. 

.Assorted Cake. Fmit. 

Cream Cheese. ('rackereand Coffee. 

Demine Tas8. 

Those present were: Misses Etta 
Moxley, Tillie Tolbert, Emma Moxley, 
Arietta and Viola Berry, of St. Paul, and 
the five members of the club. 



The Annual Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the Spiritual 
and Liberal Research society was held 
last evening in the Hunter block and 
the following ofiicers elected: Mrs. 
Mary L. McGindly, president; J. Brown, 
hrst vice president; R. C. Mitchell, sec- 
ond vice president; H. C. Boderick, sec- 
retary; J. C. Schafer, treasurer; T. H. 
Story, H. E. Hanson and J. P, Dodge, 
trustees. 

A number of lecturers are to be 
brought here this year. 



ARE Tl! COMMONPLACE 



And Does the Very Frequency of the Appear- 
ance of These Statements Blind You 
to the Depth of Their 
Meaning ? 



Does the very frequency of these state- 
ments, casual reader, cause you to pass 
them over as ordinary, commonplace 
matter ? 

I >oes the very fact that the Copcland 
physicians place before your eyes every 
week new statements Irom men and 
women well known to you— friends and 
neighbors in your community— cause you 
to regard them as ordinary matter not 
worthy of consideration ? 

Does their form and appearance grow 
so familiar to your eyes, blind you to the 
fact that each one of these statements is 
a chapter of a new life given the story 
of a man or woman saved -the statement 
of a friend or neighbor, despondent 
through sickness and suffering, now so 
joyful over health restored as to be glai 
and anxious that all the world should 
know what has been accomplished .' 

Note cartfully the statement given be- 
low showing the effects of catarrh. 



St. Augustine, Fla. 

HOTEL SAN MARCO 

Op «na .Ian. 9tb. A modern hotel iu a suDf-rh 
looatioii: perfeot saxiitary apjKjintin-i.tB; liSi il 
ntHnavenieiit, r»aiiOQabI<- iiri' H«. ('.MiHriiv . d 
MUSIC IJY IHIi IMPfcHlVL MCNtiAKlAN 
CnP.Sif HANI). Korterinsaadcircnlnr^.addrPf 
IlLANCUAUU i. Il.VfiBR, 

Jlolei MHrllx)roii«ti. N. Y. 

IF yoii wisli to drink a choice 
* Glass of La<rer call for 

Fitger's Beer. 

Wholwome. P»latabl»*nrt NonTlahlne 



LEGAL NOTICES. 

vy- * 



DR. L. A. FAULKNER 



A MASTERPIECE DESTROYED. 



A Valuable Painting Ruined During Removal in 
St. Louis. 

St. Louis, Jan. 3.— The fact was today 
made public that a $100,000 canvas mas- 
terpiece was wrecked at the Laclede 
building last Saturday afternoon. "Lz 
Roi S'Amuse"' is the catalogued name of 
the painting, and it is from the brush of 
Jules Arsene Gamier, a Ereiichman, who 
did the grandest work of his lili: when he 
executed this. 

The picture was being moved Satur- 
day from the room of the late S. A. Cole 
in the Laclede building. Three men 
were holding the valuable canvas, and 
when it reached the first story it struck 
the tloor. Instead of stopping the ele- 
vator, the boy gave the lever a shove and 
down the lift plunged to the basement. 
There was splitting crash of glass, a 
rending of canvas .ind"Le Roi S'Amuse" 
was torn to ribbons. 

The painting is the property of a bank- 
er who declines to allow his name to l)e 
published. After being shown in Eng- 
land it was brought to .America anil ex- 
hibited at New Orleans. S. A. Cole, one 
of the best art connoisseurs America ever 
knew. se:ured it for the St. Louis exposi- 
tion, but it was never allowed a place in 
ill*; art gallery, being declared improper 
by the committee. 





King of 
Specialists. 



Tronls surcn«sfii!ly 
all foriiit «.(■ J{1<«>(|, 
Nftvrdift iiu(J I'rinary 
(liseaso.K. 

NEHVOU.s/jKfJlL 
ITV, Willi Up iiiaiij'; 
srlooiiiy eyiiiplotiiti, 
curorf. I 

I.O.sr VITALITY 
per/. ctly au-l i»eiaia- 
ueutly resUjffd. 



OFnCE OF THK WABtGON IROVCOM- 
r'any. Jiulutli, Minn., December J!), iv.' ;. 
Notice ia Lurehy giveu tliai r.liu annual nioetin;.- 
of tlio fetockiiol ler>?«f tli« Wahig-on Iron Com 
[•any for ih'! election of flir<-ctor» and thetraDb- 
•ic'iou t)f buoU olli; i 'jai^ii.i- ., a> m c b'? broiiirtjt 
bcforn it. will Iw* liclil at the oHice of ttio ooii; 
faoj, itn Lyroiim \n\\hiiv :, in the City of Iju- 
Ititli.biaii ol MiuiJ...<oia, ou tljo ttiitli" day o: 
•larmary, iHtU.Mt two o" ••loci; ij. m. Thr faii'- 
f- 1 UooiiL.s »iJl b.».l...H'.J ai II loii oij iKT.'iiibK- 
:*»tb. 1H«:;. and rijo:-eno<J on .Janaary 11, lrin,n. 
ten o'elocl; a in. \\ . II. FisffHR. 

8w J. 



/ iFFiCE OF THK NIBiWA IKO.V^JAl'- 
^ / pany, Diilutb, Minn.. iJeceitiber i*:<, !;«*; 
Notice is licrehy niv mi ihat the .lunu.il mectit- 
of the Ht<>cl<lioIiierw of tbe Nibiw.t ir<in<(i«; 
vmny for f be eli>ciio:i of directore and th« rran. 
action of siicli otiier bii»unoc>« an may bi- broOtr ■ 
ivforiMt, will bo lield at tlieollicc of tliectm.- 
paiiy, 407 Lycenni buiIdinK. in ilie cily of jjo 
Ititli, t-i,atoof Minnf!-<>ta. ou the ttntli dayo: 
.JauiiarT. l^iM. at two o dock ].. n\. Tbo trt.Li- 
fiT iHM.ks will t»o closed at no n on Deo«ya|j«r 
*»tli, ls!),{, and reopened 00 J atioary II. JH:«4 at 
leuo'cJocJv a. Ill, W. H. FisoER. 

bfc'y. 



()' 



HLOOI) FOISON cured for life witboat mer- 
cnry. 

DRINAHY 
thorongbly. 

("ONtiULTATION 



Ol.SEASES cuml quickly and 
FHKK. 

Office Room 4, Over 19 East Superior Street. 



PICK OF THE All.NIWA IKON fO.M- 

p:iny, l>ul!jtli .Miii/i.. iJicember i", IMC 
Notice 18 Imreby t,'iven tbat ilic annual n . 
if thi> i^tocLliolders of Ibo Aluiiwa Ir.. • 
pariy for ijio cliTtioii of 'Iirnc'Mrt. and tij<- ^(■l.i^ 
actuirj of Mirli <itlK'rbii?int'>s a*" may bi- brotgjlj- 
before it, will Ix- bdd at tlio olliee of tJie coni- 
pany, JOT Lyceum building, in ilie cityofDu- 
Iiitli. state of Miniioiora. on tbc teuib day of 
.January. IK'J. at two o'clock \>. m. The trans^ 
b-r books wdi bf closed at noon on I>ecemb«f 
aotli, IRt.H. and reopened on January II, Isyj. at 
ten o'clock a. ni. W. If. Fi-,hkr. 

8«cy. 



A 



1 



()' 



PINCH OF SALT 

If it is 

Diamond 

'CRYSTAL SALT^ 

\vill go farther llian^ 
two pinches of the 
other kind. I-'lavors bet- 
ter, too. You'll iiiul it pays 

in iiianv vvavs to use 
The salt that's ail salt. 





FITCE OF Tin: WENOXA IKON CO.M- 

pany. l>uliiili. JluiM.. I»cc"!iber 2it. IMJ;;. 
Notice if beribv Riven tbat iIk^ Hauual njootio*: 
oftbe ^tockboldert^ of the Weimua Iron <'c«n- 
I'uny for tlie cbctiou of .Iirt.ctorK and tne tranfi- 
I action (if ^ucli otliiT bufiu'-'t as may l>e hroa^-b* 
Udorejt, will bi- liebl at tbe olliee of the com 
pany, U'T L.vccum buildic::. in tbe city of Da- 
liitli, st.tti' <if ,MirHies,ota, on tiiv ten'li day of 
Januarv, Isid. hi two o'clock i>, m Tbe trans- 
fer b<M)k... will be closed at noon o:i lieceinber 
»)tb, lrt<.;<. .and n..{»c-ned on January 11, IKMl, at 
ten o'clock a ni. \V. Jl. Fi.siiEi:. 

isoc'y. 



Treaty Ratified. 
Bi!CHAREST, Jan. 3— The senate yes- 
terday ratified the Roumanian-German 
commercial treaty, already ratified by 
theGermanreichslag, and then adjourned 
until Jan. 23. 

Engaged to Freddy Gcbhard. 

Ni:\\ York, Jan, 3. -A special to the 
.Sun from Haltimore says the marriage 
engagement was .innounced yesterday of 
Miss Louise H. Morris, one of the society 
belles of llaltimore, to Frederick Geb- 
h?r»l, of New York. 



Mr. E. G. Smith, a well-known resident 
of West Duluth who lives at 24 Si.vth 
avenue west, and is employed by the 
West Duluth Electric company, has 
been treated by the Copeland physicians 
and gives them his hearty endorsement. 
The gentleman says: 

"I suffered froni catarrh of the nose 
and throat, but at limes my whole sys- 
tem seemed to-be affected. There was 
a dull heaviness in the front part of my 
head; my eyes were weak and watery. 
The catarrhal intlamiuation stopped my 
nose HP so I couldn't breathe through it. 
Large quantities of mucous would drop 
from the back of my nose and accumu- 
late in the throat and cause incessant 
hawking and spitting; my throat was 
tender and sore and greatly aggra- 
vated by the least use of tobacco. 1 often 
had pains in the small of my back, in 
the chest and in the stomach. While 
m> appetite was good, I did not enjoy 
my food as I should. 1 did not rest well 
at night and arose in the morning as 
tired as I had been the night before. I 
had often heard of the Copelmd physi- 
sians, but didn't have much faith in them. 
However, after consulting a friend who 
had been treated by them, I decided to 
see if they could remedy my case, and 
now, after taking a course of treatment, 
feel well and cannot say too much in 
favor of their system of treatment. They 
give the best of services and at rates 
which are decidedly reasonable. 



■ ••■■■■•••■•■•«■■■«■■■<■«■■•■ ■•■■■.^* 



LADIES 



1*1 Can Secure CompeteDt SerraDts 

• j^: Ry Advertising in the 

ipERALDWANTCOLDMNSb 



jl*?i 



t UFICE Cd THK MINCiJlIN IRON COM- 
^ ' r)3nv, Dulutb. Minn . December 29. ISJCi. 
Notici- i» b'Tcb ■ ifiven that tli'» unnnal meetinc 
of tbe (^f^K-kbidd.rti of tbe Minonin iron Coic- 
pauy fur tbe ■•Icrtion of dirc-csori^ and tbe tranf- 
jiction i)f sucli otbor bn-iiiegs a* may Ix'brongbt 
befor" it. will bf bold nt ibo odice of the coin- 
l>.'uiy. ln7 Lycciini buiidiu;;. in tbo city i>f i>u- 
Intli, slate of ?IinnoKita, i>n tbe tenth day ol 
.lannary, iMd, at I wo o'clock t). m. The tran*- 
fer books will be closed at noon on December 
:.i»th. !)■!»!. and rco|>eaed on .lanuary 11, l-«4, at 
ten o'clock a. m. \V. II. Fisiieb, 

Soc'y. 



All diseases treated at the uniform rate of 
$5.00 a month. Remember, this includes 
consultation, examination, treatment and med- 
icine for all diseases and all patients. 



sT. rAllL * UtJiitJTU KAlLKUAU. 




Dady 








Except 








Snnday 


Lluaited 


MUrbi 




Fast 


DaUy. 


DaUy. 




Train. 






Lv DulaiJj 


9 00 a«n 


l:«pm 


11 I5(>n> 


ArPt. FauL 


2»»pm 


6 20 pro 


7 15 am 


At Minnoapolia... 


3 lU pni 


6 40pn: 


7 35 am 


Ar Still water 


S 1.5 pm 


7 10 iim 


7 20 pro 


At ("hicago.. 


64.'ibm 


7 00 am 


9 3Spm 


Ar Hilwankoe 


aaoain 


4 80 am 


710 pm 


ArOniftha 


.... .-k- .--- 


Offipm 


lOOOoDI 


ArSt. Lonls 




B ICpm 


5 65 am 


Ar Kansas City. 




4liOpii2 


630 am 


Lv for lUoquet, 








Carlton 


7 90 am 


900 am 


1 55 DTP 



F. B. ROSB, 
Northeni Passenger A*wit, 



VTOTK^E OF ANNUAL MEETING-THE 
-1.^ Fecietary of the Dnlath {^ Winuipoff Kail- 
road coini.any bavine omitted to give proper 
notice by ixiblicution of tiic tmnn.il tncetin*,'of 
f;»id railr.'rul company, \vJ:'cn ..Tiannl raoetiuK 
i» re<inired by ibe by-lawh of c-aiil company to 
!>•• liold on the socond Thursday of l)ecenil)er in 
eiipli yoar. now Therefore, we. the uiiiler8iKli<><I 
directors of wiid railroad con.ii.my. <io bercby 
n\\>- notice that" tin' annnal nieetiijffof <;i.- 
sfockholiier!? of tb" Duluth A Winiiii>ek' Baii 
ro.nd company to elect dircrtoj.- fo;- tbo on.-Tiiii;r 
year .Old t.> trttiise.cl all piicIi h* her business a.s 
may lawfully hi' transactijd bv mid coni|<aiiy at 
its annual meeting, will be held at t In? ollic^j of 
the wnipauy i-' the Lyceum biiiliJimc. in iXw 
citvof Dnlntli, Siinnojriitn, on tbe twelfth day 
if -lannary. ih'.U, at iVo o'clock p. ui. 

Dated Dec. ix, IS'.ia. 

W. F, FiT.ii. 
H, .f. KoAKUM.v:;. 
J. lirr.ii Peters, 
ji'rncfors of tbo Duluth i Winutpcg Haiiroad 

t'omp iny. 

Dec23t« Janl2.nc. 



PUS 



of a 



Will Winter in Florida. 

Wamiinoton, Jan. >.— (Special to The 
HeraM. |— Col. and Mrs, Graves, of Du- 
luth, leave Washington for l-lorida to- 
morrow, to spend the winter. 



Highest of all 



in 



Leavening^ Power. — Latest U. S. Gov't Report. 




Baking 
Pomier 



AESOu/rEi:r PURE 



WILL START THE WORK. 

Tower People Will Begin the Building 
County Road. 
The construction of a tote road from 
Vermilion lake to the gold fields near 
Foft Trancis is now an assured fact. 
Yesterday afternoon a committee of the 
most pronfiirient citizens of Tower, head- 
ed by l-'red IJarrett, appeared before the 
county commissioners, at their regular 
monthly meeting, and presented a peti- 
tion for and submitted a map of the pro- 
posed road, which is to run from the 
most northerly available point on Lake 
Vermilion to the most southerlv avail- 
able point on Lake La Croix, and which 
will be about twenty to twenty-five miles 
in length. The commissioners, one and 
all, favored the proposition of the Tow- 
critcs, who were also ably seconded in 
their elTorts by the iransport.'ition coin- 
millccof ihc jobbers' union, but they 
wero unable to give a formal ;tsscnt to 
the petition until the Icg.il prot-cdure in 
siK li < ascs had been coni|ilic<l wiilu 
Howi'vcr, they gave .issur.iix c t<> ihc pc- 
tUioiurs that the pclition would ultini;itc- 
ly be gr.iiited, and it wa.s thereupon iv- 
hijhcd to make a ^tarl upon ihc work lo- 
uhjirow. To be legal a » ouuty grant to 
biitld a county road can only be made 
after a ro;>d petition has been tiled, set- 
ting forth the exact starting and terminal 
points of the road, so as to show that it is 
in the county granting the aid. 

Loss Now Being Adjusted. 
In reference to the statements from 
irresponsible sources that the insurance 
companies; intended lo eoutcst ihe < laim 
<d I. e vine liros. lor their recent loss by 
lire, the lirm states that there is nothing 
whatever in this report. .As soon as the 
am<'ant of the loss is determined, which 
is now in progress in the regular w.iv, 
their cinims will be settled in full. 

Ihe Bethel's Oeod Work. 

Rev. \)r. Salter hae received the fol- 
lowing letter from a liw^-er in this city, 
which is a gratifying testimonial to the 
ETOod work of the Bethel: "I am im- 
l)resscd by the great work that is being 
done by tbe Bethel, and the relief it at- 



The M«st Pleasant Way 

Of preventing the grippv:, colds, head- 
aches, and fevers is to use the li<|uid 
laxative remedy Syrup of Figs, when- 
ever the system needs a gentle, yet 
effective cleansing. To be benefited one 
must got the true remedy manufactured 
by the California Fig Syrup company 
onlv. For sale by all druggists in 50c 
and |i bottles. 



G-D-T-I-G-U-M 



Eij^lit letters and four syllables. 

Mix them up and you have nothing. 

But properly arranged they make a 
word familiar to the civilized world 
— a word that stands for all that is 
pur?", energetic, and effective in 
medicine. 

Think of it. 

From a small beginning, against 
prejudice and opposition, against 
monied hosts and trade indifterence 
Cu TICUKA has become the greatest 
curative of its time. 

No power r»n earth could bar its prog- 
ress because it did its appointed 
work. 

Ill every clime and with every people 
if has w(»rked wonders. 

Its cures h.iye approached tne mir- 
aculous. 

S5 ,000,000 

Have beeii e.xpended in advertising it.. 

But 

j5l,OO0,0tX),0«X) 

Could not purchase the daily com- 
mendations of its grateful friends. 

Such praise cannot be purchased. 

This is the sccrtl of its success — of its 
world-wide popularity — of its won- 
derful sale — of its constant growth. 

It is stanifTcd upon the hearts of the 
once lorliiivd, di>li»{iiied, and hu- 
miliated evei3\vlieic, never to be 
effaced while life shall last. 

Such in brief is CuiiCURA, the cura- 
tive marvel of the age. 

Potter Drug and Chemical Cor. 
PORATION, Beston, U. S. A. - 




Rooms 422, 423 Lyceum Bldg, 



DK. W. H. COPKLANU, 

DK. H. M. HUNT, 

„ ('onsalting i'bysiciaue. 

DU. F. C. DBENNl.Nti, 

Bosident Pbyeician. 

Spocialtioe: Catarrh and diBeaHna of the Ear, 
Nose, Throat and Lnn4Ci*. Nervous iJieeases. 
Skin DieeaHea, (Chronic Diseaees. Ortlce boars, 
9 to 11 a. m., 2 to 4 p. m.. 7 to 8 p. m. ; Bonday, 9 
a. m. to 12 m. 

If yon live at a dl6tauce write for symptom 
blank. 



BROU 



THE OLD RELIABLE CURE 

for the most obKtlnate cases of (Jonorr 
btea and <^ileet. No other treaUnent 
re<iulred. Non-poisonous. No Stricture. 
No Incouvonicnce. sold by A1>L 
drugicrlsts. J.Forre, (succciisortoBrou), 
l*harmaclen, Parla. 





THEHERALD 




CURE 



^A X<"w end OtYOXfipi* Trewtiueiil, ronelpttn^ "f 
fTrjOWlTUlilKH, CapHnlon of Olntmen* and l-tri 
|tiix«»sot (HTilmnnf. A Pevnr-fnlMtip «'iirii forl't!-"* 
C'f ev(«r.f nut lire pibl«U'ar»»o. It innkeonnopi^raH 'M 
*Hh (111* knife <ir )iij»rlloii(iof rsrlK.M'' nci'l. Trh;'> 
aropBliifui mill oplilonj » ii'-rriionent r'irn, pnd "ft°o 
rpwjltniii fn Henlh, t,nn«>.'popBr.r. Why «<Hllir(> 

thl« tvrribi* <ii»«a»«7 Wf Buanuttsa « 
beisfi to oure nnv oa««< >(m onijr per for 
beneUts jeeetvedi |l a bos, 6 f>»r».'.hr nialL wunpl" 

free. (inaraute<-H ir-^noil by our ;i.:i'dI. 
JOHIVSON.S ORIENTAL SOAP. 
Tbe (iroat Skin < 'ure mul Fa-o llnnntili) r. 1 1 
Uhiffhljr madicated, delicately pt^rfmneij and 
absolat«ly pure. It cleanse* tbe skin and ircalp, 
promot4»s the «rrowUi of thn ii.-iir and is tK Inxnry 
for ladies' and children's batJ). S. K. ItOVC'F', 
I)ruirei»t, XttSnperbM- sfn»er VV.. Dolul.b, Minx. 



CURE YOURSELF! 



IS THE BEST 



ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



IN DULUTH. 



ITKAS HELPED OTHERS! 




Tticouiyeaieaiiurtiiuu>ivriircioroONORRHCEA< 
CUjEET, LEUCOintH<EA, ami other .Um linr«. 
ubor M 



nvcii 



ieK. A apiwdy ouret*' ^la""(><nohstin*iM 
Wtirie««ucw. T ii iftti i g ^raBgute, 9i..«90. 



IT WILL HELI' YOU! 

f 

Men with eiilerpriso and i»iMt in llunr make 
up, make money in such limes as the present. 

Seeinty- thai, the panic h.is pnssod, tliey wil^ 
out deiay iis<* cvimw MMVin-; iu .Kivcilisc ih-n' l.ir i 
ness. 

They s^ll ofoods while ihescared fel 

Tho gritty nior* .get the 
ones the blues. 






lows 

II I . 



keep 



h' 



!mi 




\ 



\ 




i 




1 



Boundaries of the Precincts as Established 

by the Ordinance— Thirty-One tHe 

Total Number. 




M«^<>Ma. — . . , -^ -.>.in«t ■. g.-^. 



• C » . -*»»|-. 3i 



^.r^-. T.j^-T— r*^ -» * ' '-T-T-* 



-#-Vt*- "'•■ * ^V 



THE DULXJTH EVENING HERALD: WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3. 1894. 



Committee Appointed to Confer With 
County Board Regarding Giving Em- 
ployment to Idle Men. 



The city council met io special session 
last evening and. all heinj; present ex- 
^ ept Alderman Dingwal!, passed the de- 
partment pay rolls for December and 
then established voting precincts in the 
cisht wards as follows: 

First Ward. 
First precinct: All that part of said 
ward lying east or northeast of the line, 
beginning where the north line of section 
32-51-13 intersects the west line of said 
section, thence by a straight line smith to 
the north line of Summit street, in Lon- 
don addition of Duluih, thence east, fol- 
lowing the north line of Suminit street 
to its intersection with Spencer avenue, 
thence following the center line of Spen- 
cer avenue to its interse tioii with Like 
Superior. 

Second precinct: All of said ward 
lying west of the First precinct and 
bounded on the west by the line begin- 
ning at the northwest corner of section 
31-^1-13, thence south by a straight line 
to the intersection of said line with the 
north boundary line of the plat uf Kast 
Uuluth, thence due east to the west 
boundary line of the plat of London 
addition, toence south to L:ikc Su- 
perior. 

Third precinct: All of^saidjuard west 
of the Second precinct and south of the 
south line of section lo-n and i>;o-i4, 
and bounded on the west by the line be- 
ginning at the intersection of Sixteenth 
avenue east with Lake Superior; thence 
on the center line of said avenue to its 
intersection with the center line of 
Seventh street; thence east to the center 
line of Seventeenth avenue east; thence 
north by a straight line to the south line 
of section n-50-14. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward ly- 
ing west of the Third precinct, and south 
of the south boundary line of sections 10 
and 1 1-50- It. 

Fifth precinct: All of said ward lying 
north of the south boundary line of sec- 
lions 10-1 1 and 12 50-14, and west of the 
west boundary line of the Seco;.d pre- 
cinct of said ward. 

Second Ward. 

First precinct: All of said w.ird 
bounded on the north by the center line 
of Fourth street, on the east by the cen- 
ter Une of Sixth avenue east and Wash- 
ington avenue and from the intersection 
of the center line of Washington avenue 
with the center line of Superior street; 
thence and by a line drawn from said 
last mentioned point at right angles with 
the center line of Superior street to 
Lake Superior, on the south by Lake Su- 
perior and on the west by the west 
boundary of said ward. 

Second precinct: All of said ward 
east of the First precinct, south of the 
center line of East Fourth street. 

Third precinct: All of said ward de- 
scribed as follows: Beginning at the in- 
tersection ot Fourth street with Eleventh 
avenue east, thence west on Fourth 
street to its intersection with Sixth ave- 
nue east; thence north on Sixth avenue 
east to its intersection with the north line 
of Duluth proper. Third division; thence 
west by a straight line to the center of 
section 21-50-11; thence north by a 
straight line to the northerly city limits; 
thence east on said north boundary line 
to the center of the north boundary line 
of section 3-50-14; thence south by a 
straight line to the interse< tion of said 
line with Eleventh avenue east; thence 
southerly on Eleventh avenue east to the 
place of beginning. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward 

north of the center line of East Fourth 

street and west of the west boundary 

hue of the Third precinct of said ward. 

Third Ward. 

First precinct: All of said ward 
bounded on the north by the center line 
of West Fourth street, on the east by 
Lake avenue, on the south by Michigaii 
street, and on the west by Third avenue 
west. 

Second precinct: All of said ward 
north of West Fourth street and west of 
Lake avenue and of Lake avenue pro- 
longed to the north boundary of said 
ward. 

Third precinct: All of said ward 
lying north ot the center line of East 
Fourth street and east of the center line 
of Lake avenue and the same prolonged 
to the center of section 21-50-14. 

Fourth Ward. 

First precinct: All of said ward 
lying southerly of the ship canal. 

Second precinct: All of said ward 
between the ship canal and Sutphin 
street and the same prolonged to the east 
and west boundaries of said ward 

Third precinct: All of said ward 
north o the north boundary of the 
Second prev,ini.t .iiid south o I Superior 
sircet. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward 
between Superior street on the south and 
Fourth strtcl on the north. 

Fifth Ward. 

First piecinct; Bounded on the north 
by Lakeview terrace, ou the west by 
Filth avenue west and the same pro- 
longed to the dot k line on the south and 
ea>t by the south and east boundaries of 
said ward. 

Second precinct: Bounded on the 



north Dy Lakeview terrace, on the south 
hv the do;k line, and on the west bv 
Eighth avenue west and the same pro- 
lon>ied to the dock line. 

Third precinct: Bounded on the north 
by I.ikevicw terrace, on tlie east by the 
west boundary of the Second precinct,|on 
on the boutb by the dock line, and on 
the west by the west boundary lin-j ot 
said ward. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward 
north of Lakeview terrace. 

Sixth Ward. 
First precinct; All that part of said 
ward north of the center lineof Railroad 
street and bounded on the west by the 
line beginning at the intersection of the 
center line of Garfield avenue and the 
center line of Railroad street following 
the center line of Garheld avenue to its 
intersection with the center line of Pied- 
mont avenue; thence following the cen- 
ter line of Piedmont avenue to its inter- 
sectum with Twentieth avenue west; 
thence by a straight iine following the 
center line of Twentieth avenue west 
and the same prolonged to its intersec- 
tion with the north anil south center line 
of section 2y-5o-r4. 

Second precinct: All that part of said 
ward lying south of Railroad street. 

Third precinct: All of said ward north 
of Railroatl street and not included in the 
First precinct of said ward. 
Seventh Ward. 
First precinct: Ail that part of said 
ward east of Twenty-fourth avenue west. 
Secoad precinct: All that part of said 
ward between Twenty-fourth avenue 
west and the corporate limits of the city 
of Duluth as the same existed on Dec. 
3f, 1893; ^I'so includes so much of sec- 
tions 20, 30. 31 and 3250 14. as lie within 
the limits oi said ward. 

Third precinct: All that part of :aid 
ward, tKjunded on the north by the south 
line of sections 31 and 32-50-14, on the 
east by the corporate limits of the city of 
Duluth as the same existed on Dec. 31. 
iSg3. |jn the south by the dock line, 
ana on the west by the center line of St. 
Croix avenue according to the plat of 
Oneota, and the same prolonged to the 
north and south limits of said ward. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward ly- 
ing west of the west boundary line of the 
Third precinct and east of Central ave- 
nue. 

Eighth Ward. 
First precinct: All of said ward boun- 
ded on the north by the south line of 
section 31-50 14, and section 36-50- 15, on 
the east by Central avenue and tne same 
prolonged to the southerly line of said 
section 31, on the south by the center 
line of Grand avenue and on the west l>v 
Monroe avenue and the prolongation of 
the same northward tq the south line of 
section 30-50-15. 
Second precinct: Bounded on the north 




A Natural Food. 

Conditions o f 
the system arise 
when ordinary 
foods cease to 
build flesh — 
there is urgent 
need of arrest- 
ing waste — assistance must 
come quickly, from natural 
food source. 

Scott's Emulsion 

is a condensation of the life 
of all foods — it is cod-liver 
oil reinforced, made easy of 
digestion, and almost as 
palatable as fttilk. 

Prepared by S««tt It Bowoe. N V. All drueficla. 



THE COUNTY BOARD. 



the 



by Grand avenue, on the east by Central 
avenue, and the same prolonged to the 
channel of the St. Louis river, on the 
south by the channel of the St. Louis 
river, on the west by .Monroe avenue and 
the same prolonged to the channel of the 
St. Louis river. 

Third precinct: Bounded on the north 
by the south line of sections 35 and 36- 
50-15, on the east by Monroe avenue and 
the same prolonged in a straight line to 
the north to its intersection with the 
south line of section 36-50-15. and also 
following the prolongation ' of Monroe 
avenue to its intersection with the chan- 
nel of St. Louis river, on the west by the 
east line of sections 3, lo and 15-49-15, on 
the south by a straight line beginning at 
the southeast corner of section 
•5-4-9-I5; thence following the 
south boundary line of said section 
i5-4g 15. to the southeast corner thereof; 
thence by a straight line to the west 
boundarv line of Hunter & Markell's 
Grassy Point addition; thence south to 
the channel of the St. Louis river, thence 
following said channel of said St. Louis 
river to the east boundary of said pre- 
cinct as before given. 

Fourth precinct: All of said ward not 
included in the first three precincts above 
described. 

Before the meeting adjourned. Alder- 
man Cox arose and moved that Presi- 
dent Spencer appoint a committee to 
confer with the county commissioners re- 
garding employment lor idle men. That 
rnotion met with favor and Aldermen 
Cox, Sorensen and « >ie were designated 
for the committee. The establishment 
of a woodyard is not improbable. 

— « — 

A BIRTHDAY PARTY. 



Miss Kathleen Moore Entertained Her Friends 
Yesterday Aitcrnoon. 

Ca['t. N. D. Moore's residence was yes- 
terday the scene of much innocent child- 
ish mirth and enjoyment. The occasion 
was the fifth birthday of Miss Kathleen 
Moore. From 3 to 6 o'clock the parlors 
were entirely given up to the enjoyment 
of the little ones, the majority of whom 
attend the kindergarten of Miss Alice 
Butchart, who, with Miss Mamie Mc- 
Ferran, her assistant, did much to add to 
the pleasures of the afternoon. Music 
was furnished bv Hoare s orchestra, and 
a kindergarten drill at the opening was 
pretty in the extreme. The drill being 
over, the children danced until they were 
tired, and after enjoying a dainty supper 
were taken home. 

The children present were: Kathleen 
Moore, Flthel, F^dna and F2dith Scoville, 
Isabel, Rosamund and Marjorie Patrick, 
Myrtle and Gertrude Butchart, Arthur 
Michaud, Agi es and R. Bayard Mc- 
Ferran, Helen Stevenson. .Mildred West, 
Eunice Smith, Frances Frazcr, May Pul- 
ford, Thomas Manley, Mamie, Antoin- 
uette and Herbert d'Aiitreniont. Harry 
and Charlie McEachron. M.iggie Co.xe, 
Nellie Moore, Nal Moore, (r., Fllhcl, 
Gracio and Clyde I' .inner, iJoUieHib- 
bing, Sophie I'aikci, Anna anil Clara 
Freaetick, Carlolt.i and Frantii. Sagar. 
Fred F'.lston, John Taussig, Ada IWirkc. 

Mrs Moore was assisted by Mcsdaincs 
McFa«;hron and Stovillc and by Misses 
Alice Butchart, Kosc Bii'i:naii ;ind 
Mamie, !• lorencc and I'aiker McFciian. 



Dr. Fullcrton Resigns—The Herald Made 
Officai Paper. 
After the election of Camille Poirier as 
chairman yesterday, the board of county 
commissioners proceeded to general 
business. Dr. Fullerton, county physi- 
cian, presented his annual report at the 
bottom of which was his resignation. He 
complained of not having received the 
support of the commissioners. He also 
made some recommendations in refer- 
ence to the office and the care of county 
patients. His resignation was received. 
The Duluth Evening Herald was 
unanimously elected the official paper of 
the county and will print the official 
proceedings, financial statement and tax 
list during the coming year. 

The following committees were named 
by the chairman: 

Highways and bridges—All commis- 
sioners. 

Poor and poor farm— -Miller, Swenson 
ani^ Butchart. 

Court house and jail— Butchart, Swen- 
son and Miller. 

Claims and accounts— Swenson, Butch- 
art and Miller. 

Taxes and assessments— Butchart, 
Miller and Swenson. 

Supplies and purchasing— Miller, Bon- 
bam and Butchart. 

Legislation -Bonham, Miller and 
Butchart. 

A committee of Tower people ap- 
peared and asked the board for aid in 
building a road from Lake Vermilion 
into the Rainy lake region. The com- 
missioners favored the idea but the road 
hind is exhausted now. As soon as the 
funds are available and the proper legal 
proceedings have been taken, an appro- 
priation will probably be made. 

An adjournment until F'riday mornin,; 
was then taken. 

This Morning's Meeting. 

At the meeting this morning a coaruy 
physician was elected. There were 
seven applicants, Drs. Sherwin, G. W. 
Davis, Walker, Bakke, MacKenzie, 
Speier and Krogstad. Upon the first 
ballot Dr. Sherwin received 3 votes and 
Dr. Davis 2 and the former was de- 
clared elected. Assistant physicians, 
they to act also as assistant superintend- 
e;its of the poor, were named as follows: 
At Tower, Dr. J. B, Noble; at Biwabik, 
Dr. French; at Ely, Dr. Shipman: at 
\ irginia, Dr. Brown; at Hiboing, Dr. 
Rood; at West Duluth, Dr. John Pearson. 

Thomas Clark was re-elected superin- 
tendent and P. O. Noben as assistant. 
Their salary remains as it is this year. 
A. Poirier will not continue as superin- 
tendent of the poor farm, Dr. A. F. Rock- 
wcll receiving 4 votes to his i. The lat- 
ter will take charge ot the poor farm on 
March I. Henry Smith was re-elected 
overseer of the county roads and the 
watchmen, janitors and firemen in the 
county buildings were reappointed. 

The committee from the city council, 
consisting of Aldermen Cox, Sorensen 
and Oie, appeared before the board in 
rcLjard to devising some means for giv- 
ing employment to idle men. The mat- 
ter was referred to the committee on 
I)Oor, Coinniissioners .Swenson, Butchart 
and Miller. They were given power to 
act. 

J. W. Marvin appeared before the 
boanl .ind offered his abstract books to 
the county for ;>5oco. No action was 
taken. 

The board adjourned to Jan. 20. 



fords to the needy and unfortunate of 
this city. The feature that commends it 
most 10 my mind is that a small amount 
of money is made to relieve a great 
many wants. ^GU can lely upon me to 
pav <25 the coraiiK' \dar. 1 iiuU I sir.ill 
tcel able later to increase fiat amount." 

A sweuTdinner. 



An Exclusive Social Affair in Colored Circles 
Given Last Evening. 
A very swell banquet, the most exclu- 
sive affair ever given in the colored so- 
cial circle in Duluth, was given last even- 
ing at the home of Mrs. H. . J. Shelton, 
17 East Fourth street, by the Chrysan- 
tfiemum club, composed of five young 
men: W. B, Richardson, president; E. 
A. Banks, vice president; J. Arthur 
Banks, secretary; W. E. (Jassaway, cor- 
responding secretary; H. (.'. Richardson, 
treasurer. The house was profusely 
decorated with chrysanthemums, smilax 
and roses. The guests were received by 
W. B. Richardson and .at <j:3o o'clock sat 
down to the tables. 1 hs toUowing was 
the menu: 

Hlue Point on Hnl( ShoU. 

t'alery. OlivoB. 

Consoinmo ' lenr. 

Boiled (Vilumbia Kiver Salmon. 

Srucp lio!lnndni»o. Prcm cr Potatoes. 

I'ontot t'anot. 

Itoast &lall&r<l Unck. 

Orab Ai>|ilo .Juljy. 

Fried .Sweet I'ot toes. 

(i, II. Munwn's Kxtra Dry. 

Chicken Saliid. Wafers. 

Salted .Xliii'iDds. 

Nonpolituu ('r(>8ni. 

.\86orted Cake. Fruit. 

Croam Clieoso. ( rackors and ( "offee. 

Domino Tass. 

Those present were: Misses Etta 
Mo.xley, Tillie Tolbert, Emma Moxley, 
Arietta and \'iola Berry, of St. Paul, and 
the five members of the club. 



ARE Til COMMONPLACE 



The Annual Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the Spiritual 
and Liberal Research society was held 
last evening in the Hunter block and 
the following ofiicers elected: Mrs. 
Mary L. McGindly, president; J. Brown, 
first vice president; R. C. Mitchell, sec- 
ond vice president; H. C. Boderick, sec- 
retary; J. C. Schafer, treasurer; T. H. 
Story, H. E. Hanson and J. P. Dodge, 
trustees. 

A number of lecturers are to be 
brought here this year. 



And Does the Very Frequency of tha Appear- 
ance of These Statements Blind You 
to the Depth of Their 
Meaning ? 



Does the very frequency of these state- 
ments, casual reader, cause you to pass 
them over as ordinary, commonplace 
matter 1 

Does the very fact that the Copeland 
physicians place before your eyes every 
week new statements from men and 
women well known to you— friends and 
neighbors in your community — cause you 
to regard them as ordinary matter not 
worthy of consideration ? 

Does their form and appearance grow 
so familiar to your eyes, blind you to the 
fact that each one of these statements is 
a chapter of a new life given the story 
of a man or woman saved -the statement 
of a friend or neighbor, despondent 
through sickness and suffering, now so 
joyful over health restored as to be glad 
and anxious that all the world should 
know what has been accomplished ? 

Note carefully the statement given be- 
low showing the effects of catarrh. 



St. Augustine, Fla. 

HOTEL SAN MARCO 

Op>nf .Jan. 9tli. A modern hotel iu a sripi>rh 
location : nerfeot sanitary appoint ni-i.ts; Ii'«' il 
ninnaffeniHiit, roasouablH iiri- Hft. ('HitM<>i<y . j 
MUSIC }{Y THK IMI'hHIAI. MUN(^AHJAN 
OlP.Sif JIAND. Fort«Tuisaad ciTiilnrH. addrpf^' 

l!L,ANCfIAm> i lIAdBK, 
Hole! MarUwruuKli. N. V. 

I F yoii wis] I to drink » choice 
M Glass of Lajrer call for 

Fitger's Beer. 

WholMoniB. Palatablnand NonTlshlne 

DR. L. A. FADLKNER 

King of 
Specialists. 

Troats wurcnssfidly 
all fornii; uf Hlood, 
Nf'tvouH and frinnrj- 
diseases. 1 

NEHVOlISOIcmL. I 
ITY, Willi )iB iiiaiiyj 
Klr>oniy sytiiplomB. 
curod. I 

LO.ST VlTAf.ITV 
iwir/i^ctly au'1 iHTjcii- I 
ueiilly restored. 




LEGAL NOTICES. 




/ kFFICE OF THE WAIilGON IRON COM- 

V/ pany. Duluth. Minn.. Dfcemf)er Sfi, \W6. 
N«>tice ia herehy (irivAii that the acnual meetiuK 
of ihf ttockiiol lor^ol th* VVftbigou Iron Coin 
[•any for ih<? eloction of directors and thntraDt- 
fic'iiiii uf fcuoli oLLi( 1 ';ai;iiii' il a- may bf b'f'nrrbt 
before it. will Ixi holil at (he oHIco of the ctnn- 
naoi. iK»7 i^ycjum boilcjii. ;. i;i the rilv uf iJa- 
Inth. i,nil< of Miuiii »oia, ou Ujc tejjth' Jay o! 
.'aruisry, l^^ltl.Hf two o'riorl; p. m. Thr feu*- 
r I lniok> mil bi» <!..-.,'j ;ji 11,011 on litTfiiiii ■' 
:«tth. is«:;, aD«l reoiHJued ou Janaary 11. 1M*I, i.i 
ten o'cldc;. :t in. ^\". II. FlstTER. 

8©i-y. 



/ iFFJCE OF IHK NIblUA IKO.V^J*!*- 
^ / p.iny, Duluth. M.na.. December l"*, \^t\. 
Notice J8 lierehy givon thnt the .-iiiuual mcctSDtr 
of tlin ^t,o^kholdBrB of the Nihiwa Ironiom- 
p:iny fi>r the ejection <if directors aud the rraht- 
actioii of such other bnsinebfl «(•■ may he hroO»?lif 
before it. uill be lip!d at f lie ollice <.f the ©<.»ni- 
pai)y, 407 Lyconni bijildiiiK. ill ihe city of Do 
liith. t^l^teof Wiiiiof-ota. ou the tenth day of 
.laiiuarv, JMU. at two o clock ;i. ni. The irim*- 
frr biM.k* will l>o cloMed at no u ou I>ec«o»|)«»r 
311th, is;i.t. .aud reoppur-d on .Jamiat-)' II. Ih;«J, at 
tpuo'dock u. til. U'. If. I'isiiEM. 

i»c'y. 



(V 



A MASTERPIECE DESTROYED. 



A Valuable Painting Ruined During Removal in 
St. Louis. 

St. Louis, Jan. 3.— The fact was today 
made public that a >ioo,ooo canvas mas- 
terpiece was wrecked at the Laclede 
building last Saturday afternoon, "Le 
Koi S'Amuse" is the catalogued name of 
the painting, and it is from the brush of 
Jules Arsene Gamier, a Kreiichsnan, who 
did the grandest work of his lili; when he 
executed this. 

The picture was being moved Satur- 
day from the room of the late S. A. Cole 
in the Laclede building. Three men 
were holding the valuable canvas, and 
when it reached the first story it struck 
the lloor. Instead of stopping the ele- 
vator, the boy gave the lever a shove and 
down the lift plunged to the basement. 
There was splitting crash of glass, a 
rending of canvas and"Le Koi S'Amuse" 
was torn to ribbons. 

The painting is the property of a bank- 
er who declines to allow his naaie to l)e 
publi:hed. After being shown in Eng- 
land it was brou£;ht to .America and ex- 
hibited at New Orleans. S. A. Cole, one 
of the best art connoisseurs America ever 
knew. se:ured it for the St. Louis exposi- 
tion, but it was never allowed a place in 
III*; art gallery, being declared improper 
by the comtnittee. 




BLOOD POISON cuPid 
cary. 

DRINAHY DISEASES 
thoroughly. 

CONSULTATION FRKK 



for life without mer 
cured ([uickly and j 



Office Room 4, Over 19 East Superior Street. 



KFICK OK TliK AllMWA lUO.N' (:<).M- 
piiuy, Duliiili AJiti/].. Diceiuber i'.<, Vstfl. 
Notice i.s hereby (,'ivtMi that !tii> suciiial nieetiii(» 
i)f the ft-ockholder.s <if the Aiiiiiw.-i Iron < oni- 
paiiy for t ho election of clireoiori- aud the Iraaj*- 
action of such other hiifiiiejt:^ as may be brciivrtit 
belore it, will be held at the ollice of the witn- 
i-ftny, 407 Lyceum building, iu the city of Du- 
luth, f-tate of Mitiufi-ora. on the teuih day o^ 
.lanuary. 1W4. at two o'clock p.m. The irau.-- 
fir books Will be closed at uoou on l)ecf»»nbB'' 
•J'Mh, Ifpis, atiii reopeued o:i .Jauuarv II, Islil. at 
ten o'clock a. m. W. H, Tt-HKH, 

8ecy. 



A 



()' 



Treaty Ratified. 

Bucharest, Jan. 3— The senate yes- 
terday ratified the Rouooanian-German 
commercial treaty, already ratified by 
the German reichstag, and then adjourned 
until Jan. ix. 



Engaged to Freddy Gebhard. 

Nr.w York, Jan. 3.— A special to the 
Sun from Baltimore says the marriage 
engagement was announced yesterday of 
Miss I-ouiso \\. Morris, one of the society 
belles of llaltimorc, to Frederick Geb- 
hard, of New York. 



Mr. E. G. Smith, a well-known resident 
of West Duluth who lives at 24 Sixth 
avenue west, and is employed by the 
West Duluth Electric company, has 
been treated by the Copeland physicians 
and gives them his hearty endorsement. 
The gentleman says: 

"I suffered frond catarrh of the nose 
and throat, but .it times my whole sys- 
tem seemed tcxbe affected. There was 
a dull heaviness in the front part of my 
head; my eyes were weak and watery. 
The catarrhal inllammation stopped my 
nose HP so 1 couldn't breathe through it. 
Large quantities of mucous would drop 
from the back of my nose and accumu- 
late in the throat and cause incessant 
hawking and spitting; my throat was 
tender and sore and greatly aggra- 
vated by the least use of tobacco. 1 often 
had pains in the small of my back, in 
the chest and in the stomach. While 
ra> appetite was good. I did cot enjoy 
my food as 1 should. I did not rest well 
at night and arose in the morning as 
tired as I had been the night before. I 
had often heard of the Copeland physi- 
sians, but didn't have much laithintheni. 
However, after consulting a friend who 
had been treated by them. I decided to 
see if they could remedy my case, and 
now, after taking a course of treatment, 
feel well and cannot say too much in 
favor of their system of treatment. They 
give the best of services and at rates 
which are decidedly reasonable. 



PINCH OF SALT 

If it ir5 

Diamond 

CRYSTAL SALT 

will go farther than 
two pinches of the 
other kind. Flavors bet- 
ter, too. You'll liiid it pay .s 

in luaiiy ways to u»c 
The salt that's all salt 





Fl'ICK OF TDK WENOXA IRON COM- 

r>aoy, Dulnih, Mum.. December ZV. IVSK'. 
Notice it. her. I.i civeu that the aituuiil tmy.ttinir 
iiftho .KtockJiolden^ of the Wetioua Iron t'oiu- 
p.iuy ffir thi> election <! .lirectort. siud tue trarip- 
ai'iion of ..-uch otlier buriufnt af may l>e broofch'. 
U-loiejt. will be held .-it the olIic<» ot the com 
l-auy. U7 L.\ceiiui buiidiD;.-. iu the city of Du- 
luth, t-t.-ite of .Minuobota. ou the teutli day of 
Januarv, lisPI. ai twoo clock J), m The trans- 
fer IxMik^ will bo closed at noou 0:1 D(<cpmber 
Sttli. HKS. ;uid r<)[,eue»l on jHiiuury II, l(<i<4, at 
ten o'clock u m. W. Ji, Kisjiiii.-, 

Soc'y. 



:*■ 
:*: 

1)^1 ny aavertieingin tne "i; 

i:|H£RALD¥ANTCOLDMNii 



LADIES 

Can Secure Competent Serraots 

Oy Advertising in the 



l?l 






ST. JTaUL « DUl^UTU KAJiiKUAli. 



Will Winter in Florida. 

Wasiiington, Jan. ;,.— I Special to The 
Herald.)— Col. and Mrs, Graves, of Du- 
luth, leave Washington for Florida to- 
morrow, to spend the winter. 



Highest of all In Leavenlnj^f Power. — T..atrsl V. S>. Gov't Report 




Pcmkr 



AB50u/rm:r PURE 



WILL START THE WORK. 

Tower People Will Begin the Building of a 
County Road. 
The construction of a tote road from 
\'ermilion lake to the gold fields near 
Fort Francis is now an assured fact. 
Yesterday afternoon a committee of the 
most prominent citizens of Tower, head- 
ed by Fred ISarrett, appeared before the 
county commissioners, at their regular 
monthly meeting, and presented a peti- 
tion for and submitted a map of the pro- 
posed road, which is to run from the 
most northerly available point on Lake 
\'ermilion to the most southerlv avail- 
able point on Lake La Croix, and which 
will be about twenty to twenty-five miles 
in length. The commissioners, .e and 
all, favored the proposition of the Tow- 
crites, who were also ably seconded in 
their efforts I>y the iran^portation com- 
millcf <>( the lobbctb' union, but they 
were unable to give a formal assent to 
the petition until the legal procedure in 
siirli cases h.id been complied witlu 
However, they gave .is.suraiu e to the pe- 
tilioiierb ih.tt the petition WDuM uiliiuate- 
ly \>c gtaiited, and it wa.s thcr«ui>oii ic 
solved to make a start upon ilic work to- 
morrow. To be legal a county grant to 
build a county road cm only be maile 
after a road petition has been filed, set- 
ting forth the exact starting and terminal 
points of the road, so as to show that it is 
in the county granting the aid. 

Loss Now Being Adjusted. 

In reference to the statements from 
irresponsible sources th.tl the insur.incc 
rompanie« intended lo « ontcst ihe claim 
ol l.cvine IJros. lor their recent loss l)y 
lire, the lirm stales that there is nothing:; 
whatever in this report. As soon as the 
amtuint of the lois is determined, which 
is now in progress in the regular way, 
their rl.-iiins will be settled in full. 

Ihe Bethel's Heod Woth. 

Rev. iJr. S.ilter har received th': Ijl- 
lowing letter from a lawyer in this city, 
which is a gratifying testimonial to the 
good work of the IJethel: "I am im- 
pressed by the great work that is being 
done by the BetHcl, and the relief it at- 



The Most Pleasant Way 

Of preventing the grippe, colds, head- 
aches, and levers is to use the li(|uid 
laxative remcfly Syrup of Figs, when- 
ever the system needs h gentle, yet 
effective cleansing. To be benefited one 
must get the true remedy maiiufactured 
by the California Fig Syrup company 
only. For sale by all druggists in 50c 
and $1 bottles. 



All diseases treated at the uniform rate ol 
$5.00 a month. Remember, this includes 
consultation, examination, treatment and med- 
icine for all diseases and all patients. 




Lv Duluiii 

ArPt. PsnL 

At Minueapolifl... 

A.rBtill water. 

At Chicago 

Ar Miiw&akee 

ArOn.ahH 

At 8t. Lonis 

Ar Kansas Cltr 

Lv for Cloqaot, 
Carlton 



Daily 
Kxcopt 
BnndRy 

FHSt 

Train. 

<£ uu am 
2!«»xtm 
3 10 liiii 
.1 Uj pm 
6 4r> txtsi 
3 HO am 



Limited 
Daily. 



7 30 am 



1 :tOpm 
« aopm 

6 40pn3 

7 10 jiin 
7 00 am 
4 20 am 
J»25pm 
B 10 pm 

4&0pD! 



NtKh) 
Daily. I 

7 15 am < 

7S.5KII) I 

7 ZO piE i 

BSSpin I 
7 10pii) 

10 00».in I 

& BS an ! 

6 auiUD 



9 00 am I 1 55 PIP 



F. B. ROS8. 
Paseeiurei 



Worttaerp Paseeiurer A^tuit, 

-inr Ht.r" 



/ \l MCK OK THE MINCSIN IHON COM- 
^ ' paiiv, Duluth, Minn . December 29. ISW . 
Notice is li-reb • LMveii that tle> anutial mt?elii5;: 
of I he -t^jckholdiTP of the Mino~iu iron (ViU:- 
Iiauy fur the elcrtion of direciors aud the tran.-- 
iicliou ofsucli (Jtlier bii--iiipss a« uiay be bronph' 
befor" it. will b.->h3hl »t tlieoHici- of tliecom- 
pnny, lo7 Lyceum buildiu^-, iu the city of i>u- 
luth. state <»f ^liiiiie^otii, on the tenth day of 
.lanuary, iv.d, at two o'clock p.m. The traai- 
fer bool^s will bo clo.'ied at iioon ou December 
;>ith. Ii-!i:!. atid reoiHJned ou -faniijiry II, l-fll, at 
ton o'clock u. la. W. II. Fisiieb, 

Sec'y. 



VTOTK^E 01 ANND.\L MEETING-THE 
-.^^ .•^ecictiiry of the Duluth <?; Winaipcff Kail- 
road compuny liMviut; oniitt'-d lo give proiip'- 
notice by jiubiicatiou of tlic auiiu.'il uieotiuKof 
i .'lid rai!r.'i(l C4iuipany, wi;"ch ..Minal moetiu;; 
is riiinired by the by-laws of e^aid cotnpiiuy t.^ 
!«• belli on the second Thiirfiday of DeceiulK?r in 
ejich year, now thirnfore. we. t!ie nnderhi^'ued 
ilirectors of wiid railroad coii.j<aiiy. cio hercb;. 
KiV" notice tjiut" the jituiiial meetiiujof <ii. 
i-tockli<ilderi? of the Dniulii A; Wiuui]>eK Kai 
road comi'aiiy to elect dinVt<wi^ for the oumijuk 
yoar .-iiid l.> truneiict all Mtcli o'her bnsiiM'f's at- 
may lawfully bi' triiiih,'ict4:d by mikI conipauy al 
its aiiiiii.il liieetiDi;. will be helil at the oilic* of 
the o<!!iii);iny in the l.ycotitu bii;!:iini,-. in the 
citvof DtUnth, Miniii\Mita. on the twelfth dri. 
■ f .launary. ;s'.t|, ;it Two o'clock ji. ni. 

Date.1 Dec. l^S. IJ-I';!. 

\V. ¥. FiTiii, 
il. .f. /fo.iKO.MA;;. 
J. Hum PKTnBs, 
D'TOctfirs of the Duluth A \Viauii»cg Kailron'i 

Comptuy. 

Dec 2:1 to Jan 12 inc. ■: . 



,^*•*^ 



PUSFJ 



G-O-T-l-G-U-H-Jl 



Eis:lit letters and four syllables. 

Mix them up and you have nothing. 

But pro}")erly arranged they make a 
word familiar to the civilized world 
— a word that stands for all that is 
pure, energetic, and effective in 
medicine. 

Think of it. 

From a small beginning, against 
prejudice and op|X)sition, against 
monied hosts and trade indifference 
ClJ IICI'HA has become the greatest 
curative of its time. 

No power on earth could bar its prog- 
ress because it did its appointed 
work. 

hi every clime and with every people 
it has worked wonder'^. 

Its cures have approached the mir- 
aculous. 

$5,000,000 

Have beeii expended in advertising it. 

But 

$l,(K)0,OiX),0«X) 

Could not purchase the daily com- 
mendations of its grateful frieikls. 

Such praise cannot be purchased. 

This IS the secret of its success — of its 
world-wide popularity — of its won- 
derful sale — of its constant growth. 

It is stamped upon the hearts of the 
owcc (oiiiiri'il, disti^nred, and hu- 
Tiiiliatcd eveiywiieic, never tu be 
effaced while life shall last. 

Such in brief is CUTICURA, the cura- 
live marvel of the age. 

Potter Drug and Chemical Cor- 
PORATIONi Bdston^ U. S. A. - 



Rooms 423, 423 Lyceum Bldg, 



DIt. W. n. COPKLAND, 
DR. U. U. HUNT, 

(Juneulting I'hyHiciauti. 
DK. F. C. DBENNl.Mi. 

Bcsidont Pbyeiician. 

Specialties: Catarrh and diBeasfle of the Kar, 
Nose, Throat and LnuKS, Nervoos Dieeasos, 
Skin Discaaee, Ohronic Discanes. Otilce lionre, 
9 to 11 a. m,, 2 to 4 p. m.. 7 to 8 p. m. ; Stmday, 9 
a. m. to 12 ra. 

If yon live at a distance write for symptom 
blank. 



BROU 



THE OLD RELIABLE CURE 

for the most obstinate cases of (ionorr 
hfpa ana cUeot. No other trfalmpni 
required. Noii-poisonous. NoStrtcttire. 
No Incouvcnlence. Sold by ALL 
drugjflsts. J. Forre, (successor to Drou), 
Pliarmuclen, PAria. 





THb:HERALD 




CURB 



_ A X»W nnil Coniplip(« TreHliui'iit., coHRlfitttis "t 
PTTrrosiTOKIKit, C«vsnlA« of tihiluierrt and iv.; 
Jtr»x«»sof ()lTitm«nt. ATtevnr-fnlMiip cnri* for rf!-><i 
of evwry tmturemulfl.Mrrn. lttDntei«niiopf»rnHr'H 
»Hh Iheltnifo or bij<»<^llon»of rsrtioH.i m i'l. whi'-¥ 
«re rehifiil stid Beliioin » ji'-rn.nnf>nt rurn, pu't r>ft"n 
rPMiltlnu In de«<h, nnii'^ewam v. Why i^iMlur^ 

this territrf* <lt»Mr»«7 W« Kuariiiitf*9. « 
bosen to oure nnv ca««< Voif only pey for 
benefltsreeetved. ft a Ihth. (> fi>r*'>hrm*U. ixunrl'" 

froo. (Juarautoes ir-Httnrf by our ntT'-ut. 

J0H(«SON.S ORIENTAL SOAP. 

The Great Skin < "ure mid Ka-'e lieantilir r. 1 1 
is hixhly medicated, delicately perfumed and 
absolntoly |iure. It cleanser the 6kiu uudecalp, 
tiromotws the growth of the h:iir and i» a Inxnry 
forladieA' and children's bath. .'^. K. HdVtlK, 
DraifgiHt. lUR Sni>orior .street W.. Muhitb. Minn. 



CURE YOURSELF! 




The oiiiy Hie anU reliable nirv lor coNORI{H(EiA , 
CUEET, LEUCOmtHOfA, ami otbcr uiwhn.tr* ' 
iitcitUerMn. A sVMIiy OUroertUeaionobxtintt'^ 



^flHirftoAwo. 



;4ni28iat6. 4MI.C90. 



IS THE BEST 



ADVERTISING MEDIUM 



IN DULUTH. 



IT HAS HELPED OTHERS! 
IT WILL m\X YOIH 

Men with eiUcrpriso and grit in Uieir make-' 
up, make money in such limes as the present. 

Seein^^' that the pani<' h.is jKissed, (hnv wit)^ 
out delay n.s<* every nicart:. lo .idvcriiiic lh<'ir l.ir i 
ness. 

They sell groods while thascared fellows ke'jo 

quipi ynH "Mnr|«M* 'vl,.:f, jl,,- 1;,. ••, , . .|| I , ,,. , , 

The gritty ni:?-! .gst ths ^r-uri^icss— His^ timicl 
ones the blues. 




\ 



■ 



If 



.■-fi i'' 1 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 



ip 



THE DULUTH EVENING HEUALD: WEDNESDAY. .TANUARY 3.1894. 



"(^lUlJf^ 



A 



ami 



1 !'■ 



'li.l I*roi^ross 
Merit. 



Another 



Aldermen and County Commissioners Agree 

on a Plan For Giving Employment 

to Idle Men. 



One! 



liiu'iU .iiui >ta- 

il.i.:-.. Ni>. !. 

;it. itur 



Council Will be Asked to Order Rock Work 

on West Superior and West Sixth 

Streets. 



KEEP 
YOUR 



THE Cin ill cw 



Some Disposition on the Part of the City 

Officers to Forego Their Presence 

is Apparent. 



This 



City 



Engineer Reed Says the City Uses 
Several Thousand Yards of Rock 
Every Year. 



Morning a Demand Was Made 

the Opening up of the Committee 

Room. 



YOUR CHANCE 

MAY 

COME NEXT 

WEDNESDAY 1 



ON 



T !■'. rm.?r.<»l' 40'» Ninth 



\'(- 



X on 



::a>l 



]\Jss Cora Williams, of 
is city, held ticket No. 

251)17, which drew the 

hoi'se and lot. 



WE 

ARE PROFIT 

SHARERS, 



more \vc 

"i! tcsti- 

rc 

DuV 

:'L'rrhr'-tTii'<ini^ al- 

.;■> to 

;c :\\\ and 

' low now. 

; ^, ■• ;;-onvr- 

tra-le i-- heavier at 

at Ibis time in pre- 



;.l t iJ Lt~< I ; IV- - 




1c r 



. Duiujii.AiNN' 



PERSONAL. 



wet 






>.e C.ibh?. of St. Fdul, the 
C. H. Gibbs. traveling^ audit- 
Paul & Dululh railroail, is 
Frank B. Ross. 

': - • L. G. Matthews 



.:ic St. 



xiMvz.. attorney for the 

; railroad, is in the city. 

e of the arbitrators of 

tjire tire case, returned 

.Minneapolis, is vis- 

Anderson. 
litcomb left today 




X- 



, r,ilaand Mary McHugh 
night from St. Paul, where 

■ idays. 
, . - ...,:i£, chief clerk in the 
'.uca army engineer oUicc. left 
' -k. W\„ to spend a noiith at 

:Vh;i:Ti left today for Houghton, 
i . la attendance upon the 

>n, the Virginia sawmill 

..: -.-i: ■. l.ouis. 

. H. Tunlin, a prurnine^nt Milwaukee 

man. is at the St. Louis. 

and Mrs. George Horton have re- 

'rom Minneapolis, where they 

:fl bv the sudden death of Mrs. 

S. A. Jewett, one of the 

^Liv!.^. .,.,it city. His funeral oc- 

-d .Sui.rlay from the First Baptist 



l he council committee and committee 
ot the county commissioners met this 
afternoon and practically agreed upon a 
plan suggested by Alderman Cox to give 
employment to the needy. They will 
meet again tomorrow at lo a. m. and 
draw up conuimnications to send to the 
city council next Monday evening. 

The plan to be recommended is that 
rock work on West Superior street 
between Piedmont avenue east and 
Fourteenth avenue west shall be begun 
and men put at work there breaking 
rock. City Ensjmeer Reei says that the 
city uses from ?ooo to 4000 yards of rock 
evary year and pays Ji.so a yard for it. 
This can just as well be done now as to 
Iniy it from the contractors later. City 
Pidcrs cin be given and if the city can- 
not cash them right away the county 
wiil take them. Work of the same char- 
acter ran also be done on West Sixth 
street between Cascade square and 
Fourteenth avenue west, as the property 
owners desire it. • , • 

Alderman Cox says if this idea is 
carried thfough every idle man can be at 
work in ten days. 

^, 

A GREATiPETITION. 

All St. Louis County to be Canvassed in Oppo- 
sition lo Free Iron Ore. 
The proposed petition, or rather me- 
morial, to the Minnesota delegation at 
Washington, in favor of the retention cf 
the duty upon iron ore was the great 
subject of conversation upon the streets 
and around the hotel corridors today. 
AH day long the gentlemen who have 
the matter in hand have hustled and this 
afternoon's train on the Iron Range road 
took out a small party of workers, who 
will proceed to both ranges to organize a 
working committee in eacn town to se- 
cure the signature of every legal voter in 
that part ot the countv. The iron men, 
the business men, in fact nearly every- 
body interested m St. Louis county is 
aroused and offers of help come from all 
directions irrespective of political be- 
liel. The loUowiiig interview will show 
how the proposed abolition or reduction 
of the duty on iron ore is regarded by a 
life-long Democrat: 

'•When t was South on my recent 
trip, " said A. E. Humphreys today, "I 
met with a good many prominent men, 
included in which number were high 
state officials and congressmen. These 
gentle-nen seemed very much surprised 
at the course taken by our representa- 
tive. Maj. Baldwin. They would ask me 
why we, being in the heart of the largest 
ore producing country in the I'nion, it 
not in the world, wanted free iron ore to 
compete with our own product. I 
answered them one and all that I knew 
that the people of this district did not 
want free ore, and that if Maj. Baldwin 
should vote in favor of free ore that be 
would represent the sentiments of a inere 
handful of his constituents, instead of.lhe 
wishes of the great majority. That 
fully realized that the removal 
duty from iron ore meant to 
tion, not only in our output^ 
number of the mines 



This Was Acceded to and the Faithful 
Gather There and Sv/ap Their 
News. 



Now 



LAKESIDE! 



LAKESIDE LAI CO., 

Wm. C. Sargent, 

Manager. 



507 
FIKST NAT. BANK BLG. 



CITY BRIEFS. 



(1 Mrs. William F. 
.■'.y^. Mr. Filch is 



Fitch 



the 
was 
ob- 
intend 



on a 
e Duluth, South 
the Uuluth & 



of Chicago, is at the 
i. A. Ross, of Virginia, 



wiii in the ci 



Killed Two Moose. 

' 'line in twelve months 

1 rnnvictions in St. Louis 

.! killing of moose 

;..: • says the people ot 

Virginia arc deserving of credit therefor. 

'-,^ ■ ! ' (• Mfv Robinson were 

Lfihal lames Ross to 

sixty days for killing 






1' 



attend. 



.■inril cf the Congre- 

rcbestra of the 

.1 supper and 

: churchi parlors on Friday 

uc.\t. An attractive program 

arranged, and all are invited to 



we 

of the 
us a reduc- 
but in the 

^ that could be 

worked under the present state of things 
at a small profit. I also took care to point 
out to all of them the fact that 
even a reduction in duty v/ould 
bring about a reduced output, reduced 
prices, and as a consequence, a reduc- 
tion in labor, not only in the number ot 
men emploved, but in the wages paid to 
those who could tind work. Any such 
reduction as this would react all over 
the country and be little shore of a na- 
tional calamity. , «• , • 

"This being the status of affairs, I in- 
terested myself in the meeting held 
other day in the city hall. This was 
broken up as you are aware and its 
ject defeated. Now we do not in 
that such an outrage shall occur again. 
To every voter in this county, without 
reference to political affiliations of any 
kind, will be presented for signature a 
memorial to Maj. Baldwin and the other 
Minnesota representatives, setting forth 
tne fact that the majority of the voters ol 
this county are undoubtedly opposed to 
a reduction in the duty on iron ore. This 
will prove conclusively what percentage 
of the voters of this county desire free 
ore and I do not believe that Congress- 
man Baldwin can maintain his present 
stand in the lace of such a denunciation 
from his constituents of the clause in the 
Wilson bill removing the duty from ore 
as th'.s memorial will be. Work on this 
memorial will be commenced im- 
mediately and will be pushed to an early 
completion." 

The Lakeside Annual Meeting. 

The annual meeting of the Lakeside 
1 and company was set for 2 o'clock to- 
day but adjourned until Monday next at 
lo a. m. W. C. Sar^'ent reports a de- 
cided brightening up in the condition ot 
affairs at Lakeside. Several pieres of 
propertv have been sold lately. C. J. 
Hunt has purchased a residence on Lon- 
don road and other sales have been 
made. 



CuUum, Dentist, top floor Palladio. 
Smoke Endion cigar. W. A. Foote &Co. 
Imperial Flour the best in the world. 
Good applications for loans on inside 
property wanted at once. S. M. Chand- 
ler, 404 Palladio bldg. 

Extra copies of the 24-page Christmas 
number of The Herald can be had at The 
Herald counting room. 

Tremont hotel now open. Board, $5 
per week; board and room, $7:50 and 
upwards per week. 

Subscribers of The Herald treceiving 
the beautiful New Year's Carriers' ad- 
dress, "Gems of Thought" from the car- 
rier, and who do not have an opportunity 
to see the carrier personally, may leave 
any little offering they.'see fit to make to 
their respective Herald carriers, at the 
counting room of The Herald, and it will 
be turned over to the proper carrier. 

Take supper and hear the concert at 
Pilgrim church Friday evening. 
We buy mortgages. Crosby Bros. 
Gate City lodge No. 35, Knights of 
Pythias, will meet this evening for the 
first time in the new hall at No. 18 East 
Superior street. The rank of page will 
be conferred and officers for the ensuing 
year will be installed. 

A tea was given this afternoon from 3 
to 5 o'clock by the Ladies' Art guild ot 
St. Paul's Episcopal church at the rec- 
tory. 

The Northwestern Benevolent society 
held its annual meeting yesterday and 
the officers chosen were: J. L. Gardner, 
president; J. P. Johnson, vice president; 
Silas Yates, treasurer; V. D. Cliff, secre- 
tary. 

Professor Custance, the musical di- 
rector of the choir of St. Paul's Episco- 
pal church, entertained the members of 
the choir at dinner at Boyle's Annex last 
night. After the dinner a reception was 
held at the rooms of the Bohemian club 
in the Mcsaba, block, which was largely 
attended and was a fashionable affair. 

The legislative committee of the Job- 
bers union met today to take some action 
upon the Wilson bill. It was decided to 
draw up a set ot resolutions to be pre- 
sented at the next regular meeting, but 
President Patrick preferred not to say 
what they will be. 

The Merchants' hotel has cut rates for 
table board to S5 per week; room and 
board, $8.50. 

Sydney Brown has been enjoined from 
giving violin lessons pending the de- 
cision in tjie case of Ernest Lachmund 
against him. 

Charles Mike has sued the Minnesota 
Iron company for $15,000 for personal 
injuries received while breaking on ore 
cars. 



OVERRULED THE DEMURRER. 



AWARDED HIGHEST HONORS-WORLDS FAIR, 





American Loan and Trust Company Scores 
First Blood in a Big Suit, 
judge Lewis has overruled the de- 
murrer of the defendants in the case of 
American Loan and Trust company vs. 
James S. Billings et al. The demurrer 
was made on the grounds that facts sufifi- 
cient to constitute a cause of action were 
not shown ; that the several causes of ac- 
tion were not properly united; because 
of defect of parties plaintiff and defect of 
parties defendant. The arguments were 
heard on Dec. 23. Judge Lewis in .^s 
memorandum says that whatever diffi- 
culties may arise in the prosecution of 
this action from the fact that all the 
parties interested in said notes have been 
added as parties plaintiff, it is clear that 
advantage cannot be taken of that fact 
by demurrer for the reason that the var- 
ious claims set forth in the complaint do 
not constitute separate causes of action. 
The only other question commanding 
attention. Judge Lewis continues, is the 
revocation of the power of attorney. 
This was one given William McKinley 
by Billings for the benefit of the Ameri- 
can Loan and Trust company and Judge 
Lewis in a long discussion decides that 
the defendant Billings cannot revoke the 
power. 

Judge Lewis also filed an order deny- 
ing the motion for a new trial in the case 
of R. F. Fitzgerald, assignee, vs. John J. 
Murphy. The motion was made by the 
plaintiff. . 

A similar order has be«n entered lu 
Smith vs. Chisholro. 

Other papers filed were: 
Petition order and receipt of awards to 
St. Paul & Duluth railroad in condemna- 
tion proceedings. 

Release of garnishee proceedings in 
the case of Ellston .^c Britls vs. A. E. 
Humphreys and Frank Cox and Security 
bank of Duluth and same vs. same, with 
Marine National bank as garnishee, so 
far as it affects A. E. Humphreys and 
the two banks named. 



The only Pure Cream of Tartar Powder.— No Ammonia; No Alum. 

Used in Millions of Homes— 40 Years the Standard. 



The city hall is not only business head- 
quarters for Duluth but it is headcjuar- 
ters for municipal politics as well. The 
business man goes to the brick building 
at the corner of Superior street and Sec- 
ond avenue east to file a chattel mort- 
gage or defend his cause in a lawsuit. 
The policemen, firemen, contractors and 
laborers go there to draw their monthly 
pay. The citizen who has decided to 
pull down and build larger must go 
there to secure his permit and so on 
through the category. 
GThe citizens and patriots who hold no 
office and who have no city orders to 
cash, also come to the city hall. They 
tell the latest political news in their 
wards; they discuss the actions of the 
administration and offer their various 
panaceas for municipal ills. Words of 
wit, wisdom, foolishness and the local 
current news of the day are all heard 
there. They fall into the capacious ears 
of the omnipresent reporters, are sifted, 
winnowed, arranged, printed and then 
read by the populace. The convenience 
and the good to all from this condition of 
affairs cannot be over estimated. 

Last year the city hall was a paradise 
for this large number of citizens and 
patriots. Thomas Clark was deputy 
building inspector, and each forenoon, 
as regularty as the day rolled around, 
the office was well filled and full and 
free discussions given to events of the 
day and municipal affairs. Those morn- 
ing meetings in time were known as 
"The Gathering of the Clans." Then in 
City Clerk Burke's office, the taxpayers 
and patriots always found a welcome 
and a vacant chair. The health cox- 
missioner's oft^.ce entertained some and 
the goose hung high. 

This year, things have changed some- 
what. The "clans" have so increased in 
membership that there is no room in the 
health commissioner's office and even if 
there was, the loud discussions would 
rattle John Rossiter when he figures out 
the monthly death rate. City Clerk 
Richardson's office is tilled up 
with office furniture, assistant 
clerks and the records of 
the suburban villages absorbed by the 
city. Then, too, there is a good deal of 
clerical work there that is disturbed by 
visitors. The quarters of the board of 
public works are always filled with con- 
tractors, so there has been no room for 
the "clans" there. In the city assessor's 
office the big tables, long columns of 
figures and the many clerks have pre- 
vented the "clans" from gathering there. 
"The building inspector's office has 
been the popular place for meeting. But 
business has been so dull lately that In- 
spector Robinson evidently is afraid that 
the members of the "clans" will carry off 
his furniture in his absence, so he has in- 
stalled a young kinswoman of his as 
deputy and placed in her hands a big 
broomstick, which has driven the pat- 
riots to the cheerless hallways. 

This morning at a meeting presided 
over by Capt. Hibbard, it was decided 
that the council's committee room, next 
to the city assessor's office, would fill a 
long felt want, so a demand was made 
that the door be unlocked for use here- 
after. City Clerk Richardson could not 
see it that way, but when ihe -clans" 
threatened to make his office their head- 
quarters, he thought of the coming elec- 
tion and wilted. 

It i& now expected each morning the 
patriots and "Clansmen" will meet there 
instead of in the offices of the city 
officials. Capt. Hibbard will tell whom 
he thinks would be a good man for the 
next mayor of Duluth and "Delegate" J. 
H. Baker will ask him why he picks out 
none but from the Democratic 
party. Colby Smith will tell 
stories about "When M. J. Davis 
was Mayor." "Uncle" John Green 
will make his regular speech saying that 
he is out of both politics and the lumber 
business. Uncle John Morgan will stop 
in while on his way down to the muni- 
cipal jury. "Uncle" Jimmy O'Neil will 
converse entertainingly in the "far down" 
dialect, while Charles McKay, the finan- 
cial agent, will bustle in and answer in 
good old Gaelic. Capt. J. C Busb, 
the artful dodger for the 
new First ward will tell, under vow of 
secrecy, the latest political move in his 
neighborhood. "Grandpa" A. J. Doug- 
last will smile benignly as he looks over 
the top of Jimmy Smith's morning paper 
and Fred Russell will wear a pre-occu- 
pied look as he thinks bow pleasant a 
job is when warmed by city hall heat. 

Frank Burke, the chiet conspirator, 
will happen along and call out Alder- 
man Cox when he is in the middle ot his 
story about "Cox voters." Nick Young, 
the "fourth wheel of the board of public 
works," will be there and "Pile Driver" 
Holden will abo have a word to say. 
Murdock McLean will puff on that pipe 
of his and slip in a word edge wise oc- 
cassionally. J. W. Preston will kick on 
the low estimates and give the latest 
from the new Seventh ward. "Gov." 
Nesbit will wink and then narrate some 
incident from his varied experiences and 
Herr August Groschau will tell what he 
saw on his tenth trip around the world. 
Billy Lynn and Dick Marvin will not 
stay from these meetings and occasion- 
ally Kmil Applehagen will drop in to tell 
the latest labor news and incidentally to 
wrestle a reporter. 



WE WISH YOU A MOST 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 

AMD IILL EMPHASIZE IT BY OFFERING YOU 

r% c PIANOS f% c 

^ Oat HALF PRICE ^O 

With us this means a GENUINE REDUCTION on 
twenty-five Pianos of One-Half of the rcg-ular retail prices. 

It has been claimed for some time, and we had beg-un 
to think so, that there is but little money at the head of 
the lakes. We now think different. 

Our large Christmas trade proved to us that there is 
lots of money stored away ready to be brought out when 
our people are convinced 'that GENUINE BARGAINS arc 

offered. 

We now propose to give our people the 

CHANCE OF A LIFETIME 

To procure a new STANDARD PIANO at prices barely 
covering- the cost of material and labor. 

S250 Pianos for $125 

8300 Pianos for $150 

$400 Pianos for $200 

S500 Pianos for $250 

8600 Pianos for $300 

We have a host of customers to whom we refer as to 
the quality of instruments sold by us. No "stencir or 
-t?ade" Pianos, only standard, FULLY GUARANTEED 
FOR SIX YEARS by RELIABLE MANUFACTURERS. 
No such bargains have been offered during the past 
twenty years. 

*'One man's loss, another's gain, 
Manufacturers' loss, now your gain." 

Now is, Your Time. 



The Crowds Are IncreasiiiE at 



M 

ii 




f 



GREAT 



INVENTORY 

SALE 

AND IT IS NO WONDER. 



Tie Prices Are SoLow 



Just Think of It ! 

PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 

On all Ladies' and Children's 
Shoes, and they are the best 
in the land. 

^ ^ I PER CENT 
^^3 DISCOUNT 

On all Gents' Underwear. 



Century 
Piano Co. 

OF DULUTH AND WEST SUPERIOR. 

1 1 10 Tower Avenue. West Superior, Wis. 



25 



PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 




1 ri^j nss Sip 



\%^\ 



On DR. Mom 
J2 PILLS 



BfiFOKB AMD i> i -ti USiSa 

■Fav Sa.lo B'" S. V. 



The creot remedy forreryons prostration nnd almervons diseases of 
the eenenui veT.fganB of ellber sei. such as ^e^von8 ^8lrati""'^>if 
liiK or ly™ Manhood, In,potency, Klphtly Emissions.Youthfu fcrrors. 
Me-ital Worry. exoe.^M ve use of Tubnooo or opium . wbicli lea.i to Con- 

ant(»etocuro orretund themoru'v. ^• .Id at If l.OO per b<ix. » Dpxes 



On Ladies' Ypsilanti and 
Lewis Undetwear, 

rhBi PER CENT 

^9 DISCOUNT 

On all White and Black Laces 

PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 

On all Curtains, Portiers and 
Draperies. 




BOVC3© euxid "L/Liajx. 'V/'lrtii. 



THE HEALTH RECORD. 

Death Rate For the Month ol December Was 
12.2 Per Thousand. 

The report of the health department 
ior the month of December is as follows: 
Totalnumber of deathsj5i. Causes- 
Pneumonia, 9; enteritis, 5; phthisis, 5; 
convulsions, 3; entero-colitis, 4; BrighVs 
disease, 3: diphtheria, 3; tuberculosis 
meningitis, 2; accidents and violence, 2; 
capillary bronchitis, 2; heart disease, 2. 
There was i death each from the follow- 
ing causes: Acute peritonitis, peri- 
tonitis from oDstruction. inanition, puer- 
peral hemorrhage, delirium tremens, 
cancer of the stomach, cancer of the 
uteris, cyanosis, scarlet fever, hydro- 
cephaius, chronic brorrhilis. 

Of these 25 were born in Duluth, 13 in 
other states and 13 in foreign countries; 
33 were males and 19 females; 39 were 
single and 12 married. The annual 
death rate per 1000 tor the month was 
12.2. One remarkable feature of the 
moiith was that not a single death was 
from typhoid fever. 

During December there were 113 
births. Sixty-nine were males and 44 
females. There were 2 pairs of twins, 6 
stillborn, 2 illegitimate. 



25 



PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 

On all Silk. Satin, Sateen and 
Mohair Skirts. 



WHEAT STRONGER TODAY. 

The Market Started Weak But Soon Firmed 
Up. 

Tho wheat market was btrou'? and advancing 
today. It opened very weak at 'ic lower than 
yosterdaj's close for May and nomiaally He 
lower fer cash. The market ruled dii-U and 
Blow but very firm, with advancirg tendeaciee, 
and thcra was small tradinsr in cash and fair 
businofs in iJay at tho advance. TJiere was 
consiaerablo iwniiy for Jnly wheat, but noth- 
iuK wasfloue and it closed firm with buyers. 
The market closed firm at » Jc hicher all r.nin.l 
than yesterday, except May No.^ ha>d, which 
was Xc higher. Following were the cl osm? 
prices: 

No. 1 hard, cash, 61ac ; December, eic ; May, 
6l'ic; July. fiO'ic; No. 1 uorthert, cash, (j-jIjc; 
December, 5»?ic; May. 63?»c; July, CS'aic; No. 
2noitheni, cat-It, 57c; No. 3, 52c. Uejrctod, 
46'/3C. On track— No. J Mort hem to arrive. Oic; 
barley, 3l@41c ; rye, 42c N) 2 oats, 27'/4c:No. 3 
•white oat8, 27c. 

Car inspection for throe days— VV tieat. 10/ 
cars; rve, 3; oats, 1; barley, 4. Keceipts— 
Wheat, LV,195 bus; rye, ;99 bua. Sliipmeatti- 
Noue. 

The Chicago Market. 

CniCAGO, Jan. 3.— Close: Wheat, January, 
60:^c; May, C.')'^c; July, e^'ofie". Com, January, 
34?sc; May, 88:'i@i,ic. Oafs: January. I'-Uc; 
May. :»?8C^ Pork, January. i;i2..52^4; M»y, 



0%E. PER' CENT 
d,9 DISCOUNT 

On all Calico Wrappers. 



50 



PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 



The District Court. 

Only Judge Lewis held court this 
morning and he got through quickly. 
Four cases were continued among them 
Ibe two cases of the City of Duluth vs. 
The Spalding liotel company and b. 1 . 
Emerson. m State Bank of Duluth vs. 
VV. P. Strickland et al, judgment was 
rendered for the plaintiff, the defendant 
failing to appear. _ „ , „ 

The case of Miah T. Hulett vs. Han- 
nah Hamilton was taken under advise- 
ment by Judge Moer yesterday. 



$12 !)7' 



Lard, .January. $7.67^ ; May, 17. j:I4. 



Hibs, "Ja:iuary, JB.37W ; Mar, 56.45. 



The Minneapolis Market. 

Minneapolis, Jan. 3.— Wheat opened weak 
at eOi^ic for May and ei'ic for Jnly and later 
advanced to fil'gcfor >l.iyand 62'iic for July. 
Receipt*, 175 cars; shipimMit*, 67 cars, which 
was tDo little to meet tiie demand. No. 1 hard 
sold.TtBl'a'ifc'.ii', No. 1 northern at 60C' H. No- - 
at 5,H(S^59'<.c. Thoclo.'!0 whs: Jannary, r)9c; May, 
61'«c; Julv, 627,c. On track-61-4ic No. 1 hard, 
60'.ic No. 1 nonhern, 5&>ic No. 2. 



Order at Once 

The number of copies of the 
Herald you want. They can 
The Herald counting room. 



Christmas 
he had at 



The Associated Charities would like to 
know of a place where those who have 
no homes could be sent for a night 
or two. Call at the office, 415 Wood- 
bridge building. 



Capt. Lewis for Mayor. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

It is a pleasure to myself and the* 
many hundred voters of the city to have 
such a man as Capt. Ray T. Lewis en- 
dorsed for mayor by the voters of 
growing city. ' It is a pleasure to every 
voter to feel that when he casts his vote 
ho knows that it is for a man that be- 
longs to no ring or any corporation. He 
is a man with a clean record and v.-iU 
stand by the helm of our city govern- 
ment and steer it clear from the rocks 
and shoals of destruction and tiring it . 
through the channel and land it in the | 
harbor of prosperity. He is a man who , 
has the interest of Duluth and the head | 
of the lake at heart. He is not seeking 



The Foreign Markets. 

London. Jan. 3.— Tho Krain markets opeue<l 
this morning irroanlar. At Liver}K>ol wheat was 
'jd lower; American advices cnasiuK depres- 
sion ; corn was tirm but uot active. ' At London 
earftoes of t'aliforuia wheat were unchana;ed ; 
floating; cargoes of wheat and com, no olTor- 
int;.'; wheat on paseapo whs quiet but stiady, 
nnd com steady. At Mark Lane wheat was 
very slow; corn was *irm (or American and 
steady for Danabiaa. Tho French markets 
were quiet. 

New York Brcadstuffs. 
New Yoek. Jan. 3,— Flour: Receipts, S'l.^SS; 
sales, 3025. State and western moderate de- 
mand, easy. Wheat: Receipts. S2.^00 bus: hjik's, 
iil.OOObus; No. 2 red opened weak at >.ic de- 
our ! clineon eesier cables, rallied ^^f'^c with the 
West, and on covcrinj;; firm, quiet. January, 
6r)'4@'/,c; March, e.7^..«t&>; May, 69''8#'-70 5-tGo. 
Corn: Keceipts. 421,6CO bus; sales, IS.i.l'OO bus; 
No. 2, dnl), eteady;4l'.,*i43Vs for No. 2; Janu- 
ary, 41?ic: February, 42V4c: May, 41 3-16^j 'ic. 
Oats: Receipts, <;),2W bus; sales, 6(>.r >:); 
No. 2. armer, q-iiet. February, :HUc; Muy, 
Wa^Soc ; state. 35@ 10c ; Western, 31@40. 



On all Silk and Cashmere 
Tea Gowns. 

0%B. PER CENT 
^9 DISCOUNT 

On Blankets and Comforters. 

CLOAKS 

Selling- now way down. 

DRESS GOODS 

Prices cut less than whole- 
sale cost. 

LINENS 

Selling fast, because prices 
arc low. 



LFREIMDIl 

PROPRIETOR. 



litn^.lTEjr<l^ CTASSTFkj. 

W'^ ANTED, BY BOY 16 YEARS OLD, LIVING 
with parents, work of somekina;viU 
work cheap. Address Q 23. Herald. 



The Mayoralty Contest. 

Geo. W. Stevens, manager Cranberry 

Lumber company rV'oTj 

Henry Uaskios.. ^ .'"!* 

W, E. Richardson *'*;' 

U. A. tiray ??:' 

A. M. Morrison »'v!s 

Robert L. Kncbel ^^^ 

H. VV. Cornell ^-7, 

H. F. Howard , *icj 

H.C. KenoaU \^f 

a. W. (^lark },'»•; 

F.C. Hartley }^ 

W. (iomberst - }»" 

(ioorgeW. Ruck "^ 

J.H. SutpUin liV, 

Scattering **•'- 



Cattle and Hogs. 

U. S. Stock Yards, Chicago, J.in. 3. —Cattle: 
Receipts. 14.000; market steady. Hogs: Ri^- 
coipts, ?1,0.)0; (luality Kood; market active, 
packers and siiipoi-rsbuyinp; prices steady on 
Die* and lij-'ht lots, and nc lower on other 
• j-o.lO<«r,.40; rouRh j)ackuiR. 



the office but the office is seeking the | Brad^^.:^^iight^^^--.^^^j^^^^^ i,eavy>«cki.j5 



iran, a man that will do right between 
man and man, and the latch string will 
always hang on the outside of his door 
That is the kind of a man we want and 
the man we will have. 

A Private Citizen. 

Duluth, Jan. 3. 



Was Not the Coldest. 

The monthly summary tor December 
of Local Forecast Official Kenealy is out 
and those who have hrmlv declared that 
last month was the coldest December 
ever known in Duluth are contounded. 
The mean temper.iture was J i degrees. 
Six times previously it has fallen below 
this. The coldest day was 19 degrees 
belowon the I3lh,and the warmest 4.1 
degrees on the 23rd. Prevailing winds 
were from the north, the total movement 
was 5072 miles and the maximum velo- 
city was ^6 miles on the iSth. The total 
precipitation was 1.91 inches. The num- 
ber of cloudless days was 6. partly cloudy 
II, and cloudy 14. 



and shippinc lots. $.'>.lo«.>.4p; pips. $4.1 Str.i.ar). 
1 Sheep : Receipts, 10,t;'X! ; market unchanged. 

New York Stock Exchange. 

New Yokk. Jau. 3.— Money on call is fla/y at 
ifil^ per cent ; prime mercantile paper, i^i}\ 
per cent. Sterling exchanire firmer with ac- 
tual business m bunkers' bills at J4 S,t' ,fe4.84 
for sixty day bil's. *nd W S;.iJfe4.<S6 for demand: 
pc6te<l rates. $4..s4^. 4.86'4. t;ommerc^al bills, 
Jt8"5(;?4.t<3for sixty days, and $».>4',«^t4.S.) for 
demand. Bar silver. 67 :ic. C«)vernment bonds 
steady ; stat^' bonds dull ; railroad bonds firmer. 
Tiie stock market rifter 11 o'clock showed a little 
more sirength under eoverins of short contracts. 
Trices rnllir.l '.i to 15i from the lowest ot the 
morning. At noon the market was dull. 



S. GELHAAR 

DULUTH'S 

PRACTICAL FURRIER, 

Makes and repairs all kinda 
of FDR GARMENTS. Sealskin Sacqnes re- 
dyed and r©-fllt»d on the premises. PLUSH 
COAT8 STEAMED. 

209-21' WEST SUPERIOR ST. 




Estcihliihi'il 7'**7. 



$8.00-BEST SET OF TEETH 



To Use the Seigniorage. 

Washington, Jan. 3.— Chairman 
Bland, of the house coinage committee, 
has introduced a bill to make the seig- 
niorage silver in the treasury imme- 
diately avjiilablc by issuing certilicates 
against it, and then coining the silver as 
rapidly as possible. 

■ ■ 

Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 





P&laless Dendsl 

_ _ Top Floor. 

1 ft T .T . A -n TQ jaxjTUjyrttat. 



OK UOUtUtUOLD 
AND 

OTHKB QOODB 
At aoe West Miehioan titreet. 

DULUTH FEED & STORAGE CO., 

D. ▲. DUNLAP, lUDacv. 




i 




i 





The 
days. [ 

We Will Sell 

Twenty-live Solid 
();ik Sccrctarv Book 
Cases, like Ibis cut 
for 

$6.50 



Kach, worth $12. 



TWENTY MORE. 

Same Style with bevelled plate mirror for 








Worth $13.50. 



TEN nORE 



Substantial Plain Book Cases, adjustable Shelves, for 



^-4.50 



i 



Worth $6,50. 

The above are from the BANKRUPT HUDSON FUR- 
NITURE COMPANY. No other firm in town has had 
g-uods from this compan}- and we can prove it. 



Our Easy 
Payment Plan 

Commands the respect and atten- 
tion of all. It enables people in 
every circumstance of life to com- 
pletely, comfortably furnish a home, 
and pay for the furnishings in 
small weekly or montly remittances 
which are no drain upon their 
finances, and leads to the posses- 
sion and enjoyment of comforts 
they would not otherwise obtain. 

FilB, SQUARE AND EQUITABLE. 

rw^tf/r wif t ^y ny lyt i^ r jy y : 



Smith, 
Farwell & 
Steele Co., 

COMPLETE HOUSE FURNISHERS, 

222, 224, 22G and 228 West 
Superior Street, 



> 



DULUTH, MINN. > 

jMnpT inngrinp " mmiir ' mi t w tw ^w ^jp" ^yT!3p hj f ^> y Tr » | ir'' w p M yn '^ j j i i y mm. ^yjM y s^p ^m 



OFFICE SUPPLIES, 

BLANK BOOKS, 

LETTER FILES, 



WE HWlfi KVKRYTHINtt AT PRICES TO 
SUIT THK TIMES. 



New Year's Cards, 

See Our Display. 

♦ 

CMmberlam & Taylor's Bookstore, 

323 West Superior Street. 



Look Out for Auction Sale 
Early in January ! 

Parties having goods to include in catalogue, send me word 
at very earliest. 

W. D. GORDON, Auctioneer, 

Office, 324 West Superior street. Duluth. 



MENDENHALL & HOOPES, /Employers Liability, 

District Mmuioem, I Elevatof Accident, 

imiM (jiantee k AccWent Co. workmen's collective, 

(LIMITED). /Surety Bonds, 

OF LONDON. ENG. I Individual Accident 

03R.a-A.NI!ZlC2D 1800. \ 



. Any Persons who buy an arti- 
cle in FURS before they visit our 
house must consider that they 
are cheating themselves. 

R. KROJANKER. 



EVERYTHINQ 
IN FURS. 



^f"^^ 




Holiday Gifts. 



j yi:;!vi;A|lt ("o' 



Black Bear and Seal Muffs, 
Ladies' and Gentlemen's Seal 
Caps, just the thing for this kind 
of weather. If we have not got 
caRYKB©E:ffKi». what you want we will order it|for 

you. We will furnish a seal Jacket or Cape at the wholesale 

price in New York, 



GATE 6c CLARKE, 

333 West Superior Street. 



Again the Republicans in the House Fili- 
bustered and the Tariff Debate Was 
Further Delayed. 



Whenever the Yeas and Nays Were Called 

They Sat Mute and No Quorum 

Voted. 



Mr. Boutelle Vainly Tried to Gel Considera- 
tion of His Resolution in Regard to 
Hawaii. 



Wa.shington, Jan. 4.— There were 

signs of activity upon the floor of the 
house even before the hour of meeting 
today. The whips had been at work and 
Ike Hill, the deputy sergeant-at-arms, 
reported that a quorum of Democrats 
were in town. There was some doubt in 
the legislative mind as to the status cf 
Mr. Bcutelle's Hawaiian resolution, and 
it was not clear whether it was still the 
pending question before the house or 
whether the motion to take it up had 
lapsed with adjournment yesterday. 

The question was soon brought to a 
test, for immediately after the reading 
and correction of the journal Mr. Mc- 
Millin, representing the element de- 
sirous of takmg up the tariff bill, de- 
manded the regular order. This speaker 
directed the call ot committees for re- 
ports, holding that Mr. Boutelle's reso- 
lution had Ispsed with yesterday's ad- 
journment. Air. Boutellfc sought to re- 
new it and tbe speaker promised to 
recognize him after the call. 

This formality over, Mr. Boutelle 
called up his resolution declaring against 
intervention in Hawaii and Mr. McMil- 
lin raised the c|uestijn of consideration, 
desiring to take up the tariff bill. Tbe 
speaker put the question and on a stand- 
ing vote the house declined to take up 
Mr. Boutelle's resolution. The vote 
stood 58 in the affirmative and 128 in the 
negative. The yeas and nays were then 
ordered. 

Here was the opportunity of the Re- 
publicans to test the strength of their ad- 
versaries, and, following up yesterday's 
tactics, they sat mute. The result was 
that the vote on considering Mr. Bou- 
telle's resolution stood yeas none, nays 
150— no quorum, and at Mr. McMillin's 
request a call of the house was ordered. 
The call showed the presence of 229 
members and again the yeas and nays 
were called on Mr. Boutelle's motion to 
consider his resolution. 

The roll call resulted: Yeas, 4; nays, 
I so; again no quorum, but the point was 
now made and the house^t 1:40, at Mr. 
Wilson's instance, aojourned. 

The Senate. 

Washington, Jan. 4.— A resolution 
calling on the secretary of the treasury 
for a statement of the sums paid to Mr. 
Clount as commissioner to Hawaii and 
the orders and law under which such 
paymert was made was offered in the 
senate by Mr. Hoar and, on objection by 
Mr. Gorman, it went over without action. 

Mr. Gray gave no:ice that on Tuesday 
next be would move to proceed to the 
consideration of the house bill to repeal 
the federal election laws and that he 
would ask to have its consideration con- 
tinued until a conclusion shall be 
reached. At i p. ra. the senate went 
into executive session. Ati:iothe sen- 
ate adjourned till Monday next. 

Killed in a Caboose. 

RocHESTKR, N. Y., Jan. 4.— D. J. 
Cushman and William Morrill were in- 
stantly killed and George Keifer was 
badly hurt in an accident on the Buffalo, 
Rochester & Pittsburg road at Warsaw 
this morning. The men were presum- 
ably asleep in a caboose, which with ten 
cars, broke away from a freight train at 
Rock Cilen and ran down hill to the 
Warsaw yards, there colliding with an 
engine which was just pulling out with 
a freight train. 



A Salesman's Suicide. 
Fort Scott, Kas., Jan. 4.— J. A. Shee- 
han, traveling salesman for the imple- 
ment house of Buford & George, of Kan- 
sas city, went to the home of his parents 
at Arcadia, Crawford county, at 2 o'clock 
yesterday morning and went directly to 
an outbuilding and hanged himself by a 
strap from one of his traveling satchels. 
He was 28 years of age and went home 
ostensibly to visit his parents. Dissipa- 
tion is given as the cause. 

— * . 

Cutting Down Expenses. 
St. Paul, Jan. 4. — A sensation was 
created in railroad and legal circles yes- 
terday bv the news that Cyrus Welhn^'- 
ton, A. R. Wilkinson and Judgp Camp- 
bell, in the legal department of the 
Great Northern, and Col. Crooks, the 
right-of-way agent, have been removed 
in the interest of economy. 



A Republican Named. 

St. Pail, Jz.n. 4.— Shortly after 3 
o'clock yesterday afternoon Governor 
Nelson announced that he had appointed 
Charles B. Elliott as judge of the district 
court of Hennepin county. Judge El- 
liott is at present fudge of the municipal 
court, and is a Republican. Andrew 
Holt was appointed Elliott's successor 

Could Not Stand Reproof. 

Ci'MHEKi.ANiJ, Md., Jan. 4. — Because 
his sweetheart reproved him for coming 
slightly under the influence of drink last 
night, young Arthur Bopn, brother of 
ex-Councilman John Bopp, of this city, 
sent a bullet through his brain this 
morning. He died instantly. No other 
cause than a few words of reproof from 
the girl he loved can be found for the 
act. 

Ocean Steamships. 

New York — Arrived: Egyptian Mon- 
arch, Loudon.* Sailed: Neustria, Malaga 
and Marseilles; New York, Southamp- 
ton; Germanic, Liverpool; Rbynland, 
Antwerp. Arrived out: Dubblcdam, 
Rotterdam; Aller, Southampton; Isfend, 
Copenhagen. Sailed for New York: 
Wieland, Havre; Amsterdam, Rotter- 
dam; Spree, Southampton. 

New York — Arrived: Trave, Bremen. 



The Supreme Court Issued a Restraining 
Order Against Freeborn. 

Toi'KKA, Kan., Jan. 4.— Hostilities 
were begun anew in the Lewelling-Lease 
embroglio this morning, the governor 
having persisted in Mrs. Lease's re- 
moval, regardless of the statute which 
states plainly that he has not the power 
to do so. 

All efforts toward effecting a cooipro- 
mise'h.ive been discontinued and papers, 
which have been ready since Monday, 
were filed in the supreme court this 
morning in the caseof Mrs. Lease against 
J. W. Freeborn, her would-be successor. 

The court issued a restraining order, 
forbidding Freeborn from acting or at- 
tempting to act as a member of the 
hoard and from interfering in any way 
with Mrs. Lease acting as a member of 
the board or in depriving her of any of 
the rights ot the oifice. 

Governor Lewelling said to a United 
Press reporter this morning that he was 
no longer a party to the case and that it 
now remained for the courts to deter- 
mine whether Freeborn or Mrs. Lease 
was entitled to the office. He ventured 
the opinion, however, that the injunction 
granted would not hold but qualified the 
assertion by saying: "There is no tell- 
ing, however, what the court will do." 

PLUMS FROM THE WHITE HOUSE. 



Several Postmasters in Kiinnesota and Wis- 
. consin Named Today. 

Washington, Jan. 4.— [Special to The 
Herald )— William Zwack was today ap- 
pointed postmaster at Brock way, Stearns 
county, Minn., vice Lawrence Schamnik, 
resigned. 

Owing to the absence from the city of 
Representative Tawnev, the delegation 
has been unable to hold a meeting to 
consider Maj. Baldwin's bill for extend- 
ing the Duluth customs district. 

The president today sent to the senate 
the following nominations: John W. 
Ross, commissioner of the district of 
Columbia; TuUy Brown, United States 
attorney for the middle district of Ten- 
nessee. Postmasters: Wisconsin — H. 
G. Ellsworth, Barron; N. H. Biddlecora, 
Minekawanee; Fred Myers, Prentice. 
Minnesota— Arthur J. Flynn, Caledonia, 

— ■ • _ 

A VERY ROTTEN CONCERN. 



It Had Two Secretaries and Each Absconded 
With the Funds. 

Chicago, Jan. 4. — Gross mismanage- 
ment and fraud in the affairs of the First 
National Building association are 
charged in a circuit court bill filed by 
James Tobin, Louis Pardee and other 
stockholders. 

Since the association was incorpor- 
ate. i, two ye.ars ago, they say it has had 
two secretaries who, it is charged, have 
absconded with the contents of the cash 
drawer. During the same time only 
three loans were made. A receiver is 
asked for who will wind up the affairs 
and save the stockholders from further 
loss. 



This Conpoa counta for one vote if eent 
to The Herald o.<fioa previoiu to Jau. 6. 



My choice ^or Mayor 
at the ensuing spring 
election is 



Signature. 
JaDaary.4. 



To Repress Anarchism. 
Madrid. Jan. 4.— The United Press 
corresponpent has this statement from 
an official source: The bill that has been 
prepared to repress anarchism defines 
what public demonstrations and what 
public incitations to crime are punish- 
able; what private acts are constriied as 
conspiracy; and what is included in the 
crimes of printing seditious documents, 
purchasing, making or concealing explo- 
sives and aiding and abetting anarchists. 
The bill fixes the graduation of the pen- 
alties for criminal acts thus defined and 
specifies a summary method of proceed- 
ing against prisoners of the peculiar 
class at which the law will be aimed. 



People Are Suffering. 
Lansing, Mich., Jan. 4. — Governor 
Rich has received a letter from Iron 
Mountain, which reports a pitiable con- 
dition of affairs. Many people in the 
county are suffering tor the want of cloth- 
ing and food, and it is feared some will 
sta.rve if something is not done soon. 
Dickinson county so far has received 
little help from the state. All the con- 
tributions were sent to Gogebic county. 
As the latter county is now temporarily 
provided for, the governor urges that 
something be done at once for Iron 
Mountain. 

Arrested for Embe2zling. 

San Francisco, Jan. 4, — WiflLim 
Fremont Perry, past niaste. of the Oak- 
land Live Oak lodge. Free Masons, and 
secretary of the Masonic Widows and 
Orphans' Home association was arrested 
here yesterday charged with embezzle- 
ment of $500, sent to him for the associa- 
tion and never accounted for. It is al- 
leged that his defalcations will amount 
to about $6000. 

Died From Paresis. 
Burlington, N. J., J>n. 4.— William 
J. Bruce died yesterday After a lingering 
illness of several mo <hs. The direct 
cause of death was paresis. Mr. Bruce 
had filled many prominent public posi- 
tions and was also a prominent news- 
paper writer, his witticism being quoted 
throughout the country under the caption 
of -Bruce's Salad." 



Blizzard in England. 
London, Jan. 4.— A blizzard prevails 
a^post everywhere in England. In Lon- 
don this evening the mercury stands at 
24 degrees and shows no signs of rising. 



Delegates to the National Board Will Meet 
in Annual Session at Washington on 
Jan. 23. 



Thirty-eight Subjects Have Been Outlined 

for Discussion, Being Proposed by 

Commercial Organizations. 



Will be in Session Three Days, and its Rec- 
ommendations Will be R<»ported to 
Congress. 



Washington, Jan. 4.— The national 
board of trade, composed of delegates 
trom various commercial organizations 
of the country, will meet in twenty-fourth 
annual session in Washington on Jan. 
23. The sessions of this body are devoted 
to discussions of matters relating to the 
financial, commercial and transportation 
systems of the country, with a view to in- 
fluencing the action of congress 
thereon by communicating to it the 
recommendations of the board. On the 
program for the coming meeting are 
thirty-eight subjects for di.scussioi-:, pro- 
posed by various organizations, recom- 
mending the following legislation, or 
other action upon the projects and topics 
named: 

By the New York board of trade and 
transportation — A bill authorizing the 
registration and protection of trade 
marks; commercia.1 relations with fteigh- 
boring countries upon broad and com- 
prehensive principles of reciprocity; <he 
tonnage bill; a national monetary com- 
mission; that third and fourth classes of 
mail matter be consolidated at eight 
cents a pound; a system of navigating 
naval reserves. 

By the St. Louis builders and mer- 
chants exchanges — The Torrey bank- 
ruptcy bill; stimulation of commerce and 
trade with foreign countries; repeal of 
the interstate commerce law. The 
wholesale associated grocers of .St. Louis, 
on the other hand, recommend the more 
thorough enforcement of the law and 
amendments thereto. 

By the Philadelphia board of trade — 
The Torrey bankruptcy bill; an executive 
department of commerce and manufac- 
ture; no income tax; revision of the bank- 
ing and currency laws; permanent es- 
tablishment of the national banking sys- 
tem and retention of the state bank tax; 
no radical changes in the tariff laws; 
sale cf g2oo,ooo,oco bonds to protect the 
treasury gold reserve. 

By the Philadelphia grocers and im- 
porters' exchange — No state bank circu- 
lation; construction of a canal to con- 
nect the Chesapeake, Delaware and 
Raritan bays. 

By the Cincinnati chamber of com- 
merce — A national bankrupt law; 
amendments to the interstate commerce 
act'that will relieve American railways 
of the competition of companies not sub- 
ject to its operations; approve the inter- 
state commerce law; a national clearing 
house; amendment to national bank act 
for prompt punishment of violation of its 
provisions; forfeiture of unearned land 
grants. 

By the Chicago board of trade — Strict- 
er immigration laws and better enforce- 
ment of those now in existence; to pro- 
tect the public and railroads from train 
robbery; to better enforce the interstate 
commerce law; prompt action upon the 
tariff bill; to issue par value of national 
bank currency for bonds deposited; to 
sell 250,000,000 fifty year 4 per cent 
bonds for redemption of currency notes. 

By Boston Merchants' association — 
The reform of the consular service. 

By the Cleveland chamber of com- 
merce — Uniform classification of freight; 
expert monetary commission. 

By the Toledo produce exchange — No 
state banks of issue. 

By the Portland (Ore.) chamber of 
commerce— Government aid for the con- 
struction of the Nicaragua canal. 

By the Trenton board of trade — The 
survey of a deep-draught ship canal be- 
tween New York and Philadelphia. 

By the Wilmington (Del.) board of 
trade — Improvement of the Delaware 
and Christina rivers. 

By the Pittsburg coal exchange — Im- 
provement of the Monogahcia river. 

The national board will be in session 
three days, and its recommendations 
will be reported to congress by a com- 
mittee appointed for that purpose. 



JACKSON BETS ON CORBETT. 



He Believes ths American Champion Will Best 
Mitchell. 

Canton, Ohio, Jan. 4, — Peter Jackson, 
who is here, says his money will go on 
Corbett if the bout with Mitchell comes 
off, of which he thinks there is much 
doubt. Jackson says the modern style of 
fighting is to hit arid run away or dodge 
and then hit, and was too much for Sulli- 
van in his fight with Corbett, because 
Corbett was too quick for Sullivan. 

When asked whether he did not con- 
sider Corbett a much better man now 
than when he met him in San Francisco, 
he promptly said: "Yes, Corbett has 
doubtless improved in swiftness, science 
and strength. Still I am anxious to 
meet him, but I can't say that I can whip 
him, but I can say the country wdl know 
that there has been a fight,' 



Probably a Murder. 
Birmingham, Ala,, Jan. 4. — The young 
sister of George Farrar, a boy of 14. 
found his dead body in the woods near 
Greenville today, with a shot gun wound 
in the breast. Irby McCarlhen, another 
boy, is in jail for the murder. The two 
were seen fighting about a gftn on 
Christmas day. McCarthen says he did 
the shooting, but claims self-defense. 

A Railway Attached. 
New York, Jan. 4.— An attachment 
for $3000 has been obtained against the 
Prescott & Arizona Central Railway 
company of Arizona in favor of the re- 
ceivers of the Madison Square bank for 
unpaid interest due on Jan. i on $100,000 
of the bonds of that company, which 
were held by the bank when it failed. 



i 



Jacksonville, Fla., Jan. 4.— After 
consultation with their attorneys this 
morning the officers of the Duval Ath- 
letic club gave orders for placing 150 
men at work on the arena in East Jack- 
sonville. This is in addition to the pre- 
sent force, The club's lawyers say that 
the city ordinance protects the club and 
that nobody can stop it now. Clubmen 
and pugilists all agree that the fight is 
a dead sure thing. 

Mitchell's manager wired the Duval 
club froni St. Augustine today that the 
Englishrhan would do nothing in viola- 
tion of law. He added, however, that 
his man would be on hand at the time 
and place fixed by the club. Mitchell 
read in today's paper that Corbett bad 
signed the amended agreement, but as 
the signature read "James J. Corbett, per 
W. A. B." it didn't please him. He told 
Thompson that he feared chicanery. 

Manager Bowden demands that Cor- 
bett put his personal si.^nature to the 
articles. When this is done, he wants to 
scrutinize all four copies of the articles 
to see that the thing is done oroperly or 
to his satisfaction. The club feels very 
sanguine today that the contest will 
come oft". Its attorneys advised the man- 
ager this morning to go right ahead with 
the construction of the arena. 

This advice will be acted upon, though 
the arena will not be so costly nor so 
comfortable as it would have been had 
there been absolute certainty that the 
fight would not be interfered with. 

IT WAS NOT ENDORSED. 



TIsMeotorySiile! 

{ Qalol 






Kansas Federation of Labor Did Not Approve 
the Tramp Circular. 

Toi'EKA, Kan , Jan. 4. — H, M. Ives, of 
Topeka, the retiring president of the 
state federation of labor, returned to- 
day from Leavenworth, where he at- 
tended all the meetings of the federa- 
tion this week. He says a press associa- 
tion sent out the information that the 
federation indorsed Lewelling's tramp 
circular in the resolutions. This, he 
says, is a mistake, for the circular was 
not mentioned in the convention. 

The governor or some of his adherents 
sent over a big roll of the circulars to be 
distributed at the convention, but they 
came a long way from meeting the ap- 
proval of the delegates. Governor Lew- 
elling was himself scored in the resolu- 
tions. The governor had .several Popu- 
lists present to look after his interests, 
but they could not accomplish the de- 
sired result. 

A FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT. 



Ono Man Killed and Three Dying in West Vir* 
ginia. 

Fairmount, W. Va., Jan. 4. — There 
was a frightful accident at the mines of 
the Monogahela Coal and Coke com- 
pany, five miles from here yesterday 
afternoon, caused by a train of four 
loaded cars breaking loose from the toil 
rope on the inclined entry and running 
back where the miners were at work. 

Robert Ritter was crushed against the 

wall and died in a few hours. Fenni- 

more Anderson was frightfully cut about 

the head and had his skull fractured. 
Frank Gallagher had his left arm crushed 
off and sustained other severe injuries. 
Both Gallagher and Anderson are ex- 
pected to die. 

- ' ■ # 

WAS SHOT IN THE CHEST. 



A Young Man Fatally Wounded While Defend- 
ing His Father. 
Berea, Ohio, Jan. 4. — Between 1 1 and 
12 o'clock last night four men accosted 
Webb Miller the night watchman, and 
seized him. Miller attempted to tear 

himself from the hands of the strangers, 
who iuformed him that their intentions 
were to loot the town with the watch- 
man's assistance. 

He finally got hold of his revolver and 
ordered the robbers t,o throw up their 
hands. The latter began shooting. 
Miller's son, Edward, attracted by ttie 
shooting came'to the rescue of his father 
and was shot through the left chest, re- 
ceiving a fatal wound. The robbers es- 
caped. 

— ■ - • 

THEIR LIBERTY WAS SHORT. 



Prisoners Escaped From a West Virginia Jail 
But Were Recaptured. 
Cumberland, Md., Jan. 4. — A special 
to the Evening Times says: The jail of 
Mineral countj', W. Va., at Keidcr, was 
broken by five prisoners late yesterday 

evening, all of whom made good their 
escape. Among them was William 
Rhine, a crazy man who tried to wreck 
a West Virginia Central railway train a 
few days ago and afterwards tried to 
swallow a red hot poker. 

The men made their escape by sawing 
the lock of the main jail door in the ab- 
sence of the jailor. Four of the five, in- 
cluding Rhine, were recaptured after a 
struggle late last night, but a notorious 
thief is still at large. 

Greenhalge Inaugurated. 

Boston, Mass., Jan. 4.— Frederick 
Thomas Greenhalge was inaugurated 
governor of the commonwealth at noon 
today before the memliers of the legisla- 
ture, in joint convention, and a large 
number of citizens of both sections filled 
the gallery of'the house of representa- 
tives. 

Beaten to a Jelly. 

Chicago, Jan, 4.— J, B. Aldrich, a 
butcher on West Harrison street, was 
assaulted and robbed of $600 in the rear 
of his store last night. The assault was 
committed by two men who used sharp 
instruments. Mr. Aldrich's head was 
almost beaten to a jelly and he will die. 



Baron Crewe Dead. 
London, Jan. 4. — Baron Crewe died 
last night from influenza at his residence, 
Crewe hall, Crewe, county of Chester. He 
was born in 1S12. 



Pensions Granted. ' 
Washington, Jan, 4.— The following 
pensions were granted today: Minneso- 
ta—George M. House, St. Paul; Lewis 
M. Story, Minneapolis; Catharine John- 
son, Gotha. Wisconsin— William Zim- 
merman, National Military home. 




Now Going OD at tlie 

Gte icl[ Store 

Is making things lively at the emporium 
of daily bargains. 



A 





t 



is being made in this house to clean our 
stocks up previous to inventory and our 
buyers going East next month. 



THE 

FOLLOWING 

PRICES 

Are but a sample of the hundreds of gi- 
gantic bargains we are giving this week. 



TriiBied Hats. 



200 Ladies' and Children's Trimmed 
Hats, formerly sold for $3 00, §3.50, 
?4.25 and $c.oo each, see our window 
display. We give you your pick for 



$L00 

Embroideries. 



Each. 



We have put on sale a lot of Ham- 
burg Embroideries from 4 to 24 
inches wide and worth from 25c to 
75c per yard. All go at 



I5c 



Per Yard. 



See our window display. 



Ladies' and Gliildren's 
Wool Hose. 

All odd lots put in one big pile, 
formerly sold for 25c to 50c. All go 



at 



i9c 



Per Pair. 



RemnaDts RemnaDts 

All Renmants of Dress Goods and 
Silks of every description go at 
exactly 

HAI.F PRICE. 

Don't miss the Bargains in our Linen 
department just now. 

Table Linens, 
Damask Towels, 
Muslins and Sbeetings, 
Are Selling Very Cheap. 



Do Yon Know 



That Blankets are being sold regard- 
less of their actual worth to reduce 
our stock which is too heavy? 



Shoes aod Robbers 

Are going fast. It is tbe ridiculously 
low prices which we are quoting 
that makes us busy in this depart- 
ment. 

TRADE HERE. 



SKATE SALE. 

Friday and Saturday we will close 
out our entire stock of Skates in- 
cluding all our regular Si.oo, $1.25, 
$1.50 and $1.75 Skates. Your 
choice of any pair in the house for 

50c. 

Scissor and Shear Sale 

All our regular 50c, 60c and 65c 
Shears and Scissors for Friday aiid 
Saturday only 



Every pair warranted. 



25c, 



All our re^lar q5c, (1.00, $1.25 
Shears and Scissors for Friday ana 
Saturday only 



Every pair warranted. 



50c, 





\ 



1 

1 





-, , . I 



V 



,1 



ii 



I t 



Governor Peck, of Wisconsin, Placed Him- 
self Squarely Against the American 
Protective Association. 



He Thinks it Should be and Will be Con- 
demned by Every True American 
Citizen. 



Those Most Zealous in This Movement Were 

Active in Pushing the Obnoxious 

Bennett Law, 




MiLWAi'KEE, ]an. 4.— Governor Peck 
has placed himself squarely upon record 
as denouncing the American Protective 
association. The editor ot the Catholic 
Citizen of this city recently wrote to the 
governor to learn his views upon the ob- 
jects of the association and the methods 
it Is employing to advance its interests. 
Governor Peck's reply is as follows: 

Editor Catholic Citizen.— Dear Sir: 
Your letter asking for my opinion of the 
organization known as the Aroerican|Pro- 
tective association is received. The or- 
ganization is one which ought to be and 
will be condemned by every true Ameri- 
can citizen. So far from representing 
true Americanism, the doctrines of the 
organization are thoroughly un-Ameri- 
can and if the association [s successful 
in its aims, will strike a deep blow at the 
liberties of our country. Any organiza- 
tion which would deprive men of citizen- 
ship for conscience sake must be con- 
demned as outrageous m its effect and 
dangerous to the welfare of the country. 

"This association appears to be a re- 
vival of the old Know Nothing move- 
ment, by which years ago a few fanatics 
soiight to annoy and subvert the liberties 
oC their fellow citizens. Among those 
who are most zealous in fostering and 
promoting this new movement are many 
who were active in pushing the obnox- 
ious Bennett law. The attacks of the 
organization are now directed against 
oae class of religious people. Should 
they prove successful, it would not be 
long before others would feel the weight 
of their power. That such an organiza- 
tion can succeed is impossible, its ob- 
jects are so thoroughly antagonistic to 
that high sense of justice which liei deep 
in every American heart that, as soon as 
they are thoroughly known, it will be 
driven out of existence. The people of 
the country will show their disapproval 
^it in as emphatic a manner as they 
ild their distaste to the principles of 
tte Bennett law. Yours very truly, 

George W. Peck. 



HEAVY FIRE AT TOLEDO. 





Two Elevators and the Chamber of Commerce 
Block Burned. 

Toledo, Ohio, Jan. 4— This city was 
visited by a very severe fire last night. 
It started in Quale's elevator at Water 
and Madison streets on the water front, 
and spread rapidly. The total loss is 
about $850,000, with $700,000 insurance. 

The principal losses are: On the 
Quale elevator, $120,000, insurance about 
$«^,ooo: on the chamber of commerce, 
$200,000. insurance about $100,000; on the 
King elevator, $80,000, wholly insured; 
on the King block, $80,000, wholly in- 
sured; on the Hartford block, $75,000; 
insurance $25,000; Toledo Street Railway 
company, S3000. The minor losses will 
aggregate $100,000, the insurance on 
which cannot be learned. 

Julian Odell, a hoseman in Company 
6. was run over by his cart and so badly 
injured that he cannot recover. 

... m 

Ordered to the Cameroont. 

Berlin, Jan. 4.— The German cruiser 
Hawk, which is now at Cape Xft*?. bas 
been ordered to the Cameroons to aid the 
Hyaene and the German land forces in 

Suarding against further trouble. The 
ispatch of the Hawk to West Africa is 
more a matter of precaution than a ne- 
cessity, no fear being entertained by the 
German officials in the Cameroons of 
further trouble with the natives. 



A Sudden Death. 
London, Jan. 4.— Baron Soloyns, min- 
ister of Belgium to Great Britain died 
suddenly yesterday. He had held the 
post nearly twenty-one years, having 
been appointed Feb. 21, 1873. 




HON. Z. AVERY, 

Out or TNI Laaoiar coNTRftCTeRS *iie WnnM' 
CMS la NeaR««R*. 

HEART DISEASE 30 YEARS. 

Gbaiid ISLAicD, Nn., April 8tb, 1391 
Dr. MOm M«d*eal Co., Elkhart, lnUL 

OnTLntix : I had been troubled with MEMir 




ic roR TMC LART 30 vt«R«, »i>d although I 

e*lc<l by able phyiicians and tried many 
let. I grew BtesdUy worse until i wIir com- 



BiRtaa. 

was trealc 
rem«dieR, „ 

PLCTELV rRORTRaTCOaWDCONriNepTO ••▼■««» 
VITMOUT ANT MOM Of RCCotcNV- I WOUia DaTO 

very t>ad bIbk ^^. ■ »« ■» a^lDK spells, when 

aUoieether.^^*' ■• *" *^and it was with 
the greattf t dlfBculty that my circulation coukl 

EiiTHOUSANDSS 

tk to consclooRneM again. While In this condi- 
tion I tried your New Hkart Cure, and f*«*° 
to improve from the first, and now I am able to ao 
a lood day'a work for a man 68 y^ars of age. I give 
D»i WiLM- New McART Cure all the 

n for mT recoverr. It Is 



Chicago, Jan. 4.— Shortly after noon 
yesterday George Washington, a negro, 
took Mary Hayes, a 12-yearold girl, into 
an outhouse near Forty-sixth street and 
attempted to assault her. The girl re- 
sisted and after a severe struggle suc- 
ceeded in escaping. She immediately 
informed an officer, who. alter a tierce 
tight, arrested the negro. 

The arrest was witnessed by 150 
people, who had learned the girl's story, 
and who demanded that the prisoner be 
given up to them. The officer refused 
and sent for a patrol wagon. After the 
wagon arrived the crowd made another 
attempt to secure the prisoner. Some 
held the horses' heads while others tried 
to climb into the wagon. 

They were finally driven off. however, 
and the prisoner taken to the Fiftieth 
street station. He remained there but a 
short time, however. The officers, fear- 
ing an attack on the station, sent him to 
the Hyde Park station. 

TO PROTECT PENSIONERS. 



Mr. Martin's Bill Which He Will Press For Con- 
sideration. 

WASHiNtJToN. Jan. 4.— Although the 
first section of Representative Martin's 
bill, declaring a pension once granted to 
be a vested right, has become a law by 
incorporation in the urgent deficiency 
bill recently passed by congress, the 
author of the bill does not intend to 
abandon the other sections of the meas- 
ure, as originally introduced by him. 

He believes that their enactment into 
law is necessary to fully protect the pen- 
sioner in his rights. These additional 
sections declare it to be the right of any 
pensioner or a person who is an appli- 
cant for one, either in person or by at- 
torney, to inspect every paper filed in 
the course of adjudicating the claim, and 
to be informed of the name of any per- 
son who may have given a statement of 
evidence in relation to such claim. 

It is also provided that any appeal 
from the action of the commissioner of 
pensions, upon any question affecting the 
right of applicant for relief, shall be de- 
cided within ninety days; and that froni 
the final decision of the secretary or as- 
sistant secretary of the interior, an ap- 
peal may be taken to the supreme court 
of the District of Columbia. • 

Mr. Martin will ask the committee on 
invalid pensions, of which he is chair- 
man, to make a new bill of these sec- 
tions of the original bill, and order a fav- 
orable report thereon to the house. 

ONLY THE MULES KILLED. 



Nanow Escape of Eight Colored Men From 
Instanl Death. 

Nashville, Tenn., Jan. 4— While 
workmen were engaged in undermining 
the wall of the old Wisdom block at 
Chattanooga yesterday, the wall fell and 
eight colored men were caught under 
the debris. The solid line of masonry 
was 150 feet long, thirty-eight feet high 
and four bricks in thickness. 

How any of the men escaped death is 
a miracle, but fortunately none were 
killed. Levon Smith, Jack Mayfield and 
Jov Henry were severely hurt. The 
other five escaped "'ith slight injuries. 
A train of mules standing in the space 
between the wall and adjoining building 
were killed. 

TORTURED BY ROBBERS. 



An Old Couple Robbed and the Woman Died 
From Injuries. 
Lima, O., Jan. 4.— The home of Samuel 
Follansbee and wife, three miles west of 
Lima, was visited by seven masked men 
at an early hour yesterday morning. The 
robbers tortured the old man in a ter- 
rible manner, burning his feet in the at- 
tempt to extort information from him as 
to where his cash was. The old lady 
was so badly handled by the ruffians 
that she died yesterday afternoon. One 
thousand dollars was secured. The rob- 
bers bound the old people securely and 
left them in a pitiable condition. 

PETITION FOR k PARDON. 



a«a°U 'formj reCbVerr . It is over kIx months slncfl 
1 have taken any, although I keep a bottle In the 
Eouae Jn caae I ahould need It. f have *l«o,u«2 



gnatt 

Sold on a PoaltiT* Oiu»rmnt4Be. 

On. MILES' PILLS. 60 Doses 26 Cts 

worn sAiiTiiY all druoqistb. 



Govornor Peck's Clemency to be Invoked for 
a Murderess. 

Richland Center, Wis., Jan. 4.— 
Governor Peck will be asked to pardon 
Rose Zoldoske, the pretty milliner who 
is serving a life term in the penitentiary 
at Waupun fop' the murder of Ella 
Maley, a young lady of this city. 

The formal application to the govern- 
or will be made on Tuesday, Jan. 23, by 
L. H. Bancroft, the Richland Center at- 
torney, who, assisted by ex-Assistant At- 
tornev General Chynoweth, defended 
the young woman at the trial, and who 
subsetjuently carried the case to the su- 
preme court. The application for a 
pardon will be supported by a petition 
signed by several hundred citizens of 
this county. 

The Massachusetts Legislature. 

Boston, Jan. 4.— The legislature con- 
vened yesterday. Governor Russell ad- 
ministered the oath of office to the sena- 
tors and representatives-elect. Senator 
W. M. Butter (Rep.), of New Bedford, 
was unanimously elected president of 
the senate. The house reorganized by 
electing the Republican caucus nomi- 
nees, including George Meyer, of Boston 
tor speaker. 

An Unfounded Repoit. 
Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 4.— The report 
telegraphed from here that an athletic 
club was organized here with a paid up 
capital of $40,000 and would make a bid 
for the Corbett-Mitchell contest in the 
event of the pugilists being prevented 
from appearing in Florida, proves on in- 
vestigation to be without foundation. So 
far as can be learned no club here has 
made an offer for the fight. 

Robbed tho Mails. 

Caldwell, Kan., Jan. 4.— Walter 
Donaldson, assistant postmaster at Cald- 
well, has disappeared with several regis- 
tered packages. A partial exrimi nation 
developed a shortage of $1400. Post- 
master Ball had been sick and Donald- 
son practically had full control of the 
office. 

Will Meet in May. 
Harrisuukg. Pa„ Jan. 4 —The Re- 
publican state committee yesterday de- 
cided to hold the next state convention 
which will nominate candidates for gov- 
ernor, lieutenant governor, auditor gen- 
eral, secretary of internal affairs and two 
congressmen-at-large, in Harrisburg on 
Wednesday, May 23. 

Sixty cents a month will have The 
Herald delivered every oigbt at your 
home. 



The Lowest Prices Recorded for Iron and 

Steel in the History of the 

Trade. 



Offers Have Been Made for the Coming 

Year on Ores Lower Than Ever 

Before. 



More Done in Steel Rails Than Has Been 

Made Public and the Pro.^pects 

Better. 



Cleveland, Jan. 4. — The Iron Trade 
Review today says: "The close ot 1893 
recorded the lowest prices for iron and 
steel in the history ot the trade. There 
has been a disposition to think that the 
coming of l8g4 would arrest the down- 
ward tendency, but evidences are to the 
contrary. It is known that on ores offers 
have been made for the coming year 
lower than were touched in 1893 on 
standard grades; in pig iron the opening 
of the year brings a report of an offer by 
a Northern furnace using Lake Superior 
ores, to sell for deliveries running into 
the spring at a figure not touched by 
December transactions. 

"Two or three instances do not make 
a market, but they indic?te a tendency; 
and the indications are that producers in 
all lines are preparing for a turthei cam- 
paign in low prices. The study of cost 
is the most serious business producers 
have on hand today.and while every buyer 
may be satisfied that what is raw ma- 
terial to him has touched a level that 
leaves the maker without profit, he knows 
that with greater reductions in labor cost 
the market may be still further de- 
pressed, and that, with foreign competi- 
tion added to that at home, the ten- 
dency must be farther downward. It is 
evident that a period cannot yet be put 
to the decline in rolling mill products. 
As tt) immediately future demand in any 
department of the market, the week has 
brought no positive development. 

"In steel rails there is reason to believe 
that more has been done than has be- 
come public, and some good-sized con- 
tracts are looked for in January. The 
recent receiverships may even help the 
rail mills." 

Bank Sa'e Robbed. 
Dixon, 111., J.an. 4.— The private bank 
of Conrad Durkes at Franklin Grove, 
five miles cast of here, was invaded 
by burglars Tuesday night. When the 
bank officials entered the building yes- 
terday they found the safe blown open 
and the place wrecked. Between $20,000 
and $35,000 was stolen by the burglars, 
who left no clue. The bank building is 
in the center of the town, and the ex- 
plosion awakened a number of people 
who thought it was shooting by belated 
New Year's observers. 



Awarded Damages. 
St. Paul, Jan. 4. — Master in Chancery 
Townley has decided that John J. 
Rhodes, manager of the Minnesota coal 
bureau, suffered $3500 damages by the 
seizure of the books of the coal combine, 
and judgment in default was entered 
against the members of the legislative 
committee. 

- - — e 

A Minneapolis Failure. 
Minneapolis, Jan. 4.— Yesterdjiy af- 
ternoon the Children's Endowment asso- 
ciation assigned to L. C. Lane. The of- 
ficers of the association are: H. K. 
Pratt, president; J. H. French, secretary, 
and Dr. F. A. Dunsmore, treasurer. 
There is a membership of 4000. 

Two Miners Killed. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 4. — Two miners 
named Peter Leavitz and John Zinga, 
both Polanders, were killed in the twin 
shaft at Pittson last night by a fall of 
coal and rock. They were engaged at 
the time in propping an unsafe roof in 
one of the lower lifts in the shafts. 

Opera House Burned. 

Shell City. Mo.. Jan. 4.— At i o'clock 
this morning fire destroyed the opera 
house block. Seven business houses 
were burned and the loss will probably 
reach $30,000, with very little insurance. 

^ • 

Anarchist Arrested. 
Paris, Jan. 4. — An anarchist named 
Tame Court was arrested at Argenteuil 
today. The police seized at his lodging 
an incriminating letter from London. 



^V^upffios 




Both the method and results ^hen 
Syrup of Figs is taken; it is pleasant 
and refreshing to the taste, and acts 

Esntly yet promptly on the Kidneys, 
iver and Bowels, cleanses the sys- 
tem effectually, dispels colds, head- 
aches and fevers and cures bahitual 
constipation. Syrup of Figs is the 
only remedy of its kind ever pro- 
duced, pleasing to the taste and ac- 
ceptable to the Btomach, prompt in 
its action and truly beneficial m its 
effects, prepared only from the most 
healthy and agreeable substances, its 
many excellent qualities commend it 
to all and have made it the most 
popular remedy known. 

oyrup of Figs is for sale in 60c 
and $1 bottles by all leading drug- 
gi8t& Any reliable druggist who 
may not have it on. hand will pro- 
cure it promptly for any one who 
wishes to try It. Do not accept any 
substitute. 

CALIFORNIA Fie SYRUP CO. 

8»N FRACICISCO. CML. 
WVWIIU. ICr NEW rORK. tt.v. 



SUPERIOR MEDICAL INSTITUTE 

IAIN OFFICES, NEW YORK BLOCK, CORNER lOWER AVENUE AND FOUETEEKTB STREET, WEST SOPEtiOR, WIS. 

SPECIALISTS IN 

NERVOUS AND PRIVATE DISEASES OF MEN AND WOMEN. 



UoDatoral Discliarges Stopped PermaneDtly. 

Uuuatnrnl diecban;o8 are not earned nocessarily by 
eelf-abnse. Any othi r Irritation • f aezunl orfraae often 
tbe cnuse— driukerti auil auy who have iudalxod iu 
oarly ezcoisoB, gpeoially liable. 



TO ALL VICTIMS OP SELF-ABUSE : A New Method ! A cure whicL 
ttiousandrt have tried and obtaia immediata relief. Iu effects arc aimply 
astonndiDg in all tbeso easee. You can bo curod ! Lc-t tho BDceeaaful f pecial- 
ist talte hold of yonr casn at ouco. Kemomb<>r this fact. Yon liava a dipoaee, 
if taken in time and treated according to our now method, i^raud resnlts arc 
8uro to follow ; bnt you have a dlaeaae, if neglected or loft ta iteelf, has 
driron bo many of its victimB to the ioaane aaylam— yes, even to tbe gtavo ! 



All IrregQlarities of tbe Saoal Power Treated 

Saccessfally. 

Intense sexual desire un atoral -some irritation of 
the nerrons nyst^m always at fanl-,. LOCATE THE 
CAUStS and it is no Iroublo to I)R1VE OUT THE 
DISEASE. 



THE SUPERIOR MEDICAL INSTITUTE, 



Tower Avenue and Fourteenth St., 
West Superior, Wis. 



Same Offices Formerly Occupied 
by Dr. Speer Sl Co. 



WANT MORTON REMOVED. 



New Hampshire State Grange Opposes the 
Secretary of Agriculture. 

Washingto.n, Jan. 4.— The Post says: 
It is not often that a president is called 
upon to remove one of his cabinet of- 
ficers, but Mr, Cleveland has that ex- 
perience. 

A couple of weeks ago tbe State 
Grange of New Hampshire, coroprismg 
over 100 subordmate granges in good 
condition, passed a resolution asking the 
president to remove .Secretary Morton, 
because he had been a failure in his 
high office and his relt:ntion was an in- 
sult to the intelligence of the great agri- 
cultural industry ot the country. 

More than this, the grange sent a copy 
ot the resolutions down to Washington 
with a request to the New Hampsnire 
congressional delegation to present them 
to the president, and yesterday this was 
done. 

THE RIOTS IN SICILY. 



A Mob Stones a Town Hall and Explodes Two 
Petards. 

Rome, Tan. 4 — An anti tax mob stoned 

the doois and windows of the town hall 
in the city of Tiapani, Sicily, last even- 
ing. Police dispersed the rioters. 
Later in the evening two petards were 
exploded in the grounds of Senator 
Giuseppe D'AIis houst iiiTrapani. They 
did only slight damages. Accounts of 
the riot in Gibellina vary somewhat. A 
dispatch just received says that a priest 
named Casapinta and a police magis- 
trate were killed by the mob that snot 
down the usurer. 



Swore He Was Drunk. 

Chicago, Jan 4. — Yesterday at the Ta- 
coma building, four witnesses were ex- 
amined before Court Commissioner 
Wade in connection with the Madison 
Democrat libel suit. The defendant 
paper charged Chief of Police Adamson, 
of Madison, with drunkenness and there- 
by allowing a prisoner to escape. It is 
said Adamson was drunk while taking a 
14-year-old boy prisoner from Chicago to 
Madison Nov. 8, 1891, and that while in 
this state the boy escaped at Desplaines. 
Wis. Witnesses swore that they were 
on the road and that Adamson was 
drunk. 

To Prevent a Lynching. 
West Union, Ohio. Jan. 4.— The 
negroes of Wayne and Winchester town- 
ships are up in arms to prevent the pos- 
sible lynching of Murderer Parker. Ben 
Lloyd, a resident of Winchester, has 
been to Red Oak, a small settlement 
across the Brown county line, and while 
there freely expressed his opinion against 
Parker. On his way home he was am- 
bushed by a party of negroes who opened 
a murderous fire on him. He escaped 
unharmed and made his way home. 



Griflo's Stock High. 
Chicago, Jan. 4.— Young Griflfo, con- 
ceded to be tbe champion featherweight 
pugilist of Australia, last night met 
Solly Smith in a six-round "go" at the 
Tivoli theater and came off with flying 
colors. Tha general opinion now is that 
Griffo is all that he claims to be, and 
that his chances to whip Dixon or any 
man of bis class are of the best. 



A New York Philanthropist. 

New York, Jan. 4.— It has developed 
that J. Pierpont Morgan is the philan- 
thropist who has donated a large sum of 
money to Nathan Stras' new charitv, the 
grocery store where articles of food may 
be purchased cheaply by the poor. The 
amount is understood to be $50,000. The 
man who makes this generous gift never 
speaks of his gifts to the poor, but it is 
thought his charities foot up fully $100,- 
000 annually. 

Four Men Injured. 

St. Louis, Jan. 4.— A scaffolding at the 
new Union station fell at 2 o'clock yes- 
terday afternoon. Six men were work- 
ing upon it and all were precipitated to 
the ground, a distance of 30 feet. Four 
men were injured as follows: Thomas 
Victor, 20 years old, badly injured; 
George Shaw, aged 25, ankles injured; 
Adolph Miller, 42 years of age, foot 
mashed and bruised: William Redpatb, 
injured internally. 

To Extend Oklahoma. 

Washington, Jan. 4.— Representative 
McRae, of Arkansas, has prepared a bill 
looking to the addition to Oklahoma be- 
fore its admission as a slate, of the lands 
(icrupied by the Cherokee, Creek. Semi- 
nole, Choctaw and Chickasaw nations. 

Rheumatism originates in the morbid 
condition of the blood. Hood's Sarsa- 
parilla cures rheumatism. Get only 
Hood's. 24 



Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 

■ • ^ ■ — 

Have You Any Work? 
Are there any families in Duluth who 
would like a man to do odd work around 
the house, such as taking care of the 
fires, carpenter work, etc., by the week or 
month? If so, the Associated Charities 
would be glad to supply their need. 
There are several men who have been 
ill, and are out of work, who would be 
greatly helped in this way. Please send 
word to 415 Woodbridge building. 

Gus Swendst^n, 106 First street, carries 
a complete stock of fre>h roasted coflfic, 
roasted every day at the Eagle Coffee 
and Spice mills. * 




r^TTnn td a nm?Q ^^^^ moving 

O U X XVXi. ± JllO FOR THE WINTER. 



OFFICE: 
206 West SniJeiior St. 



Trnnks to Adj Part of City, 25 Cents. 




TEUNKS and 
TRAVELING 
BAGS. 



vil made in Duluth. 



if you wautone ClK'ap call at 
219 W. SupcriurSt. 



"DON'T PUT OFF TILL TOMORROW THE DU- 
TIES OF TODAY." BUY A CAKE OF 





1^0>''X°^J? 



The only c^rs, bxlto anfl 
reliable Fcnale PILIi 
ever oileTed to Ladies, 
especially rccoznznend^ 
1 cd to married I<adIos. 

A8k for DB. MOTT'S PSjraTTBOTATf 7?TLt.B and take no ether. 

iFsend for circular. Price ^l.OO per fox, fl boxes for^s.OO. 

13R. MOTT'S CIIEIMICAI^ CO., - eiovdand, Ohio. 



PENNYR 





For Sale by S. F. Boyce and Max "Wirth. 




An even mouthful of 
CLIMAX PLUG gives 
more satisfaction than 



a bulging mouthful 
of any other kind,— 
for the reason that 



Climax Plug is miicli the best. 




LOST MANHOOD RESTORED. 

" SPANISH NEItVE GRAINS*' the wonderful remedy issclil 
with a written giiar.ititee to cure all nervous di.'C.".scs such .•« Week Mem- 
ory, Lossof Brain I'o-.vcr.Lost Manhood, Nightly Emissions, Evil Dreams 
Lack of Confidence, Nervousness, Lassitude, all drains and loss of power 
of the Generative Organs in either set caused by over exertion, youihf i;l 




1. .\.Nn AiTER i;si;vG. 



for ^i^ 



; pock 



65.1 WJtJi CTerr'JS order rs gjre a written guarantee to cure or refund tlie 
ey. Circular J: leu. Address SPANISH KI2TE CSAIK CO. Kew Vcri. 



For Stie la DolDtli b; li! VIRTH, Droggist 13 West Superior Street 




MANHOOD RESTORED 



BLiOKE 

Sold 



Nerve seeds.** 

This wonderff.l i-emedy 

TaarAnteed to cure .ill 

nervimsdiseasof.fiJch n.s Weak Memory, Lo.>^.s of Br:iln Powcr.Heud- 

uc-he. 'Wak.erultieii*, I.o»t Munhoorf- MKhtiyKnilssloiis. Quickness, 

livii I.rt'ani.-*. I.aok «r CtHiBtlencc, Nervoannei*". uil dniliisand loss 

of !>ow<'rln Gnrf rntlvnOi-vaiis «.! ♦'itlier sex cau.-ed by overexertion, 

?ronthrul errors, excos^ive use of tobacco, opium or iitlniulanls '■. hlcli 
i-:.d to liiflruiity, Cotuutni'tlon oiid Insuiiiiy. Convenient to carry ii. 
i vcot poclcev. Ilv niaiipreii.'xi'i In pl.aln (-ix to any a<1<irP!«9 for «1 eac.i, 
' iir«iorrf«». (\Vitii every W5 or«lcr we ntve written Buarontee to 
fHrc't-rrefnnil ifia monpy.) Sold hy nil dnipplstK. As!; for it find »ecep» 
11(1 othor AVrlte fur froi. Wedlral Boot sent soaled In jjlain wrapper 
AM> AJTKa IS'Nti. AUdrcss JVr.KVK SF.EU CO.. Masonic Tenple, Cklcacv. IU. 

in Duluth, Minn., by S. F. BOYCE and by MAX WIRTH, Druggists. 



SAVED FROM A LIVING GRAVE. WEAK MEN CURED 



THE ELIXIR OF YOUTH 





?mn^ ODly by THE GERMAN HOSPITAL REMEDY CO. 

GRAND RAPIDS. MICH 



W« Lave on file sworn t»ti- 
moniftls with onr dri.«Ki8t agente 
the uainos of those ctircd by tliif 
Kreat remedy, or address with 
stamp, and wo will send theip to 
yon. Wo gnamntee this elixir to 
cnre Spermatorrliea, or Nervous 
Oebility, Loes of Power, Night 
Emiseions, and all Seminal weak- 
ness of any natnre, arising from 
disease, over-iudtilgonce or abuse 
of any kind. It. elTocts poody and 
> peniiaiieut cnres in old and 
yonng of either »«x, renews 
sf rengtij and restores the viiiror of 
yonlh. making life worth living. 
»uUl by all leading draggistn. $1 
i>er bottlM. Mix botUea for fi 



■V^OTICEQF MORTGAGE 8ALE.- 

Whereas, default has been made in tbe condi- 
tions of a certain purchase money mort^&ge, 
which waf duly exocuted and delivered by Ed- 
waul ('. MoMinn, mortgagor, to Martin L. Mc- 
Miuu. m( rtgagee, bearing date theeightli i'<tL) 
day of (Jctobor, A. D. 1SS2, and witli a power of 
sale therein contained, duly recorded iu the 
ottice of the register of deeds iu aod for tbe 
coocty of 8t. Lo'ii*, and state of Minnesota, 
on the twelfth (12th) day of October, A. D. It^i, 
at three o'clock and twenty minutes p. m. in 
book 92 of morttfageK, on page 139, which said 
mortgage wae thereafter duly a^bigued and 
tranfcferred for a valuable consideration by tho 
said Martin L. McMiun to S. H. Heywood, by 
an instrumeut of assignment, dated October 
19th. Ibdi, and duly recorded in the oDice of tbe 
register of deeds in and for said 8t Lotii« 
C'onnty on November 9th, 1892, at S o'clock a. 
m., in book 97 of mortgages, on page 319 ; tnch 
default cunsisting in the non-payment of one 
of the promibFory »jotes thereby secured, due 
one year after the date of paid riifirtgaise. for 
the sum of two hundred dollars, togt-tlier with 
interest for one year ou the whole pnucipal sum 
secured by said mortirage at the rate of eicht 
per cent per annum, amounting to the further 
bUm of SfJ.t.O; and whereas there is therefore 
claimed tt> be due, and there is actually due at 
the date cf this n<«t:ce, upon eaid mortgage 
debt the sum of two hundred thirty-five and 
55-100 (S2;v).a5] dollars, principal, and interest 
and tweuty-nve dollars attorney's fees, stipu- 
lated for in said moi tgage in case of foreclosure ; 
and whereas no action or proceeding at law 
or otherwise lia.« been iDstitoted to recover the 
debt secured by said mortgage, or any part 
thereof : 

Now therefore, notice is hereby given that by 
virtue oi thohaid power of sale contained in said 
mortgage which has become ot>erative by reason 
of the default above mentioned, and pursuant 
t'>the statute in such case made and pro- 
vided, tiic said mortgace will be foreclosed by 
a s.ilo of tlie promises described in and covered 
by said mortgage, viz. : All those tracts or 
parcels of land Ijing and being in tho county of 
St. Louis ai.d ttato of Minnesota, described as 
follows, to-wit : Lot6 numbered one 1 1 1 and two 
fi). in block Foventeen (17), in Carlton Place 
.\dJition to Duluth, according to tbe recorded 
plat then of; wliicli said prernisos, with the her- 
iiditanients and appiirt<Mi>iuce8. will be sold at 
public auction to the highest bidder for caeh, to 
pay said debt and interest, and the taxes (if 
any; on said preiuiites and twenty-five (Tli) dol- 
lars attorney's fees. a<< stipulated in and by said 
mortgage in ca^e of foreclosure, and the dis- 
bur^emeniB allowed by law.by the sheriff of said 
St. Louis ("ouuty.at the front door of the court 
house.in the city of Uulutli, in said county and 
state, on the tenth (10th) day of Ff bruary. A, D. 
1834,at tendOi o'clock a. m., of that day, sub- 
ject to redemption at any time witbin one year 
irom tho day of sile, as provided by law. 

Dated December 2Mh, A. D. 18P.S. 

S. H. Ueywood, 
Assignee of Mortgagee. 
Feancis W. Sullivan, 

Attorne.v for Ast-igno^, 

Dec 2S Jan 4-11-1^-2.5 Feb 1. 



SHEEIPFS SALE OF REAL FSTATE 
UNDER JUDGMENT OF FOKECLOSURE. 
STATE OF MINNESOTA, t 
CouNTK OF St. Louis. J 
District Court, Eleventh Judicial Di^tiict. 
Benjamin F. Howard, doing") 
business as the Howard | 
Lumber Company. 

Plaintiff, | 
vs. I 

Albert E. Qninn and James y 
Pierce, copartner.* as A. K. j 
Quinn and Co., Mitchell W. I 
McDonald and Wagenstein | 
and BaiUie, 

Defendants. J 
Notice is hereby given that under and by vir- 
tue of a judgment and decree entered in the 
above entitled action on the 15th d«iy of Novem- 
ber. 1&93. a certified transcript of which has been 
delivered to me, I, the undersigned, sheriff of 
said St. Louis CoDnty,will sell at public auction 
to the highest bidder f«ir cash, on Saturday, the 
loth day of February. 1S94, at 10 o'clock in the 
forenoon at the frontdoor of the court bouse in 
the city of Dulutb, in saidoiunty. in one parcel, 
< he premises and real eetate described in said 
judgment and decree, to-wit: All that tract or 
parcel of land lying and being in the county of 
St. Louis and state of Miimcsota, described as 
follows, to-wit : 

Lot numbered fifteen (1.5), in block numbere<l 
seventy-two (Tl), in the Endiou Division of Du- 
lull), agcordiiig to the recorded plat thereof, on 
tile in the office of the register of deeds, for said 
county. 

Pacl Suaevt, 
Sheriff of St. Louis County. 
By II. R. Abmstbono. 
Deputy. 
Dat<-d December 2Sth. 1S93. 

TlNKKAM & TiNKIIAM, 

Plaintiff's Attorneys. 

Dec-28-Jan-4-ll-18 2.5-Feb-l-8. 



►Ke. 



VVTranted ** 
to cure 





iie Celebrated French 

APHROOITIHE 

Is Sold on a 

POSITIVE 

GUARANTEE 

to cure SBV form of 

nervous disease or 

Buydlsordcrof the 

generative organs 

of either se.-t,^ 

whether arlsiuf 
r, ,- r „ n i. from the excessive ' 
GEfCRE ufe of stimulants, AFTER 
Tohirco or Opium, orthrough youthful Indiscre- 
loii over ludal-'enefc, &c.,Buch as Loss of Brain 
Power, Wnkf fulness, r.eaiiuir down Paius in the 
bae'f, Seminal Weakness, Hysteria, Nervous lYos- 
tration. Nocturnal Em^s^ion^, Lcucorrhiea. Dli- 
<ine 8, Weak Memory, Loss of Power »:;d Impo- 
I'n'v, which if reRlecte<i often lead topremature 
lU > iT'^ and insanity. Price fl.OO a box, 6 boxes 
ior (■'> • n. ^'eit bv rr\- '■> ri 'proj t of jirice. 

A WKtT'.ZN eUARAMlElE is ^iven for ererr 
T.5.0J oni.i- retcivea. J luiund the money If a 
.}irm(in<7it cnre is not offecteJ. We have tben- 
•<«ud» of testimonials from old r.nd vounK, of 
totii Fexog, who hav.- beeu permf<nently ctirvd 
bftheiiseof Aphroditine. rireularfree. Adortw 
^ TflK APHR^ MKDiriNK CO.. 
TTester.^ Branch. Box 2T, Fokixand, Ok. 



Sold inDnlath 
Walhank. 



^ax Wirth and Selleok A 



For SaleBy MAX WIRTB, Druggist, 13 West Superior, Street. 



DULUTH INVENTORS. 

We art inf^'rmed by 
MESSRS. MASON, FENWIOK A LAWRRNCB, 

PATENT LAWYERS AND SOLICITORS. 
Of 104 Palladia bQildinx, Dnluth. and of Waah- 
iugton D.C., that the following Dnlnth inven- 
tors have reoentlv be<>n grantod patents by the 
United States PiTtent ofBee: 

Edward E. Pitigerald, SiveH B. Nilaob, Peter 
J. ('aesar, JotiD K. Knnis, AletanderMeDoocitll, 
Edward C. Bbdn and John Op<i)Ue. 



PILES! PILES I 

Dr. Williamo' Ittdian File Ointtfteut will core 
Blind, Blee.inig Itching ai'.l Ulcerated PiUs of 
ten years staiidioff. It al^^irbs the tumon, |I- 
lays the Itcln'ng at once, acts as a poultice.ffiTes 
{ instant relief. Or. ^ Uliariio' luitisD Pile OUit- 
ment is |irepnr<-d <»il) f<>r Piln^ Hod itching of 
tbe private part«, aini noMiihw )*is«. Sold and 
gnarantoed by MAl WlfilU, DoloUi Mliui. 



! i 



\ I 



I I 



i ! 



i ' 





Pile Urivinx on the New Sawmill of C. S. 
Murray 4 Co. is Now Com- 
pleted. « 

The Work "of Driving the Piling for the Lum- 
ber Dock Will be Becun To- 
morrow. 



Foundations for the Engines and Boilers 
Nearly Completed—Mill to be Fin- 
ished April 1 . 



All the pile driving on the Murray mill 
is now completed and tomorrow the 
drivers will be put to work on the dock, 
wLi:h will necessi-ate the driving of 
3500 piles. Work on the mill proper is 
progressing satisfactorily and the con- 
tractors are coiitidenl of having the mill 
ready for work by April I. The iound- 
ation for the engine and boiler house is 
almost completed and it is claimed by 
the contractors to bs the most substan- 
tial at the head of the lakes. The found- 
ation for the gang saw is also completed. 
The frame work of the main building is 
well under way and will all be up by the 
end oi the week. 

West Ouluih Briefs. 

A. F. Rockwell has sold his Grand 
avenue market to W. A. Lawson. Mr. 
Rockwell has been appointed overseer 
of the poor farm ana will move his 
family there March i. 

Miss Angie Stewart, who has been 
visiting friends m Minneapolis, returned 
yesterday accompanied by her cousin. 
Miss Nellie Goss. 

Revs. Robert Forbes and T. M. Price 
have about completed arrangements for 
a series of union meetings oi the Metho- 
dist. Conjrregational, Presl^teri»in and 
Baptist churches beginning the hrst of 
next week. 

•The United Workmen installed the 
following officers last night: Charles 
Silger. N. W.; T. R. Mayo. P. M. W.; 
William Blamev, foreman; Charles litis, 
receiver; A, J. Filiatrault. financier; M. 
A. Willisen, recorder; S. Lavallee. over- 
seer; John Connor.guitle; M. C. Murray, 
J. H. Sullivan and John Connor, trus- 
tees. 

The Good Templars celebrated the 
first anniversarv of West Duluth Lodge. 
No. 315. 1.0. G.T.. last evening by an 
entertainment at the W. C. T. U. hail on 
Grand avenue. Dr. Forbes made a 
stirring address in the cause of temper- 
ance. Mrs. Buck and Mrs. Charles 
Manning, of Duluth, gave recitations, 
and music by the West Duluth quartet 
and string band. Refreshments were 
served and the meeting was a decided 
success. 

"This evening A. Freimuth, D. O. G.C., 
will install the following K. of P. officers 
of Kitchi Gammi lodge: C. C, E. O. 
Ballard; V. C. J. C. Hanson; P., W. G. 
Miller; M. of W., Neil Darrah; M. of E., 
L. S. Newman; M. of F. and K. R. and 
S.. Kelly; M. of A.. C. M. Phillips. 

C. E. Peaslee, of Taylor's Falls, is a 
guest of his partner, G. H. Reeves. 

G. S. Mallory has been named i mem- 
ber of the Republican city committee 
from West Duluth. 

Misses Phillips and Owens entertained 
a party of Duluth friends at the Bennett 
last evening. 

P. R. Ritchie, of St. Paul, is in the city. 

RAINY LAKE CITY. 



fiew Townsite to be Laid Out on the Boundary 
Line. 
Surveyor Frank and a large party left 
today for Rainy lake where they will lay 
out the hrst town ever laid out upon 
American soil upon the international 

boundary between Lake Superior and 
the Lake of the Woods. The name of 
the new town will be "Rainy Lake City" 
and will be .'ituated in township 71-24 
on a beautiful point of land in the 
narrows leading to Black bay and 
just opposite to what is known as Shay- 
Shay's point. As soon as the platting is 
done, 100 acres in extent, work will be 
commenced upon a sawmill and enough 
logs will be cut from the townsite and 
two adjoining forties owned by the town- 
site company, to furnish lumber for the 
erection of houses next spring. 

The site of Rainy Lake City is all that 
could be desired. The point juts out 
into deep water, and it is situated within 
a mile of the best gold fields in that vi- 
cinity. The townsite company is repre- 
sented locally by W. C. Sherwood & Co , 
and comprises among its members seve- 
ral millionaires. The work at present 
will be superintended by John B. Wei- 
mer, and enough snnn'ies will probably 
be hauled iu uis muiici i... last a large 
crew until next spring. 



For Colds, 

Coughs, 

Croup. Influenza, and 

Bronchitis, 

use 

AVER'S 

CHERRY PECTORAL 

the best 

of all anodyne 

expectorants. 

Prompt to act. 

Sure to Cure 



Duluth as a Stvei Centtr. 

Minneap*"'*" Ti ;i , : Able to get 
coal more c .^aply than Chicago, and 
possessing abundance of ore within a 
few hours' haul, Duluthoughtin the near 
future to leave Chicago in the rear as a 

rroducer of pig iron and Bessemer steel, 
ndeed, Duluth has superior resources as 
a producer of pig iron and steel to Pitts- 
burg. The latter gets its ore from Min- 
nesota and pays in transportation of the 
ore fully 50 cents a ton more than Du- 
luth wouM have to pay in the transpor- 
tation of Pennsylvania coal to Minnesota. 
Duluth cm use in its furnaces thousands 
of tons of cheap ore at nominal prices, 
ore which is not considered high enough 
grade to ship East and is now either 
thrown into the waste pile or left unde- 
veloped. 

Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 



BEWAREiVrGRIP 

Op. Edson fears another epidemic, 
and sounds the alarm. 

In Iting and chest pains, coughs, colds, 
hoarseness and pneumonia, no other 
external remedy affords prompt preven- 
tion and quicker cure than 

BENSON'S POROUS PUSTER. 

Indorsed by over 5/)00 Physicians and 
Chemists. Be suffe to get the genuine 
Benson's, may be had from all druggists. 

SEABURY & JOHNSON, Chemists, N. Y. City. 



WHEAT VERY STRONG TODAY. 

The Market Ruled Firm and Strong and Ad- 
vanced One Cent. 

The wheat market today opened Ho below 
la«t nltflit's closo, but at once ruled very firm 
atiii active io May at advanciuK pricos. Mny 
itdvanced -itc up to uoon. There were kochI sales 

early iu round lotn of No. 1 liard and No I nortli- 
orn to arrive at the mills at Vjtii'je advancf. 
^11 thooutaidencws was buliioli aud the market 
was very tirm. Tlio nfttruoon aossiou was 
etroDf;nnd active and the close was Ic higher 
all around than yesterday. Following were the 
clotiiDK prices : 

No. 1 haril, cash, %l%c; JaDaary,62c; May, 
es'sc; July. 6"'ic; No. 1 northern, cash. Bl'-c; 
January, (iOJic: May, (ViSc: Jnly, &&\ie; No. 
2 northern, cash, 5s*c ; No. 3, hie. Kejected, 
47 'ic. On track— No. 1 northern to arrive, 62c; 
barley, ll@41c; Tie, 42c ;.No. 2 oats. 27'ic;No. 8 
white oat«, 27c ; (lax, $1 31. 
• Car inspection for today-Wheat, 12.'> 
pars; rye. 2; flax. 1; barley. 1. Receipts— 
Whoat. .M5,43y bus: barley, J827 bus; flax. t>5» 
bus. Shipments- Barley, 6052. 

New York Stock Exchanga. 

N«wYoRK. Jan 4.— Money on caU is easy at 
1©1H percent; prime mercantile paper W^\-i 
lM»r cent. SterliuK exchauKe is steady with 
actnal business in bankers' hills at $1.84C< U 
for sixty days and $4.85'**' 4. Si> for demand. 
P<wted rates $l.84ft4,H6'4 ; comme'-cial Nils 
W.^21iP'i fi'^ for sirfty days and W.m:^*64.85 for 
demand, (iovernment bonds steady; state 
bonds dull; railroad bmds irre«alar. Higher 
prices were the rule at the stock exchange dur- 
itig the last hour. The bear* were more in- 
clined to cover and in their etforts to get back 
their shorts put prices up on thcmselvos. The 
advance from the lowest puintof the day ranged 
f rom 'i to 3^ji . At noon the market was strong. 

London Stock Exchange. nzi 

London, Jan. 4, 5 p m.— At the stock exchange 
today American securities ruled steady at the 
opeuiug and virices improved uliirhtly on receipt 
of Now York oi>nuing prices. Later, in response 
to the course of the New York market prices 
slnmptMHieavily. Amont,' the 8t'<cks that not- 
ably declined wopo Northern Paciflc preferred, 
which fell X*i and Ljuisvill.^ A Na-'bvillo I. No 
trading of cousciiucnco wa^ done. 

New York BreadstulTs. 
New York. Jan. J.— Flour: Ueceipts. 35,- 
276: sales, 3025. State and western 8t»ady, 
moderate demand. Wheat: Receipts, 15,075; 
sales, 520,0(,0; No. 2 red advanced S«c on firmer 
cables and west baying, fell \c on 'orelgn sell- 
ing; rallied lie OD free clearings and local cover- 
ings, firm: more active; March, 68»i*J Vi ; May, 
70 ii*i?4: July, 72. Corn: Keceipts, 142800; 
salf-s, l4'i,C0O. No. 2, strocg, Januarv, 4l'i<t42c; 
February, iiVifg^c? March. 43'-4ft,iic,; May, 
4i7-l{W<-!ic; No. 2. 41Sig4Sc. OaU: Receipts. 
5:» 000: sales, 20 OfK). No. 2, lirmcr. February. 
3i%ii.% ; state, :W'i(g40; Western, 34H(§40c. 

The Chicago Market. 
rHK'AOO, Jan. 4.— Close: Wheat: January, 
(Jl'8:May. 66"*>@67c; July, ftSiic. Corn: Jan- 
uary. 3r.i^c ; May, 39t(,^gc ; July, 39' ic. Oata :.Ian- 
nary, 2S\c: May.'.'Si^C' 31c ; July. idSCc. Pork: 
January. $12 75; Mav. $12.>2'4. Lard: Janu- 
ary, $7.82H;May, $7.60. Ribs: January, $6.50; 
May, $6,624. 

The Minneapolis Market. 

Minneapolis, Jan. 4.— Wheat was stronger 
today and Ic higher. It opennd 
at 61>ic for May and 62\c 

for July, and closed at 62>gc for May, and 63^c 
for Jnly. On track— fl2'ic No. 1 hard. 61c No. 
1 northern, 59c No. 2. Receipts, 235 cara; 
shipments 10 cars. 

The Foreign Markets. 
London, Jan. 4.— The grain markets opened 
this morning firmer. At Liverpool wheat was 
unchanged, but more disposition to buy ; com 
^d higher and firm at the advauee. At Lon- 
don cargoes of (.California wheat off coast 
and nearly due were 3d higher; wheat on pas- 
sage was firm, but not active: corn in demand 
for cargoes near at band, bat quiet for distant 
deliveries ; floating cariboos of wheat and corn, 
no offerings. The French country markets 
were unchanged. At Paris wheatand flour were 
2O6;:)0 centimes higher. At Berlin wheat was \ 
@1 mark higher. A heavy snow storm was ore- 
valont in the United Kingdom. 

Cattle and Hogs. 

U. 8. Yards, Chicago, Jan. 4.— Cattle: Re- 
ceipts, 11,000; market fairly active and firm. 
Hogs: Receiptx, 31,000; quality goo^pl ; market 
firm and active; all parties buying; prices 5e 
higher ; light $5.15@5.45 ; rough packing, $5@5.20 ; 
mixed. S5.15@5.45: heavy packing and ship- 
ping lots. $5.25^5.45; pigs, S4.20g5.30. Sheep: 
Receipts, 10,000; market slow and weak. 

Dowiing Acquitted. 

New Orleans, Jan. 4.— James M. 
Dowiing, the ex-cashier of the United 
States mint, who was accused of having 
embezzled $25,000 and started a fire in 
the vault to cover up the crime, was 
acquitted by the judge in the United 
States CDurt at 7 o'clock last evening. 

Desperado Kills Deperado. 

Carlton, Minn., Jan. 4.— William 
Haggarty shot and instantly killed 
Frank Young at Twin Lakes, six miles 
south of here, yesterday evening. The 
two have been living together all winter 
in a shack in the woods. Haggarty 
claims the killing was accidental. Both 
are desperate characters. 

The Safe Fell Over. 
The New Duluth Land company was 
moving its offices today from the 
Chamber of Commerce building to the 
Torrey block. As the big safe was 
being loaded on to a dray, its weight 
proved too much for the men who were 
attempting the job, and it fell over back- 
wards with a crash that smashed in the 
stone sidewalk and did not improve the 
appearance of the safe. No one was 
hurt, strange to say, as the manner in 
which the safe was being loaded on the 
dray was reckless to say the very least. 

'■ ■■'■I. ' I - » 

Supper and Concert. 

The "Friends m Council" will give a 
conundrum supper and entertainment at 
the Pilgrim Congregational church tomor- 
row evening. The following program 
will be given: 

Selection from "Robin Hood ' Do K( « n 

Urcli^tra. 

Selections 

Venetian Mandolin Clab 

Vocal solo— "Co"M I" Toati 

Mis Comstock, Z 

Due for piai o and flute 

Messrs W I uQo aud Uuntloy. 

Piano solo, selecte*!. 

Miss Weiiismiller. 

Recitation— "Jerry An' Me" 

.^IlS8 Z'tlla ilurd. 

"Lullabj ' Behr 

atriug (^artet. 

Violin solo 

Mr. Weismiller. 

VocjI solo, selected 

Miss McDojald 

Snanish dance Cobani 

Orcbe-tra. 

You can rent vour rooms, or houses 
quickly through The Herald want 
columns. 



George Dinwoodie was summoned by 
telegraph to St. Paul where his aged 
mother lies at the point of death. 

J. A. Bowman, the La Prairie banker, 
is m the city. 

W. O. Winston came up from Minne- 
opoiis today to look after his stripping 
contract at the Iron King mine. 

W. H. Seeley, of Mankalo, is at the 
Spalding. 

F. McDonough, the Eau Claire mill- 
wright, is at the Spalding. 

J. H. Chapman, of New York, is at the 
Spalding. 

Miss Phillips left today for Omaha. 

B. H. Baker, traveling auditor for 
Armour & Co., is in the city. 

Mrs. L. M. Willcutts. nurse and child 
left today over the Wisconsin Central 
for Pass Christian, Miss , to spend the 
winter. 

F.. L. Brown, master of transpoVtation 
of the St. Paul & Duluth, is in the city. 

W. W. Broughton, general freight 
agent of the St. Paul & Duluth, came up 
from St. Paul today. 

P. H. Scanlan, traveling passenger 
agent for the Milwaukee road, is in the 
city. 

W. H. Fisher is at the St. Louis. 

A. L. Ide, a prominent electrical manu- 
facturer of Sprmgfield, 111., arrived to- 
day .md immediately left for Wcbt Du- 
luth in company with M»-. Matthews, of 
the West Duluth Manufacturing com- 
pany. 

Mrs. James Vance, who has been visit- 
ing her son, returned today to Montrose, 
Mich., over the Omaha. 

L. R. Doty, of the Sunday Creek Coal 
company, went to Chicago today. 

A. A. Kerr went to Chicago today over 
the Omaha. 

John R. Wood, president of the First 
National bank of Iron Mountain, Mich., 
is at the St. Louis. 

John T. Jones r*. turned today from 
Iron Mountam, Mich., where he has been 
to spend the holidays with his family. 

Bitten by a Dog. 
Last night. Dr. Bangs was sitting in 
the Spalding hotel accompanied by his 
beautiful greyhound. A boy came along 
with a bulldog which immediately pin- 
ned the doctor's pet. With admirable 
courage the doctor seized the bulldog 
and pulled him oU the greyhound, and in 
so doing sustained a bite in the hand. 
The wound is not serious and it is hoped 
that no bad consequences v/ill ensue. 
"The muzzle law is not very strictly en- 
forced in Duluth it would seem," said an 
eyewitness to the occurrence. 

— »■ 

Prominent Elk Dead. 

Brooklyn, Jan. 4.— Harry Kennedy, 
the well known ventriloquist, died at 
midnight last night at his home 
in this city. He was about 45 years 
of age and was well known throughout 
the country. He was a prominent mem- 
ber of the Elks. 



How tbo Noso Works. 

In ordinary respiration the nose recog- 
nizes only pronounced odors, since the fila- 
ments of the olfactory nerve are distribut- 
ed only ir the upper third of the lining 
membrane of its fossie, and in ordinary 
breathing the air passes directly through 
the lower half of these caviti&s. Hence a 
modified respiratory effort — a quick, forced 
inspiration or "sniff" — ia usually necessary 
in order to bring air carrying odoriferous 
particles to the olfactory nei^'e endings. 

Nevertheless, whenever air mixed with 
odorous gases and noxious particles is in- 
haled through the nose during a few suc- 
cessive ordinary respirations, the olfactory 
sense is awakened to a knowledge of their 
prtsence throui(h the law of diffusion of 
ga.sos, in virtue of which the odorous par- 
ticles are conveyed to the superior fossae of 
the nose and hence to the terminal fila- 
ments of the olfactory nerve. Thus to a 
certain extent the sense of smell is preserv- 
ative of health. — Dietetic and Hygienic Ga- 
zette. 

"Natural Wool." 

What "natural wool" is has been re- 
vealed by a lawsuit in Leicestershire, 
brought by the Nottingham chamber of 
commerce against a respectable hosiery 
manufacturer of 50 years' standing, who, it 
was. charged, had, with intent to defraud, 
falsely described certain items of feminine 
underclothing. The goods, which were 
marked "natural wool," turned out to be 
half cotton. A London maker called for 
the defense testified that high priced arti- 
cles were known as "all wool" and moder- 
ate priced goods were described as "nat- 
ural wool" and understood to contain cot- 
ton. It w^as said that the Leicester manu- 
facturer had simply used the terms as em- 
ployed by other firms for years. The court 
decided, however, that the designation in 
question was a false trade description un- 
der the merchandise marks act, and the de- 
fendant was fined £5 with costs.— Chicago 
Tribune. 

An Ungrrateful Texan. 

Some people never know wheji they 
ought to he grateful. Old Judge Peterby, 
a noted Texan, has been laid up for some 
time with the gout. His legs are swelled 
up to an enormous size. He is very impa- 
tient, and his doctor, who is also a church 
member, rebuked him. saying: 

"You should be grateful to the Almighty 
for bis kindness." 

"What kindness?" 

"His kindness in giving you only two 
legs to suffer with. Suppose you had as 
many legs as a centiped." — Texas Siftings. 



Inside Information. 

"Waiter, here's a quarter for yourself. 
What dishes would you recommend to a 
fastidious man as being neatly prepared 
here, don't you know?" 

"Thankee, sirl I think the oranges and 
the mixed nuts will be perfectly satisfac- 
tory in that respect, sir." — New York Re- 
corder. 



" Miss Nicholson, modiste, 308 West 
First street, French & Bassett building. 




4IOOOO««OOOC 

(Patient suffering 

is no virtue if there 
be a remedy. 

Beecham's 
Pills 

_ . (Tasteless) 

positively cure Indi- 

igestion, Biliousness, 

Sick Headache. Whyi 

endure continued 

iMartvrdom ? -^ »5 cems 

00 




I7p>>n It Rests the System of Commerelal 
Individualism and lAlssez Fair*. 

At St. Paul's church, Boston, recent- 
ly Rev. Charles Fergnson of Cohaaset 
preached an intereating aermon upon 
"The Industrial Crisia— Work for the 
Workless." He said: 

We are standing in the presence of a 
great absurdity— not amusing, but trag- 
ic—the spectacle of a million working- 
men compulsorily idle in a country ca- 
pable by nature of giving work and bread 
to ten times the earth's population, a 
country whereiu everybody admits and 
asserts the common duty and the com- 
mon right to labor. 

The causes of this phenomena are not 
local and not transient. We are ap- 
proaching the climax of the nineteenth 
century in nearly evei.flTtace with all the 
great nations of the world. The root of 
the whole worldwide trouble is a i)e- 
culiar and modem quality of our old 
primal selfishness permeating society 
from top to bottom — selfishness for the 
first time in the world's history formu- 
lated into a creed and erected into a sys- 
tem — the system of commercial individ- 
ualism and laissez faire, out of which 
has sprung this infidel disbelief of man 
iu man and the consequent failure of 
commercial credit. 

You cannot 4ove and trust your neigh- 
bor if yuu fiud in liim only an intelli- 
gent apparatus for the calculation of his 
own "enlightened self interest." The 
nations are weary of this profane gospel 
of greed. God is about to change all 
that. The spirit of the age is more than 
the body of the age— it rises to do the 
work of the Holy Ghost. Men must 
soon be found who are willing to do 
business that does not pay. I think 
that is the precise specific. It is not a 
nostrum. There is no patent on it. It 
is the open secret of Christ. The busi- 
ness of Jesus did not pay, neither did 
the business of the prophets and apos- 
tles, and no genuine and noble work of 
painter, ix)et, soldier or craftsman, no 
true labor aud pain of good worker or 
good fighter was ever done and suffered 
siiice the world began — for mere pay. 

There is no need to argue the immoral- 
ity of this utter commerciaJ selfishness. 
We have before our eyes the demonstra- 
tion of its entire folly and impracticabil- 
ity. It is not merely desirable that men 
be found who are willing to do business 
that does not pay. It ia absolutely neces- 
sary. Thirty yeai's ago there were found 
men who offered their lives to their coun- 
try. Wo shall find men now who will 
oilvT their dividends, though indeed this 
latter be somehow a more difficult sacri- 
fice. 

The plain way to find work for the 
worklesB is that they who have land and 
capital shall go ou with useful enter- 
prises or embark in new ones straight- 
way, being principally careful that their 
enterprises shall be useful and helpful, 
and only secondiirily careful that they 
shall yield rent, interest or profit. There 
in not the slightest danger of overproduc- 
tion of the common necessaries and de- 
cencies of life. There are not good houses 
enough; there are not warm coats enough; 
there is not bread and butter enough; 
there are not well cleaned fields enough 
in Massachusetts. There are roads to be 
made, swamps to be drained, wells to be 
dug, dikes to be built — and every stroke 
of the work shall permanently enrich 
the commonwealth — and yet I suppose 
it will not pay. 

But America haa a right to expect 
something from this quarter. If the 
heart is the seat of the passions of love 
and honor and self devotion, then. Boston 
is the heart of America. Here, then, if 
anywhere in America, shall be formed 
that generous syndicate of capitaHsts to 
put down capitalism. Here, if any where, 
shall be found men brave enough tcr defy 
the law of the market in order to .keep 
the law of God. 



p?mmmmmmmmmmmt??mmmmmmmmmmmi4i 

I Better Than a Game of Chance! I 






Buy a cheap lot or acre tract on almost your own term^ of payment and 
build yourself a comfortable house while labor and material is low in price. We 
have the sale of a large number of lots in the manufacturing district of West 
l)uluth and in the beautiful residence district traversed by the motor line, as 
well as fine acre tracts near the city, which we can sell on monthly payments. 



^ 



The Microstructure of Steel. 

Some highly instructive facts concerning 
the appearance of steel under the micro- 
scope have been developed by Albert Sau- 
veur. A polished and etched section of a 
steel rail does not by aray means, when un- 
der the microscope, re\'eal in all its parts 
the same structure. The different temper- 
atures at which different parts of the rail 
leave the finishing rolls and the uaequal 
rate of their sub.sequent cooling have much 
to do with the want of uniformity. The 
outside of the rail, being colder, shows a 
smaller grain than tbe mterior. This is in 
accordiuice with ttiat law of crystallization 
which ordains that the higher the finishing 
temperature and the slower the cooling in 
any given chemical camposition the greater 
will be the crystallizataon.— St. Louis Globe- 
Democrat. 

Pressure Sustained by Divers. 

George W. Fuller, the veteran submarine 
diver, in reJating some anecdotes concern- 
ing the bottom of the sea and its inhabi- 
tants, giv^es some ioteresting figures as to 
the amount of pressure the body of a diver 
is subjected to. At « depth of only 100 feet 
the pressure is 44 pounds to each square 
inch of the diver's body surface. The or- 
dinary human frame has about 12 square 
feet of surfiace, wiiich would make the 
pressure at the deptti mentioned above not 
less than 38 tons! This enormous weight 
is not all pressing dbwnward, but inward 
from all directions — St. Louis Republic. 



I R. R. MACFARLANE & CO. | 

^ Room 34, Exchange Building. ^ 

^UUUUllUUlUllUUlUllUUUUlUiUUUUlUUiUlUiUttUlUtU^ 



VieOR OF MEN 

Easily, Quickly, Permanently Restored. 

'Weakneaa. Hervonsneaa* 
Debility, and all the train 
of evils from early errors or 
later excesses, the results of 
overwork, elckness, worry, 
etc. Fullstrength.TOvel- 
opment and tone given to 
every organ and portion 
of the body. Simple, nat- 
ural methods. Immedi' 
ate improvement seen, 
'allure impossible. 2,000 references. Book, 
explanation and proofs mailed (sealed) free. 

ERIE MEDICAL CO., Buffalo, N.Y. 




NOTICK.-PEUSON8 HAVING GOODS IN 
pledge witL mo maet redeom same within 
ninety days of timo stated i>n ticket or they wiU 
bo sold for char^ee. G. A. Klein, Collateral 
Loan Bank. 17 West Superior street. 



Members of ilie Dnlntb Clearing House Association. 

CAPITAL. BURFLUa 

First National Bank $1,000,000 $200,000 

American Exchange Bank _ 600,000 350,000 

Marine National Bank 250,000 20,000 

National Bank of Commerce 200,000 21,000 

tate Bank cf Duluth , 100,000 40,000 

Security Bank of Duluth— 100,000 40,000 

ron Exchanlie Bank 100,000 



w 



jl '^t^*** -^^ (Tg TO VVASSIVY. ^ ^ 

ANTED, GIBL FOR GRNERAL HOU8E- 
work. Apply at 317H Third avenae east. 



ipOR SALE. BOARDlNfr MOUSE, FDR- 
nished complete : only $100 cash required ; 
a 6nap. Call Room 7, 123 West Superior Btreot. 

Ir<OR RENT, STEAM HEATED FLAT IN 
' Buffalo flats. Apply to R. P. Payne, Room 
1, Graff buiiding. 

ANTED, A COMPETENT GIRL AS COOK 
and lauadrees; references required. 
Ai>ply, between the hours of 3 and 5 o'clock, at 
905 East Superior street. 

N INTELLIGENT, EDUCATED MAN 
wants a position as ODgiuccr to a building 
or janilor work. Ho comes with highest rec- 
ummeadations from Dos Moines, where he has 
worlied as engineer. Apply at Associated Char- 
ities office. Room 415 Woodbridge bldg. 

IT ~ 

PAYS! 

To give the People 
an inyitation to trade 
■with you 
The best way 
is to advertise in 
THE HERALD. 



IT 
PAYS! 



It Bores Square Holes. 

A machine has been brought out in Lon- 
don which will, it is claimed, enlarge a 1% 
inch round hole to a 2 inch square hole, 
with corners rounded to a quarter inch ra- 
dius, in 15 minutes^ the material worked 
being bessemer sterel, three-fourths inch 
thick. A 2 inch hesracon hole with sharp 
comers can be pro<luced in 12 minutes. 
This machine was originally introduced 
some time ago, but has recently been re- 
modeled and inxproved.— Invention. 




OHTHERH 



18 THE ONLY LINE RUNNING THROUGH 
CARS TO 

St. Fail, Miiiiieapolis aid CMcap 

TO 

HELENA BUTTE SPOKANE 
TACOMA, SE ATTL E. PORTLAND 

Pnllman Bleeping Cars, Elegant Oinin«t Can 
on all Through Trains. 

TIME SCHEDULE. 



Texas' Products. I 

Texas raises 1,200,000 bales of cotton, 
which yield nearly »50,000,000. The cotton- 
seed product exceeds 600,000 tons. The 
sugar plantations on the Brazos alone pro- 
duce 12,000,000 pounds of sugar and 1,300,- 
000 gallons of molasses. Texas has 5,000,- 
000 sheep and clips 25>D00,000 pounds of 
wool. The pecan trees oif Texas yield every 
year 9,000,000 pounds of nuts.— Exchange. 

So strict is the law in Sweden against the 
importation of doga, from fear of hydro- 
phobia, that two haudsome Russian dogs 
brought by the Gra&d Duke Michael as a 
present for the crown prince were not per- 
mitted to land, and even his royal high- 
ness' application to the crown authorities 
for a pass Xurjthein w^im; fyluaed. 



Dlalng Cars on Poeifie 
Express. 



I'ficillo KxpreFtJ foi^uii am 
nesota aud Dakota poiiite 
WinnipAff. YeUowston< 
Park, Helena, Bntt«, Bpfv 
kone, Tacoma. Bsattle 
Portland, Alaska, Bar 
Francisco nnd all Pacin< 
coast points • • ■ • • • ■ 

CbieaffO Limited for all Wis- 
oonsin Central A Milwau- 
kee, Lake Shore & West- 
em points. Milwaukee, 
Chloa«o and beyond. ..... 

Wiseonsin Central Local 
Express for aU Gogebic 
Banc* and Wisconsin Cen- 
tral points and Chicago.. . 
1 Except Sunday. All other trains dally. 
Rat^, maps, or other pamphlets and infonna- 

tlon wiii be cheerfully '°^\';<'^jJoVA*N. 

*° City Ticket Aceot, 416 W. Saperiot 8U. 

O' C^I^'Sd Tk't. i*t.. 8t. Paul. 



Leave 
Dulnth 
Daily. 



3 :\^ vm 



4:05 pm 



Arrive 
Dolnth 
DaUy. 



7:&5 am 



UaOan. 



The 

Coming 

Contest 




In the spring election for mayor will be the most 
animated that has ever taken place in Duluth. 
In order to simplify matters and arrive at the real 
sentiment of the people as to who is their popular 
choice for mayor, The Herald hereby inaugurates 
a voting contest, by printing in each issue of The 
Evening Herald a coupon which every person in 
Duluth is requested to cut out and vote as often 
as they please and mail or bring it in person to 
The Herald ofKce. The popular contestant who 
receives the largest number of votes will on Jan- 
uary loth, the day of the close of the contest 
receive his choice of the $125.00 Haviland China 
Dinner Set now on exhibition in Panton & Wat- 
son's window, or a $100.00 Easy Chair. The for- 
mer valuable prize will also interest the ladies ot 
Duluth to take a part themselves in this enter- 
prise of determining who is the popular choice 
for Dulutb's executive bead. AU you have to do 
is cut out the coupon which appears on the first 
page of The Herald tonight and write on it your 
choice for mayor; every vote cast in De- 
cember counts three votes and each vote cast the 
first ten days in January will count one vote each. 
The China Dinner Set or the Easy Chair will be 
delivered to the fortunate winner on the mornmg 
of January iitb, and he may also be successful 
nominee of the citizens' convention which will be 
held a few days later. Send in jxjur votes. The 
outcome of this contest will be watched with a 
great deal of interest and the standing of the 
different candidates announced from time to time. 



=S 



\ 







i 



\ 




Jf 



- 




EVENING nEHAIi P. 

roBLnnsD bt thb 
lll'LUTH PRINTINO M POBUSHINU CO. 

BtwineM and oditori&l room* In The Herald 
baildiiui. 230 West Bnperior etreet. Telephone 
-Bii»inees office. 324. two rin««: e<Utori*l room*, 
J24, three rings. 

" SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

Daily, per rear *'•* 

Daily, per three mootha l'"" 

Dally, per month -^ 

Weekly, per ye ar '•'^ 

y^KSf CIRCULATIOH 18 DULDT| 

Kutered at the ixMtijffice at Dulalh, Minn.. a» 
■<tct>nd-«la»» mall matter. ^ 



The Weather. 

JJ 8. Wkvthkk KiKKvc, Drtrxn. Minn.. 
Jan. 4. -Tb.' bart.met.^r is U.west in tlio eastoru 
lakti rorfion aiul ArWiuisaH. It is hik-hoKt in tli« 
rt-t-iou northwi»st of Mont(»na. where au mcr^asl^ 
in f.rfssurt' of six-teuths of an mrli since yes- 
« V-. bei»n aci"OTn|>auii>d by a fall of 10 to 

- in tcmi>oratare. ... 

.. ..^, ,, (,.,., f iDpti HI the I vn>cr 

\ a uii>l Motitaua. 

- , I to -I' .U»»r»«>s in 

ppi vuil.«y. At St. PiULl it 

^, ,.w aero this. moraioK. 

Duluiii temperature* at 7 a. m, ttxiay. 14 
di'»crtwe abo*«^ 3ser«> : maximum 
itreag above; minimum 

DCLCTU. Jan. 4.— Liwal forecast nntilj*, 
ti>nn»rrjw : riouily. with ^luw tlurncs, 
Friday by fair: c>..M.«r tont«ht 

uortliirh wif.ir- t' .- vnriahle. 

J AMi:d Khm:ai \. 
Local ForocatiS oihcer. 
The I'-oti ■ r Fit I comi-any sells the best grrades 
ofwoaLa; tlio low prices now in effect 

irivp lihei ""t* f*"" cash an.l mako prompt 

deliveries. Ulfacc. 2iO W<5st Superior street. 



yesterday. It! de- 
for twentj four hoar», 

p. m. 

foUowod 

and Friday; 



chasing it (roiu contractors next sum- 
mer. City ortlcrs c.in be issued in pay- 
ment of the l.tbor ami the county will 
cash them, .i plan which effectually «lis- 
poses of any financial ililficulty. 



In the Superior Leader a few days 
ago, there was a brief interview with 
John G. Brown, of Duluth, who said: 
"Yes, I f.tvor free ore and the Wilson 
bill and any one who does not is not a 
Democrat." Some ^ood friend should at 
once telegraph this sentence to the Dem- 
ocratic members of congress, or they 
may find themselves outside the parly 
breastworks tomorrow morning. 



sc.TiN. Jan. 4.— ForecJist until S p. m. 
For Wi'ct^nsin: Fair, colder in 
• A ' west to north. 
r ; collier in ea«it- 



«»a«*t- ■ ' 

For -■ ^ 

ern piiruuu touiijiii 



To Restore the Duty. 

The Democratic caucus on the tariff 
bill is to be held at Washington tonight, 
and it is stated that Mr. Wilson is will- 
inji that the bill should be amended in 
some particulars, while Congressman 
Wkeeler, of Alabama, asserts that a 
small tariff will be put on iron ore and 
bittiminous coal. 

This is good news, and the people of 
St. Louis county will trust that it may 
prove true. Mr. Wilson has evidently 
felt the full force of the strong protests 
which have gone from various parts of 
the country against certain features of 
his measures, and many Democratic 
congressmen have experienced so much 
pressure from their constituents to vote 
against the bill in its present shape that 
Mr. Wilson tinally agreed to the adop 
tion of amendments to save the measure 
from defeat. 

It is to be hoped that the advocates of 
a tariff on iron ore will not yield m the 
fight that they have begun and that they 
will not compromise on a small duty 
that will be practically no protection at 
all. The existing duty of 75 cents a ton 
should not be changed. It is not too 
high, and therefore should not be re- 
duced. In fact its increase would be 
beneficial to the ore interests of this 
country. 

It is rather amusing, however, to con- 
template the position in which those 
who have been upholding the idea of 
free iron ore are placed by Mr. Wilsons 
willingness to amend the bill in 
this particular. According to the resolu- 
tions adopted at the free ore meeting at 
the city hall and the manifesto subse- 
quently issued in its support, the Wilson 
bill will cease to be a Democratic meas- 
ure, when so amended. But of course 
this idea is based upon the presumption 
that those who passed those resolutions 
are authorized to decide who is a Demo- 
crat and who is not. 



A Minneapolis paper had a Duluth 
tlispatch yesterday, staling that the first 
of the Great Northern passenger steam- 
ers was launched that day at Cleveland. 
This is erroneous. The first of these 
fine vessels, which is to be called the 
Northwest, will be launched next Satur- 
day. 

The rumor that J. W. Scott would re- 
tire from the m.in.igement of the Chicago 
Herald .and was likely to purcha,se the 
St. Paul Globe is denied. Mr. Scott will 
rem.iin with the Herald, of which he is 
part owner, and has not had the slighest 
intention of quitting the institution which 
he has made such a splendid success. 



The unemployed men in Duluth want 
work, not charity, and it now Uxjks as if 
the campaign started in their behalf by 
The Herald will result in work being 
provided for all within a few days. 



Gen, Nelson A. Miles says that he con- 
siders football about as brutal as prize 
fighting. He might have truthfully 
added that it is also more dangerous than 
serving in the army these days. 



Several faith cure fanatics in Portland, 
Ore., decided to laugh to scorn the hard 
times by going without eating during the 
winter. One will not eat any more. The 
others are in the hospital. 



Vaillaut, the French anarchist who 
threw the dynamite bomb in the cham- 
ber of deputies, was addicted to the 
cigarette habit. His defense will prob- 
ably be paresis. 



The city debt of St, Paul has been re- 
duced $782,955 during the past nineteen 
months. St. Paul is to be congratulated. 
If Duluth could only make an equally 
good showing! 



Mayoralty candidates are becoming 
numeroiis. May the best men get the 
nominations, and then there need be lit- 
tle concern about the result of the elec- 
tion. 

The News Tribune asserts again today 
that it is a Republican paper. Who is 
the vile wretch that has disputed this 
fact? 

Cayenne, N. D., is a small place that 
is giining some notoriety as a divorce 
center. Of course, it is a red hot town. 



If the governor of Florida had ever 
seen a football game he would permit 
the Corbett-Mitchell fight to proceed. 



J. Sloat Fassett wants to run again for 
governor of New York. Some men do 
not know prhen they have enough. 



days at the most, 
purpose would be 
lengthy campaign, 



The Municipal Elections. 

The idea of calling an early convention 
of the Republicans to select a candidate 
for mayor has been credited to some 
members of the city committee. There 
was a rumor yesterday that the conven- 
tion would be called to meet next week. 
The Herald trusts that such a move will 
not be made, because it would unduly 
prolong the campaign. There is no 
good reason why a municipal campaign 
should last more than a week, or ten 
Certainly no good 
served by making a 
with all US disturb- 
ance of business and the usual bitter 
feeling that seems inseparable from 
every election. 

There are many men in the Republi- 
can ranks who would ably fill the posi- 
tion of mayor. This is equally true of 
the Democratic party. The main thing 
is to have the best men placed in nomi- 
nation, and this desirable result would 
likely be defeated if the primaries were 
brought on suddenly bsfore the people 
had a chance to consider the relative 
claims of the various candidates. It 
would not do any harm it the calls for 
both the Republican and Democratic 
conventions were issued at once, but the 
primaries should not be held until about 
the last week in the pre.=;ent month. 



The Populist row in Kansas may give 
John J. Ingalls a new Lease of public 
life. 

A Pretty Sure Sign. 
Chicago Times: When an under- 
taker's wife adjusts a noose about her 
neck while standing on a barrel, puts a 
revolver to her temple, blows her brains 
out, kicks the barrel away, breaks her 
neck and is discovered hanging by the 
neighbors, it's a sign that she was tired 
of life. And a woman in Millvale, 
did all this Monday morning. 



Pa., 



Knows How to Sharpen an Ax. 

Allentown City Item: The first rush 
of the McKinlcy boom being over, Mr. 
B. Harrison has taken the road for a 
little spurt; also to r-p up a few blind 
ditches along the road that will be tra- 
veled by tbe McKinley nag. 

The Seivant Girt Question. 
Baltimore American: The servant 
girl problem has reached a point that 
threatens serious consequences, not to 
s.ay a crisis, in family cabinets. A cook 
in New York, on being reciuested to 
leave, indignantly refused and empha- 
sized her declaration that she liked the 
place by bombarding her mistress with 
hot tlat-irons. This is a striking in- 
stance of the irony of fate as exhibited 
in domestic rule. 



NEW YEAR'S DONATIONS. 

Contributions to the Home lor Women and 
Children. 

The Women and Children's home was 
not forgotten during the holiday season, 
and many donations were received. On 
Saturday evening the children were 
gladdened by a Christmas tree hand- 
somely decorated with dainty gold col- 
ored lanterns and bright hued paper 
chains, made by the children at the 
kindergarten conducted by Misses May 
Sherwood and Helen Spencer. Intcr- 
twinetl were strings of pop corn and ber- 
ries, dolls and everything imaginable in 
the line of toys. At 6 o'clock the little 
folks marched ana sang, and a pretty 
Christmas carrot followed. Old Santa 
Claus bounded in about that time with a 
big pack from which he produced toys and 
presents innumerable. F.ach of the wo- 
men in the home received a dress: 

The New Year's donations to the home 
were unusually liberal and were as fol- 
lows: 

Meining Hardware Co., bill of ii2; Kal- 
houne Silbert. b.ig containing dresses 
and shirts, 2 glasses of jelly and a ball; 
Mrs. A. C. Jones, 25 pounds o.itmeal; 
Mrs. H. C. Church, infant's clothing, 2 
pairs mittens; Mrs. P. .\. Sjoselius, large 
pail of jelly, 2 pounds Japan tea, baking 
powder; Mrs. R. D. Mallett, oranges, oat- 
meal, rice, jelly and jam, mincemeat, 
cornstarch, currants; Duluth Cash Groc- 
ery, 20 pounds rice, 10 pounds oat flakes; 
C-ipt. Smallwood, 50 pounds flour; Mrs. 
H. F. Williamson, quilt, glass marme- 
lade, 6 glasses jelly; Mrs. J. Dight, ap- 
ples and oranges; Mrs. F. W^. Paine, ?! 
worth sugar, 2 cans fruit, oatmeal, rice; 
Jackson school, thanksgiving offering, 
i;ii.55; Mrs. D, T. Adams, i pair chick- 
ens; Mrs. MacLeod, sugar; Mrs. J. T, 
Hale, potatoes, flour; Mrs. J. B. Adams, 
oatmeal, clothing, roast of beef; Esther 
."^dams, dress, white apron, cloak, stock- 
ings, undergear and 52 cents; M. 
M. Gasser, grocer, apples, flour, 
and canned goods; Mr. Munsey, 
ham and 4 chickens; a friend, 
sugar; Gronseth & Oleson, conoa shells, 
4 packages children's food, currants, 10 
pounds raisins, I package granola; Mrs. 
R. C. Ray, flour; Mrs. Saxton, oat meal, 
rice; Mrs. C. R. Haynes, potatoes; Mrs. 
V. P. Foster, bread, clothing; a friend, 
clothing; Mrs. J. D. Ray, sugar; Mrs. 
O'Brien, canned goods, dried fruit, rice; 
Mrs. J. W. Sheridan, sugar and clothing; 
J. B. Hawkes, flour; unknown child, nuts, 
vegetables; Mrs. Buck, canned fruit; 
Mrs. Ellis, clothing; H. A. Smith, corn- 
starch, tea, canned corn, rice, sago; D. 
T. Adams, apples, tea, coffee, sugar; a 
friend, 50 pounds flour; Mrs. B. A.Eddy, 
old linen; Mrs. C. M. Yance, sugar; 
Adam Kirst, 2 cans beans, 2 pounds 
candy, 2 pounds nuts, cheese, tapioca, 
s.igo, tea, coffee, breakfast food, flour, 
apples, hominy, rolled rye, cracked 
wheat: Mrs. J. T. Hale, potatoes; Mrs. 
Joe Coxe, grapes, oranges; Mrs, H. 
Chadwick, tea, coffee; Mrs. M. T.Brown, 
toys, confections, clothing; Mrs. F. W. 
Smith, toys, clothing, jelly; Mrs. J. C. 
Schafer, quaker oats, tea, cereline; Cox 
Bros, roast beef; D. T.Adams, flour; 
Mrs. Dunning, crackers, raisins, corn 
meal; Mys. McGonagle. apples; Max 
Wirth, box of apples; Mrs. Manly, $i 
worth of sugar; Mrs. Fuller, sugar; Mrs. 
M. J. Starkey, flour; Mrs. H. R. McCord, 
bananas, zephvrs, sugar; Mis. Gridley, 
sugar, tea, coffee, beans, rice; Mrs. Tot- 
man, clothing; Mrs. William H. Blades, 

1 ham, 12 cans vegetables; Thomas K. 
Hicks, 2 chickens; J. P. Johnson, sugar; 
Mrs, F. H. Freker, potatoes; Mrs. C. C. 
Hawley, oatmeal, sugar, potatoes; Mrs. 
Fred J. Voss, $1 sugar; Mrs. Lon Mer- 
ritt, 20 pounds flour; Mrs. W. B. Phelps, 
sugar Si, baby food 25 cents; Mrs. W. S. 
Birch, 3 pounds rice, 8 pounds rolled 
o-tts, corn starch, 2 packages baby food; 
Mrs. Peyton, child's underwear; Mrs. 
Condon, 12 bars laundry soap, little 
dresses and waists, 4 yards gineham; 
Mrs. S. L. Frazer, maple sugar 
6 glasses crabapple jelly, large bowl 
jelly; Mrs. O. H. Simonds, 2 sets flannel; 
Mrs. Hawlev, oatmeal, sugar, potatoes; 
Mrs. Charles F. West, 2 bottles catsup. 2 
glasses of jelly, babies' clothing; Ath- 
letic club, I barrel flour; Johnson cc Moe, 
20 pounds granulated sugar, 10 pounds 
oatmeal, Japan tea, soda, crackers, butter, 

2 cans corned beef; Mrs. C. W. Strayer, 
sugar, Si, i bushel potatoes, i dozen cans 
tomatoes; Mrs. Capt. Pressnell, 2 boxes 
crackers, tea, Si worth of sugar; Mrs. Dr. 
Taylor, beautiful while dresses, little 
shirts, shoes and rubbers, flannel dress 
and hood; Mrs. James McKindley, baby's 
cheesecloth quilt, toys and underwear; 
Willie and Eulalie Schiffman, apples, 
oranges, cocoanut, dried fruit, nuts; Mrs. 
Slocum, apples, glass jelly and crackers; 
Northwestern Fuel company, 2 tons egg 
coal, I ton nut coal. 

The following cash donations were 
made in November and December: 

A friend, Si ; J. D. Ensign, Sio; J. H. 
Upham, Sio; Irving school, $5.50; Ameri- 
can Exchange bank. S350; Panton & 
Watson. Christmas opening, $28; Jack- 
son school, Thanksgiving,Si 1.50; Mesaba 
relief committee, S200 to the home and 
$100 to the hospital; Dr. Ryan, $2; Mrs. 
Codding, *i; Esther Adams, $53. 



ONE PRICE AND THAT RIGHT 




Negotiations Failed. 
Washi.ngton, Jan. 4.— The commis; 
sioners appointed report that they have 
failed in their negotiations with the Sho- 
shone and Arapahoe Indians in Wsom- 
ing for the cession of a portion of their 
lauds to the government. 



An Excellent Plan. 

The prompt manner in which tbe 
common council and the county commis- 
sioners have responded to The Herald's 
appeal to provide work for the unem- 
ployed men is deserving of the highest 
commendation. It is gratifying to learn 
that there is now a good prospect that 
arrangements will be made whereby 
every idle man can be at work within ten 
days. 

The plan which has met with most 
f.^vor is to give the men work getting 
rock on Superior street between Pied- 
mont avenue cast and Fourteenth aveque 
west, and also West Sixth street near 
Cascade scjuare. The city uses from 
2000 to 4000 yards of rock every year and 
pays S1.50 a yard for it, and the amount 
needed for the coming year might just 
as well be secured now, thus furnishing 
work when it is needed, instead of pur- 



Buflalo Bill's Platform. 

Bangor Commercial: The Boston 
Record is for Buffalo Bill for governor 
of Nebraska and intimates that en such 
a platform as "cut rates to all Nebras- 
kans to the Wild West Show" he would 
be simply invincible. William might 
even make a great pull for the presi- 
dency on a platform like that. 

Dabbled in the Same Mess. 
Providence Journal: The Republi- 
cans are debarred from making much of 
a protest against the admission ot Utah, 
New Mexico and Arizona by the fact 
that they have had some of the pork out 
ot the same barrel. 

» ■ ■ 

Entirely Out of Place. 

Ashland News: Hon. Thomas Lynch, 
the able representative in congress from 
this district, in the interview published in 
the Milwaukee Sentinel, very correctly 
said that putting ore on the free list was 
a "sop" for certain Eastern manufac- 



SYPHILIS 



sop 
turers. Such 
a proteotion 
law, but are 
tariff. 



"sops 
affair 
out of 



are appropriate in 
like the McKinley 
place in a revenue 



'Twill do Duluth Good 
To mail your Eastern or Western friends 
copies of The Herald's Christmas num- 
ber. 



A Wri!5cn Guarantee to 
CURE EVERY CASE OR 
MONEY REFUNDED. 
f3nr cure is poruianont and not a patching np. 
Ccees treated eight yoaie affo have never eeen a 
synjptom since. By describing case fully we can 
troat yon by mail, and wo give the same stronff 
g.iarantea to cnro or refnnd all mocoy. Three 
who prefer to come bore for treatment can do eo 
and wo will pay railroad fare both ways and 
hotel billo wlule here if we fail to cure. We 
challenge the world for a case that onr MAGIC 
BKM BUY wHl not cnre. Write for full particn- 
inrs hikI «?et vhhBvideucf. 

We gnaran ifetocnre or refnnd every dollar, 
aud ao we have a r.natal^ju to project, hIoo 
anancial b.nckkig of *-VK!,i>ii), it Is p<;rft>ctly aafe 
to all who will try the trMtmoot. Herc'^jfcre 
y.iu have been pntting Tip and paying on t your 
money for ditfenint tr'<airaeutB and aUhouifh 
yon are nut yet cnrod, no one has paid back 
ynnr n40upy. Do not waete any more nonoy nn- 
til you trj' u«. Olil chronic, deep aeatfld caf^ee 
ciire<i in !6 to 40 days. InToatigate onr flnancl.".l 
PtHudinif, onr repntati<<n rb business jiien. 
Write u» for natncs and addre*fi<»« of those we 
have curod who have given penniesion to ofor 
to tuem. ^. 

If your eymptoras are aore throat, mncoai 
pntchnp in month, rlieuniiitiBm iir bones aud 
jolute, hair falling out, eniptions on any part 
«>f Ui?. ijody, fe'ding of general deprrsslon, i.ains 
in hf>»d or bonee— y<>a have no time to wa-sto. 
TLo«o who arc comitantly taking mercury and 
potash should dicCotitiuue it^ 

Don't fail U) write. AU correspondeooe seat 
sealod In plain wisolof*/. We invite the nin«t 
rigid invoetigation and will do all In oar i«wer 
to aid yon in It. Addrt>ee, 

COOK REMEDY CO., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Room 307 Masonic Temple. 



THESE SMALL ADVERTISEMENTS ARE M0M-MAIER8 FOR TIOSANDS. 

EVERYBODY SHOULD USE THEM. 



ONE CENT A WORD! 



American Store! 

* * * 

It is a most steady, constant, 
diligent buying that is now 
roins: on here. To see is 
sulficient to the intending in- 
telligent purchasers. No 
matter how much of a skep- 
tic you are you'll find our 
values at under prices even 
beyond your most exalted 
anticipations. And while 
this extensive reducing of 
surplus quantities of Cloaks, 
Furs, Dress Goods, Under- 
wear, Hosiery, Gloves and 
Hats is going on we wish to 
incidentally announce that 
we have just opened our 
spring purchases of 

New 

Muslin 

Underwear 

and \A'e wish to now go on 
record as saying that no one 
ever before saw such ex- 
quisite goods at such low 
prices. A half hour will 
be sufficient to show you 
through, and we shall be 
proud and pleased to do 
so. 



Herald Wants, 

Popular Because Eflectlve. 

One oent a word ; 75 centa a line per month. 
No advortifli'iu'.mt taken for lusethau 15 cents, 
Payinoute mnst be made in advance. 

SITUATIONS WANTED. FREE. 

All persona wanting aitnations can use The 
Herald wont columnti for throe iusortioos free 
of charge, 

This doss not inclnde agents or omployment 
oihces. 

Partiee advortisinf; in those colnmns may have 
auBWiTH ad<lre(«Ked \n care of The Herald aud 
will bo given a check to enable them to c-et 
auswere to their advortispmeutd. All auawors 
ehunld bo propcily oncloeed la envelopes. 



FR»BgHi. 

WANTKD-SITUATION RY A MAN WITH 
a f.'iniily to support. Will do any kind of 
woik cheap. A<ldrcss li 57, Herald oliice. 

/ tOOK-A BOBEK, STEADY MAN WANTS 

V' work. Understands his husinnsb thor- 
ouKhly. Is not anxious for large salary, but 
wants work very bad. Address Stevens, care 
(iarondoa houi'l, Duluth. 



ONE CENT A WOKD. 



_^ ro icKyT—nin'SKK. _ 

RENT YOUltTlbuSFrirFLATS AND bTOHUB 
of Alexander & Hpeyers, iXb W. Haporior at. 



ir'Ott KENT 
eteiini heat 
rate till May. .Sttc Sherwood, Torroy building. 



ELEVEN-KOOM HOUSE. 

eteiini heat aOf, East TJiird street. Half 



JO JIJSKI' ti'ft.Ma 



170a KENT. TWO FURNISHED ROOMS. 
X" heated by hot air. 411 West 'ITiird street. 

\ri(;ELYFURNISHi:D ROOM FOR RENT 



cheap ; electric lit'ht and bath. 
Second street. 



l«;iWest 



tj>li{8T-('LAS3 
sewing in family by the day 



DRESSMAKER DESIRES 
Address D 60. 



r^lRL WANTS A SITUATION FOR GEN- 
\Jf eral house work. I'lease call or addre&s, 
732 Twenty-third avenue west, Duluth. 



WANTKD-POSITION 

tV clerk in store, (/ity "loforcnces. Exper- 



ienced 
Herald. 



and 



BY A LADY AS 

"loforci 
speaks Swedish. * Address (t 22, 



X-^OU RENT-FURNISHED KOOM. IN- 
J^ <luiro i;i Wofct Second street. 

ITiOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM WITH 
A board. 120 First aveuue west. 



ONE CENT A WORD! 



FRATERNITIES. 



lk<\ 



1^ 



P. A 



j-^OR RENT - THREE UNFURNISHED 

ping, re 
Apply 1::0 Firs^t avenue west. 



month. 



.^OR RENT-FIR.ST 
five room?, hardwo< 
cated. Apply 120 First avenue west 



I.^OR RENT-FIR.ST FLOOR FLAT OF 
? five rooms, hardwood flnish, centrally lo- 



LADIES-IF YOU LIKE TO KNOW THE 
way throng}) married life troubles, seud 
2-ccnt Etamp aud get a pass. Address £ ii3. 
Herald. 



MAKRIED LADIES-BEND 10 CENTS FOR 
"Infallible Safogaard" (no medicine, no 
deception ;) jntt what yea want. Ladies' Bazar, 
Kan£i>iB City, Mo. 



TJOSITION WANTED-BY A YOUNG MAX 
X of 11 years, in office, will work for board, 
first class penman. Address George Brown, cere 
Mercluintfe hotel. City. 



S^ 



:mtuation wanted by thoroughly 

competent young man as stenographer, two 
years' experience in lirst-class hiw office; ma- 
rhine furuistied; references. Address M 125, 
Duluth Evening Herald. 



Vf.%\'Th:it- MAI t. tlj^f ' 

Wantkd-two men of good appeab- 
ance to canvass and collect. 403 Chamber 
of Commerce. 

anted-an intblijgsnt, hustling 

man tx> represent a leading insurance 
company. Address .1 1, Herald. 

ANTED-MAN TO WORK FOE HIS 
board and room. IG First avenue east. 



w 



WANTED-MEN OF FAIR ADDRESS OUT 
of employment to know they can make 
big money at work for us here in the city. Call 
at once. The Singer Manufacturing company, 
62.5 West Superior street. 

SALESMEN TO SELL BAKING POWDER. 
We put our goods in Glass Rolling Pius. 
StX) month and expenses, or conunission. Chi- 
cago Baking Powder Co., 767 Van Buron street. 
(Chicago. 



TWO GOOD UUSTLEES, SALARY AND 
commission to sell goods on instalment. 
7V3 West Superior street. 



XIDWIF£. 

T3R1VATE HOSPITAL-MRS. L. BALDWIN. 
X Midwiie. Full graduate of German college 
of acconchiment. ('upping and vaccinating 
done. (509 East Third street. 



PJ 
A. M. R(!gT:lar meeting first and third 
Monday evenings of every month at 7:iO 
'ctock. Next meetini; Jan. l.'i, l'^94. 
Work, Tiiird dpfrrt-s, W. E. Covey, W, 
M., Eiwin Mooere. secret iry. 

IONIC LODGE No. 186, A. F. & A. M 
fiogolar meetuig^i second and fonrih 
Monday evemugs 'f everv month. Next 
meeting Jnu. »5th. ixyi. Work. E A. de- 
gree. B. L. Krater, W. M., H. W. Cheadle, 
Bec^e^ary. 

KEYSTONE CHAPTER No. 20, B. A. M. 
Stated cornmnnicatioos second aud foortb 
Wedneeduy evouinga of each mouth at 7 :30 
o'eloclr. Next meeting Dec. 1:5, annual meeting 
— flection of oHicers. (ieo. A. Flack H. P., T. 
J. Uuiiter, secretary. 




DULUTH COMMANDEHY No. 18, 
K, T. Stated conclave at 7 :30 
o'chxik first Tuesday evenings of 
every month. Next conclave will 
hold on Taesday, Jan. 2, 1^34. W. 
G. Ten Brook, E. C. ; Alfred LeKichoux. secro- 
tary. 



Aoisricaii Developieit Coipaiy. 



WAyTKD—MTSrKT.T.A XKOVS. 
USE 



VXTANl-ED-THE USE OF 

VV wood heal ing stoves for 
the Associated Charities, 
bridge building. 



TWO LARGE 

the winter, by 

Apply at, 415 Wood- 



MISCIU.LA\KOl'S.^ 

G\ ET RUBBER STAMP INK OF H. E. G. 
T Adsit. 103 Herald building. 

EMPLOYMENT OFFICE. 

r|^5E~liOST~liE8PECTABLK UCEN3EB 
A office in Duluth, free of charge to all gixle, 
also have a frdi line of hair Bwit^hee, chains, etc. 
Mrs. M. C Seibold, 225 East Bnporior street. 




WANTED A 'GOOD NURSE GIRL ABOUT 
15 years old. 2025 East First street. 



VOH SAJLE~]UlS*jJi:X.LAJSJSOlJS,^^ 

FOE SALE-EXCELLENT LIBRARY AND 
egtablished law busidess. Rare opportun- 
ity. C. F. Lamb, West Duluth. 



For 5a le or Rent. 

Tlio building situate at 106 West Michigan 
ctroet, now occupied by the Duluth Electric- 
Light aud Power Company, with central steam 
heating apparatus. 
ForfurthiT information enquire at 

HAETMAN ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., 

Boom 3, Exchange Building. 

aaauimvvT'HM 




TO t::icnAXjai:—MiscE^LAKKOvs^ 

I'^OR EXUHANGeT- DESIRABLE 'mINNE- 
' aDolis pioperty for Duluth realty. Send 
description to 11 ."46, Herald. 



ARCHITECTS. 

ALBERT BRYAN, 510 BURROWS. WARE 
houses and heavy buildings a epeoialty. 

TBAPHAGKN & FITZP4TH1CK, AHi^KI- 
i. tects. Booms 911 aud 917, Torry buildu:g, 
Dti luth. Minn. 

HOTELS. 

TJOTEL BENNETT. WEST DULUTH, CA- 
XX tors to social clubs and sleighing parties; 
banquet aud dancing hull; all modern con- 
vonieuces. P. F. Smith, proprietor. 



JiJEAL ESXAXJS rSAJiSfEIiS. 

F and P Hartman to Alf Kjellin, land in 
section lS-50-15... $450 

John Grady to G W Post, land in section 
?6-67-20 - 700 

O P Stearns et ux to S M Stearns, part 
lot 35, E^st Sui>orior street, Dulaih 
Proper, Kirtt division 1 

M M Smith et mar to Alexander Cam- 
eron, lot 4, block 12, West Duluth, 
Stewart's addition 300 

W J Green < t nx to C H Green, lot 59, 
Minnesota aveane. Upper Duluth 540 

Total 51.991 



W.^ 



AVCTTiJNKKR. 
GORDON, 324 WEST SUPEiilOtt 61. 



MASSAGE. 

DR. JOHN GREIiNFIELD - MASSAGE 
treatment ; satisfaction to all guaranteed. 
Rooms 1 and 2 Max Wii th block, 13 West Supe- 
rior street. OHice hours, 11 to 1 a. m, 4 to 6 p. m. 




A year's subscription to Scrib- 
ner's Magazine will bring into 
3'our home twelve monthly num- 
bers, aggregating over 1500 pages 
of the best and most interesting 
reading, and more than 600 beau- 
tiful illustrations. 

Announcements. 

GEORGE W. CABLE wUl begin in the January 
number a romance entitled "John Match, 
Southerner." 

T*o other importaat serials have been engaged : 
J. M. BABBIE, authorof thefamoua "Little 
Minieter," has written a new novel, the flret 
eii;cc that famous story. GEORGE MERE 
DITH, the great English novelist, has in 
pri?paration a novel entitled "The Amazing 
Mariiage.' 

SHORT STORIES wUl bo abundant. 

W. D. HOWELLS. MISS ELLIOT, W, H 
BISHOP, LUDOVIC HALEVY, PAUL 
BOUH(iET. JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS 
and many new writers will contribute. 

STUDIES OF AMEIilCAN LIFE wiU be an im- 
portant feature, Including Newport, Bar 
Harbor, Lenox, etc., end the West. 

THE ILLUSTRATIONS will be even more 
numerous and beautiful than ever. A series 
of Frontiepiocfs chosen by PHILIP GIL- 
BERT HAMERTON will bo especially not- 
able. 

Complete Prospectus Sent on Request. 

Special Offerr?;';%'^Tan'S 

a subscription (or 1894 $4.50 

The same, with back numbers, bound 

in cloth $6.00 

Sample Copy. 10 Cents. 

Charles Scribner's Sons, 

743 Broadway, New York. 



^I'^i^iSSlis^t.,^ 

MONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS 
. watches, jewelry, etc.. Standard 
J«w»lry and Lcrd OJ<ice, AvA W. Sup. 
rfr. Business strictly confldentiul. 



ONEY TO LOAN IN ANY AWOUNT ON 
horses, wagons, honsohold fnmitnre, pi 
onos. djanioniia, jow-ifry and ail kinds of per- 
sonal prop&rty, f'n shori; notice and a lower rate 
than you cea pofc«tibl> get it elsewhere. Inquire 
of Wm. liortan, cmnager, Drdnth Mortgage 
Loan company, room 430, Chamber of Gommeroe 
building, Duluth. 



M 



LOAN ON DUMOWDS AND 
*. A. K- 
broker ia Duluth, 17 West Haporior stieat. 



MONEY TO 
J,»w«ilry. G. A. Kir-ha, only llwtnsed pawn- 



JIININO^SGINEKRS;^^ 

CHARLES F. HOWE. SPEciAL ATTSN- 
tion given to the examination and report 
iag on mineral lands. Iron lands bought and 
sold. Analyses of all kind? made on abort 
notice. 631 OhaD;f>er of C-ommerce. 



T^OTICE OF MORTGAGE SALE. 

Whereas, default has been mads in the condi- 
tions of a certam mortg.ajre, made, ex- 
ecuted and (telivered by James L. Dow and 
Mary B. Dow, his wife, of Duluth, St. Louis 
County, Mitmesota, mortgagors, to WillUam M. 
Prindle, of St. Louis County, Minnesota, mort- 
gagee, dated February twentieth, A. D. 1891, 
and recorded in the oflfice of the register of 
deeds in and for the county of St. Louis and 
state of Minnesot.i, on the twentieth day of 
February, A. D 1891, at tliree o'clock and forty- 
five minutes in the afternoon in book sixty-one 
(til) of mortgag?s on page ninety-six (PS), and 
which said morta-age was thereafter duly as- 
signed by the said William M. Prindle, mort^ 
gagee, to Ann E. Morey by deed of assignment 
dated February twenty-oitrhth, A. D. 1891. and 
recorded in the olHce of the register of deeds in 
;iud for the county of St. Louis and state of 
Minnesota on the tenth day of March, A. D. 
1^91, at eight o'clock in tlie forenoon in book 
sf!venty-four (74) of mortgages on page throe 
hundred and thirteen (313). 

And whereas it was provided in and by the 
said mortgage, that if default should be made 
iu any of the conditions or covenants therein 
contained on the part of said James L. Dow 
aad Mary B. Dow to be kept and performed, 
and such default should continre for the space 
of ten davs. that then and from thenceforth it 
should be lawful for the said William M. 
Pxindle, his heirs, executors, administrators or 
afiftigns, at his or their election, to dt'clare the 
vhole sum thereby secured as immediately 
due and oayablc without notice, and whereas 
default was made on the llrst day of Octo- 
ber, A. I). 1.S93. in the payment of the interest 
covenanted to bo paid in said mortgage and 
then due upon the principal sum thereby ee- 
r.nrefl and which amounted to forty (.?40.00) dol- 
lars, and snch default has continued for the 
space of more than ten days, and whereas tlie 
said Ann E. Morry, assignee of said mortgapi\ 
has elected to declare tbL- v.'hole sum secured 
by said mortgage t+> be now dno and payable, 
and wiierons there is claimed to be duo and is 
nowdue thereon at the da; of tliis notice, the 
Eomofone tliousaud and tixty dollars aud 
eighty cents (fltHjO.^O) principal and interest. 

Aud wliereas no proceeding or action has 
bceu instituted at law or otherwise to recover 
the debt secured by said mortgage or any part 
thereof. . , , . ,, ^ , 

Now, therefore, notice is hereby given that by 
virtue of a power of sale contained ia said 
mortgage .lud of the statute in such case made 
and provided, 1 he 8.iid mortgage wUl be forr- 
closed by the sale of the premises tlierein de- 
scribed, by the sheriff of the county of St. Louis 
and state of Minuirsota, on Fridny the six- 
le. ulli day ot February, A. D. 1>94, at ten 
o'cluck in i ho forenoon of baid d.iy to satisfy 
the amount which ehall then ba due on said 
mortgage with iuterest thereon and thri costs 
.ind disbursements of the sale, aud ttfty (?!30.00) 
dollars attorney's fees as .stipulated in said 
niortga;;e. .,..,... . . 

Th-« premises dcf criboa m said mortgage ana 
BO to he sold is the tract and parcel of land 
lyi;;g and being in the county of St. Louis and 
state of Minnesota, known and described as 
follow-, towit: . 

Lot three hundred and ninety-fonr (394) m 
block forty-nine (49) in Duluth Proper, Second 
Division, according to the rerorrted plat 
thereof. AnnK. Mobev, 

Assignee of said Mortgage. 
IlENnv S. Mahon, 

A ttornfy for Asi^ignce. 
Dated Duluth, Jan. 2. A. D. 1894. 
Jan-4-U-lS-25-Feb-l-8 



AMERDMEBT TO ARTICLES. 



Ki.ow all men by these presents, that we. 
George E. LUlligan and W. T. McClnrg, who are 
respectively president and secretary of the Am- 
ericau Development Company, a corporation 
duly organized and ettisting under and by vir- 
tue of the la W6 of the state of Minnesota, do 
hereby certify that a special meeting of the 
stockholders of the said company duly called 
and held at one of the offices of the said com- 
pany, R(>om41S Western Union building, in the 
city of rhicago. state of Illinois, on the 23rd 
day of December. lStt;<, at 10 o'clock a. ni., a 
rej^olution was duly adopted by the unanimous 
vote of the stoc'<holders of all the issued thares 
of the capital stock of said company, amending 
Article 1. of t.fce articles of incorporation of 
said company ^o as to read as follows, to-wit. : 
• "ARTICLE 1." 

"The name of this corporation idiaU be the 
American Development company. 

The genpral niture of the business of this cor- 
poration shall be the mining, smelting and 
manufacturing of iron, copper and other min- 
erals, and the jiroducing of the ;:reci(jns metals ; 
the quarrying and m.Trkcting of any kind of 
ore, stone, elat.e or other mineral substance ; tbe 
buying, ownicg. improving, selling and gener- 
ally dealing inlands, tenements and heredita- 
ments; the buying, owning, seUing and dealing 
in personal property, raiuiug and other stocks, 
and Eecurities. of every kind and natun-, and 
the transaction of all such other business as 
may bo df-emed necessary or convenient for the 
welfare of this corporation. Any of said biiei- 
ness to bo carried on in the province of British 
t^olumbia, the state of Minnesota, the state of 
Illinois or clsev.-here. 

The principal place of transacting the busi- 
ness of this corporation shall be the city of Du- 
luth, Minnesota."' 

In witness whereof, we have hereunto set our 
hands and the corporate seal of said corpora- 
tion this 23rd day of December, 1893, in dupli- 
cate. 
In presence of : 

G. E. MlLLICVK, 

President. 
fSeal.] W. T. McCLUEci, 

Secretary. 



PIMMBIVB. 



W. 



w. McMillan company. 

HEATING AND PLUMBING. 

215 West Superior street. 



HTOVtC BJBPAJSiyO. 



HEATING STOVES, COOK BTOVFS AND 
ranges cleaned and repaired on short no- 
tice, castings fnmished for any kUid ot atOYW 
made : American Stove Repair Works, 118 East 
Superior street. 



CIVIL ElfaiNKBRS. 



STATE OF ILLINOIS, 1 
County of Cook. 
George E. MiUigan and W. T. McClnrg being 
first duly sworn (>n oath depose and say, and 
each for himself deposes and says, that he, the 
said George E. Milligan is president, and that 
ho, the said W. T. McClurg is the secretary of 
the .\morican Development Company, and that 
as sucli. president and secretary respectively, 
they have subscribed the foregoing ct-rtilicate. 
That eacb has carefully read over the foregoing 
certificate so subscribed by him and knows the 
contents thereof, and that the same is true of 
his own knowledge. 

G. E. Mllligax. 

President. 
W. T. McClceg, 

Secretary. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me this Zitd 
day of December, 1893. 

Laura IIoescel. 
Notary Public. 



[Seal.] 



Cook Coimty. 111.* 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, ; 
Depaetment of State, j 
I hereby certify that the within instrument 
was filed for record in this oflice on the 26th day 
of December. A. D. 1893, at 9 o'clock a. m., 
and was duly recorded iu Book J 2 of Incorpor- 
ations on page 433. 

F. P. Brown. 
Sooretary of Stai*. 
Jau-4.11. 




NEW 
LIFE 



RICE A MrGILVRAY. CIVIL RNQINEERB 
and Borvoyors. 621 Chaitiber of Com- 
i»erco. 



M. 



8, & W. H. COOK, nUBVEYORS AND 
civil engineers. 305 Woet Fourth street. 



GOLD. 



SILVER BOUGHT FOR 

BagU. mannftioturing 

jewolore, 105 W , Sup, st. Booms 5 and 6, upstairr. 



OLD GOIiD AND 
cash by Hirsohy & 



bVEING AND CLEANING 

msrnLAaslDYEINGluJD CLEANING OF 
of all sorts of ladies and genU warmente, 
Rtthe Lake Superior Steam Dye Works, 32 
Weat First street. Mrs. A. Forster, Prop. 



Dr. E. C. West's Nerve and Brain Troatmenl 
l."! sold under ponitivo written guarantee, by author- 
l/o.-l appiita cnJy, to cure Weak Memnr.v; Loss of 
Jiii.in and Nerve Power; I.ost Manhood; Quirkness; 
N'l'bt l/>.'»ses; Evil Proanis* Ijick of Confldonce; 
Kurvonsness; Ijissltude; all Drnins; Loss of Power 
af the Generative Organs in either sex, con.-ed by 
over-exertion; Youthful Errors, or Excessive Use of 
Tdbacco, Oijium or Liquor, which soon lead to 
:^lt^ef/ Consumption. Iiisiinity and Death. By mail, 
;i a box; b for t5;jwlib Mvitton guarantee to cure or 
refund monev. 

WESTS LIVRR PILLS cures 8>ck headache, 
billiousness. liver complaint, sour stomach, dys- 
Tiepsin nud constipation. 8. F. Koice Druggist, 
:U"i West Sui>erior street. Duluth. Minn. 



OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, ? .. 
County of St. Louis. 5 

I hereby certify that the within instrument 
was filed in this olQce for record, on the 4th 
day of Jan. , A. D. 1S94. at 9 :4.5 o'clock a. m.. and 
was duly recorded in Book — of MisceUaneous 

Amos Skephard, 
Register of Deeds. 



"VIORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE. 

Default having been made in the payment of 
the snm of twenty-five hundred fifty aud 3(5-100 
(f2.J50.8'5) dollars, which is claimed to be due 
aud is due at the date of this notice, upoa a 
cert.nin mortgage duly estcuted and delivered 
by John E. Fuller, mortgagor, to Susan L. 
Hitchcock, mortgagee, bearing date the 25th 
day of September, 1SS9, and with a power of 
sale therein contained, duly recorded in the 
office of the regit^ter of deeds ia and for the 
county of St. Louis and state of Minnesota, on 
the iitftli day of Septfniber. INJfti, at 8 o'clock a. 
m., in Book 41 of mongpges, on page 15^. and 
no action or proceeding having been instituted, 
at law or otherwise, to recover the debt secured 
by said mortgage, or any part thereof; 

Now, therefore, notice is hereby given that by 
virtue of the power of sale coataiued in said 
mortgage, antl pursuant to the statute in such 
case made and provided, the said mortgairo will 
be forrclosi-d by a sale of the premises described 
iu and conveyed by Raid mortgage, vfa : Lots 
(S.')©) three hundred fifty and (35i) three hun- 
dred fifty-two, in block (14) fourteen, Duluth 
Proper, Second division, according to the re- 
corded plat thereof, said mortgaged prpmises 
being in St. Louis County and stat'' of Minne- 
sota, with the hi^reditaments and appurte- 
nances; which ."^ale wiU be made by the sheritf 
of said St. Louis County, at the fr<int door of 
the court house in the city of Duluth. in said 
county and state, on the I7th da> of February. 
1S94, at 10 o'clock a. m. of that day, at public 
vendue, to the highest bidder for cash, to pay 
caid debt of twenty-five hundn d fifty and 36-100 
dollars and interct t, and fifty lUdlars attorneys' 
foes, as stipulated in and by ^ald mortgage in 
case of foreclosure, and the disbursements al- 
lowed by Itw; subject to redemption at any 
time within one year from the day of sale, as 
provided by law. 

Dated January 2nd, A. D. 1S94. 

Susan L. HiTrHCocK, 
Mort«aeee. 
8. T. & Wm. Harrisox, 

Attorneys for Mortsragee. 
Rooms m;-6ll Torrey bldg., 
Duluth, Minn. 
Jan 4-11-1S-25 F 1-S 



WISCONSIN CENTRAL USES. 

XaSLtest Tiine Oard. 



4 A'^pm 

7 :2.NDm 

10 .-(Sam 



Lv. Ar, 

....Duluth. 

...Ashland 

Ar ('hieago Lv 



r 

lldOam 
8-.20am 
6: Opm? 



8:80pm 
11 :4.Spm 



Ticliots sold and baggage checked through to 
nil poiuls in tbe United States and Canada. 

Cloee cormections made in Chloaffu wtttx ail 
trains going Kast and South. 

For fuR uifotmatioo appl/. *<> your neareet 
Uoket agent or . _, JAB. C. POND, 

UOB. Fm*. and Tkk. Act,. Cbioaco, IU 



D., M. ft N. RAILROAD TIME TABLE. 
Daily, except Bmiday; ia effect Dec. 18, 1S83. 

Train No. 1, northbotmd— 

Lv Duluth (Union depot) — o.rsam 

Ar Virginia •..••••••... 11 :^^0 &m 

Ar Biwabik 12:01m 

A r Mountain Iron ll::<3am 

Ar Uibbing - lU:20pm 

Train No. 2. eonthbound— 

Lv Virginia laOpm 

Lv Mountain Iron... ...••>.•>•••• •••••• t;40 pm 

LvBiwabik .'. !"^5f *>" 

Lv HibbiuK.. 1555 pm 

Ar Duluth (Union depot) B« pm 

Q. C. GILFILLAN. 
D. M. PfllLBIN, 0«n'I Paaa. Act 

Qen'l Manacar. 



I 



I, 



k 




'^=*"W 



THE DULUTH EVENING HEBALD: THUKSDAY. JANUARV 4, 1894. 



Part of Governor Flower's Message Which is 

of Considerable Interest to the Du- 

luth People. 



He Discusses the Improvement of the State 
Canal System and Shows its Great 
Necessity. 



At Present He Thinks the Substitution of 

Electricity for the Present Motive 

Power is Advisable. 



The Herald is indebted to Governor 
Roswell P. Flower, of New York, for a 
copy of his annual message to the legis- 
lature, which was mailed in advance ot 
its delivery. There is one subject touched 
u[)on in the message, in which Duluth 
has a deep interest— ttie improvement of 
the canal system of New York state. 
I pon this subject the governor says: 

"I have alluded in other otBcial papers 
to the necessity for maintaining the 
efficacy of the canal system and extend- 
ing its usefulness wherever practicable. 
The Krie canal was built three-uuarters 
of a century ago to divert the flood of 
agricultural wealth of the West from 
outlets to the sea by way of Canada or 
the Mississippi liver. That policy poured 
the treasures of the new country at the 
feet of New York and built up her great 
cities. As much now as ever before in 
her history does the state of New York 
need the maintenance of substantial 
waterways. No narrow or short-sighted 
policy should permit this tide of com- 
merce between West and East to be 
turned away from New York. Today 
Canada aspires to contest with us for the 
traffic of the great lakes. She has 
already spent upwards of $60,000,000 in 
improving and building canals and in 
deepening channels. She is construct- 
ing a new canal through her territory at 
the Sauk Ste. Marie, and is making a 
channel fourteen feet deep all the way 
from Lake Superior through the Wel- 
land canal and St. Lawrence river to the 
sea. When this is completed a 2000 ton 
boat can go from Duluth to Montreal, 
Halifax or Liverpool. To meet this com- 
petition the Inited States government is 
making a 20 feel channel through the 
lakes to Buffalo. When this is com- 
pleted a 3000 ton host can come as far as 
Butjfalo, and from that point freight must 
find a cheap and easy outlet to the sea- 
board. Here is where New York's in- 
terest lies, and where the necessity of 
utilizing the advantage of the Erie canal 
is vital. 

"Think for a moment of the vast 
wealth centered now in the territory sur- 
rounding the great lakes. Here, in these 
states, is already nearly half the popula- 
tion of the country. There has been no 
parallel in history to the rapid develop- 
ment of this region. Its industrial and 
commercial possibilities are almost un- 
limited. The great wheat fields of tne 
world are there, great areas of limbered 
land, immense deposits of iron, copper 
and the precious metals. The cities of 
this region must eventually be the great- 
est centers of wealth and population in 
the country, and the natural pathway of 
their products and those of the vast 
country beyond them must 

ever be through the great 
lakes to the east. Railroads alone can 
not carry all the product of this region; 
develooment would be checked if de- 
pendence was alone upon them. But 
railways and waterways together, not 
antagonistic but mutually essential will, 
year by year, carry increasing burdens 
from these treasuries of wealth to the 
seaboard, and take back the products 
which our industries or commerce supply 
in return. The figures of the lake com- 
merce are already startling. In i88g the 
tonnage is said to have been 10,000.000 
greater than the combined entries 
and clearances of all the seaports of the 
United States and 3,000.000 greater 
than the combined entries and clear- 
ances of Liverpool and London. States- 
manship would be short sighted which 
would fail to take consideration ot these 
facts in outlining or establishing a policy 
of state development. How to attract 
to and through our own state this enor- 
mous traffic should be the subject of 
careful solicitude. 

"To establish a ship canal is, in the 
opinion of most persons who have given 
the suggestion careful consideration, 
both impracticable and unwise. The 
most practicable suggestions are con- 
tained in plans for increasing the ton- 
nage of the Erie canal. 

"One of these plans has been in pro- 
cess of execution during the last seven 
years. It consists in lengthening the 
locks so as to permit two boats to pass 
through at the same time, thereby saving 
expense and time of transportation. 
Under this policy all but four of the 
locks which it is feasible to lengthen, in 
the opinion of the superintendent of pub- 
lic works, have been so lengthened. The 
cost has been about §3,000,000 thus far. 
The results have been disappointing, 
for the tonnage ot the canals has dimin- 
ished instead of increasing. The length- 
ening of the remaining tour locks will 
not change the situation materially, for 
it requires on the average about three 
minutes to lock a boat, so that the time 
saved between Buffalo and Albany, by 
lengthening the remaining locks, would 
be less than half an hour. 

"Another plan proposed in connection 
with the lengthening of the locks is the 
deepening of the canal and the raising of 
its banks, so as to enable boats of larger 
capacity to be used. The deepening of 
the canal would necessitate the rebuild- 
ing of all its structures— an enormously 
expensive undertaking: the raising of 
the banks, however, would be quite feas- 
ible as a means of securing greater depth 



of water. Something in this direction 
should undoubtedly be done when the 
present capacity of the canal proves in- 
sufficient, and at present provision should 
be made for the prompt removal ot all ac- 
cumulations in the bottom of the canal so 
that its full depth may be enjoyed. 

"It has seemed to me, however, that 
the n<ost practical plan for immediat:Iy 
increasing the tonnage ot the Erie canal 
is that which would supply a speedier 
and more economical motive power. 
Mules and horses now propel canal boats 
at a rate of about two miles an hour, 
while steam sends them along at the rate 
of about three miles. The banks of the 
canal will stand a speed of about four 
miles an hour. It seemed to me, after 
personal observation of present meth- 
cds, that electricity might be applied as 
a motive power with a considerable sav- 
ing in cost and a considerable in- 
crease in speed. Experiments in 
this direction were authorized by the last 
legislature upon my recommendation, 
and seem to have demonstrated clearly 
the feasibility of using electricity as a 
motive power on the canals. The only 
question still to be determined is that of 
cost, and the estimates are quite favor- 
able to a considerable reduction from the 
cost of propulsion by steam. Just how 
much of a reduction could be obtained 
it is of course impossible to say definite- 
ly, but very conservative estimates make 
the saving in cost of transportation at 
least 25 per cent, and the increase in 
speed at least 30 per cent. 

"The advantage of electiicity ever 
mule or horse power would be much 
greater. If these results could be 
attained the benefit to the canal would 
be immediately greater than the benefit 
which would flow from al' the proposed 
enlargements, and need not cost the state 
a penny, lioatmen could make many 
more trips in a season, fewer employes 
would be needed on each boat, no money 
would be required for horses and mules, 
the large space occupied by steam boiler 
and engine would be saved for freight 
and danger from fire or explosion would 
be avoided. At the same time the in- 
creased tonnage and business of the 
canals would provide more employ- 
ment and more remunerative occupa- 
tion for boatmen. Other advantages 
readily suggest themselves. It should be 
clearly understood moreover that the 
adoption of electricity as a motive power 
does not mean the abandonment of 
horse, mule or steam power it boat own- 
ers prefer to have their boats propelled 
by these powers. The idea is that 
whether the state furnishes the electric 
power from its own plant, or whether in- 
dividuals or corporations furnish it under 
contract, there will be no compulsion to 
use it, but the endeavor will be to supply 
it at such a low cost to boatmen that they 
will find it advantageous to apply it to 
their boats in the interest of economy. 

"This plan need not interfere, either, 
with any proper enlargement or deepen- 
ing of the canal. Indeed, if the plan is 
found to operate satisfactorily, the next 
logical and necessary step would prob- 
ably be to so improve the eanal as to 
enable the use of larger boats. But for 
the present I am quite convinced that 
the proper course is to give electric pro- 
pulsion a fair trial, and if it accomplishes 
what is claimed for it, a new era of 
activity and prosperity should begin for 
our canals. Grain.has been carried dur- 
ing the last season from Chicago to Buf- 
falo for as low as i cent a bushel; boat- 
men can carry it profitably at 2 cents a 
bushel. If by cheaper and quicker pro- 
pulsion the cost from Bu^ala to New 
York by way of the Erie 
canal can be reduced to 
3 cents a bushel. as is 
reasonable to suppose, there is no other 
carrying route that can successfully com- 
pete with it, and a continuance ot New 
York's supremacy is assured. 

"Moreover, the harnessing of the tre- 
mendous water torrent of Niagara to the 
wheels of industry will furnish the cities 
of Buffalo and Rochester and all West- 
ern New York with the cheapest power 
for manufacturing in the United States. 
We may look forward to the time when 
the great flour mills of the world will be 
located there, for the cheapness of power 
would more than comoensate for the cost 
of transportation of grain from the fields 
of the Northwest. So with other 
manufactories. Then, more than 
ever, will be needed cheap 
transportation through the state. Today 
the Erie canal does not carry one-half its 
capacity. Reduce the cost of transpor- 
tation and increase the speed and the 
tonnage will increase, and when the ton- 
nage increases then will be the proper 
time to seriously consider expensive 
schemes of enlargement. 

"The essential point in arranging for 
the application of electric propulsion on 
the canals is that the power should be 
furnished at the lowest possible cost, and 
any construction of state works for this 
purpose or any contract with individuals 
or corporations for supplying power to 
the boatmen should be hedged about 
with abundant safeguards for the protec- 
tion of public interests." 

Ladies' Aid Society INeeting. 
The annual meeting and election of 
officers of the Ladies Aid society of the 
First Baptist church was held yesterday 
afternoon and those chosen were: Pres- 
ident, Mrs. G. C. Steele; vice president, 
Mrs. H. H. Hanford; secretary, Mrs, T. 
B. Hawkes; treasurer, Mrs. Mahon; 
directors, Mrs. Z. D. Scott, Mrs. Colby 
Smith and Mrs. Thomas Cameron. Dur- 
ing the year, according to the treasurer's 
statement $400 has been realized. A 
sale ot fancy and other articles is to be 
held soon. A New England supper was 
served in the evening. 

A Curious Specimen. 
There is a curious natural history 
specimen on exhibition at the Merchants 
hotel. It consists of two black tail deer 
heads with antlers interlocked in such a 
manner as to be inseparable unless some 
of the prongs should be broken from the 
horns. They are the property of James 
Foley, of Medora, N. D., and attracted 
much attention at the World's fair, 
where they occupied a place in the 
Northern Pacific exhibit. The deer 
were found dead thirty miles south of 
Medora. 



TBIHK THIS OYER. 



Highest of all in Leavening Power. — Latest U. S. Gov't Report 




Baking 
Pomier 



Of Profound Interest to Every 
Woman in the Land. 



Tbis CoDcerDs Them Only and is Not 
For Men to Bead. 



You Will Value This if You Are Old, But 
Much More if You Are Young. 



Our country has many thousands ot 
fair daughters women whose beauty 
and vivacity are marred only by being 
in almost continual ill-health. They are 
not exactly sick, but they are certainly 
far from well. If they were in good 
health, how attractive they would be ! 
Concerning this matter, Mrs. John Bar- 
low, who lives at Winn, Me., says: 

"For about three years 1 had been 
troubled with those weaknesses peculiar 
to my sex. 1 became very nervous and 
my head troubled me so 1 could not 
sleep or read. It seemed as though 
something was drawing down from the 
top of my head. 1 would be so tired at 
times it was a burden for me to move. 

"1 had dyspepsia so that my food did 
me no good. I had doctored all the time 
without benefit and was afcout discour- 
aged when 1 commenced taking Dr. 
Greene's Nervura bloixl and nerve rem- 
edy. I have taken two bottles and am 
decidedly better, fmy head does not 
trouble me and 1 rest well nights. I am 
not troubled with dyspepsia. I feel that 
I cannot say enough in praise of Dr. 
Greene's Nervura blood and nerve rem- 
edy." • ' • 




♦♦♦♦»»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»»♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

I GREAT SLAUGHTEB SALE! 

Bargains In Everything. 

For thirty days, our entire stock, Dry Goods, Shoes and Groceiies, must w 
and will be Sacrificed. Thousands of dollars' worth 
will be sold for less than half. 



♦ QROCERIESI GROCERIES! GROCERIES! 



21 lbs Granulated Sugar for. .$1.00 

32 lbs Rolled Oats i.oo 

32 bars best Soap i.oo 

25 lbs good Rice i .00 

20 lbs choice Rice i.oo 

20 lbs choice Raisins 1.00 

20 lbs Currants 1.00 

10 lbs choice Cali. Peaches. . i.oo 
10 lbs choice Evaporated 

Blackberries 1.00 

20 lbs choice Crackers i.oo 

8 lbs good Coffee 1.00 

5 lbs choice Burnt Coffee i.oo 

5 lbs good Java and Mocha. . i.oo 

3 lbs choice Java i.oo 

5 lbs good Tea i.oo 

3 lbs choice Tea i 00 

Choice Hams 9c per lb 

Best Hams 10c per lb 



Molasses and Syrup 

from 25c to 50c per gal 

Good Vinegar 20c per gal [ 

Choice Apples $4 40 per barrel _ 

Choice Burbank Potatoes, ^ 

55c per bush ', 

1000 barrels of our best Pat- 
ent Flour at $1.70 per sack 

100 lbs choice Lard at. .7'zC pei lb '. 

Our best Lard loc per lb < 

An endless line of canned 
goods, choice corn and 
tomatoe?, peas and beans 

at loc per can 

Large line of California 
Fiuits former price 20C, 15c a can 

Dairy Butter 20c to 25c per lb ' 

Best Creamer j^ Butter. .30c per lb T 
Choice Butterine 16c per lb ^ 



PRICES SUBJECT TO MARKET CHANGES. 

Wholesale and Retail Department House. 

^ In our Wholesale Dep.irtment prompt shipments will be made toall [ 

■ points in the Northwest. Prompt delivery in our Retail Department to , 

all parts of the City and Suburbs. 

203-205 East Superior 81.. Temple Opera. 
Telephone No. 509. 

>♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦»♦»»»♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



J. WILKEY. 



MBS. JOHS BARLOW. 

Mrs. Amos V. Dell, of 235 Hancock 
avenue, Jersey City Heights, N. J., de- 
scribes just exactly the feelings of thou- 
sands of other women. 

"I suffered," she said, "from complete 
prostration and exhaustion of the nerves 
and physical system. I had womb dis- 
ease terribly, and leucorrh(L;a so bad that 
I could hardly walk. 

"1 was tired snd weak all the time, 
and hardly cared whether I lived or died. 
I took Dr. Greene's Nervura blood and 
nerve remedy, and now feel as if I had a 
new lease of life. 

"I no longer have that tired feeling, 
the leucorrhcta* has stopped, and I do 
my work without getting tired. 

"This wondeiful medicine has done 
me more good than anything else I have 
ever taken. Why, I had only taken one 
dose on going to bed, and in the morn- 
ing I woke up feeling like ai o her 
woman." 

No suffering woman should be without 
this medicine. It is purely vegetable 
and harmless and its effects are wonder- 
ful. 

The discoverer of this great remedy is 
Dr. Greene, of 35 West Fourteenth 
street, who is the most successful special- 
ist iti the world in curing nervous and 
chronic diseases. He can be consulted 
in all cases, freeof charge, personally or 
bv letter. 



W. L. DOUGLAS 

00 On%^El WELT. 

Squeaklcss, Botlotn Waterproof. Best Shoe sold at the price. 

86, 84 and $3.60 Dress Shoe. 

^ Equal tusioin \\<>rk, tobUng lioiii $6lo 4iS. 

.83.60 Police Shoe, 3 Soles. 

^ Best Walking Shoe ever ni;nle. 

82.60, and 82 Shoes, 

Unequalled at the price. 

Boys 82 & 81.76 School Shoes 

Are the IKsl lor Service. 

LADIES' 
$3, $2.60 $2, $1.76 

" BfBtDongolB, stylish. Perfect 

I'lttingand Servlceable.Best 

in the world. All Styles. 

luBiet upon having AV.L. 

DoiigluH ,Shoe8. >'auie 

l>riet' stamped on 




bottoui. lirockton 

Mass. 



For sale by SUFFEL & CO. 




GOSSIP OF THE TOWN. 



What Other People Have to Say of Each Other 
and Things in General. 
"One of the most cheering signs of the 

revival of the interest taken in Duluth by 
Eastern parties," said G. A. Leland, "is 
the amount of money that is coming here 
for loaning on improved real estate. 
More money is ready than can be used 
profitably at present, and before long 
some will seek investment in real estate." 
«• c> • 

Contractor Frank McDonald, of the 
West Knd, leaves in a few days for 
Southern California where he intends to 
settle. He said: "My friends .out there 
tell me that many a modest fortune is 
being made and is still to be made in 
Southern California among the- gold 
fields that were hastily worked over 
many years ago. New veins are being 
found constantly in localities that have 
been passed by as worked out and I am 
going to try my luck." 

Employers' Liability. 
The state supreme court has handed 
down a decision for the respondent in 
the case of James Sims, respondent, vs. 
American Steel Barge company, appel- 
lant. Following is the syllabus: 

1. Where upon the trial of a case it 
is shown that a defendant had in his em- 
ploy a crew of men whose exclusive 
work and duty it was to put up such 
staging a- d scaffolding as from time to 
time was needed for the use of workmen 
engaged in the defendants' general work 
and business, the presumption arises that 
a staging found in position at the place 
where a workman is reciuired to perform 
his work, and upon which he is obliged 
to stand to perform it was built by one or 
more of the staging crew. 

2. The men composing such a crew 
and the men engaged in defendants" gen- 
eral work and business are not fellow 
servants. 

3. Held that there was no abuse of 
discretion on the^iart of the court below 
when it denied defendant's motion for a 
change of place of trial lor the conven- 
ience of witnesses. Order affirmed. 

Collins, J. 



The modern, progressive business training school of the Northwest. Business, 
Shorthand, Typewriting, Telegraphy, English and Penmanship departments. Over 
100 graduates placed in good paying positions during the past year. Day and 
Evening Sessions. New year opens Jan. 8, 1894. 

LOCATION. 105 and 107 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



^ 



98 \^ Lbs?" 

PRIMUS 

FANCY PATENT 

WARRANTED 

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INCDRPOBATED 




Start the New Year with a sack of 

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FACTUREKS 



ABSOU/TEUr PURE 



Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 

Every One Mall Them. 
No one should fail to mail one or more 
copies of The Herald's Christmas num- 
ber to distant friends. 



Will Commence This Month. 
Dr. Henry Johnson, the new pastor ot 
the First Presbyterian church, who ar- 
rived on Tuesday from South Bend, Ir.d., 
will not fill the pulpit until about Feb. i, 
the presbytery there requiring him to re- 
main two or three weeks longer. Satis- 
factory arrangements were made here 
and Dr. Johnson has selected apartments 
here and will come as soon as released 
at South Bend, Ind. 

Installation of Officers. 
Duluth Camp, No. 8, Woodmen of the 
World, installed officers at the A. O. U. 
W. hall last evening, those who went in 
being: Dr. J. F. Landry, C. C; M. Bert- 
rand, A. L.; Joseph Lemoignan, clerk ; A. 
Lemay, banker; Dr. J. F. Landry, physi- 
cian; f. Beauchamp, escort; Joseph Per- 
reault, watchman; I. Bonneville, sentry; 
A. Racette, manager. A banquet was 
served afterwards and speeches, songs 
and music gave pleasant entertainment 
for the guests^ 

Has a Son in Duluth. 
A Lexington, Ky., dispatch of Jan. 2 
says: "Dan Safirans, aged 52 years, a 
prominent politician and influential citi- 
zen, died at his home in this city this 
morning from an overdose of chloral. 
Mr. Saffrans cime here from .\berdeen, 
Miss , and has held dififerent places in 
the revenue service. He was a candi- 
date for the postmastership here, but 
failed to get the endorsement of those 
who promised him. He has been in liad 
health for some time and leaves a family, 
his son being a railroad man at Duluth." 
The son referred to is in the employ of 
the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic rail- 
way at thi'j point, having recently come 
here from Cincinnati. 

■ — ■ ■♦ - - ■ » 

In Torment. 
Surely if there are any unhappy suf- 
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look down in pity it is people agonized 
with rheumatism. They are in torment 
the year around with little or no respite. 
Now, there is no evidence to which pub- 
licity has been given in behalf of Hos- 
tetter's Stomach Bitters more concurrent 
and convincing than that in behalf of its 
efficacy in incipient rheumatism. And 
since iheumatism and rheumatic and 
simple gout are among the most obsti- 
nate complaints to which this admirable 
remedy is adapted, and since they all 
have a fatal tendency to attack the vital 
organs, the advisability of the early use 
of the bitters, whtn they manifest them- 
selves, must be apparent. Efficacious, 
and mo>t signally so, are the bitters, too, 
in malaiial diseases, kidney and bladder 
icactivity. constipation, dyspepsia, hver 
complaint and nervous ailments. 



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Florida and Western R. R's* can be 
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170 East Third St., St. Paul, Minn. 
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\|ORTGAaE8ALE- 

Defnolt bavinR boon made in tbe payment of 
tlio sum of $3152.48, wbicb is claimed to be due 
at tbe dat« uf ttiiH notice, upon a cortaiu mort- 
gage liuty ezocntAtl and deliveriHi by John 
Mallmauu and ('atiirinHliBllmaDn.bis wife, mort- 
KagorH, to C'barlns H. ClaKue, inortga^pe, bear- 
ing Jat« tbel»tb day nf April, A. D. 18S0, and 
duly rocordfd in the ofliee of the register of 
deeds in uud fur the county of St. Ix>nis and 
state of MituPBota, on ttie :25th day of April 
A. D. 18B0, at h .30 o'clock a. m.. in book 37, of 
mortgages, on pase 4!>0, and whlcti Euid mort- 
gage, together with the debt secured thereby 
was duly assigned bv said Charles U. ('lague to 
Z. T. Mullin. by written assignment, dated the 
22nd day of May, A. D. 1890. and recorded in the 
otiice of tlie register of deeds of said county of 
St. Louis, and Btateof Minnesota, on the 3Ut 
day of May. A. D. 1890, at »:50 o'clock in the 
forenoon in book "74' of mortgages, on 
page 21, and no action or proceeding at law 
or otherwise having been instituted to re- 
cover the debt secured by raid mortgage, or 
au^ part thereof. 

Now, tliorefore, notice is hereby given that by 
virtue of the power of tale contained in said 
mortgage and pursuant to the statutes in such 
case made and provided, the 

said mortgage will be foreclosed 
and the premisos described in and convered 
by said mortgage, namely : 

Westerly one-iialf {■w%) of lot thirty-eight (3Si 
East First street. First Uivision, Duluth, Min- 
nesota ; otherwisft, described as all that part of 
lot thirty-oiglit (3?), East First street, Dulnth 
Proper, First DiviBioD, according to the plat 
thereof on tile and of record in the office of the 
register of deeds in and for the county of St. 
Louis, that lies within twenty-five feet of the 
southwesterly line of said lot thirty-eight (3'S). 
being a rectangulair piece ot land 2!) by 140 feet 
in size, all situated in St. ],oui8 County, 
and state of Minnesota, with the hereditaments 
and appurtenances will be sold at public auc- 
tion to the highest bidder for cash to pay said 
debt, and interest and taxes, if any. on said 
premises, and $75 attorney's fees, as 
stipulated in and by said mortgage in case 
of foreclosure, and tbe disbursements allowed 
by law ; which sain will be made by the sheriiT 
of said county of St. Louis at the front door 
of the court house in the city of Duluth, St. 
Louis (/onnty, Minnesota, on Saturday, the 
3rd day of February, A. D. 1894, at 10 o'clock in 
the forenoon of that day, subject to redemp- 
tion at any time within one year from the date 
of sale as provided by law. 

Dated December 2l8t, 1893. 

Z. T. MtJLLIN, 

Assignee of Mortgagee. 
Schmidt & Beyn-old.s, Attx)rneyB, 
Torrey building, 
Duluth, Minn. 

D 21-28 J 4-11-18-25 F 1 



M 



ORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE- 



Whorcas default has been made in the condi- 
tions of that certain mortgage, duly executed 
and delivered by Joseph John Thatcher and 
Margaret Thatcher, his wife, mortgagors, to the 
Homestead Building and Loan .Association, of 
Duluth, Minnesota, mortgagee, bearing date the 
17th day of February, 1890 and with a power of 
sale therein contained, duly recorded in the 
ofliee of the register of deeds in and for the 
county of St. Louis and state of Minnesota, on 
the 8th day of March A. D. 1890, at 2 .-40 o'clock 
p. m., in book M of mortgages on page 246. 

And, whereas, default has been made in the 
payment of the interest, premium, and dues on 
the obligation and indebtedness secured by said 
mortgage for a period of more than six months 
after the same bec»me duo and the same is now 
wholly unpaid : and, whereas, it was provided 
and expressly agreed in and by said mortgage 
that if default should at any time be made in 
the payment of the prmcipal sum when due, or 
of the interest, or of the monthly premium or 
insurance, for the space of six months after the 
same shall have become due. then and in that 
case the whole principal debt secured by said 
mortgage shall become due. payable and collect- 
able immediately, and the ^aid mortgagee was 
authorized and empowered to sell the mort- 
gaged premises described in said mortgage at 
public auction and convey the same to the pur- 
chaser in fee simple agreeably to the statutes 
in such case made and provided ; and, whereas, 
there is claimed to be due at the date of this 
notice, on said mortgsge and indebtedness the 
sum of twenty-three hundred four and 18-100 
($<!304.1S) dollars, and no action or pro- 
ceeding having been instituted at law or 
otherwise to recover the debt secured by said 
mortgage or any part thereof. 

Now therefore notice is hereby given that by 
virtue of the power of sale contained in said 
mortgage and pursuant to the statute in such 
case made and provided, the said mortgage will 
be foreclosed by a sale of the premises de- 
scribed in and conveyed by said mortgage, 
viz.: That part of lot numoered one U) on 
East Fifth street, Duluth Proper, First Divi- 
sion, according to the recorded plat thereof, 
lying northerly of a line drawn through Raid 
lot parallel to the northerly line of Fifth street 
and seventy (70) feet distant therefrom, being 
the northerly oue-half of said lot. Also lots 
three (31 and four (4) and the east one-half of 
the Southwest quarter of section two (2) and 
the southeast nuarter of the southwest quarter 
of section twelve (12.) and lots four (4) and five 
(.5j and the west tialf of the northwest quarter 
or section \wenty-four (24) all in township 
fifty-one (51) range sixteen (16) west. Also the 
west half of the southeast quarter and the 
southeast quarter of the southwest quarter and 
lot four (4), all in section eighteen U8) town- 
ship fifty-dne (51) range fifteen (15) west, ac- 
cording to the government survey. 

All the above described lands being situated 
in the county of St. Louis and state of Minne- 
sota, with the hereditaments and appur- 
tenances which sale wUl be made by the sheriff 
of said St. Louie County, at the front door 
of the court house in the city of Duluth. in said 
county and state on the 13th day of January, 
1894, at 10 o'clock a. m. of that day at public 
vendue to the highest bidder for cash, to pay 
said debt of twenty-three hundred four and 
18-100 ($2304.18) dollars, and interest, premium, 
dues, insurhuce and the taxes, if any, on said 
premises, and one hundred (100) dollars attor- 
neys' fees as stinulated in and by raid 
mortgage in case of foreclosure and the dis- 
bursements allowed by law subject to redemp- 
tion at any time within one year from date t>f 
sale as provided by Isw. 

Dated November 28th, 1893. 
The iJoMESTEAD BuiLDixu & Loan Associa- 
tion. 

•Mortgagee. 
, T. T". IlrDSON. • 

Attorney for Mortgagee 
N 30 D 7-14-21-28 J 4 



LEG-AL NOTICES. 



N 



OTICE OF MORTGAGE SALE. 



Ttoooiy •&!• and t«liat>ia cure for QONORRHSA, 
CLKET. LSUOORRH<ZA, And other Ui»chiir«t>i, 
In eCUter lex. A •p««dy CUr* ot the moat obMlnate 

M«X-to««ur«. Leading druggl»t<», 91.^>Ok 



Whereas default has been made in the condi- 
tions of that certain mortgage dated the 28th 
day of October, A. D., 1891, made, executed and 
delivered by James 1'. Watson, as mortgagor, to 
Sidney Adams as mortgagee, which said mort- 
gage was recorded in the office of the register 
of deeds in and for St. Louis C/Ounty, Minne- 
sota, on the 30th day of October, A. D., 1691, at 
9 ::« o'clock a m.. in Book 71 of mortgages, on 
page .■>42, mortgaging certain premises situated 
m said county and state described as follows, 
to-wit : 

Lot seven (7). block thirty (30), village of 
West Duluth, First Division, according to the 
plat thereof as recorded and on file in tbe office 
of the register of deeds in said county of St. 
Louis and state of Minnesota ; and whereas de- 
fault has been made in the payment of the 
couoon note and the principal note secured by 
said mortgage, and both of which notes became 
due and payable on the 28th day of October, A. 
D. 1893. and there is due on said mortgage at 
the date of this notice the sum of sixteen hun- 
dred and twenty-three and sevmty-two one 
hundredths dollars; fifteen hundred dollars of 
said amount beiug the principal and one hun- 
dred and twenty-three and seventy-two 
one hundredths dollars of said amonn*-. 
being the inter- st doe on _ said 
mortgage ; and whores s no proceeding, either at 
law or In equity, has been iustituted to recover 
the debt secured by said mortgage. 

Now, tlierefore, notice is hereby given, that by 
virtue of the power of sale' contaiued in said 
mortgage, and pursua' t to the statut^i m such 
case made and i>rovidftd, the said mortgage 
will be foreclosed and the aforesaid premises 
doKcnbed in said mortgage will be scdd at 
public auction to the highest bidder for cath. 
at the front door of the court house 
of said St. ]x)nis county, on Second street, in 
the city of Duluth, and state of Minnesota, ^.u 
Saturday, th- 3rd day of February, A. D. 1S94, 
at tb« hour of 10 o'clock in the foreuouu of >ai<l 
dar, by the sheriff of said St. Louis County, to 
satii-fy the amount due at t-aid time on said 
mortgage, together with twenty-five dollars for 
attorneys' fees, as provided in said mortgage, 
and for the costs and charges of notice and 
sale. 

Dated at Duluth. Minnesota, this 2Ist day of 
December. A. D. 189.1. 

Sidney Adams, 
Mortgagee. 
MoEs, TowxE & Harris. 
At'orneji" Ikt Mortgagee, 
41J Palladio Building, Dulnth, Minnesota. 
Dec 21-28 Jan 411-18.25 Feb 1. 



/ \FFICE OF THE WABKKDN IRON COM 
^ / pany. Duluth, Minn., December 29, 1893. 
Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting 
of the stockholders of the Wabigon Iron (Com- 
pany for the election of director* and tlie trans- 
action of such other busiueisa as may be brought 
before it, will be held at the ofiice of the oom- 
i)any. 407 Lyceum building, in tbe citv of Du 
luth.stateof Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, 1894. at two o'clock p. m. The trans- 
f<-r books will l>e closed at noon on Decembei 
:iinh, 1893, and reopene<l on January 11, 1894, at 
ton o'clock a m. W. U. Fisher, 

Becy. 



/ \FF1CE OF THE NIBIWA IRON COM 
\ / pany, Duluth. Minn., December 2i«, I'SVf.-;. 
Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting 
of the stockholders of the Nibiwa Irrm Com- 
pany for the election of directors and the trans- 
action of such other busineos as may be brought 
before it, will bf; held at the othce of the com- 
pany, 407 Lyceum building, in the 'city of Du- 
luth, state of Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, 1H94. at two o'clock p. m. The trans- 
fer lxK>ks will be closed at nocn on December 
90th, 1893, and reopened on January 11. 1894, ar 
ton o'clock a. m. W. H. Fishee. 

Sf c \ . 



OFFICE OF THE MINIWA IRON COM- 
pany, Duluth, Minn.. December i9, 1893. 
Notice is hereby given that tlie annual meeting 
of the stockholders of the Miniwa Iron Com- 
pany for the election of directors and the trans- 
action of such other business as may be brought 
before it, will be held at the otIic« of the com- 
pany, 407 Lyceum building, in the city of Du- 
luth, state of Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, 1894, at two o'clock p. m. The trans- 
fer bo<iks will be closed at noon on December 
■30th, lSt^3, and reopened on January 11, 1891. at 
ten o'clock a. ii;. W. H. Fisher. 

Sec y, 

OFFICE OF THE WENONA IHO.V COM- 
pany, Dnluth, Minn., December 29, li««;i. 
Notice is hereby given that the annual lueetini: 
ol the i-tockholders of the Wonona Iron < 'om- 
pany f<ir the election of directcjrs and tne trans- 
action of tuch other business as may be brought 
before it, will be held at the office of the com- 

fiaiiy, 407 Lyceum buildint;, in the city of Du- 
uth, state of Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, 1894, at two (('clock p. m. The trans- 
fer books will be closed at uo<jn im December 
:J0th, 189:1. and reopened on January 11, 1S64, at 
ten o'clock a. m. \V. H. Fisher. 

Sec'y. 

/ \FF1CE OF THE MINC81N IRON COM- 
y ' pany, Duluth, Minn., December 29, 189:3. 
Notice is hereby given that the annual meeting 
of the stockholdt-rs of the Minosin Iron Com- 
pany for the election of directors and the trans- 
action of such other business as may be brought 
before it. will be held at the office of tbe com- 

fiauy, 407 Lyceum building, in the city of Du- 
uth, state of Minnesota, on the tenth day of 
January, 1894, at two o'clock p. m, Tbe trans- 
fer books will be closed at noon on December 
30th. 1^93, and reopened ou January II, 1.*^, at 
ten o'clock a. m. W. 11. Fishes, 

oec y. 

NOTICE OF ANNUAL MRKTING-THK 
secretary of the Dulnth & Winnipeg Kail- 
road company having omitted to give propei 
notice by publication of the annual meetiug of 
said railroad company, which annual meeting 
is re(iuire<l by the by-laws of said company Ui 
be held ou the second Thursday of December in 
each year, now therefore, we. the undersigned 
directors of said railroad company, do herebj 
give notice that the annual meeting of the 
stockholders of the Duluth & ■Winuii>eg Rail- 
road company to elect directors for the ensuing 
year and to transact all such other business a^ 
may lawfully be transacted by said company ai 
its annual meeting, will be held at the office of 
the c-ompany in the Lyceum building, in the 
city of Duluth. Minnesota, ou the twelfth day 
of January, 1691, at two o'clock p. m. 
Dated Dec. 1", 1^93. 

\V. F. Fitch, 

H. J. BOAEDMAN. 

J. IIlgh Peters. 
Directors of the Duluth &. Winnipeg Railroau 
Company. 

Dec 23 to Jan 12 inc. 



M 



ORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE. 



James T. Watson has disposed of his iuterest 
ia the above p;ope{ty. 



Whereas default has been made in the condi- 
tions of that certain mortgage, made, executed 
and delivered tiy Stephen L, Seldcn, mortgagor, 
unto William 11. Selden, m*>rtg;igee, by which 
the power of sale therein contained has be- 
come operative. Said moi^age bears date the 
second day of November, eighteen hundred aatf 
ninety-one, and was duly recorded in the 
office of the register of deeds ia and for St 
Louis County. Minnesota, on the ■.'7th day of 
November, 1891, at 4:55 p. m., in book 71 of 
mortgages, page 578. Said mortgage • wa.-- 
duly assigned by said William H. Selden untc 
James H. Webb by inetrument dated the 2.5tL 
day of November, ll<i91, and duly recorded in the 
registry ol deeds aforesaid ou the 19th day of 
December. 1.^91. at 4 p. m., in book 97 of mort 
gages, page 19; and by said .fames H.Webb 
duly assigned unto Wdliam Foyle by instrn- , 
ment dated the 2:-^ day of January, 1892, and 
(luly recorded in the registry of deeds aforesaiii 
on the SSth day of January. 1892. at 4 p. m . in 
book 97 of mortgages, page 57 ; and by said 
William Koyle duly assigned uuto J. K. Newel' 
by instrnmei.t dated the 27th day of February. 
1893, and duly recorded in the registry of dee<lt 
aforesaid on the 14th day of November, 1?WJ, at 
8 :30 a. m., in book 97 of mortgages, page 5:4>. 

Said mortgage was given to secure the pa;- 
ment of the sum of $3.''iO. two years from date, 
with interest at the rate of 8 per cent per 
.nnnum, payable semi-annually. And wherea? 
there is now claimed to be doe and is due 01 
said mortgage, anil th^debt secured thereby, a* 
the date of this notice the sum of five bundreit 
and sixty-five dollars and sixty-live cents (K)65.6.'i ' 
principal and interest, and no action or pro- 
ceeding • having . been instituted at . law 
to recover the amount so due or any part 
thereof. 

Now theretore. notice is hereby given, that in 
pursuance of the power of sale C(mtaine«i in said 
mortgage, and of the statute in such 
case made and provided, the premises deecribe.i 
in and covered by said mortgage, situate, lyinc 
and being in the county of St. Louis and stat<» 
of Minnesota, and described as follows, to-wit ; 
Lofnumhored six (61 of block numbered two \'l 1 
of We't End addition to^'-tlutli according to tbe 
recorded pl.it thereof, o» ale au<i of record in the 
oiliceof theregiBterof deedsin and for said coun- 
ty, will be sold at public auction to the highes' 
l^idder at the front door of the court house in 
the city of ])nluth. iu the county of St. Louis 
and state of Minnesota, on Monday, the eightli 
day of January, 1894, at ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon of that day, to satisfy the amount whicl 
shall then be due on said mortgage, with taxef . 
if any, together with the costs and disbursi' 
ments of the sale and $.'0 attorney's fees as 
stipulated iu said mortgage. 

Dated November 23, 1^9:*. 

J. K. Newell. 
Assignee of Mortgagees'Assigtiee. 
W. II. Tnirp, 

Attorney for said As.signee. 
Nov-2;V3Q-Dcc-7-14-21-2>-Jan 4 

Tbe Nortbwestern Liie! 

C, ST. P. M. h O. R'Y. 

THE SHORT LINE TO CHICAGO 

And the Pullman Car Linn to St. Paul 
and Minneapolis. 



for Ht. Paul 
aiul MinneRpoIia. 


Uay tixi:. 
Ex. SunV 


Nytni Kx 
Daily. 


Lt Dulnth 

LvWMit Superior... 


10 00 am 

10 20 am 

4:*)pm 

600 pm 

5 40 pm 

Day Exp. 


11 00 rni 
11 20 pm 


Ar Stillwater 

4r8t. Paul „. 

,Vr Mirin<»*pol» 


7 28 am 
660 an 

7 30 am 


Kor Kan Claire, Chlea«o 
and tne Ba«t and South. 


Chioaco 
Limited 
Daily. 


Lv Duluth 


1000 am 
lOaOam 

"Tbcrim" 


S15p(ii 


Lt Weet HnpArior «. 

Ar Milwaukee 

Ar C^hioago 


5 35 pin 
7 50 ant 
9 30 am 



Luxurious Parlor Cars on day trains. 

Direct ceunectious in Union depot, St. 
Pa 1. for all 1 r-intg^South and West. 

PullmHii and aWagner finest buffet slcepein 
on the ' Chicaco Limited," 

Connections in Chicago with moruing trai'J 
South and East. 

GilU. M. HMITIT, B. W. RUMMEH8, 

f^ineral Agent . t "itv Ticket Acent. 

40ft W«wt Knoerinr 8r 



i'HK II 


JLlilll 
PASSF 


klKUN UANtiE 


UA1LK4 

4HLK. 


}AD Ctl 


.NGKH TIME T 




^. M. 


A._M_ 

11 W 

10 SO 

9 2U 


STATIONS. 


P.M. 


A.M. 


Ar Dulnth Lv 
Two Uai bors 
Allen Junction 


3 15 

4 IS 

5 53 




8S!i 
8 1ft 
8«) 


Biwakik 

McKinley 

Lv Virginia Ar 


t) 40 
700 
7 30 






8 20 
7 ao 


Ar Tower Lv 
Lt Ely At 


6 47 

7 40 





I 



Daily >^xc«pt Suudsy. 



Dulnth. Miuu. 



Nov 11 



rml !-. 



H. VIKT.R. 
Kneiigui A^eUt. 



t 




M 



^seta 




6 



THE DULUTH EVENING HERALD: THURSDAY. JANUARY 4.1894. 



'7 



\ 







11. 



Sv>lid Progress 

::v Merit. 




Four Separation Cases on the Calendar To- 
day and Three Were Heard Before 
Naon Adjournment. 



Suits, 

$6.00 

$9.50 
$12.00 

Over= 

$8.00 
$10.00 
$12.00 

Soils ia Doiible-Breasted Sacks. 
SailJ in SIngle-Breasteii Sads. 
Slits iQ Cataway Frock Styles. 
Oyrcoats in Regular Cot Styles. 
Q,,....„»^ in Ulster Styles. 

.New j^Mrments, our regular 
t<^rk — with from S3 to $5 

... :c valne crowded into 

c.ich price tlian any other 

store will* irivc. 

Thousands to pick from — 

every one a solid, honest, 
atisfying bargain. 



Three More Are to be Before the Court To- 
morrow Other Proceedings Tliis 
Morning. 



Judge Ensign Has Handed Down His De- 
cision in the Superior Woolen Mill 
Cases. 



.IHiii 




V\:> 



<^$to 



^mi.AiiNN* 



CAPT. RAY T. LEWIS FOR MAYOR. 




\ 



Many People Think He Would be a Good Man 
for the Place. 

^!any frier. Is nf Capt. l\.ay T. Lewis 

: _ , his availability as a cSindidate 

-nd if the captain vsill con- 

. : the race there is no doubt 

uit he will make it very iuterestinj? for 

spirants for the office. Capt. 

[, s lived ill Duluth formanyyears 

anu has a very wide acquaiiitance among- 

t^e voters, and- his popularity is un- 

lioned. He is not actively engaged 

■ :ss at the present time, and is 

■ ir. a p< sition to devote to the 

: the mayoralty all the time that 

renuires. This is a very im- 

Doinl, as the business of fhe city 

u^^.. . ..v.n very rapidly in recent yeais 

and has niiw reached a stage which de- 

: ds the close attention of the chief 

i,!tive. 

Lewis has a clean record. He 

r ...ays taken a keen interest in 

vthing tending to advance the in- 

t^ of I)uluth and the whole head of 

.ike, and has ever beeri at the front 

veinenl which has bad that 

w. A good, keen business 

mar., bound to no clique or corporation, 

'ould discharge the duties of the 

c with abihty and with evenhanded 

'" rtain is genial in 

. (. ilc by every one 

tn iiis ideas. His many 

fire believe that he would 

'date, and they are con- 

iminated, he would re- 

A a larijc majority of the 

Duluth. This they as- 

di5n->ra!::eraent of the 

T gentlemen 

'^- ■ ..^^ as probable 

■ \ that if convinced 

oral desire that he 

id enter the field, Capt. Lewis 

! "onsent. because he has 

r j.l anv of the duties of citi- 

:- ' ; duty of every true 

. ; I a call of this char- 



1lA 



an.. 



R 



tiiry Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 



T 



Order at Once 

- "'I cr of copies of the Christmas 
■ ou wint. fhey can he had at 

The Hi;raid couatmff room. 



iated Charities would like to 

place where those who have 

. homes could be sent for a night 
or t vo. Ca'l at the office, 415 Wood- 

brid,.je brni<iinj^. 



This was divorce day in the district 
court, three cases being heard this morn- 
insj and another was down for this after- 
noon. Judge Lewis heard one, James O. 
Rodney vs. Mary Rodney, colored peo- 
ple. There was no appearance of the 
defendant and the witnesses were ex- 
amined. The charge was improper in- 
timacy with other persons. The judge 
ordered a judgment for divorce. 

Two cases were heard before Judge 
Mocr and in neither one was there any 
appearance of the defendant. The first 
taken up was Fannie Bonathan vs. 
William H. Bonathan. Cruel 
and inhuman treatment was 
charged and findings were ordered for 
the plaintiff. Erie A. Westrom vs. 
Charlotte Westrom was the other and 
the plaintiff complained that his wife, 
the defendant, hurled abusive language 
at him. Judge Moer heard the evidence 
and took the matter under advisement, 
not being satisfied that the use of abusive 
language is sufficient ground for getting 
a divorce. 

Tomorrow three m.ore divorce cases 
are on the calendar for hearing. 

Before Judge Lewis the case of Perris 
T. Norton vs. Duluth Street railway was 
tried and submitted. John Karby vs. 
Alfred Young et al. was stricken, 
there being no appearance of the 
parties. Henry P. Gill secured a judg- 
ment against the Mutual Fire Insurance 
company, of Chicago, the defendant 
failing to appear. In the Portsmouth 
Trust and Guarantee company vs. John 
McKinley et al., the defendant did not 
appear and judgment against James 
Billings for ^^5000 was entered. 



WOOL CASES DECIDED. 



Judge Ensign Files His Findings in the Suits 
Against E. J. Salt. 
Judge Ensign has filed his findings of 
fact and conclusions of law in the Supe- 
rior wool cases in which Enoch J. Salt & 
Son were concerned. When they failed 

a number^f parties who had consign- 
ments of wool in transit stopped 
them at Duluth. A bank in Ports- 
mouth, Ohio.seized these shipments under 
a v/rit of attachment. The owners 
brought suit against Sheriff Sharvy to re- 
cover and have been granted judgments. 
Judge Ensign decided that the defendant 
took the wool while the plaintiffs were 
entitled to possession, they having exer- 
cised their right of steppage in transitu 
prior to the taking of the wool. Judg- 
ments were rendered as follows: H. 
Hodgson and H. W. Otis, $2620.15; H. 
Hodgson and James Wing, $1022.45; H. 
Hodgson and C. Armstrong, $1801.27; H, 
Hodgson and H. Lewis, S2910 87; J. D. 
Sears, ^2430.71 ; John Gleason, $2499.20. 

Judge Ensign has made an order al- 
lowing plaintiff to proceed with execu- 
tion in the case of S. F. Snively vs. W. 
C.Bond. The -defendant filed a notice 
of appeal and bond, but the plaintiff 
claimed this was done only to delay exe- 
cution. The motion to enforce judgment 
was argued at the special term on Sat- 
urday last. 

Charles L. Edmonds has brought suit 
against Charles Carlson, H. C. Hanson, 
Duluth «S; Iron Range railway and Win- 
ston Bros., for work and labor furnished 
in the roadbed of the Iron Range road, 
between Virginia and McKinley, to the 
value of $253.40. He asks judgment for 
the amount and a mechanic's lien. 

Other papers filed were: 

Replies to defendant's answers in case 
of Rochester Loan and Banking com- 
pany vs. W. P. Strickland et al. 

Answer in Jones & Laighton, limited 
vs. Clyde Iron company. 



FOR CRIMINAL LIBEL. 



Managtr Weiss Served With Papers By Itasca 
County's Sheriff. 
Sheriff O'Toole, of Itasca county, ar- 
rived in the city today and served Man- 
ager A. C. Weiss of The Herald with 
papers of arrest in dn action for criminal 

libel instituted by County Attorney 
Pratt, of Itasca county, on account of 
the publication of a scandal involving 
the county attorney and the wife of a 
Grand Rapids jeweler. 

Mr. Weiss and the sheriff left by the 
3:05 train for Grand Rapids, where he 
will appear before the justice of the 
peace and waive examination. 



Deaine&s Cannot be Cured 

by local applications, as they cannot roach the 
flisAiised portion of the ear. There is ouly one 
way to cure deufnPSB, and that ie by coostita- 
f lonal remedies. Deafaee;* is caused by an <d- 
tkunwl condition of tlie nuicouH lining; of the 
puHtachiaii tube. V/hi.-n this tube* jfcts mflarned 
you liavo a rambling 8oiin<l of imperfect hoar- 
iriv', aud wh"n ic is entirely closed deafness is 
tlvft result, and nnle&s tt.e inllammatiou can be 
taki-n r.nt and this tnbe restored to its uormal 
coaditiou heving will bo destroyed forever; 
ninaca'-es ont of ton are caused by catarrh, 
which i^ nothiuK but au inflamed condition of 
the mucous surfaces. 

We will .ifivo one Lurdrod dollars for any case 
of deatuetih (caa&ed by catarrh) that cannot be 
eurud by Hall's ('atarrh Cnro. Send for circu- 
lars*, free. F. J. CnENKy Jc Co., Toledo, Ohio. 
;';" Sold by drujcffists, ISc. 



AWARDED HIGHSST HONORS-WORLD'S FAIR. 




The only Pure Cream of Tartar Powder. — No Ammopia; No Alum. 

Used in Millions of Homes — 40 Years the Standard. 




KEEP 

YOUR 




ON 



101 FOS THE NEEOy 



Another Meeting of the Aldermen and Com 

missioners at Which the Question 

Was Fully Discussed. 



Establishment of a Woodyard Not Considered 

Feasible— Breaking Rock Finds More 

Favor. 




lAKESIDE! 



LAKESIDE LAND CO.. 

Wm. C. Sargent, 

FIRST NAT. BA.NK BLG. Managef. 



CITY BRIEFS. 



Cull;ina, Dentist, top floor Palladio. 
Smoke Endion cigar. W. A. Foote & Co. 

Imperial Flour the best in the world. 

Good applications for loans on inside 
property wanted at once. S. M. Chand- 
ler, 404 Palladio bldg. 

Extra copies of the 24-page Christmas 
number of The Herald can be had at The 
Herald counting room. 

Tremont hotel now open. Board, $5 
per week; board and room, $7:50 and 
upwards per week. 

We buy mortgages. Crosby Eros. 

The Merchants' hotel has cu: rates for 
table board to $5 per week; room and 
board, $8.50. 

"The Idlers" gave a dance last evening 
at the Hunter block hall. 

The funeral of Charles Peterson, who 
committed suicide, took place yesterday 
afternoon from Bayha's morgue. 

The executive committee of the Du- 
luth Humane society met yesterday at 
T. O. Hall's office. Humane Officer 
Haskins' report was received as well as 
those of other ofificers. 

George Wallace, alias Santa Claus, 
was buried this afternoon. His son, 
James Wallace, arrived from South Da- 
kota yesterday. He had not seen his 
father for many years. 

Joe Balton will be examined before 
Judge Carey this evening on the charge 
of selling liquor on the Fond du Lac 
reservation. 

The Parkersburg Mining company has 
amended its articles so as to make all 
assessments not paid in ten days a lien 
on the stock. In thirty days the stock 
may 'oe sold to satisfy the lien. 

Anna K. Anderson died yesterday at 
329 St. Croix avenue of heart failure. 
The coroner decided upon no inquest. 

The Central Cinch club met last even- 
ing with Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Hoopes, 
of West Third street. The lady's prize 
was won by Mrs. Hough and the gentle- 
man's by George E. Long. The club 
will meet next Monday evening with Mr. 
and Mrs. B. F. Hough, 3 West Fourth 
street. 

A marriage license has been issued in 
Clerk Sinclair's office to George E. Se- 
ville and Amelia Matheson. 

Second citizenship papers have been 
issued to Claus O. Christenson, formerly 
a citizen of Norway. 

The Willis A. Gorman G. A. R. post 
had an installation of officers last night 
and the event, with all the attending ex- 
ercises was a most enjoyable one. 

Frank Collins entertained the mem- 
bers of the "Koo Koo Klub" at his home 
on East First street last evening. 

An assignment of a mining lease, cov- 
ering a seven-eighths interest in the sw '4 
of section 31-58-17, from G. A. St. Clair 
to William R. Rood, was filed today. 

The American Development company 
has filed amended articles of incorpora- 
tion, changing some of the provisions as 
to the business to be carried on by the 
company. 

Births as follows have been reported 
to the board of health: Charles and 
Mabel Watts, 324 Nineteenth avenue 
east, a son; Walcritz and Stonirtowa 
Ygnariak, 27 Eighth street east, a son; 
Julius and Fugaler Hansen, 231 East 
Seventh street, a son. 

Deaths as follows have been reported 
to the board of health: Maren H.Helm, 
aged 61, 216 Central avenue. West Du- 
luth, cancer of the mouth; May Chison, 
aged 25 years, 619 First avenue, typhoid 
fever. 

A civil service examination for the 
grade of clerk and carrier will be held 
in Duluth on Saturday, Feb. 10, .it 9 a. 
m. Only citizens of the United States 
can be examined and those applying for 
the position of clerk must be 18 years 
old and those for carrier 21 years and 
nDt over 40. 

Miss Amanda Brown died yesterday 
morning at Two Harbors of heart dis- 
ease. She was a sister of Harry Brown 
and George Brown, of Duluth. The 
body will be brought to Duluth and the 
funeral will be from the Endion depot 
shortly alter 1 1 o'clock, Rev. C. C. Salter 
officiating. 

An alarm of fire was turned in from 
Box 32 last evening, but the services of 
the department were not needed. A 
gasoline stove exploded in the Ashta- 
bula fiats. 

The Mayoralty Contest. 
George W. Stevens passed the 21,000 
mark today and has a clear lead in the 
mayoralty contest. The contest closes 
Wednesday night. The record is as fol- 
lows: 

Geo. W. Stevens, manager Cranberry 

Lnmtwir company 21,008 

Henry Haskins 17,!>14 

W R. llichardson «« 

K. A. Gray 2H.')0 

A. M. Morrison 1730 

Robert L. Knebol 6.5.3 

G. W. ('ornell 627 

B. F. Howard 4«0 

U.C. KeudaU IM 

S. W. Clark 165 

F. C. Hartley 164 

W. Gombertr ~ IW) 

(ieorfte W.Buck 132 

J. B. Hntphin 120 

Scattering 1272 





The Crowds Are teeasioi al 

FREIMDTH'S 



Work Will Probably be Under Charge of the 
Board of Public Works and Engi- 
* neer. 



The special committee appointed by 
the council Monday night to investigate 
ways and means for employing idle and 
needy men in the city, met with the 
county commissioners at the city hall 
this morning for the purpose of arriving 
at some joint understanding in the mat- 
ter. Aldermen Cox, Oie and Soi- 
ensen, the members of the 
aldermanic committee were pres- 
ent and Commissioners Butchart, 
Swenson, Poirier and Miller represented 
the county interests. Alderman Cox was 
chosen chairman and a full and free dis- 
cussion was given the question. 

Commissioner Butchart said that a 
wood yard had been mentioned, but he 
did not favor that. In the first place the 
ordinary laborer is not a skilled chopper, 
and in many cases would not cut more 
than half a cord a day. In the second 
place, all the available timber is three 
and four miles back, and by the time 
the workmen tramped out and back they 
would have a very limited time in which 
to work. Then, again, wood is a drue 
on the market and a general cutting of 
it would work a hardship to the many 
small dealers in the city who now find it 
difficult to make ends meet in the busi- 
ness. Only a short time ago, a ma« with 
a horse and wagon brought a load of 
wood onto the street and it was eight 
days before he sold it. That was all he 
wanted of the wood business. At Tower 
the county had about 700 cords cut. 
When it was found that only 50 cents a 
cord would be paid less thart 
forty men took work. Commissioner 
Butchart also thought that in the case 
of single men the best plan is to furnish 
them money to go to work in the woods 
when employment is guaranteed them. 
Married men are on a different footing, 
for if they go to tiie woods, they get only 
about $12 a month, which will still leave 
their families on the hands of the public 
to care for. 

The members of the aldermanic com- 
mittee thought that some men could be 
put to work at once on rock work. The 
opening of West Superior street will be 
imperative in the course of time and it 
will have to be done from the general 
fund. The rock taken out can 
be used on street work and 
much can be sold to contractors and 
builders. In the long run the city would 
not be out to any extent on that kiud of 
an arrangement. Then the contract is 
all ready to be let for the improvement 
of West Sixth street from Cascade 
square to Fourteenth avenue. That 
matter will be brought before the coun- 
cil. There are other places in the city 
where rockwork can be conducted to 
good advantage. If the waterworks 
bonds are sold next Monday evening, 
work can be commenced at once on the 
pumping station, as W. C. Sargent owns 
the ground and immediate arrangements 
can be made with him. 

Commis.sioner Poirier thought there 
was no doubt but that the county could 
and would cash citv orders and then turn 
them back to the city later on in lieu of 
money due the city from taxes. These 
city orders, too, will bear interest and 
many stores will take them gladly. 

The plan considered the most feasible 
was to have the work under charge of 
the board of public works .nnd tbi city 
engineer. Men who want work will be 
required to present to the foreman or- 
ders to that effect from the alderman in 
their ward or from one of the commis- 
sioners. 

Recommendations in accordance with 
the above ideas will be made to the 
council next Monday night, but before 
that time the committee .ind the commis- 
sioners will meet again for the purpose 
of taking action on any new develop- 
ments in the matter. One thing is cer- 
tain, however, that work of some kind 
will be furnished in someway, and in ac- 
cordance with a motion by Alderman 
Sorensen, $1.25 per day will be paid. 
The relief will also be especially de- 
signed for heads of families. 



And it's worth paying heed to, May save you several dollars 
on a small purchase. We're deep in the intricacies and annoy- 
ances of taking inventor}'. We want to wind up by next 
Monda)% and have laid out all our short lengths of 



THE CALL PREPARED. 



The Republican City Convention to be Held on 
Januaiy 23. 
A meeting of the city Republican 
committee was held last night in Chair- 
man Holiday's office. Some difficulty 
was experienced in the apportionment 
of dele gates from the new wards, as no 
accurate account of the number of vot- 
ers could be obtained. The apportion- 
ment, which was finally based on the 
vote for Governor Nelson, gives the en- 
tire citv forty-nine delegates but will not 
be finally completed until this evening. 
The Republican primaries will be held 
between 7 and 9 o'clock on Monday, Jan. 
22, and the convention on the following 
day, Tuesday, Jan. 23, at the city hall. 

Entertainment at Two Harbors. 

Professor Custance and Mrs. \'ictoria 
Aras, pianist, assisted by musicians from 
Duluth and Two Harbors will give a re- 
cital and operetta at Two Harbors this 
evening. A special car was attached to 
the Duluth & Iron range train this after- 
noon for the Duluthians and will return 
by special train after the performance. 



TEMPLE THEATER. 

One Night, Saturday, Jan. 6tb, 

you will shontl You will scream 1 Yon 
wi;l yell? Yon won't do a thing bat 
lau(;h at tbnt funny comedian 

MR. FRANK DANIELS 

And IiIh bi<r comedy company which in- 
cludes Bossto tiaaiBou and 

I 20— Other PIayers"20 t 

J rilESENTISO ^ 

"LITTLE PUCK/' % 

All Fan! AllLanghs! AU Surprises! 4 
Seat" now on bale at box office and Kil- T 
gore & Siewerl's. Price : i5c. .500, 75c $1. T 

»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦ ♦ 




GREAT 



1 




SALE 

AND IT IS NO WONDER. 



on tables in the aisle, and marked them at prices that will 
simply astonish you for their lowness. We want to get rid of 
all or a great many of them in the next two days, and in order 
to do this, price has not been taken into consideration in the 
marking. All kinds of Silks among them — black and colored, 
fancy ar^d plain —enough for waists, enough for big sleeve?, 
enough for a trimming, and in some cases enough for a whole 
dress. 

Mark V/hat We Tell You, 

It will pay you to look this up, as the prices made will only hold 
good for two days, TOMORROW and SATURDAY. 



TliePricesAreSflLow 



Just Think of It ! 



30 



PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 





WE WISH YOU A MOST 

AHD WILL EfflPHASfZE IT BY Of FERING YOU 

PIANOS 

AT HALF PRICE 

With us this means a GENUINE REDUCTION on 

twenty-iivc Pianos of One-Half of the regular retail prices. 

It has been claimed for some time, and we had begun 
to think so, that there is but little money at the head of 
the lakes. We now think different. 

Our large Christmas trade proved to us that there is 
lots of money stored away ready to be brought out when 
our people are convinced that GENUINE BARGAINS are 
ofifered. 

We now propose to give our people the 

CHANCE OF A LIFETIME 

To procure a new STANDARD PIANO at prices barely 
covering the cost of material and labor. 

$250 Pianos for S125 

$300 Pianos for S150 

$400 Pianos for $200 

$500 Pianos for $250 

$600 Pianos for $300 

We have a host of customers to whom we refer as to 
the quality of instruments sold by us. No "stencil" or 
"trade" Pianos, only standard, FULLY GUARANTEED 
FOR SIX YEARS by RELIABLE MANUFACTURERS. 

No such bargains have been offered during the past 
twenty years. 

"One man's loss, another's gain, 
Manufacturers' loss, now your gain." 

Now is Your Time. 



f 



Century 
Piano Co. 

OF DULUTH AND WEST SUPERIOR. 

I no Tower Avenue. West Superior, Wis. 




More Bread ! ^ % 
Better Bread ! 

Is made from a sack of 



IMPJ^RIAI^ 



On all Ladies' and Children's 
Shoes, and they are the best 
in the land. 

I PER CENT 
3 DISCOUNT 

On all Gents' Underwear. 

2JJ PER CENT 
9 DISCOUNT 

On Ladies' Ypsilanti and 
Lewis Underwear. 



PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 

On all White and Black Laces 

PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 

On all Curtains, Portiersand 
Draperies. 

PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 

On all Silk, Satin, Sateen and 
Mohair Skirts. 

PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 

On all Calico Wrappers. 

PER CENT 
DISCOUNT 

On all Silk and Cashmere 
Tea Gowns. 



2 Si PER CENT 
9 DISCOUNT 

On Blankets and Comforters. 

CLOAKS 

Selling now way down. 

DRESS GOODS 

Prices cut less than whole- 
sale cost. 



I : 



■I 



LINENS 



Selling fast, because prices 
are low. 




\ 



% gi,/OUR 

Than from any other similar amount 
of Flour in the world. It is the best 
and sold everywhere by all dealers. 

ASK YOUR GROCER! 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 

Throe 16x30 Otis .Steel Rollers. 

Throo lSxC4 Oiib .^t<»ol toilers, Rutmnn Bottini?. 

One fiO Uorsi-'-powfr ISice Autonxatic t'ut Off Engine. 

One 140 horec-iiower Huckeyo Kucine. 

One 40 horso-jH^wer WestinRlumce Kupino. 

One 80 horsc^power VVostiaghouso l^gnie. 

All lu tirst-class condition. 
AJbo the old power hooe-^ bnildin^ o{ llie Hartman General Electric ( o. nt ibe foot 
of Fifth avenue east, on lake front, and a miscellaueons lot of Pipiuij and Steam 
FittingH, PuntpF. riliatting, Pulleytj, etc. 

ENQUIUE 

HARTMAN GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, 

ROOM 3, EXCHANGE BUILDING 



PROPRIETOR. 



WANTED. B\ BOY 16 YEARS OLD. LIVING 
with parents, work of some kind; v ill 
work cheap. Address G'23. Herald. 



S. GELHAAR 

DULUTH'S 

PRACTICAL FURRIER, 

Esfiihliflu'il ?S'«7. Makes and repairs all kinda 
of FUK GARMENTS. Sealskin Sacques re- 
dyed and re-fltted on the premisee. PLUSll 
COATS STEAMED. 

209-21' WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



$8.00— BEST SET OF TEETH 





GULLUM. 

PalQleM DesUst. 



Top Floor. 



OF UOUBEUOU) 

AND 

OTHRB GOODS 

At 206 West Michigan Utroet, 

DULUTH FEED & STORAGE CO., 

D. A.. DUNLAP, Ifanacw. 



I- 

i 




■piiT^^ 

I 



Fill «ut the Cou|Mn in 
The Herald this evening 
■nd send it to this office. 



BULUTH EVENING HERALD. 



WbttaywrdMtotftr 



tion T 



ELEVENTH YEAR 



FRIDAY. JANUARY 



5, 



1894. 



FIVE O'CLOCK EDITION, 



i Home InstitQtion Omed and CoQtiolled by Dalatli len and not TribaJary 
to any Eastern Management. Establistied in Dnlntli in 1881. 



] 





AT 




Tie Greatest Qyercoat Sale of lue Year ! 

We Place on Sale this Week our En 
tire Mammoth Stock of our 




Worth of Hen's Overcoats at 1=2 Price 

This includes all Ulsters, Storm Coats, Fur Trimmed Overcoats, 
our handsome Tailor-made Double and Single-Breasted Meltons, 
Kerseys, Beavers, etc. 

Our $40.00 Ones go at $20.00 
Our $30.00 Ones go at $15.00 



Our $25-00 Ones go at 
Our $20.00 Ones go at 
Our $15.00 Ones go at 
Our $1000 Ones go at 
Our SaOO Ones go at 



$12.50 

$10.00 

$7.50 

$5.00 

$4.00 



Our entire stock of Boys' and Children's Clothing 
Selling at 20 Per Cent Discount, or 

ONE-FIFTH Off tlie REGULAR PRtGES 



W 



ILLIAHSON* 



/H 



ENDENHALL 



Complete and Trnsti ortliy Ontfitters for Men, Boys and Children. 




More Bread ! ^ ^ 
Better Bread ! 

Is made from a sack of 

Than from any other similar amount 
of Flour in the world. It is the best 
and sold everywhere by all dealers. 

ASK YOUR GROCER! 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 

Thnxj 16x60 Otis Steel Boilers. 

Three l^xfi* Otis Sleol Boilers, Cntrnwi SettioK. 

One 50 hon«-rower Bice 4ti' on.titic Cut Oflt En^in*. 

One 140 horsepower BDckeyo Engine. 

One 40 horse-power We»tin«honso Ectjine. 

t)ne 60 hor9«-powor Weetinghonsp Engine. 

All Ui flrat-claaa condiriiiD. , ™ ^ ., .. . . 

Also tha old power hous'* bnihlins of the Hartman General Electric v o. at the foot 
of Fifth avcune east, on lake front, and a miscaUaneoofi lot of Piping and Steam 
fittings, Pninpe, fhaftlng, PoUeys, etc. 

ENQUiUE 

BARTMAN GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY, 

ROOM 3, EXCHANGE BUILDING 



Members of tlie Dnintli Clearing Honse Association. 

CAPITAL. SURPLUS 

First National BanH $1,000,000 $200,000 

American Exchange Bank ~ 500.000 35O.000 

Marine National Banlr 250.000 20.000 

National Bank of Commerce 200.000 21.000 

t-tate Bank of Dulnth - 100.000 40.000 

S*«;tu-ity Bar.k of Dulath— 100.000 40.000 

ron Exchange Bank-- — - 100.000 



MENDENHALL & HOOPES, /Employers Liability, 

Dutrict Manager*, 1 Elevator Accidcnt, 



LOEiOJ GflarateS i ACClfleit CO.^ workmen's collective, 

/Surety Bonds, 



(LIMITED), 

OF LONDON, ENG. 

OK.c»A>rrzB3D lees. 



Individual Accident 



Must Reduce Stock 

And turn it into Cash. 

$33.0O and 3o5.00 Sack Suits, dow $23.00. 
$38.00 a.nd $40.00 Sack Suits, now $28.00. 
$45.00 and $48.00 Sack Suits, now $33.00. 

These prices are for CASH ONLY. 



J. S. LANE, 



MERCHANT TAILOR, 

430 SPALDING HOUSE BLK 



— i | 

ill I 



WILLIS IE 



The Provisional Government of Hawaii Has 

Been Asked By the United States 

Minister to Resign. 



It Was Informed the Queen Would Grant 

Amnesty to all Concerned in the 

Revelution. 



President Dole is Now Preparin^a Reply in 

Which the Demand Will be 

Refused. 



The Leaders of the Provisional Government 

Are Ready to Fight to the Last 

Ditch. 



Chicago, Jan. 5.— A special to the 
Tribune from Washington says: The 
United States government has just been 
intormed that its wishes in regard to the 
government of Hawaii have been con- 
veyed to the provisional government of 
the islands, and that while President 
Dole has promised a§ reply soon it is 
hardly expected that this will be favora- 
ble to (^ueen Lil. The message received 
was cabled from Auckland, to which it 
was conveyed by the steamer Alameda, 
which sailed from Honolulu Dec. iz. 

The information is that the reply of 
President Dole and his colleagues will be 
delayed until the case can be gone 
into thoroughly, and the contention of 
the provisional government will be fully 
set forth in answer to the demand of the 
United States. 

All this is news to the president and 
the cabmet, but it was not unexpected, 
as it is now said that the Corwin bore 
positive instructions to Minister Willis 
that he should make his demand for 
Oueen Lil's restoration at once and use 
cVery means to carry it to a successful 
termmation. The only obitacle was the 
decision of the deposed monarch that she 
would not accept the throne on the plan 
proposed by President Cleveland, but 
would insist upon support after she was 
placed there. • 

To encompass this difficulty the infor- 
mation now received is, the queen has 
informed the minister, who transmitted 
the conditions to the provisional govern- 
ment, that she will grant amnesty to all 
those who took part in the revolution and 
m subsequent acts of the government; 
will carry out all contracts since entered 
into, and will take care of all the busi- 
ness on the basis on which it is now "on- 
ducted. She agrees, further, to govern 
strictly under the constitution and will 
be guided by men whose character will 
be a guarantee of their correct course in 
public matters. 

Minister Willis, it is said here, takes a 
hopeful view of the matter, but does not 
seem to be sanguine of the success of his 
mission, especially at this time. The 
government has onlv informed him that 
it will submit a reply in due time, and is 
now getting it in shape. 

But there are disquieting features in 
the situation. The government organ 
recently published an article supporting 
the government, and, in words seemingly 
inspired, said that the action of congress 
in asking for the papers had practically 
taken the entire affair into its hands and 
the president's wishes in the matter were 
not likely to carry. After a review of 
the case and the part taken by the 
United States officials, the article con- 
cludes, it is announced, that the pro- 
visional government will not step down 
unless force is used, and this is not ex- 
pected by any one on the islands now. 

In the same connection, it is stated by 
one who knows of the message received, 
the condition of affairs on the island is 
daily growing more complicated. The 
government, since Us unofficial informa- 
tion of the intention of the United States 
government by the newspapers and Min- 
ister Thurston's messages, has been to 
all intents strengthening its forces. The 
members of the regular police force 
have been notified of the probable con- 
tlictaud theirnumber greatly augmented. 
The arms are all at hand, 
and the most resolute of the 
Americans are at the head of this 
force. The number of, men who will 
fight for the provisional government is 
placed at from 3000 to 4000, as it is 
stated that many of the supporters of 
Dole from other islands are gathering at 
Honolulu to take part in any defensive 
action made necessary. 

The provisional government continues 
tirm, and there seems no feeling on any 
hand other than that a return to the old 
order would mean a step backward, 
which must not now be taken". The 
leaders of the provisional government 
are ready to fight to the last, but they 
hope congress will prevent a carrying 
out of the declaration of war made by 
the president upon them. 



EXCITEMENT IN HONOLULU. 



Willis Called Upon President Dole to Give Way 
to Queen Lil. 

London, Jan. 5.— A dispatch from 
Auckland, New Zealand, states that the 
American steamer Alameda, from San 
F'rancisco, via Honolulu, has arrived 
there, bringing Hawaiian advices to Dec. 
22. According to these advices the 
greatest excitement was prevailing in 
Honolulu. A number of policemen, who 
had been requested to bear arms in de- 
fense of the provisional government, had 
refused to do so, and had been dismissed 
from the government service. 

Jt is further stated that Mr. Willis, the 
American minister, had written to the 
provisional government, declaring that 
they must surrender office, as the United 
States had decided in favor of Queen 
Liliuokalani, who had agreed to grant 
amnesty to the men who had overthrown 
her government, to ratify the govern- 
ment obligations and to govern the is- 
lands according to the present constitu- 
tion. 

The provisional government, at the 



time the Alameda sailed, was preparing 
a long reply to Minister Willis' letter. 
The Commercial Advertiser, of Hono- 
lulu, declares that the American con- 
gress has taken the Hawaiian matter 
out of the hands of President Cleveland 
and that the provisional government will 
not retire unless it is forced to do so. 
The paper holds that the employment 
of force to depose the present govern- 
ment is not likely. 



AT THE STATE DEPARTMENT. 



The Report Almost Doubted, but Still May be 
True. 

Washington, Jan. 5.— The Honolulu 
news to Dec. 22, transmitted by way of 
Auckland, N. Z., and conveyed to that 
point by the officers of the steamer Ala- 
meda, was discussed at the Swate depart- 
ment with much more interest than ap- 
parent credence this morning. 

In truth, as nearly as diplomatic reti- 
cence would permit, the information given 
out by the Alameda's officers as to Mr. 
Willis having at that late date made a 
formal demand for the surrender of the 
provisional government, was almost 
doubted, in view of the assurance con- 
tained in the last paragraph of the presi- 
dent's special message to congress, dated 
Dec. 18, in which he distinctly turned 
over the matter of the further course to 
be pursued to the discretion of congress. 

Still, up to Dec. 22, when the Alameda 
left Honolulu, Mr. VV'illis was acting un- 
der instructions from Secretary Gresham 
which left San Francisco by the revenue 
cutter Corwin on Dec. 4, which were 
transmitted to congress with the presi- 
dent's message. It is pointed out that 
there was nothing in these instructions 
to prevent Mr. Willis from asking the 
provisional government to abdicate. All 
that was necessary towards taking this 
action was the consent of the queen to an 
act of amnesty. 

All interest now centers in the cutter 
Corwin, whose arrival at San Francisco 
has been expected for several days. The 
Corwin is at the disposal of Mr. Willis 
and will sail from Honolulu at his plea- 
sure. Her arrival at San Francisco will 
mean that something definite has been 
injected into the situation, for it is learned 
at the state department that Mr. Willis 
would hold the vessel until be had some- 
thing important to communicate, either 
of positive action on his'part or of the 
small chance for a speedy settlement 

Dispatches From Willis. 
San Francisco, Jan. 5.— The Corwin 
arrived today and anchored off Fort 
Point. She sent dispatches ashore and 
immediately proceeded to sea again. 
Her commander absolutely refused to 
hold any communication with newspa- 
per reporters. 



This ConpoQ cotutB for one vote if sent 
to The Herald office prOTioxu to Jan. 7, 



My choice ^or Mayor 
at the ensuing spring 
election is 

Signature. 
January S. 



CRAZED BY A LA GRIPPE. 



A Mother Drowned Herself and Babe In a 
Canal. 

Dayton, Ohio, Jan. 5.— Mrs. Joseph 
Wautz, of Miamisburg, crazed with la 
grippe, seized her 8-months'-old child 
Sadie this morning, while watchers were 
momentarilv absent from the home, and 
hurrying to the canal near by, plunged 
into Its murky waters. Some time later 
her absence was noted and they went in 
hunt for her whereabouts. Tracks were 
discovered leading to the canal. An 
a'arm was given and in a few moments 
almost the entire village population lined 
the canal banks. The water was drawn 
from the canal, when the drowned body 
of the mother, with her dead babe 
clutched to her breast, was found lodged 
against a lock. 

Died From Heart Disease. 

New York, Jan. 5.— Otto Singer, a 
musician of much ability, who was a 
close personal friend and co-worker of 
Theodore Thomas and a colleague of 
the late Dr. Damrosche, was found dead 
in bed at No. 235 East Nineteenth street 
on Wednesday morning. An autopsy 
showed that death resulted from heart 
disease. 

THE REPORT WAS INCORRECT. 



The Herald Retracts the Story About an Alleged 
Scandal at Grand Rapids. 
The Herald has caused careful inquiry 
to be made as to the facts of the scandal 
reported on Jan. 2 in this paper concern- 
ing Mrs. Nesbit and County Attorney 
Pratt, of Grand Rapids. That a long in- 
timacy had existed between .Mr. Nesbit 
and Mr. Pratt is undoubtedly correct. 
but there seems to be no foundation in 
fact for the report that reached this paper, 
and the publication of which is sincerely 
regretted. That in a moment of jealousy, 
Mr. Nesbit may have been led into some 
Unguarded reference to a difference be- 
tween himself and his wife, which was 
overheard by some gossip monger, is 
perhaps true, but as far as can be 
learned it seems to be false that he 
either pretended to leave Grand Rapids 
that afternoon or over-indulgod that 
evening and while so doing circulated 
the gossip to which the article related. 
Mr. and Mrs. Nesbit have been living 
together as usual ever since. The Her- 
ald apologizes for and sincerely regrets 
the publication into which it was so un- 
wittingly led. 

Ocean Steamships. 
New York— Arrived: Weimar, Bre- 
men. 

Boulogne— Arrived: Spaarndam, New 
York for Rotterdam. 
Philadelphia— Arrived: Sardinia, from 
I Liverpool; Cartbagentan, from Glasgow 
I and Liverpool via Halifax. 



NO STATE El[»ATi 



The Supreme Court Has Reversed the Lower 
Court's Order in the State Ele- 
vator Case. 



Holds That the Act For Bulldine: the Ele- 
vator is Not an Exercise of Po- 
lice Powers. 



The St. Paul it Duluth Road's Lands in Ait- 
kin County Held Not to be 
Taxable. 



St. Paul, Jan. 5.— [Special to The 
Herald.] — The supreme court today re- 
versed the order of the lower court in 
the state elevator case. The opinion is 
written by Judge Mitchell, who says the 
act of last winter providing for the erec- 
tion of an elevator is not an exercise of 
the police powers of the state to regulate 
the business of receiving, weighing and 
inspecting grain in elevators. It has no 

relation to the regulation of that busi- 
ness, but provides for the state engaging 
in and carrying it on. 

The police power of the state to regu- 
late a business is to be exercised by the 
adoption of rules and regulations as to 
the manner in which it shall be con- 
ducted by others, and not by engaging 
in it itself. The act in question is held 
to be a violation of section 5 of article 9 
of the constitution, providing that the state 
shall never contract any debts for works 
ot internal improvements or be a party 
to carrving them on. Works of internal 
improvements, as mentioned in the con- 
stitution, are held to mean not merely the 
construction or improvement ot the 
channels of trade or commerce, but any 
kind of public works except those used 
by and for the state in the exercise of 
governmental functions. 

In the opinion the projectors of the 
plan for building the elevator are roasted 
to a turn, and Judge Mitchell claims that 
the state could" as well engaee in the 
brewing business as in the grain busi- 
ness. 

The supreme court also decided that 
the lands of the St. Paul & Duluth road, 
in Aitkin county, were not taxable. The 
decision of the lower court is affirmed in 
L. H. Grieser et al., appellants, vs. M. O. 
Hall, respondent. 

A WIFE MURDERER HANGED. 



Martin Reed Paid the Law's Extreme Penalty 
at Kansas City. 

Kansas City, Jan. 5.— Martin Reed 
(colored) was hanged at 9:15 a. m. to- 
day for the murder of his wife. Reed's 
crime was a brutal and cold-blooded 
murder of his wife. The killing oc- 
curred Sept. 16, 1890. Reed and his 
wife, Hester, quarreled over charges 
and counter-charges of inhdelity and 
separated. Later .Mrs. Reed filed suit 
for a divorce. 

The morning of the murder he told 
the landlady of the house adjoining his 
own home, which was 108 East Eighth 
street, that before the day was over he 
intended to kill Hester. Shortly after 
noon he found his wife in a room in a 
half reclining posture. He held her down 
and while she cried for mercv he placed 
the revolver against her neck and fired. 
The woman fled to the street and fell 
dving. 

Reed's mother-in-law entered the 
room where Reed was and he attempted 
to kill her, but she escaped him. Reed 
then shot himself in tne pit of the stom- 
ach, the bullet passing through his body. 
The police surgeon on exammg the 
wouna said he could not live two hours. 
Reed was 42 years old and an express- 
man. Before he murdered his wife. 
Reed went to Undertaker J. W. Wagner 
and selected two caskets. 



THE REVOLT IN HONDURAS. 



Choluleca Captured by Boniila With Nicara- 
guan Troops. 

New York, Jan. 5.— The Herald's 
Managua. Nicaragua, cable says: The 
town of Cboluteca, in Honduras, was 
captured Thursday at noon by Gen. 
Bonilla's army, aided by the Nicaraguan 
troops. Gen. Williams and several other 
officers were taken prisoners in this en- 
gagement and many were wounded. The 
invaders will march at once into Teguci- 
galpa, which is the largest and finest 
city in Honduras. 

Boniila has chosen the following cabi- 
net, members of the provisional govern- 
ment, of which he has himself assumed 
the presidency: Minister of foreign af- 
fairs, Casar Boniila: interior. Angel 
Arias: finance, Miguel Davela; war, Man- 
uel Boniila. 

Another Managua, Nicaragua, special 
has this account: The town of Choluteca 
was taken by storm yesterday. Gen. 
Villela made a heroic defense. The loss 
in killed and wounded is said to have 
been 150 men. Villela retreated to a 
ranch, where a battle was begun with a 
vanguard of the invaders, who hourly 
expected reinforcements. 

Gen. Ortiz, commanding the ' Nicar- 
aguan forces, has been ordered to await 
a Honduran attack and if made, to im- 
mediately invade their country. The 
government has levied a forced loan of 
§350,000 on merchants. 

Crespo Elected President. 
New York, Jan. 5.— The steamer Ven- 
ezuela, arrived this morning from Ven- 
ezuelan ports. At Caracas all was auiet. 
The presidential election had just been 
held and Gen. Crespo had been elected 
president. Accoruing to the constitu- 
tion two terms are not allowed. Never- 
thfejess the former incumbent was a can- 
diaate. 

A Milwaukee Firm Lowest. 

Washington, Jan. q.— [Special to The 
Herald.)— The bid of Allan Black & Co., 
of Duluth, for constructing the heating 
apparatus in the Ashland, Wis., public 
building was $6194. The lowest bidder 
was Charles B. Kruse, of Milwaukee, 
$4692. The bids were opened at the 
supervising architect's office today. 



A QUORUM STILL ABSENT. 

■r. Beutelle Persisted in His Dilatory Tactics 
Again Today. 
Washington, Jan. 5. — There being no 
session of the senate today, all the inter- 
est in congress was transferred to the 
popular branch and there was a large 

attendance in the galleries when the 
house met. No sooner had yesterday's 
journal been read than Mr. Boutelle was 
on his ftet putting questions to the 
speaker as to what had become of his 
privileged resolution in relation to Ha- 
waii. 

The speaker's replies were not satis- 
factory to Mr. Boutelle, who continued 
to press bis point and was finally ignored 
by the speaker, who recognized Mr. 
Catchings to present a report from the 
committee on rules. 

The report was' read. It provides 
for sessions beginning at 11 
o'clock; that immediately after 
the call of committees each day 
the house shall go into committee of the 
whole to consider the tariff bill; that gen- 
eral debate shall close Jan. 10; that the 
bill shall then be open to amendment 
and the previous question on bill and 
amendment shall be ordered at noon 
Jan. 25. Provision is made for night ses- 
sions and printing remarks. 

When the order was read, Mr. Bur- 
rows, a member of the committee on 
rules, raised the question ot considera- 
tion, but the speaker decided that the 
question of consideration could not be 
raised against a report of the committee 
on rules. 

Mr, Boutelle said that be would ap- 
peal from that decision, but the speaker 
declined peremptorily to entertain the 
appeal. Mr. Burrows, however, pro- 
ceeded to argue that, as the matter bad 
not been specially referred to the com- 
mittee on rules, that committee was not 
authorized to report a code of rules for 
the house. That point was also over- 
ruled by the speaker, on precedents 
heretofore established. 

That matter having been disposed of, 
Mr. Boutelle demanded that the speaker 
should inform him under what rule the 
speaker had declined to entertain his 
appeal, and was told very pointedly that 
it was not the duty of the chair, on the 
demand or request of the gentleman 
from Maine, to furnish him with any in- 
formation. 

The Democrats applauded this re- 
mark, but Mr. Boutelle persisted that it 
was his privilege to make the point of 
.order. The speaker brushed aside this 
demand and put the question on order- 
ing the previous question on the adop- 
tion of the report of the committee on 
rules. On a standing vote there were 
but 138 affirmative votes and no nega- 
tive ones. Then the yeas and nays were 
called. 

The yea and nay vote on ordering the 
previous question on the report of the 
committee on rules, resulted in a disclos- 
ure of the absence of a quorum — every 
Republican member declining to answer, 
ana one Populist (Bell of Colorado) vot- 
ing no. The result as announced was 
yeas, 169; nays, i — nine less than a 
quorum. A call of the house was then 
ordered. ' ' — 

The call of the house was responded 
to by 273 members, and then the ques- 
tion whether all further proceedings 
under the call should be dispensed with 
was put by the speaker, who announced 
the result as ayes 144. nays 40, but Mr. 
Reed thought that the vote had better be 
taken by tellers and he and Mr. Catchings 
conducted the vote which was summed 
up as 135 to 10. As the vote did not re- 
quire a quorum, further proceedings 
under the call were dispensed with, and 
then another attempt was made to get 
an effective vote by yeas and nays on 
securing the previous question on the 
report of the committee on rules. 



PHIL EVANS EXECUTED. 



Before Being Hanged He Made a Full Confes- 
sion oi His Crime. 

Bardstown, Ky., Jan. 5.— The trap 
that sent Phil Evans into eternity was 
sprung at 12:55 P- ™' Before he died 
Evans made a full confession of his 
crime. His only excuse was that he was 
drunk. Death ensued in nine minutes. 
In a speech from the scaffold he begged 
to be forgiven by God and man. 

On the night of Oct. 15, 1893, at 
Samuels dept, six miles south of bere, 
Phil Evans, colored, and Ed Hall were 
on a drunk together. Hall being very 
drunk, Evans agreed to take him home, 
a mile and a half from Samuels depot. 
When a short distance out the negro 
laid Hall in a haystack, where he quietly 
slept, and going to Hall's house called 
to Mrs. Hail to let him in, saying it was 
her husband. 

She perceived that it was not the voice 
of her husband and refused him admit- 
tance. This angered Evans, and he be- 
gan firing in at the window, which so ter- 
rified Edna, Hall's 12-year-old daughter, 
that she ran out of the house. As she 
did so Evans grabbed her, dragged her 
to a pig pen, where he brutally assaulted 
her. 

The terrified mother raised the alarm 
and the negro was captured and brought 
back. He was three times spirited 
away from here to save him from the 
fury of a mob. His trial, which lasted 
five days, was held under a heavy mili- 
tary guard. It was impossible to get a 
jury from this (Nelson) county, and a 
special venire was made from another 
county. 

THE POOR ARE SUFFERING. 



THBEE CENTS 



Tie OHil ami M Sale! 



I 








(Of Goingonattlie 

Glass Ml Store 

Is making things lively at the emporium 
of daily bargains. 



A 





Heavy Snow and Cold Weather in England 
Causes Misery. 

London, Jan. 5.— Snow has been falling 
in the county of Westmoreland, North- 
ern England, for twenty-four hours, and 
the storm shows no signs of cessation. 
The roads in every direction have been 
rendered impassable by the drifts. This 
condition of affairs is not peculiar to 
Westmoreland. 

Two mail coaches Tunning north and 
the Tunbridge, in Kent, are snowed in on 
the road. Dispatches from various out- 
lying districts in the midland counties 
report the non-arrival of mail carts. The 
intensity of the cold in Cornwall may be 
ludged from the tact that many of the 
inlets of the sea there are partly frozen 
over. 

The suffering of the poor all over the 
country is terrible. In London the 
weather has already caused a rapid in- 
crease in the death rate. 4 



is being made in this house to clean our 
stocks up previous to inventory and our 
buyers going East next month. 



THE 

FOLLOWING 

PRICES 

Are but a sample of the hundreds of gi- 
gantic bargains we are giving this week. 



Trimmed Hats. 



200 Ladies' and Children's Trimmed 
Hats, formerly sold for $3 00, $3.50, 
$4.25 and S5.00 each, see our window 
display. We give you your pick for 



$L00 

Embroideries. 



Each. 



We have put on sale a lot of Ham- 
burg Embroideries from 4 to 24 
inches wide and worth from 25c to 
75c per yard. All go at 



iSc 



Per Yard. 



See our window display. 



Ladies' and GJiildren's 
Wool Hose. 

All odd lots pat in one big^ pile, 
formerly sold for 25c to 50c All go 



i9c 



Per Pair. 



Remnants Remnants 

All Remnants of Dress Goods and 
Silks of every description go at 
exactly 

HALF PRICE. 



Don't miss the Bargains in our Linen 
department just cow. 

Table LioeDS, 
Damask Towels, 
Muslins and Sbeetings, 
Are Selling Very Cheap. 



Do Yon Know 



That Blankets are being sold regard- 
less of their actual worth to rtduce 
our stock which is too heavy? 



Siioes and Robbers 

Are going fast. It is the ridiculously 
low prices which we are quoting 
that makes us busy in this depan- 
' ment. 



SKATE SALE. 



Friday and Saturdav we will close 
out our entire stock of Skates in- 
cluding all our regular fi.(0, ;^i.25, 
$1.50 and $1.75 Skates. Your 
choice of any pair in the bouse Cor 



50c. 



Scissor and Sbear Sale 

All our regular 50c, 60c .ind 65c 
Shears and Scissors for Friday and 



Saturday only 



Every pair warranted. 



25c, 



All our regular 95c, $1.00, $1.25 
Shears and Scissors for Friday and 
Saturday only 



Every pair warranted. 



50c. 






\ 



IHi 




'* » 




BILLS WLL Nfll M. 



THE THfAL OF VAILLANT. 

Usual Amount ot Muddle-Headed Sympathy 
for the Prisoner. 
London, Jan. 5.- A dispatch from 
Patis says: A circular signed by a 
Little Chance That Any of the Duluth Bridge group of freemen has »>een sent to the 
Bills Will be Passed This Vaillant jury asking them to acquit the 

Session. prisoner on the ground that he used the 

only means in the workin>;man's power 



m AN iFUL DEATH. 



No Local Bill Not Supported by the Entire 

State Delegation Can Secure 

Any Consideration. 



for 



means in the 
limit-n^j the cupidity. 



The 



A Man Who Has Not Been Identified 
Over by a Grip Car 
Chicago. 



Run 



m 



The Two West Virginia Senators Will 
Out for a Duty on Iron 
Ore. 



Stand 



to 
of 
in 
to 
in 



\Vashington. Jan. 5. — [Special 
The Herald] -The legislative mill 
the national government is again 
operation, and it may be interesting 
note just what Minnesota may expect 
the way of nation-il legisilation during 
the remander of the first session of the 
Fiftv-third congress. Various measures 
have been presented in which Duluth is 
particularly interested, the most impor- 
tant of which are the several bridge bilis 
now before congress. Maj. Baldwin 
seems to be confident that the bill he 
has presented (that of the Duluth and 
Superior Bridge company), which was a 
compromise bill with Representative 
Haugen, of Wisconsin, will become a 
law before the expiration of the present 
session. wh<le others seem to be juit as 
contidenl that neither this bill nor the 
one presented by Senator Davis will re- 
ceive favorable consideration by either 
the house or senate. 

So many measures of national import- 
ance will occupy the attention of the 
members at this session that no local bill 
which is not supported by the entire dele- 
gation of the state will stand the least 
chance of becoming a law. Next in im- 

Sortance to the bridge bill is the plan of 
Lepresentative B-ldwin for a readjust- 
ment of the boundaries ot the Duluth 
customs distncc. It will be recalled thut 
this matter was referred to the Minne- 
soU delegation for an opinion as to the 
advisability of this change, and it is 
pretty generally understood that this is 
the last that will be heard of it. 

Representative Boen, during the ex- 
traordinary session, presented a tariff bill 
providing that all foreign goods intended 
for exchange for American products 
might b-- imported free ot duty, hut this 
measure is so chimerical that it will prob- 
ably never be given any serious consider- 
ation. Outside of these bills no measures 
of anv consequence have been presented 
by the Minnesota congressmen of local 
interest to their siate. 

The tariff s:ill continues as a disturb- 
ing element, but that wiil probably be 
removed in time to allow of a readjust- 
ment on the i^w lines of tariff policy be- 
fore the do e of the vear 1894 The 
outlook in regard to tariff changes is 
much brighter than- it was a few weeks 
ago. It is evident that the Wilson bil 
will be greatly modified in its passage 
through the 'two houses, and especially 
by the senate, and the changes to be 
made in it will be in the direction of re- 
storing some measure ot protection to 
Americ-in industries. 

The two senators from We-t Virginia 
have announced that they will stand out 
for a duty ot from 4=5 to 



police 
Jui'ge Casee's dwelling extra } 
guards toii'gtit in response to the earnest 
appeals ui persons living in the same 
block. 

The latest statement as regards Vail- 
lant's application for a postponement is 
as follows: The court rejected the ap- 
plication but in consequence of M. Adei- 
bert's action in refusing to keen his 
brief, the trial probably 'vill be pojt- 
uoncd. After M. Adelbert renounced 
hs brief the court appointed M. Libori 
todi fcna Vaillant, but he refu^ed the 
case on the ground tnat he h.id too little 
time for preparation. It is »aid that 
Deputy Lemier, who wa^ injured by the 
explosion in the chamber has off. red lo 
testif) tor the defense. 

The Pans correspondent o? the Daily 
Chronicle says that M. Lemier i> not the 
onlv rt spectable person who has offered 
to help Vaillant- "There is the usu il 
amount of muddle-headed sympathy," he 
says, "for the interesting prisoner." 



His 



Body Sev»'red Completely Above the 
Waist Before the Gripman Could 
Stop the Train, 



Fifty-Two Prisoners Now Behind the Grat- 
ings of Cook County Jail Charged 
With Murder. 



A TRAGEDY IN TEXAS. 

and Dr. 



W. 



Charles Clay Mortally Wounded 
H Waters Killed. 

Brknham, Tex., J.in. 5.— At Indepen- 
dence, Washington county, late yester- 
day afternoon, thrre was a difficulty be- 
tween Charies Clay and Aaron Shannon, 
two young men. 16 and 19 years respec- 
tively. Shannon opened tire on Clay, 
two balls t tking effect, one in the chin 
;ind ihc other in the stomach, and it is 
believed he is mortally wounded. 

Clay drew his six-shooter to return the 
fire and commenced shooting just as Dr. 
W. H. Waters reached the scene to stop 
the difficulty, and the fi.'St bullet from 
Clay's pistol struck the doctor in the 
shoulder, killing him instantly. Dr. 
Waters was a prominent and influential 
C'tizen. 

Judgments Confessed. 

Homestead, Pa., Jan. 5 —Judgments 
imounting to $23,000 have been confes- 
sed by J F. Schmitt, of this pUce, and 
an assignment has been made to the 
cashier of the First National bank. 
Schmitt's property is worth S28.000. 
Since the sensational robberv of his 
jewelry store and tragic developments 
c>i nected with the arrest, trial and es 
cape aid suicide of the robber Fi.zsim- 
mon>-, he ha> done III le busioess. Re- 
ce .tlv Schruitt has been conducting 
Hotel Amity. 

Monte Carlo Scared. 

Nick, Jan. 5. — In cunstquence of 
threats that have been made to blow up 
the Casino at Monte Carlo, everybody 
who ent< rs the gambling houses there is 
-earched to see that he does not catry 
dynamite. Some of the high patron* of 
the place objected so vigorously to this 
pricess. that an excep'ion is made in the 
cases of persons who are well known to 
the police and attendants. All others, 
however, have to submit to be searched 
before they can get into the gaming 
tables. 



Chicago, Jan. 5. — A man w' . was not 
identified, but is supposed to have been 
a peddler, met a trightful de;ith List 
night while he was attempting to board 
a Milwaukee avenue grip train. His 
body was severed completely above ih 
waist before the gripman could stop the 
train. None of the trainmen apparently 
saw him fall. He must have been stun- 
ned, for he made no outcry. 

He fell with his heail inside the rail, 
and was rolled some distance. When 
the wheels passed over him, that side of 
the ca- was raised off the track. The 
couductor knew something was wrong 
and signaled the gripman to stop. Be- 
fore the train was slopped three trailers 
passed over his body. When found the 
two portions of the man's body were 
some feet apart. Nothing to identify 
him was found on his person. 



CHARGED WITH MURDER. 




It is very difficult 

t o convince 
children that 
a medicine is 
'nice to take" 
— this trouble 
is not experi- 
enced in ad- 
ministering 

Scotfs Emulsion 

of Cod Liver Oil. It is 
almost as palatable as milk. 
No preparation so rapidly 
builds up good flesh, 
Strength and nerve force. 
Mothers the world over rely 
upon it in all wasting diseases 
that children are heir to. 

PrcpBred by Scott ft Bowne. N. Y. All itrajfirists. 



JAPANESE FESTIVAL. 



Secured an Injunction 

Council Bluffs, Iowa, Jan. 5. — The 
Council B uffs Motor company yesterday 
temp'ir iriU h adrd oEf the movement to 
50 cents per ton ; dis«up: it by the citizens who insist .^n a 
on iron ore as a compromise, and their j reduction of fare. A temporary injunct- 
exampie will undoubtedlv be followt d ' ion was secured, asking to restrain ihe 
by many other Southern and Wc stern j county au horities from placing the com- 
senators, only th<it ihcy will pr bably de- ! p,ny in the hands of trustees as had been 



mand that the present rate of 75 cents 
per ton remain unchanged. 

Fatal Explosion. 

New York. J n. 5 — Ai l o'clock yes- 
terday afiernoon an txplosi -n occurred 
at the New York Oxvgcn works, Fir^t 
avenue and Twenty second street 
Thomas Gregg, 20 years old, of 370 
Ea^t Twenty first street, was fnstanily 
killed. Jame- Moran, at;ed 22, of 3S9 
First avenue, had his rigtit leg broken 
and Fred E Gardiner, aged 50, of 236 
Warwick street, Brooklyn, was injured 
about the legs and body. 

A Postmaster in Trouble. 

CiN'Ci.NNATi, J^n. 5.— Postmaster Sam 
Cisle, of shannon, Butler county, was 
arrested yes'erdav by a deputy United 
States marshal Cisle is charged with 
disobeying pes al regulations and ap- 
propriating to his own use several hun- 
dred dollars belonging to the money 
order department. 



SURROUNDED BY MYSTERY: 



A Great Mistake. 



accompany int 



A recent discovery is that hradache 
dizziness, dullness, confusion of tha ruhid 
et-.. are due to derangemont ot ilio nor-.- 
centers which supply the brain with nerv. 
force; that indigestion, dysiK-psia, neuralgia 
wind In stomach, etc., arise from t ho derange 
mcnt of the nerve ceatt^rssupplying these or 
pnriH with nprvf fluid or force. This Is likcwlst 
t nif of many dist^ases of the hfiiri und iunirs 
Ttio nerv*' syst» mlslike a tplt-ttrapii sv *- — 
as will hQ M-ea by the 
lut. ThP littln 
white lln»>g are 
llie nervf's which 
ro'ivey thenervn 
for-B from the 
r.erve centers to 
cvfry part (it the 
tiodv, lust as tho 
electric current Is 
conveyed alone 
the telctfraph 
wires to every 
station, large or 
small. Orrlinary 
physicians fill 1 1<» 
rfzard this fact; 
instead of treat- 
ing the nerve ren- 
ters for tlie cause 
of the di^rders 
nrisinK therefrom 
they t r e it t the 
part affeoti'd. 

Franklin Miles. 
M I)., LL. B.. the 
highly celebrated 
specialist and 

student of nervous disease'*, und author 
of aiiuiy noted treatises on the latif'rsuljject, 
ly.vj. Since realized the truth of the first 
hmtement. and hLs Restorative Nervine 
Is prepared on thiit principle. Its success 
in curing all diseases arising from derantre- 
rncnt or the nervous system is wonder- 
ful, as the thousands of unsolicited testlmo- 
n'als in p<is,s«-ssion of the company manurac- 
turinK the n-medy amply prove. _ , .,^,j- 

l)r. Miles' Restorative Nervine 13 a reilahlc 
remedy for ail nervous diseases, sucn as 
!..ndiiche, nervous debility, prostration 
'■ . . pieesness, dizziness hysteria, sexual ue- 
i iiitv, St. Vitus dance, epilepsy, etc-_^lj }» 
i-.id'byalldrueKlstson a positive guarantee 
or sent direct by the Dr. Itflics Medical Co. 
Eilthart, Ind.. on receipt of price, il per tKJi- 
tie, six bottles for 35, express prepaid. 

KestoraUve Nervlae positively contains no 
spiatM or daBgeious dxuga. 



the purpose. 

Collided in a Fog. 

New London. Conn., Jan. 5 — The 
Norwich lino steamer, City of B ibto <, 
from New York, collided earlv ye>terday 
morning, at the mouth of New Lond ju 
harbor in a dense fog, with the schoor er 
Mary Adelaide Randall, hence for Phd 
adelphia. The steamer susfained coi- 
sidcrable damage, but the injury to the 
schooner was slight. 

i^ i ■ ■ ■■ — 

The Body Cremated. 
London, Jan. 5.— I he body of Sir 
Samuel White Baker, the African ex- 
plorer, who died on Saturday last, was 
reduced to ashes at the Woking crema- 
tory yesterday. After a religious cere- 
mony in the chapel, the body was placed 
in the retort. A number of relauves of 
the deceased and a few friends were 
present. 

m. • • 

Distress in Italy. 
RO.MK. Jan. 5. — Great distress prevails 
among the poor in the compartment of 
Apulia, composed of the provinces of 
B.iri, Foggia and Lecce, and it is feared 
that bread riois will occur. Every pre- 
caution has been taken to preserve or- 
der, but many of the people have been 
rendered de sperate by hung er. 

Suspension Removed. 
Washington Jan. 5.— The commis- 
sioner of pensions has decided, in view 
of the passage of the act of Dec 21, iSqj, 



Fifty-two Prisoners in Chicago Awaiting Trial 
For Murder. 
Chicago, Jan. 5. — Fifty-two prisoners 
are 1 ow waiting behind the iron-barred 
gratings of Cook county jail charged 
with murder. Besides this large num- 
ber of men who are to be tried for their 
livts, over 500 other prisoners, charged 

' with almost every crime on the calendar, 
are in j.til awaiting trial. 
At no time has the county jail been so 

' completely crowded with prisoners as 
within the last few month:>. Not a cell 
IS empty. Few contain less than two 
prisoiter^. In many instances three and 
even four persons are crowded within 
ih<- narrow walls of a single cell. 

The women's quarters are as full as 
the men's. Bui since the release of 

I Anasii i Bi chkc, a few monihs ago, no 

I woman remains iherc under the charge 
of murder. 

I PEIXOIO'S FORCES WON. 

Report of a Fight in Brazil Lost by the 
i Rebels. 

i London. Jan. 5. — A special dispatch 
' to the United Press from Lisbon savs 
that in a fight that occurred at Rio 
Negro, in the state of S-inta Catharina, 
Brazil, between the government forces 
and the insurgents, the former were vic- 
torious. 

The insurgents lost forty killed and 
nineteen prisoners. The date on which 
the engai,'em,nt took place is not given. 
A iiumb.-r ot guns and a qu.intity of mu- 
nitions of war tell into the hands of the 
government forces. 

The dispatch adds that on Dec, 15, 16 
and 17 the insurgent war.shipsAmazonav, 
liuanabtra, Ahnirante Tatuadao and 
Jupiter, aided by three lau ches, bom- 
barded Rio I ineiro. Many persons were 
killed or wounded. Ensign Goncalvts, 
a member of the nati nal , uard, was 
killt d by the explosion of a gun. Some 
of the splinters thrown by the explosion 
were scattered over the British bark Bal- 
akava, lyii'g near Cobras island. 

The dispatch further says that Fort 
Lagc, held by the government, fired on 
the steamer Ruapehn, whi< h was at- 
tempting to fori:e the bar, and com- 
pelUd her to return outside. The gov- 
ernment newspaper Oiempo has sus- 
pended. 

Petition Against Free Wool. 
San Angklo, IVx., Jan. v A peti- 
tion signed by oVvT 2000 property owners 
i:nd voters was forwarded last evening 
by the local woolmen to Hon. J. C. Bur- 
rows, member of the wavs and means 
committee at Washington, prote-^ting 
against placing the fleecy staple on the 
free list. The wool men selected Mr. 
Burrows, a Republican, in preference to 
the district congr-.ssman, T. M. Paschal, 
on account of the difference in their 
views on the wool problem. 



A TERRIBLE ACCIDENT. 

Sol Collins. His Wife.and Four Children Will 
Probably Die. 

West Plains, Mo., Jan. 5 —A terrible 
accident happened Wednesday at the 
home of Sol Collins on Spring creek, 
news of which has just reached here. 
Collins sat by an open tire place with a 
keg of blasting powder beside him. He 
threw some ot the powder into the fire, 
thinking it too damp to burn. 

A terrible explosion followed tearing 
the roof from the house and burning 
more or less eight persons. The only 
way any of their lives was saved was by 
jumping into a creek which runs close to 
the house. The doctor thinks Collins 
and Wife and four children will die. 



Killed From Ambush. 

BiiSSEMER, Ala., Jan. 5.— James Hart- 
man, a prominent young planter and 
member of the legislature, was killed 
• rom ambush at du^k last evening, while 
passing through a field on his farm. 
Several days ago he had a ne^ro ar- 
rested for selling hags. Wednesday 
the negro got out on bail. He is sus 
pected ami a posse is hunting for him. 
The sheriff I'.ft herewith bloodhounds. 
A lynching will be the outcome. 

Short of Money. 

London, Ian. 5.— The Berlin corre- 
spondent of the 1 imes, after referring 
to the recent large defections from the 
Agrarian league and the growing oppo- 
sition among Us members to the dema- 
gogism of its leaders, adds: "The 
league is also short of money. The 
league's newspaper is distributed gratis. 
It has lost already /8500 and there are 
no profits. It is proposed to establish 
other papers, only upon a paying basis." 

The Report Was False. 
St. Paul, Jan, 5.— A tew days ago an 
evening pap» r stited that Cyrus Well- 
ington, A. R. Wilkinson and Judge 
Campbell, of the Great Northern legal 
department, and Col. Crooks, right-of- 
way agent, had been relieved of their 
positions by President Hill. The state- 
ment is absolutely untrue. When asked 
regarding the matter President Hills^id: 
"I know n ilhing about the matter what- 
ever. I have not even read what the 
evening paper says." 

• . 

Firebugs at Work. 
Memphis, Tenn., Jan. 5.— A dastardly 
attempt was made to desfroy Walnut 
Ridge, Ark., by fire yesterday morning. 
Land & Lester's livery stable, with 
vehicles was burned. Williams & Co.'s 
hay store was firerl at the same time, and 
Ponder & Co.'s gin and huller *as satu- 
rated with coal oil, but the watchman 
frightened the incendiaries away. 

Was Roasted Alive. 
Tu.scUMiUA, Ala., Jan. 5.— Wednesday 
night, Thomas Kilroy, residing near here, 
went home drunk. He went to bed with 
a lighted pipe in his mouth and the bed 
clothing caught fire. Kilroy endeavored 
to escape but was overcome by the 
sm )ke and roasted alive. His wife, iu an 
adjoining room, escaped and rescued 
one child, but two others, aged 3 and 5 
years, were burned to death. 

Navvies Panic Stricken. 

London, Jan. <;.— The St. Petersburg 
corresDondent of the Chronicle says: 
"Chinese robbers are pillaging on the 
outskirts of Vladivostock and along the 
Ussuri railway, now in course of con- 
struction. The navvies, who are Cos- 
sacks, are panic stricken as tiey are 
menaced with an open attack." 



The KDipcror'a Itirtlulay Feto a Study In 
Cusinopolitaii I'uceH uiid CustiiiitHR. 

The enipeior's l)irth(hiy occur-ioii the .^1 
of November, and the foreign minister 
gives a ball on that occasion, to which all 
the representatives of foreign countries and 
as many others iis are deemed worthy of 
attention are invited. Our introduction 
had been sufficient to secure invitations, 
Hiid liHviiiK conferreil with the chaplain ha 
a|i{)roved of my purpose to attend as a mat- 
ter of editfvition in et huology. For the em- 
peror's birthday ball, you must know, is a 
cosmopolit. an affair. It was given on this 
occiision in the building called the Roku- 
ueikan, in which both the Nobles club and 
the Tokio club have quarters. The build- 
ing and its apiiroaches were a blaze of liKht 
worthy to cc4tbrato the birthday of the de- 
hceiidant of the sun goddess. 

Inside the <U'Corations were such as only 
the Japanese could make. They included 
a wealth of chrjtMinthemums lining the 1 
con-idors. great artillcial sections of cryp- 
lomeries, the bark and foliage real, fruit ; 
trees with fruit upon them, and a broad 1 
expanse carryinK the coat of arms of the 
empress, made of foliage and flowers. The 
f<uests were received by Vice Foreign Min- 
ister Hayoflii and his wife because of the 
illness of the wife of Mr. Mutsu, the for- 
eign minister. I will not undertake to de- 
scribe tlie company. The emperor and em- 
press were not there, but there were several 
imperial princes and princesses, quite a 
sprinkling of the old nobility, a full repre- 
senUition of the oflicial class and of course 
all the foreign representatives. 

As may be imagined, the company was 
somewhat promiscuous, but as an ethno- 
logical study it was interesting and in- 
structive. The costumes presented a great 
variety, from the representative of "far 
Cathay" to the last globe trotter from 
America. The Coreaus were entitled to 
the "ciike," for they were dressed in frilled 
nightshirts and tall hats, which no other 
nationality ventured upon. Most of the 
.Japanese ladies were in their own Kraceful 
costume. Those of them who were in 
European dre-ss Imjked unnatual and pain- 
fully self conscioi^. The Japanese gentle- 
men were almost all in European dress. 
Many of the ladies, both Japanese and for- 
eign, were expensively be jeweled. 

The physical stature of the Japanese was 
manifestly below that of the Europeans, 
and the ladies of the various legations, in 
decollete costumes, towered above their 
eastern sisters and gave them an example 
of self assertion and social leadership which 
was sufficient to increase the celerity of 
revolution in Japan. But the Japanese as 
manifestly outshone all others in manners. 
NothinK can exceed the courtliness and 
grace of their address as they greet each 
other with the repeated low bows which 
survive as .-i .souvenir of the old refiime. 
The number in attendance was about 800, 
and the spacious rooms of the princely 
building were too crowded for satisfactory 
dancing, though the programme of dances 
was ciiriied out by the irrepressi»)le young 
people of l>oth sexes. There was an excel- 
lent supper provided, served, when the 
number of quests is considered, with most 
commendable efticiency.— Boston Herald. 




You Don*t Get 
The News. 



A MOKTHJ 00c HI 



The Evening Herald, 

THE PEOPLE S PAPER, 

Is fearless and independent and stands first 
among the evening papers of this country. It 
is by all odds 

The Best 
7[dvertistng Medittm 



4 \ 



The •Dress of Paris. 

Thi' population of Paris is as remarkable 
for vuiety as that of London for uniforffii- 
ty of costume, for in Paris almost every 
class has its own distinctive dress. In Eng- 
liiiid, and especially in London, the em- 
ployer and his workmen, the millionaire 
and the crossing sweeper, wear coats of the 
same pattern. In London, again, every 
workgirl, every market woman, wears a 
bonnet imitated more or less perfectly from 
those worn by ladies of fashion. Shopgirls 
and workgirls in Paris wear neat white 
caps instead of ill niadeor, it may be, dilapi- 
dated bonnets; though the more aspiring 
among them reserve the ligLr of appearing 
in a bonnet on Sundays and holidays. 

The French workman wears a blouse and 
a cap, an<l looks upon the hat as a sign, if 
not of superiority, at least of pretension. 
Owitifx to the varieties of dress already 
touched upon a crowd in Paris presents a 
less irloomv, less monotonous appearance 
than the black coated mobs of London, and 
iu harmony w ith the greater relief allorded 
by the different colors of the costum<-s are 
the uni mated gestures of the persons com- 
posing the crowd. Observe, indeed, a mere 
group of pei-sons conversing on no matter 
what commonplace subject, or idly chatting 
as they .sip their coffee together on the bou- 
levards, and they appear to be engaged in 
some violent dispute.— Old .-md New Paris. 



-IN- 



Duluth! 



And if your ad. is not in it you are making the 
biggest business mistake of your life. 



The Evening Herald 



-HAS- 



A Heavy Sentence. 
Jackson, Tenn., Jan. 5 —Rev. G. F. R. 
Howard was last night sentenced to nine 
years in the penitentiary at Columbus, 
Ohio, and fined ;?i2oo by Judge Ham- 
mond, of the federal court, and taxed 
with the costs, about $22,000 He was 



eclaring ptnsions a vested right, that | gtricken from'the rolls of' practicing at 
he no longer has the right to withhold . - 

he pension of Judge Long, of Michigan, 
and has arcoroingly ordered that the 
suspension of his pension be removed. 





Cold in France. 

Paris, Jan. 5.— The river Seine is rov- 
ered with thick ice- The railway trains 
arriving in the city are hours behind 
time, the del.^y being caused by the 
" •"' freezi ig in the feed pfpes of the 
cngitie. 

Morton Donounced. 

CoLUMi I's.Jan.s. — The Ohio Farmers" 
Alliance in convention here adopted a 
resolutirm unanimously Wednesday night 
demanding that President Cleveland re- 
move J. S. Morton, secretary of agricul- 
ture, because of his unfriendly and un- 
just treatment of agricultural interests. 

Moro Pensions Granted. 
Washington, Jan. 5.— The following 
pensions were granted today: Minne- 
sota—Emma j. Skillman. Minneapolis 
Wisconsin— Michael J. Walsh, national 
military home; Edward H. Perry, New 
Richmond; Elizabeth Hammond, Platte- 
ville. 

Elizabeth Peibody Dead 

Boston, J n. 5.— The venerable Eliza- 
beth Pt abofiv di d Wednesday at her 
home in Jair.aica Plain in her <)\lh year. 

The great value of Hood's Sarsaprilla 
as a remedy lor catarrh is vouched for 
by thousands of peop e whom it has 
cured. '3 

— ■- 

Sixty cents a month will have The 
Her-iid delivered every night at your 
borne. 



torneys in the federal court inasmuch as 
he had practiced this fraud. 



Won by Carroll. 
BuFF.\r.o, Jan. 5.— The wrestling 
match last night between Ed Atfa^rtou, 
of Belfast, N. Y., and Joe Cat roll, of 
ICngland, for a purse of $700, given bv 
the Iroquois Athletic club was won by 
Carroll in two straight falls. The men 
worked like Trojans from 10 p. m. until 
2 a. m. 

m 

Yellow Fever at Rio. 

Riu Jani IKO, lau 5. The yellow fever 
season has set in here. Two cases of the 
disease and one death were reported to- 
day. The shore leave of all the mem- 
bers of crews of foreign warships in the 
harbor has been stopped. 

— ■ ■ —■■-■■■■■ 

A Long Telephone. 

lin RMN, Jan. 5.- A long disl.ance tele- 
phone i«; about to he put in operation be- 
tween this city and Stockholm, .Sweden 

— ■ - m 

Have You Any Work? 

Are there any families in Duluth who 
would like a man to do odd work around 
the house, such as taking care of the 
fires, carpenter work, etc., by the week or 
month? If so, the Associated Chanties 
would be glad to supply their need. 
There are several men who have been 
ill, and are out of work, who would be 
greatly helped in this way. Please send 
word to \i$ Woodbiidge building. 

Gus Swendson, 106 First street, carries 
a complete stock of fresh roasted coffee, 
roasted every day at the Eagle Coffee 
and Spice mills. 



Scare at the Astor House. 

New York, Jan. 5.— There was al- 
most a panic-at midnight in the Astor 
house owing to a fire which broke out in 
the drug store underneath the building 
at the corner of Barclay street and 
Broadway. The guests hurriedly 
dressed themselves and made a mad 
rush for the street, taking to all three of 
the entrances to the hotel. The fire was 
slight and easily extinguished. 

An Ironical Remark. 

Bi:ki.in, Jan. 5.— The Kleinc Journal 
says: "1 pon hearing of the result of the 
Augoulem trial the emperor remarked 
ironically; "These Frenchmen arc al- 
ways unintentionally working for the 
king of Prussia.' implying thus that by 
angering the Italims the Frenchmen in 
this case had driven them to closer inti- 
macv with Germany." 



Murderers Identified. 
Prac.ue, Jan. 5.— The murderers of 
Rudolph Mrva have been identified. 
They were subsidized by Cizek. The 
trial of the seventy-eight members of the 
Omladina will be held in camera. 



Faber's Golden Female Pills 




Box «7. 

Bold l» Dolabh by 
Walbaok 



Relieve Fuppressed 
Meiistruailoii. Used 
sotceg.sluliy i)y tiioua- 
ands of proir.luent la* 
dies ■montlilii. Tlior- 
ougbly reliaDio and 
sale. W'ortii twenty 
times thpir weight In 
gold for frvmif. irrrg- 
ulaHtics. iJever known 
to fail. 

Seut by mall ncaiod 
tor •>. AddretiS 

Tbe Aphro Medicine 

COMPANY. 
Tl'catem Branch, 
Portland. Oretcan. 
Max Wiith and Selleck A 



Temperature of tbe Sun. 

There is almost as much diversity as to 
the temperature of the sun as there is re- 
garding the .source of its heat. A recent is- 
.viie of Knowledge contain.s an article by 
Mr. lijinyard on the photosphere, .suggested 
by two large photoj^raphs taken by Dr. 
.Jansseu. These show the apparent torma- 
tiou of the tun's surface, which is n)otllt<l 
all over, as Mr. Ranyard remarks, like tlie 
cirrus clouds in a mackerel sky. From the 
appeanince of the sun as thus depicted ?.Ir. 
liunyard a.s.sumes that the Ijrilliance of the 
solar surface docs not greatly exceed the 
brighte.st iucaude-scence of the most refrac- 
tory bodies obtained by means of the elec- 
tric current. Nor is the heat so gi-eat as 
many .solar physicists a.ssume. From his 
own* observations and those of othei-s the 
writer concliidus^that the snivs heat cannot 
exceed lO.iXiU decrees C. -a very high tem- 
perature, itmu.st l)e admitted, but still fall- 
ing far below that assumed by other as- 
tronomers. 

Beecher on His Own Career. 

Hardly auythiuvc that could be desired in 
this life has Ijeeii withheld from me. I have 
had that which many covet and .seek for in 
vain; my life all through hiis been aveiy 
happy H.ine; it may be .saiil, without c.\cep- 
lion, t.ikiug il from luKinning to end, to 
have l)een a life of extraordinary prosperity 
and happiness, although I have Wen a man 
of war. But there is nothing in this worlil. 
it seems to me, that is to be desired for one 
single moment in comparison with the life 
iwyoiid. If that life is all that we have 
l>een taught it is— and I l>elieve it to Ih; that 
and ,ihi;ii(laiUly more— then l.i no man 
wisli to slay here. It is true that the uoinc 
of iMif and another leaves a wound in the 
bean of those that are left behind, but it is 
true, also, that God heals such wounds 
spiedily. — "Mr. Beecher's Uuprinted 
Words'" iu Latlies' Home Journal. 

ClilciiEoans Believe In Their City. 

One of the chief factors to the gi-eatiiess 
ol' Chicago is tiie unwaveriuK and active 
loyalty of her citizens. On all occasions, 
in' stiuson and out of .season, the Chicago 
man siuys the praises of his city. Let any 
man go there to remain, and he becomes 
imbued with thi.sprogres.sive spirit aiid is 
us ixdd und persistent us the oldest resi- 
dent in shouting the praises of his home 
city.- Kansas Ciiy Jouiual. 



THE LARGEST CIRCULATION 

OF ANY PAPER IH DDLUTH. 

Your business languishes because you adver- 
tise in dead newspapers that are read by people 
who are dead and don't know it. The newspaper 
for you is 

THE EVENING HERALD, 

A Live Newspaper, 
Read by Live People. 

You do not advertise. enough. You are asleep 
and want your business to run itself. A. standing 
advertisement in 



The Evening Herald 




I 



Commands confidence. The man who for a year 
lives in one community and leads a respeetble life 
will grow in the confidence of the people. On the 
same principle an advertisement in The Evening 
Herald becomes familiar to the eyes of the readers. 



A MONTHi 60c tel 



A Zealous ^Vltuess. 

A witness was called forward to give his 
testimoDy. Having taken Lis place, he 
turned to the bar add earnestly asked, 
"\Much aide ntn 1 on!-" — Tit-IUt.s. 

■ 

Read Cemuiy Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 



If You Don't 
Talvr. 




THE 

EVENING 
HERALD 



It 



You Don't Get 
The News. 




( • 




Il 








THE DULTJTH EVENING HERALD: FBIDAY, JANUARY 5, 1S94. 



3 



m II 



WEST DULUIH ITEMS 



G. H. Reeves Was Elected Captain of Com- 
pany H at the Regular Meeting 
Last Evening. 



Eight Applications for Membership Received 

and the Prospects for a Large 

Company Are Bright. 



Police Lieutenant Patterson Has Mailed His 

Annual Report of the Jail to 

Secretary Hart. 



G. H. Reeves was unanimously elect- 
ed captain of Company G at the regular 
meeting last eveninif. Eight applica- 
tions for membership* were received and 
the indications are that there is a revival 
of interest amonR the members ot the 
company. The annual meeting tor the 
election of civil officers will be held two 
weeks from last night. Maj. Braden. 
who presided last evening expressed the 
opmion that this organisation has the 
material to make it the leading militia 
company at the head of the lakes. The 
newly elected captain gave the boys 
some good advice and stated that a full 
attendance at drill would hereafter be 
required. 

Wast Duluih Jail. 

Police Lieutenant Patterson mailed to- 
day his annual report of the condition of 
the West Duluth jiil. to Secretary Hart, 
ot the slate board of corrections. The 
report gives the number of insane pris- 
oaers incarcerated during the year as 3; 
total number of prisoners. 284, of which 
15 were females; number of vagrants 
a id lodgers not prisoners, 424; largest 
number of prisoners at one time, 8: nine 
of the prisoners were under age. The 
cells are declared to be in a neat and 
sanitary condition and to accommodate 
1 2 persons. 

West Duluth Briefs. 

George Sullivan was arrested yester- 
day on a charge of stealing a trunk, tool 
chest and contents from John Jendson. 
He pled not truilty and his trial set for 2 
p. m. today. 

The report that a new block is to be 
erected on the site of the Capliss block 
recently burned is incorrect. 

lames A. Kirku lod, whose name was 
mentioned in the morning paper in con- 
nection with the coming election says 
that he is not a candidate, that he is not 
a Democrat, nor an aspirant for any po- 
litical office at the present time. 

G. J. Mallory has been named as mem- 
ber ot the Republican city committee 
from West Duluth. 

Misses Phillips and Owens entertained 
a party of Duluth friends at the Bennett 
on Wednesday evening. 

A number of the members of Kitchi 
Gammi Lodge. K. of P.. attended the 
banquet given by the Gate City and 
Zenith lodges at Duluth last evening. 

John Ritberger, a St. Louis real estate 
dealer, was in the village yesterday. 

C. E. Peaslee, of Taylors Falls, is in 
the city on business. 

P. R. Ritchie, of St. Paul, is registered 
at the Bennett. 

J. R. Blackburn, of Milwaukee, is in 
the city. 

Union services during the week of 
prayer will be held in West Duluth 
commencing on MonJ ay evening, Jan. 8, 
in the I5aptist church: Tuesday in the 
Presbyterian church; Wednesday in the 
Congregationalist church ; I hursday in 
the Methodist church and Friday in the 
Protestant Episcopal church. Service 
will commence at 7:30. 

WILL THE FIGHT OCCUR? 



WHEAT DULL AND LOWER. 



The Club Says it Will and the Governor is Very 
Quiet. 

Ja' rm.n'. iLM.. Fla.,Jan. 5.--The fight 
situation here is practically unchanged. 
The club says it is to come off; that their 
l.iwyers tell them to go ahead, as the 
legal status is all right, and that no Flor- 
ida statutes exist to prevent. 

On the other hand. Sheriff Broward 
says that be will under his pres- 
ent orders prevent any such gather- 
ing, if public, though he confesses 
his inability tn prevent it. he held in 
secret, or if held on a boat in St. John's 
river or in the woods he perhaps could 
not stop it. 

Governor Mitchell is very quiet at 
present and friends of the club say that 
great pressure, political and otherwise, 
is being brought to bear on him to 
"let up." 

■■ -iiii ■ ill " '■ 

A Destructive Fire. 

WORCESTEK, .Mass., Jan. 5— Fire this 
morning destroyed the R. C. Taylor 
block, which -v^ '^r, n-»ied mainly by 
Clark. Siwyer & Co., dealers in crock- 
ery, glassware, etc.. whose loss is about 
$80,000 covered by insurance. There is 
an insurance of $27, ,00 on :'ie building. 

The other t ' • ... »■ i .a small losses. 

Most of the u.ock was untenanted. 

Very Cold Weather. 
London. Jan. 5. -The extremely cold 
weather uov.- prevailing Uas delayed the 
mails in the north of England. A mail 
cart running helwcen Sleaford, Lincoln- 
shire and Peterboro. Nortbamptoushirc, 
had not yet arrived ai the latter place. 
It is thirteen hours overdue. At Spald- 
ing, Lincolnshire, a laborer named 
Smith has been found frozen to death. 



For Colds, 

Coughs, 

Croup, Intliienza, and 

Broiifhitii^, 

use 

AVER'S 

CHERRY PECTORAL 

tlic b«.'st, 

of all nnoflvne 

expectorani.5. 

Prompt t«< :iCt, 

Sure to Cure 



The Market Wat Firm Early But Soon Became 
Weak. 

The wUoat iu«rkot was duU auJ lower today, 
Altlioucli itopenod eA»y,a buUisLi feoliu((|uickly 
»ot io nod tho market nrlvitucioir -Sc, r«iuiiiuinK 
tiriii until at>i»ut U) n'clix'k, wLoii iirict^ btigKod 

off. There was siii.ill trading; in May neiir the 
close at Uc lowiT tliau tlio upoDiu^. Tho clo»« 
waa T«rv dull aud *fuk at ' .c l"w<>r tlinu y«v- 
t«rday for cnsli, '^c K>wer for May aud ',c lowot 
(ur july. Following were the closincr prict'o : 

No. 1 hard, ca^h, ('.JUi' : J<uiu4i'y,t>l>«r: May, 
(v'.'jc; July. <>7'.ie: No. t uorthcro. cai>li, 61e; 
lauuary. i-i'ic: .May. rtl'^cJub, Otic; No. 
.^ uortberu. cash. 5i' ;C ; No. 8. !V2'ic. Rejected. 
17c. On track No. 1 nortluTii to arrive, 6l'jc: 
rye. t^c ; <l<tx, $VM<^, ; barloy, 3t@llc ; .No. 2 oata. 
27'»c: No. 3 wfiitooaf*, 27c. 

Car iDhViection for today - Wheat. 4H 
c«ro;oata. 1; barley, l*. Recoiptu— Wheat, :>l>.- 
'M'Zhua: barley, 446 bus. Shipments -None. 



The Minneapolis Market. 

MiWEAPOLis. Jan. .">. -Wheat opened at 
til%c for May and advauced to tiZ^tO aud oloseil 
January, r>»!|c; May »U',c:July, t«?,c. Track 
ch>i*t»d tCUc No. I hard, t'.<>'\tc No, 1 northern. 
Mt'icNo. i. Receipts UU oars; .shiproent*. L'7 
cars. 

Cattle and Hogs. 

Union Sto< k Yards, Jan. .'i.-Cattl I;. 
ceiptx, .ViOO; market firm and jirices .'>c Li^'iifi. 
Hotfs: Kooeipts :U,iX<0; <iualu> koou ; market 
moderately active ; sood tirudes firm early and 
iu some cases .V hiciier; later, packinx (cradr-x 
ruletl easy and declined '>c: UglU, $-').lWiS3.50; 
routth pai-kiuK, .?:> (iO(i< tS.iri : mixed. $.'>_!.'■«< *,'> 4. ^ : 
ijv'avy paclciuc and shipping lots, *.*>.W«.'i.5li; 
pigs. Si.Mrio.:*). SliPep: Heceipts, ."lUni ; mar- 
ket steady. 

The Foreign Markets. 

Lt>NL>uN, Jan. ,'»,— Tlie Kraxn markets oi>ened 
this morniuB higher. .\t Liverpool wheat wa» 
■|d blither and tirin at the advance: corn waa 
'id higber with an upward tendency. At Lou- 
don e&rgoes of California wheat were3«l higher ; 
tioating cargoes of wheat were firmer; wheat 
and corn on pae8a»;o were tirmer ; held higher. 
At London (lour was ;!«ihi(jhpr, .^t Mark Lane 
wheat was steady and com a turu dearer. The 
trench country markets were tlrm. At Paris 
wheal was lu couiimes Cic) a bushel higher 
\t Kerliu wheat was 1 mark (*iC> a basuel 
htMher, A very hard frost prevaile<l in the 
Uuitwi Ktngdum aud on the coutiuent. 

The Chicago Market. 

CnirAoo. Jan. ."..—Close; Wheat. Jauuary, 
tile; May. 66S,c; July. 67'j»< Ho. Corn. January. 
.<«',<•: May, S«4c; July. 3.H'jc. Oate; Januarv, 
i^'r" Sc; May, ;«)'"»*i'»c; July, '^\c. Pork, 
January, $12. 7.'.; May. :?12."5. Lard, Jannary, 
S7.*: May. 57"'..Kih8. January, Jtt.52'i ; May, 
iti.cKt. 

New York Stock Exchange. 
Nkw Yo«k. Jan. 5.— Mcmey on call is easy at 
IftlMi per cent ; prime mercantile paper. 4@,4Vi 
per ceut. Sterling exchange steady with ac- 
tual business in bankir* bills at f4 >^;i'i*' 4.84 
for sixty day bills, tnd J4.N">'jfe '4 for demand; 
po.«ted rates, $t.8t*i,4.8o'i. Commercial bills, 
.« 821i«( 4.,S3'4 for sixty days, and $4 *.5 for 
demand. Bar silver. 6S',4c. tiovernment bonds 
steady ; state bond9 dull ; railroad bonds higher. 
The stocks during the past hour have been weak 
and lower. Missouri Pacific made a further de- 
cline to iHi ^ and than rallied to l^^ on the de- 
nial of the rumors current thi.s morning that a 
receivership was imminent. In the general li-t, 
LoulsviUei .VashviUe fell 2?i t- 12; Western 
Union. Vi to »4'.t : Burlington Sc t>ainci-, \\ to 
H\t ■■ St. Paul. \ to .% 5-16, and VVhisky l'» t<» 



WHAT V/ON THE ACQUITTAL? 

A Lawypr'a Ucmarkublf I'len Wlieti II i» 
Client's CaRp Se«>me<l Iloprlrsa. 

A i)roniifieut lawvi r of tlic Loiu* Star 
Stale, who receiuly vi>iif<l Neu' < )rlfaiis, rc- 
ta^-d to ;i reporter the foUowiiiK >iorj- of a 
murder trial iu his Texas home: 

The prisoner wa.s on trial for hi.s life. 
The evidence h.itl all been heard. The state's 
M t nrnej- had j list taken h i.s seat after a nio.st 
incisive .statement of the evidence, wherein 
he demonstrated the utter failure of the 
prisoner'."^ theory of .self defense. The coun- 
sel for the prisoner was a stranger, too, 
known only by reputation to the judge and 
bar. and that reputation wa.s one of great 
ability, perfect integrity and a marvelous 
knack of "snatching verdicts" each time 
by some new turn. This gaunt, yet grace- 
ful, gray headed man aro.sc, seemingly 
without looking at the jury, though each 
man felt he was under the power of that 
wide open eye. After bowing to the judge 
and saying a few nl most inmidible words 
of courtesy to his honor, he firnedtothe 
prisoner and s-aid; 

."You must die, John— die liy hauiring. It 
will l)e for no fault of yours, by no fault of 
the jiTfcge, or of his jury, or of the goo<l j)eo- 
ple of the county; neither will it be any 
fault of the law. The law of Te.vas is all 
right, though you die innocent. The law, 
though its machinery may sometimes e.\ 
pose perjury, cant always prevent the fal.se 
swearing of witnesses. .ludges and juries 
have not the power, tiiouKh they sometimes 
exercise the authority, of Almighty God. 
They conldn't look down into the souls of 
tho.se perjuretl witnesses and see the malice, 
hate and private purpose that colored and 
twisted all the facts. We can't help it 
no\v. You must die as you have lived, liko 
a Imivo man. I don't need to tell you that. 
Tiie woman who bore you, three months 
ljeft>re you saw the light of heaven, carried 
in her arms from one of the bloodiest 
fields of the late war the bleeding, senseless 
form of your father, while shot and sliell 
still shrieked and the groans of the dying 
filled the air. 

"And your fatlur, whose maimed body 
we laid to rest List week, was not matched 
ill all tills land. The.se triLsled you, and 
their blood can betray no trust. The only 
message he .sent yf>u was, 'Tell him we be- 
lieve in him.' We will lay you beside them. 
In a few ilays this old white head will be 
laid ue.vt to yon. Ill not be a.shamed to be 
buried soon beside you, .Tohn. You are so 
like the other, John, that I see the visions 
of happy iMjyhood while gA^ing into the 
.same true eyes — confuse*! with these is the 
pridir! I have taken m my friends* boy. 
While we lay these bodies in the church- 
yard over the mountain we'll appeal this 
case. We'll try it all over again up yon- 
der." 

Then, in a few of the Ixjldest and grand- 
est figures, he sketched his idea of a trial in 
heaven, where, its he said, "in that glorious 
presence the fal.se witness is dumb and the 
incrrant judge neetis not the aid of coun.sel 
or of jurors." Then he pictured the eager- 
ness with which the mother and the calm 
conlidence with which the father awaittnl 
heaven's verdict, the quick rush, the en- 
trancing, soul satisfying embrace of Ijoth at 
the woid.s, "not gtiilty." Then, taking up 
l>oth hands of the prisoner, he IrKiked down 
in his face for a moment steadily, then, 
l>ending forward with mother like tender- 
ness, kissed him twice on the forehead, say- 
ing in a whisper audible to all: "We can 
wait for that? So gofxlby. .John, myboy." 
Boning respectfully to the judge he took 
his seat, still holding one of the pri.soncr's 
hands. 

The district attorney, who through all 
this sat with iiis back half turnetl to the 
speaker and to the jury nervously and e.\- 
citedly (hewing his toothpick and crossing 
and rtcrossiuK his legs, liegan a re^dy 
which quickly ended after a gootl look at 
the jurors" fjices in a .stammering request 
to litem to tlo their duty. The juilge's 
charge wius scattering. He seemed to 
scarcely know what he said. The jury did 
not hear him. Xot the slighte.st incident 
occuiTcd to break the spell. They went 
out, returned, and in a very few moments 
the verdict of "not guilty" wiis recorded. 
What wjis ihe force that 'worketl" this re- 
sult?- X'^w Orleans Picayune. 



You c.in rent your rooms, or houses 
quickly through The Herald want 
-oliinins. 



i 



Miss Nicholson, modiste. 308 West 
First street, freftcb & -Bas&eit btiilding. 





F, 




Mate Leroy Describes in Her Interesting 

Style Late Ball Gowns for Maids 

and Matrons. 



A Practical Disquisition on the Materials 

That Are the Most Serviceable and 

Most Elegant. 



Fur is Now Very Conspicuous on Hats and 

Bonnets -An Interesting Variety 

of Headgear. 



No two young ladies would caretogotoa 
ball dres^ni exactly alike. Otherwise there 
.vould not be such an infinity of designs in 
•iiich gowns. The ball gown is considereil 
by nearly everyone to lie the one of all best 
suited to embellish the beauty of the wear- 
rr. It is not even lulvisable that all should 
he dressed in white, as that would give a 
ballroom theappe.iranceof a hall of ghosts. 




BALI. GO^XS FOR DUDS. 
Nor is white l)ecoming to everybody, so a 
choice of suitable colors shoultl be made, 
while at the same time the age of the wear- 
er should be taken into consideration, and 
the materials should be delicate and fltte<l 
to the occasion and to the peculiar complex- 
ion of t he wearer. Float iug laces and tulles, 
though dainty and airy, are still poor econ- 
omy, for a touch tears them, and they are 
so light they are always catching on every 
button or anything else. And it does not 
improve a latly's temper or appearance to 
have her ball dress torn off. 

This season there is a very much larger 
choice than ever before. The new dancing 
crapes are novelties, and so are several light 
silk tissues in delicate colors. However 
light a silk tissue is it is always strong, .so 
that the wearer's mind is serene. The pret- 
tiest of the dres.ses shown for young ladies 
in their secon^ season are made of light 
and hej'.vy goods combined. 

One has the skirt of white faille. Around 
the bottom there is a deep flounce, gathere<l 
very full, of baby blue silk muslin, headed 
by a complete wreath of velvet anemones. 
At each side there are two long ribbons 
with a bunch of anemones set on each, and 
t here is a belt of the same. The waist is of 
faille, bebe style, with puffed sleeves, and a 
ruffle ot blue silk muslin in form of bertha. 
Long white gloves and an old fashioned 
string of beads make up an exquisite cos- 
tume. 

Another gown for a lieautif ul young bru- 
nette recently shown had the underskirt of 
cherry satin, that red cherry that seems 
ready to turu to .1 black. Over this wna 
wrrii a white ailTl silver tissue, made t}Ui(e 
plain, but full, and caught up on the left 
side by a drooping cord. A narrow r)5) 
bon of the same rich color encircles the 
waist and liangs down, fastened under a 
tinychon. The corsage is modestly low, 
of the cherry satin, and has a bertha of 
point lace made into full epaulets on the 
shoiildei's. In the hair will lie worn a tuft 
of shaded feathers. 

Peaudesoteof a pure, mat white made 
another handsome dancing gown. The 
front was perfectly plain, but the back 
breadths were arrangetl in form of a very 
short train, with ricli pannier drapery at 
the, sides. There was a Itouuce of lace 
around the bottom of the train, which ex- 
tended up the sides iu a full jabot. At the 
top were set three leafless velvet {jansies, 
and tliere was a wreath of them all arouncl 
t he train. The corsage was an infant waist, 
with a shell plaiting around the neck for 
sleeves and Itertha, with pinketl etlge. In 
the hair there will be a pansy anil an 
aigret starting from it. All three ladies 
will wear white mousquetaire gloves. 

These gowns may serve as motlels for 
many others, and those who copy them can- 
not well go amiss, even though they make 
many minor changes. 

There are several qualities of silks quite 
suitable for ball gowns for young ladies, 
and the light brocatles aud satins are also 
permissible this season, provided there is 
an abundance of light drapery in .shape of 
flounces, etc. 

J saw two dres.ses of tulle, one pink aud 
one white, made exactly alike. They had 
three skirt)', all gathered very full. 'ind over- 
lapping each other. Around the edges of 
the two upper ones were .sewed wa.\heads so 
that they hung a little loose. The waists 
were plain gathered and had puffed berthas 
held iu by beads and puflfed sleeves. The 
white one was exquisite, and the pink one 
was pretty. These were for sisters, and 
that makes me remeraberto s;iy that where 
there are .several girls in one family no two 
Jire to be dre.ssed alike. 

Marrie<l ladies are not entirely debarred 
from d.ancing, so they do go to small dances 
and grand balls when they feel inclined. 




WINTER II VTS. 
and to them is allowed greater choice in the 
matter of materi.il, atid they take advan- 
tage of it by \vearing the richest, silks, sat- 
ins, moires, velvets and laces. Fur, wiien 
of the right kind, is also seen once in a 
while on a handsome dress. It must be 
real ermine and used sparingly. I noticed 
one superb dress of lilac satin duchess, 
with the skirt cut In deep Vandyke points. 
Between tl;o point* tvere facs of ducUwa, 



al pni^ie veivet. IHe corsage was ot tue 
velvet, and so were the large puffed lileevea, 
whicii were short. There were a stomacher 
point of ermine and a liertha of the same 
fur, aud on the edge was a full frill «)f duch- 
ess point. The skirt was cut en t raine. 

Another dress trimmed with ermine also 
comes to my mind. It was a black velvet 
princess gown, cut with a slight train and 
Hlashe<l on each side quite to the waist. The 
slashes were filled in with white and silver 
brocade. The corsiige had a bertha of the 
brocade shirred on and arranged so that 
one puff of the shirring formed the sleeve. 
I'here was a narrow baud of ermine above 
this, and ihere were two other band.s start- 
lug in just at the waist line under thearms 
and making a sharp point. P2rmine cannot 
go with anything but velvet. It would l>e 
fatally cheapened if put on ordinary mate- 
rial, ^ 

Fur upon millinery seems to bu gaining 
ground, until certainly half of all the 
hats and bonnets are trimmed with ou^j 
kind or another, and often wiiole anlmi.ls 
of remark.ible species are set up over [iretty 
faces. There is no law which "governs the 
mann«r of wearing a hat. It may be ^et on 
the back of the head. formin« an auivolo to 
the face, or it may Ik- pcrchctl cuqiiettishly 
over one ear, or it may l>e set up in the back 
and shade the eyes. Yet there is ;i sort of 
likeness all the way tlirougii tiiiit i)elongs 
to the season. 

One very becoming style for a young per- 
son is a faced felt, green ami purple, b«iit 
to a slight peak in front. On each side are 
set rosettes made of ribbon, and from them 
come two stiff quills on each side. A pert 
little butterfly bonnet is of dark mazarine 
blue velvet. The velvet is nuule into two 
bow ends and held in the center by a steel 
buckle. From these start two thin quills 
like atenufP. A flat plateau has a line of 
looped velvet bows across the back under 
the brim. Tlie crown is nowhere at all, 
there being but a twist of velvet ribbon 
around the flat portion. There are two 
phmies and an aigret. The plateau shape, 
having no crown unless one is pinched or 
bent up, must have a narrow but stiff 
brim sewed in under it, to give it a fit on 
the head. Rhick velvet and other colors 
made in Tam o' .Shanters are much liked 
for young girls in their "teens," 

The week has seen scarcely a new thing 
put forward, .so that I shall finish out this 
letter by some notes I have made regard- 
ing some of the minor matters of fashion, 
but which have their place after all. The 
first and most important is that overskirts 
are certainly coming in, and they are seen 
on the nicest of the new gowns. Not only 
overskirts are seen, but the draping of the 
skirts themselves by the gathering of the 
natural folds intodiffeient positions, which 
give different aud nearly always graceful 
effects. The prettiest of them all is iho 
wrinkled front, and the most diffictilt to 
get right. It is obtainetl by means of two 
plaits taken in on each side at the waist 
line, but only the practiced modiste can uet 
them right. 

There WHS a beautiful tailor gown of this 
style turned out in one of the swell estal>- 
lishments up town. It was of hairline 
cheviot, brown and white. The skirt had 
that elegant little drapery across the front 
and a band of black astrakh.iii down each 
froiit side seam. There was :i brown velvet 
belt aud a plaited skirt waist of tan surah. 
A bolero jacket was made of the same ma- 
terial as the skirt, with narrow bindings of 
.astrakhan on the levers and ruffle. The 
principal style so far for overskirts is to 
have a sort of jieplum point in front aud the 
skirt lifted a little on each side with amass- 




THE NEW UHAPKU SKIKTS. 

ing of deep plaits, though many are cut 
(juite rouml. The underskirt is usually 
m.ide of lining, faced up on the outside 
witli the dress material to ,1 heigl;t suffi- 
cient to allow the overskirt to hide the lin- 
ings. The bottom skirl may or may not Ik.- 
trimmed. One very handsonie gown of this 
description was of black diagonal with 
quite wide wale.s. The underskirt had two 
rows of black fur aud the pointed overskirt 
ii.id one row.. The sleeves had five, and 
there were live around tlu! yf)ke and two 
more around the collar. The costume alto- 
get her was very rich, yet (iui«tly elegant. 

Among the dainty novelties are Mephis- 
t(*pheles shoes for the boudoir. They are 
made «if rich brocadu Jind lined with .swan.s- 
down flannel and bound or edged with nar- 
row (juilled ribbon ill light color. They 
have no heels. The new <l;iucing slippers 
remind one of tho.se of Cinderella. They 
have retl satin or kid heels, and are often 
covered with glistening cut beads that re- 
semble jewels. I .saw a few with white 
.satin vamps nearly covered with fluffy lace 
'.jows, in which were set gleaming rhine- 
stones. The hosiery is lacelike and most 
exquisitely line and delicate anil can be had 
to match every seasonable color. The tar- 
tan plaid in fme wool, with black tops, are 
very much liked for the street, and white, 
with embroideries in naturd flower colors, 
are very choice for home \\>iiv. 

There are a hundred iio>el and lovely 
fancies in muffs asitle from those of fur. 
Small fur lies m;ulc of one animal, with 
head, paws .and tail on. are much worn, 
but very few l>oas. There is a new Marie 
Antoinette fichu of fur, which is exceed- 
ingly pretty for young ligures, though 
scarcely warm enough without a thick 
coat, and then it becomes sujierfluou.s. 
Still it is liked. -Matk Lkuov. 



Finishing St. Paul's Cntliedral. 

It may interest those who have criticised 
the slow construction of the Philadelphia 
public buildings and similar structures to 
know that althiwigli nearly three centuries 
have elapsed since St. PauTs catlieilral was 
opened to public wurshij) yet workmen .-ire 
still engaged in putting the finishing 
touches to the sacrc«l edifice, and it is only 
now that the colossal st.atues of the saints 
and the fathers of the church are being 
hoisted into the niches prepared for them 
by Sir Christopher W reii around the drum 
of the great tlou'.e in llie interior. Each 
statue weighs over three tons, and the work 
of hoisting them to such an enormous 
height constitutes a labor of much peril 
and difficulty. 

Xbat May marriages are luiiueky is a su- 
perstition as old as Ovid's time, and had 
then passed into u proverb among the peo- 
I pie, which puzzled even Flutaich. 



^mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmtmmttmn^m^. 

i Better Than a Game of Chance! I 



I * 




^ I 



Buy a cheap lot or acre tract on almost your own terms of payment and 
build 5'ourself a comfortable house 'while labor and material is low in price. We 
have the sale of a large number of lots in the manufacturing district of West 
Duluth and in the beautiful residence district traversed by the motor line, as 
well as fine acre tracts near the city, which we can sell on monthly payments. 



I R. R. MACFARLANE & CO. | 

^ Room 34, Exchange Building. ^ 



x^ju JU.1TB m vi.ASS.rrrr. 



WANTED, A FURNISHED FOUR OR FIVE- 
room. stPHra heated lUt by .1. L. Dickin- 
son, manacor Woodward OlothiaK Co. 



TV"OTICE.-PEKSON8 HAViiNG Q(X)D8 IN 
i.^ pledge with me maet redeem tainn within 
ninety days of time stated o;i ticket or they will 
b« sold for cbarKes. G. A. Klein, Collaloral 
Loan Itaak, 17 wiaet Snperior street. 



ills Gelelirated French Curs, 



tVnrrnntcd 
to cnr« 



" APHRODITINE " 



or r"o ej 
refunded. 




A' 
EEFCRE 




Is !^OI,D ON A 

POSITIVE 
GUARANTEE 

^ to cure aHy form of 
y^ y-y nervous dlsea'o or 
/'(^Vv_2/ any disorder of the 
generative organs 
of either sex,^ 
whether arlsinsr' 
from the excess • ve 
nreof titlniulnntfi, AFTER 
■ •if)iiccoorOt>iBin,rrtlirough youdiful l"dl«:cr»- 
• 'M ovo ■ Inaul'cnct, &c..8ucn as Loss of Bndn 
ivvcr, Wnkcfulness, Bearinij down Pains In the 
'<• t, ii.-miual \Vi akneNi.IIyf-ter'a, NervousPros- 
rrioa, No< tiirnal Kni's^ion"', I/euforrhfea, l)iz- 
'..<i<; s. Week Memory. Loss of I'o.ver ai d In'po- 

• n y,whi, h if 1 cglcctedoften loadtopremnture 
. . Hco aud insanity. .Price ?l-00 a box. 6 boxes 

.,1' ^.'i CO. Soni hv Tn"ll 01 'ec'i t of price. 
A WRITTEN GUARANTEE la given for evorr 

♦ .0) order received, lo refund the money if a 
' I viaiir'nt cure la not cfTecleJ. We have thou- 

II Ik of iL-stimonlalB from oil and young, of 
■ >u\ hest'8. who have been permanently cur»d 
. tliPMseof Aphroditlne. Circularfree Adoresa 
IHC: APHK' SIEDI<I>B CO.. 

••■♦•>r.. Branch. Box 27, Portland, Om. 

SoldinDnlnth lax Wirth and Solleck A 

Walhank. 



IT 
PAYS! 

To give the People 
an invitation to trade 
with you 
The best way 
is to advertise in 
THE HERALD. 



IT 

PAYS! 




ORTHERN 



IS THE ONLY LINE RUNNINQ THBOUOfl 
CARS TO 

St. Pail, Miiieaplis aid Chicaif: 

HELENA BUTTE SPOKANE 
TACOMA. SE ATTL E. PORTLANl 

Pnllnian HlcoplniT t;ar8. Elegant Diniag Cfci. 
on all Throngh Traina. 

TIME SrHEDULK. 



Dlninff Cara on Paciflo 
ExprebS. 



Leave 
Oaloth 
Dadir. 



Pariflc Express for all Min- 
nesota and Dakot.nt-oiuts. 

Winnipeg. Yf>llow8U>ne 

I'ark, Helona. Hntte, 8ijo- 

kaue, Taeoma. Beame. 

Portland, Alaska, San 

Francisco and all Paclflc 

coast points.... ;;-,i,v 

Cbicaeo I.iniited for all Wli 

consln Central 4 Milwan- 

kno. Lake Shore & W^str 

em points. Milwankee, 

<'hicRgoand beyond. . 

Wisconsin Central Looal 

Exprnas for all Oogebic 

Bangn and Wiucousiu Cen- 
tral point* and Chicago... 

t Except Bnoday. AH otJ»#»r trains dailj. 

Rates, mous. or other pamphlets and 'nfoirou 
tlon will be cli<»«rfaHy ^^^'^^'^{^'^yQy{{^*^"^ 
^ City Ticket Afapt. 4*l» W. Sny«rior 8'.. 
ton. Pass and Tk't. A^.. 8t. Paul. 



3 :4.^ ( m 



4 :111V poi 



Arrive 
Dolntli 
Daily. 



7:£&ain 



U:in 



The 

Coming 

Contest 




In the spring election for mayor will be the most 
animated that has ever taken place in Duluth. 
In order to simolify matters and arrive at the real 
sentiment of the people as to who is their popular 
choice for mayor, The Herald hereby inaugurates 
a voting contest, by printing in each issue of The 
Evening Herald a coupon which every person in 
Duluth is requested to cut out and vote as often 
as they please and m.iil or bring it in person to 
The Herald ofifice. The popular contestant who 
receives the largest number of votes will on Jan- 
uary loth, the day of the close of the contest 
receive his choice of the $125.00 Haviland China 
Dinner Set now on exhibition in Panton & Wat- 
son's window, or a $100.00 Easy Chair. The for- 
mer valuable prize will also interest the ladies ot 
Duluth to take a part themselves in this enter- 
prise of determining who is the popular choice 
for Duluth's executive head. AH you have to do 
is cut out the coupon which appears on the first 
page of The Herald tonight and write on it your 
choice for mayor; every vote cast in De- 
cember counts three votes and each vote cast the 
first ten days in Januar> will count one vote each. 
The China Dinner Set or the Easy Chair will be 
delivered to the fortunate winner on the morning 
of January iitb, and he may also be successful 
nominee of the citizens* convention which will be 
held a few days later. Send in your votes. The 
outcome of this contest will be watched with a 
great deal of interest and the standing of the 
different candidates announced from time to time. 




[ 



y 




\ 



■•4'' 



1 

EVENHSTG HEBALD. 

PCBI.IflH«D ST THB 

DULUTH PaiNTlNO A PUBLISHING CO. 

Bnslneea and editorial fooma in Th« Herald 

bnihilim. 2:i) VVeet Saperior street. Telephone 
— Bnninaeeomce, 3i4. two rings; eilitorial room*, 
S34, tlxreo rin«a. ^_^___^_^_________ 

SUBSCRIPTION RATMS: 

Daily, per year "•*' 

Oailx, per three montha *•*' 

Dally, per month *> 

Weekly, pe r year >-M 

LARGEST CIRCDLATIOM IB DULUTH ^ 

Kntsireid at tlie poetoffice at Dulnth, Minn., as 
■eooad-olHM mall matter. 



The Weather. 

V. 8. Wkatheb BiKKAD. Dcirrn. HiXN.. 
Jan. 5.— Tho storm which was ceutralt'ver Lakt» 
Huron yesterday has moved Tarj slowly south- 
ward tt> Northern Ohio. 

Snow or rain i* reported from all lake sta- 
tions. e3Ec«»i>t Port Arthur audlChicago. At 
Cleveland the procipitation was 1. 16 inch ; De- 
troit, IS ; Marquette. .Zl ; Duluth, .!». 

The temperature continues below zero in 
Western Mmuesota. the Dakotas and extreme 
Nortliwtvjteru Iowa, but it has become slightly 
warmer in those sections since yesterday morn- 
ing. 

Dalath temperattire at 7 a. m. today. IS 
di'tfrees above zero ; maximnm yesterday, -i de- 
ffreee above : minimum for twenty-four hours, 
14 dtfgrem above lero. 

DcLCTH, Jan. .'>.— Local forecast until S p. ro. 
tomorrow: Fair tonight and Saturday with 
lower temiH>ratnre Saturday morning and 
•veniog; winds becoming north to west. 

James Kenkalt, 
Local Forecast oSJcer. 

Tlie Pioneer Fuel company sells the best grades 
of coal, and from the low prices now m effect 
give lioeral discounts for cash and make prompt 
deliveries. Office, 2-0 West Superior street. 



WAsnixQTOX, Jan. 5.— Forecast until S p. m. 
tomorrow: For Mitmeetita : Fair, colder; 
northwesterly winds. For Wisconsin: Fair, 
preceiifHl by snow near the lakes ; colder ; north- 
westerly winds. 



ll 
I I 



Sixth District Sentiment. 

According to a Washington dispatch 
to the Minneapolis Tribune, Maj. Bald- 
win "says The Duluth Herald, though 
Democratic, is controlled by iron mine 
speculators and so does not represent 
the interests of the people of the Sixth 
district." This is the major's answer to 
The Herald's arguments against free iron 
ore and its criticisms upon the course 
that he is pursuing. It is a feeble and 
impotent reply and shows the utter weak- 
ness of his position. Furthermore, it is 
absolutely and unqualifiedly untrue and 
exposes the major to the charge of de- 
liberately misrepresenting The Herald. 

In the first place this paper is not 
Democratic and has never claimed to 
be, and Maj. Baldwin knows that it is 
not. It gave him cheerful and unswerv- 
ing support during his campaign for 
congress, because it as well as many 
others who are not Democrats believed 
that it would be to the advantage of 
this city to have a Duluth man in con- 
gress and because he, who had never 
during his residence shown himself to be 
a bitter partisan, promised both private- 
ly and publicly to vote for no measure 
that would unfavorably affect the inter- 
ests of Duluth. How faithfully he is 
keeping that promise the people of Du- 
luth, whom he is now misrepresenting on 
the iron ore question, are fully compet- 
ent to judge, and they will no doubt ex- 
press their opinion at the proper time 
and in an effective manner. 

The assertion that The Herald is "con- 
trolled by iron mine speculators" is also 
wide of truth. Such an assertion is al- 
ways the result of those who are worsted 
in argument and are placed in a tight 
place. The Herald has experienced this 
style of "argument" before and is able 
to estimate its full strength and 
effect. It is similar to the 
reckless claim of some people 
who, when this paper has protested 
against piling up the city's debt and in- 
creasing its fixed annual charges at a 
time when the whole country is suffermg 
from commercial and financial depres- 
sion and economy is being practiced 
everywhere, assert that The Herald is 
"under the grasp of a monopoly," etc. 
One assertion is as false as the other. 

But this is not all. Maj. Baldwin as- 
serts that upon the iron ore question 
The Herald does not represent the inter- 
ests of the people of the Sixth district. 
Ergo, he does represent their interests 
when he favors placing iron ore on the 
free list. The Herald has not heard of 
a Republican in this district who favors 
free ore. The Sixth district is nominal- 
ly Republican. Maj. Baldwin carried it 
by the aid ot Republican voters, who 
supported him because he was a Du- 
luth man and for other personal 
reasons. Without their aid he 
would have been defeated. The Sixth 
district Republicans believe in protect- 
ing home industries and therefore favor 
the retention of the duty of 75 cents a 
ton on iron ore. The Democrats, in Du- 
luth at least, are divided uponthis ques- 
tion. 

How then can Maj. Baldwin truthfully 
assert that in opposing free ore The 
Herald does not represent the views of 
the people? Certainly it represents the 
views of the majority, and it has gener- 
ally been supposed that it was a car- 
dinal principle of the Democracy that 
the majority shall rule. In voting for 
free ore, he himself will represent the 
views of a small minority of his constit- 
uents. 

♦ « ♦ 

The New York Canals. 
The extract from the message of Gov- 
ernor Flower of New York, published 
yesterday, which dealt particularly with 
the plans for increasing the capacity of 
the state canal system, must have been 
read with pleasure by all who take an 
interest in the improvement of the water- 
way trom Duluth to the Atlantic. This 
portion of the message shows that New 
York's chief executive is fully alive to 
the necessity of providing improved 
facilities for handling the trade of the 
great lakes that is transferred at Buffalo, 
and It . gives additional hope that the 



New Vork legislature will provide suffi- 
cient funds to carry out the plans that 
have been suggested. » 

The recent canal conference in New 
York city has been instrumental in 
awakening public sentiment on the 
question, and the legislature may prob- 
ably be depended upon to vote suflicient 
money to carry out the Seymour plan of 
lengthened locks, vertical walls and re- 
moval of the silt from the prism, which 
it is believed will give the maximum of 
efficiency for the minimum of expendi- 
ture. 

The committee on canals of the New 
York produce exchange has created a 
bureau for the express purpose "of gath- 
ering information as to any regulation, 
rule or practice of a character tending 
in any way to increase the cost of work- 
ing traffic on the canals, impede the 
same, or in a general way, to impose un- 
necessary burdens or restrictions on the 
free and proper use of the canals by 
boatmen." The committee says: 
"It is proper to state that the 
physical deficiencies of the Erie 
canal with respect to free waterway and 
lockage are sufficiently well understood, 
and that any statements regarding those 
general features will be unnecessary, but 
informatiou respecting such or any other 
like deficiency in special localities will 
be in order. The design being to sub- 
serve the interests of those to whom this 
circular is addressed through the ac- 
cumulation of well-authenticated evi- 
dence as above, and its proper presen- 
tation in the proper quarter at the proper 
time, it is hoped that the earnest co- 
operation of those concerned will be se- 
cured." 

The prospect is bright, therefore, that 
the early future may see extensive im- 
provements made in the New York canal 
system. 



A Unique Character. 

Galusha A. Grow, who has been nom- 
inated by the Republicans of Pennsyl- 
vania as congressman-at-large to fill the 
vacancy caused by the death of Gen. 
Lilly, has a splendid record as a public 
man. Although he has been in private 
life for thirty years he is one of the really 
great men of this country today, and al- 
though almost a patriarch in years, he is 
active and in full possession of his facul- 
ties and as able as in his younger days 
to take a leading part in the work of 
congress. 

One of the few historic characters yet 
left from the civil war period, ex-Speaker 
Grow is a unique c'naracter in politics 
and has had a remarkable career. He 
was elected to the popular branch of 
congress in 1850, when but 26 years 
old, as the result of the 
Wilmost dispute in the Bradford and 
Susquehanna district, which was then 
largely Democratic, with revolutionary 
free soil variations. Entering congress 
in the following year, he at once took a 
prominent part in the debates, his first 
speech being in support of a resolution 
to grant the use of the hall of the house 
of representatives to the Hungarian pat- 
riot, Louis Kossuth, who, by the way, is 
still living in his gad year. This first 
speech was entirely impromptu, and was 
in reply to a Southern member who had 
opposed the resolution. Afterwards Mr. 
Grow vigorously advocated the home- 
stead bill, of which measure he is the 
real father. He participated actively in all 
the stirring debates which preceded the 
breaking out of the civil war. In one of 
these debates his courage was suddenly 
tested and it was never afterwards ques- 
tioned. He was continuously returner' 
to congress tor twelve years, and when 
the special session of the Thirty-seventh 
congress was called by President Lincoln 
to meet on July 4. 1861, so high was his 
standing among his Republican col- 
leagues that he was chosen speaker of 
the house, which position he filled with 
great credit until his retirement from 
congress on March 4, 1863. 

His retirement was due to his defeat 
for re-election, owing to a reorganization 
of the congressional district, and he 
never became a candidate again. In 
1876 President Grant offered him the 
mission to Russia, but this honor he de- 
clined. Since 1S63, Mr. Grow has been 
engaged in business pursuits, but always 
taking an active part in national and 
state politics, and at one time his name 
was prominently mentioned in connec- 
tion with the chairmanship of the Re- 
publican national convention held at 
Minneapolis. His election is certain, 
and he will be a tower of strength te the 
Republican minority in congress. 



The five young men'who went on a 
slumming tour in Hartford, accompanied 
by their spiritual adviser, with the idea 
of reforming fallen women, and were ar- 
rested by the police in company with the 
inmates of a disreputable house, would 
do well to secure another adviser at 
once. Their present leader in this work 
may have splendid intentions, hut he has 
started in the wrong way to work a re- 
formation. Slumming injures the slum- 
mers, and benefits no one. 




Mr. Bellamy's paper, the New Nation, 
has a novel scheme for relieving the un- 
employed. It wants state legislatures to 
start the unemployed in the business of 
supplying each other's wants. The un- 
employed, it says, "must be so organized 
as to their employment that they shall 
by their various products support one 
another, completing within their own 
class the circle of production and con- 
sumption." 

> ■ • ■ 

Louisville can boast of the strangest 
boycott on record. A lawyer, who had 



had a bill already pending for two years, 
applied to an undertaker to have his 
wife buried. The undertaker not only 
refused, but, notifying the rest of that 
guild, the lawyer was obliged to apply to 
the city undt raker, who supplied a 
pauper's coffin, being unable to get a 
better one from the union. 



ONE PRICE AND THAT RIGHT 



H*Q#A.Rb 



The members of the legislature, in- 
cluding our -own Mr. Boggs, against 
whom Manager Rhodes of the coal com- 
bine has secured a judgment of $3soo 
for damages, will not have to pay it out 
of their own pockets. The last legisla- 
ture, anticipating such a result, made an 
appropriation to protect its members 
whose bold action resulted in the ex- 
posure of the combine. 



The Corbett-Mitchell fight will cer- 
tainly take place in Florida on Jan. 25. 
The governor of Florida declares that he 
will not permit the Corbett-Mitchell fight 
to take place in the state even' if he has 
to call out the militia. These are state- 
ments that are alternately sent out from, 
Jacksonville. It is a great harvest for 
the local correspondents. 



The height of theatrical realism has 
been reached in Philadelphia. A pas- 
toral melodrama is about to be produced 
there in which 300 live ducks, geese and 
chickens are to be placed on the stage, 
being brought trom Gen. Fisher's famous 
chicken ranch at Valley Forge. 



Who for Congress? 

MilleLacs County Times: Candidates 
galore, some of whom must be slaugh- 
tered at the conventions, are having 
their little boomlets sprung. The fan- 
tastical editor of the Delano Gazette, is 
haunted with the idea that Senator A. Y. 
Eaton may be a candidate for congress. 
The friends of ex-Speaker W. E. Lee 
are said to be carefully grooming him 
to make the race. The name of C. H. 
Graves has a pleasant and familiar 
sound. And then again it might be sug- 
gested that St. Louis county Repubh- 
cans may take more kindly to the name 
of Searle, when a brilliant lawyer by that 
name, who stands high in the party and 
profession, has become a citizen of Du- 
luth. The Sixth district is a large one 
and when carefully looked over, it will 
not be found wanting for good congres- 
sional timber. 



Prominent Citizens Not Exempt. 
St. Joseph News: About $400 to pay 
claims aggregating $250,000 is what the 
receiver of the Guarantee Investment 
company found at Chicago. Among the 
names of the patrons of the concern 
were found those of very prominent citi- 
zens, which shows that prominent citizens 
can make fools of themselves just as easy 
as common people. 

At the Wrong Time. 
Philadelphia Times: The great 
schemes which President A, A. McLeod 
has projected are likely to be carried out 
some day, because they are in the direc- 
tion of natural railroad development. It 
was his misfortune, and a public misfor- 
tune as well, that he started at the wrong 
time. 

- ■ ■ ■ ' • 

The Deadly Ohio Man. 
Kansas City Star: The story that an 
Ohio man made an attempt to kidnap 
a Pittsburg millionaire lacks plausibility 
in view of the fact that the millionaire is 
still on deck. When an Ohio man makes 
a play for a stake of that magnitude he 
never gets left. 



He Has to Get Rid of Them. 

Washington Post: Mr. Bissell con- 
tinues to advertise one of the unpopular 
features of the Harrison administration 
by conducting a forced sale of the Col- 
umbian stamps. 

No Business Here. 
Chicago Dispatch: A man without 
faith sufficient to remove mountains has 
no business fooling around Duluth for a 
minute. 

Both Alike. 
Chicago Dispatch: The future of the 
Reading railroad and Archie McLeod, 
like their past, is a matter of specula- 
tion. 



The best medical authorties say the 
proper way to treat catarrah is to take 
a constitutional remedy like Hood's 
Sarsaparilla. 16 




Haynie 




American Store! 

* * * 

It is not a preference of per- 
sons or location that has 
made so many friends to the 
store, it is the goods that 
are in the store and the fair 
system of trading in practice 
here. 

During 
This 
Surplus 
Reducing - 
Here 

The smart shoppers are uni- 
versally investing their dol- 
lars in such things as we 
carry and they need or are 
liable to need. The selling 
of fine Underwear at these 
cut prices is of very large 
proportions, and the Cloaks 
and Furs, Dress Goods and 
Silks are being snapped up 
by the knowing ones. 

New Laces 
Just In. 






Jfrs. S. A. Jforroto 
Doad'e. Iowa. 

Hiv_es 

Like Afl Other Blood DIsoases, Are 

Cured by Hood's Sarsaparilla. 

"I hare been a sufferer for several years with 
hives, and have tried cTrrytfaiag K c»nld 
brsr •t, from friends, or ordered by pliysicians, 
but notlilns cured. In fact, I 

Seemed to be Getting Worse 

Finally I read about hives beins cured by 
Hood's Sarsap.irilla, and decided to try this 
inndicine. Peforo half a bottle was gone I was 
almost cured, and now, being on the second boW 



Hood's 



Sarsaparilla 

CurGS 

tl», ■ aia eatirelr cared and take great pleu- 
ore in recomnionding Hood's SarFaparllla to all 
who suffer from Uiis dlstrossing afillotlon. 
Hood's Sarsaparilla has also helped ms In 
many other tvays. It is a good meiUoine." 
Mb8. 8. A. MoKBOW, Doud'a, Iowa. 

Ho<Ni'e Pllle eare all Liver Ills, BlUeo*. 
BMS, Jaoftdioe. ladlceattei^ Sick BeadMks. 



A year's subscription to Scrib- 
ner's Magazine will bring into 
your home twelve monthly num- 
bers, aggregating over 1500 pages 
of the best and most interesting 
reading, and more than 600 beau- 
tiful illustrations. 

Announcements. 

GEOKCIE W. CABLE will begin in the January 
number a romance entitled "John March, 
Southerner." 

Two other important serials have been eneaffed: 
J, M. BAKRIE, authorof thefaniona "Little 
MiniBtor," has written a new novel, the first 
since that famous story. GKOStJE MERE 
DITII, the groat English novelist, has in 
preparation a novel entitled "The Amazing 
Mar.-iase." 

SHORT STORIES will bo abundant. 

W.l>. HOWELLS. MISS ELLIOT, W. H 
BISHOP. LUHOVIC HALEVy, PAUL 
BOUK(ii:T. JOEL CHANDLER HARRIS 
and many new writers will contribnto. 

STUDIES OF AMEHICAN LIFE will be an im- 
portant featnre, incladinR Newi)ort, Bar 
Harbor, Lenox, etc., and the West. 

THE ILLUSTRATIONS will lie even more 
numerous and beautiful tlian ever. A series 
of Frontiapiecos chosen by PHILIP GIL- 
BERT HAMERTON will bo especially not- 
able. 

Complete Prospectus Sent on Request. 

Special Offer. J^^i^^ 

a subscription for 1^84 $4.50 

Tne name, with back numbers, bound 

in cloth $6.00 

Sample Copy. 10 Cents. 

Charles Scribner's Sons, 

743 Broadway, New York. 



SHALL AmSEHENTS ARE lONEY-IAKEBS FOB 

EVERYBODY SHOULD USE THEM. 



ONE CENT A WORD! 



Herald Wants, 

Popular Because Eflectiva. 

One eent a word ; 75 cants a line per month. 
No advertisement talcen for less than 16 ceuu. 
Payments must be made in advance. 

SITUATIONS WANTED. FREE. 

All peraons wanting sltnationa can oae The 
Herald want eulnmna for three inaertlonB free 
of charge. 

This does not Include agenta or employment 
offices. 

Parties advertising in theee columns may have 
answers addressed in care of The Herald and 
will be given a check to enable them to get 
answers to their advertisements. All answers 
shonld be properly enclosed in envelopes. 



SJTVATrnys WANinit. 



YOUNG SCANDINAVIAN WANTS SITUA- 
tion in drug store. Has had two years' ex- 
perience; will worlc for small wages. Address 
Oscar Hoflel. Windsor hotel. 

FIKST-CLA8S BARBER WOULD LIKE A 
l>crmaneut place to work. Address fi 71,' 
Herald. 

WANTED - SITUATION AS H0U8E- 
keeper by a widow lady. (Jan give good 
reforoaces. Address J. F.. 102 West First 
street. 



w 



ANTED-SITOATION BY A MEAT CUT- 
ter. Address C 43, Herald. 



AN INTELLIGENT. EDUCATED MAN 
wants a position as engineer to a building 
or janitor work. He comes with highest rec- 
ommendations from Des Moines, whore bo has 
worked as engineer. Apply at Associated Char- 
ities office. Room 415 Woodbridge bldg. 



WANTED-SITUATION BY A MAN WITH 
a family tt> support. Will do any kind of 
woik cheap. Address H 57, Herald oflico. 



COOK-A SOBER, STEADY MAN WANTS 
work. Understands his business thor- 
oughly. Is not anxious for large salary, but 
wants work very bad. Address Stevens, care 
Clarendon hotel, Dulnth. 



F 



IR8T-CLAS8 DRESSMAKER DESIRES 
sewing in family by the day. Address D 60. 



SITUATION WANTED BY THOROUGHLY 
._ competent young man as stenographer, two 
years' experience in first-cJass law office; ma- 
chine furnished ; references. Address M 125, 
Duluth Evening Herald. 

WANTED. BY BOY 16 YEARS OLD. LIVING 
with parents, work of some kind; v ill 
work cheap. Address G 23. Herald. 



WANTED-TWO MEN OF GOOD APPEAR- 
anco to canvass and collect. 403 Chamber 
of Cosimeroe. 

WANTED-AN INTfiLIJGENT, HUSTLING 
man to represent a leadmg insurance 
company. Address .T 1, Herald. 



w 



ANTED-MAN TO WORK FOR HIS 
board and room. 16 First avenue east. 



WANTED-MEN OF FAIR ADDRESS OUT 
of employment tr> know tliey can make 
big money at work for us here in the city. Call 
at once The Singer Manufacturing company, 
tiiS West Superior street. 

SALESMEN TO SELL BAKING POWDER. 
We put our goods in Glass Rolling Pins. 
$60 month and expensos, or commission. Chi- 
cago Baking Powder Co., 767 Van Bureu street, 
Chicago. 

TWO GOOD HUSTLERS, SALARY AND 
commission to sell goods on instalment. 
7t3 West Superior street. 



WANTED-ONE DININGROOM GIRL AND 
one laundry girl — Esmond hotel, corner 
Twentieth avenue west and Michigan street. 



WANTED— A GIRL TO DO GENERAL 
housework. Apply 229 Fifth avenue 
west. 



w 



ANTED-A FIRST-CLASS COOK. APPLY 
1011 East Third street. 



WANTED, A COMPETENT GIRL AS COOK 
and iaundrets; references required. 
Apply, between the hours of 3 and 5 o'clock, at 
905 East Superior street. 



w 



AN TED, GIRL FOR GENERAL HOUSE- 
work. Apply at 3174 Third avenne cast. 



vv 



ANTED A:G00D NURSE GIRL ABOUT 

15 years old. 2ui) East First street. 



FOB SAJLE—MI^£IJ^AX«OUS. _ 

IT^OR SALE, BOARDING HOUSE, FUR- 
r nishrd complete : ouly $100 cash required ; 
a snap. Call Room 7, 12'.i West Superior street. 

OR SALE-EXCELLENT LIBRARY aND 
established law busidese. Rare opix>rtun- 
ity. C. F. Lamb, West Duluth. 



For 5a le or Rent. 

The building situate at 106 West Michigan 
street, now occupied by the Duluth Electric 
Light and Power Company, with central steam 
tieating apparatus. 
For ftirtner information enquire at 

HAHTMAN ELECTRIC LIGHT CO.. 

Boom 3, Exchange Building. 



i?ibR EXCHANGE — DESIRABLE MINNE- 
r* anoliB pioperty for Duluth realty. SouU 
description Ui II 56, Herald. 

ABCHITRCT8. 

A'^^iSkBtIbRYAN, ."ilO BURROWS. WARE 
bouses and heavy buildings a specialty, 

TRAPHAGEN A FITZPATRiCK, ARCHI- 
X tects. Rooms 911 and 917, Torry building, 
Duluth, Min n. 

HOTELS. 

OTEL BENNETT, WE.ST DULUTH, CA- 
tere to social clubs and sleighing [tarties; 
banquet and dancing hall ; all modem con- 
veniences. P. F. Smith, proprietor. 

MASSAGE. 

if ifoHN^ GREaNFfEI^— MASSAGE 
treatment; -satisfaction to all guaranteed. 
Rcwms 1 and 2 Max Wirth l)lock, IS West Supe- 
rior street. Otlice hours, 11 to 1 a. m-, 4 to 6 p. m. 



n 



M 



riKAJfcrAJ^ 

ONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS. 



Jewelry and Loan Ottice, 324 \V. Sup. 
£>t. Business strictly confidential. 



MONEY TO LOAN IN ANY AMOUNT ON 
horane. wagona. honsobold fumitorfl, pi- 
anos, diamonds, jewelry and all kinds of per- 
sonal property, on short notice and a lower rate 
than yon can possibly get it elsewhere. Inquire 
of Wm. Horkan, managar, Dulnth Mortgage 
Loan company, room 430. Chamber of Commaroe 
bcdlding, Dulnth. 

ONEY TO LOAN ON DUM0ND8 AND 

jewelry. G. A. Rlnin, only licensed pawn- 
hn .kor in Duluth, 17 Weet Superior streat. 



J^JJfO^^GINEERS. 

CHARLES F. HOWE. SPECIAL ATTEN- 
lion given to the examination and report- 
ing on mineral lands. Iron lands bought and 
sohL Aualysee of all kinds made on abort 
notice. 631 Chamt>er of Commerce. 



PZUXBIIfO. 



Xy W. MCMILLAN COM PANY, 

* HKATINQ AND PLUMBINO. 

iU Weat Saperior street. 



ONE CENT A WORD. 



RENT YOUR HOUSES, FLATS AND STORES 
of Alexander ft Slayers. 216 W. Superior at. 

FOR RENT. STEAM HE.VTED FLAT IN 
Butfalo Hats. Apply 10 R. P. Payne, Room 
1, Gratf building. 

FOB RENT - ELEVEN-ROOM HOUSE. 
steam heat. 305 East Third street. Half 
rate till May. See Sherwood, Torrey building. 



■pOR RENT, TyVp FURNIBHED ROOMS 



TO JtEXT-BOOMfi, 

T, TVfO FURNI8HEL ...... 

heated by hot air. 411 West Third street. 

lyriCELY FURNISHED ROOM FOR RENT 

i-i cheap : electric light and bath. 182 j West 
Second street. 



F 



OR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM, 
qnire 13 West Second street. 



IN- 



FOR RENT-FURNISHED ROOM WITH 
board. 120 First avenue west. 

IpOR RENT - THREE UNFURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping, rent $5 per 
month. Apply IM Firtt avenue west. 



ONE CENT A WOED! 



FBATERNITIK8. 

• PALBBMnFlODGENo. 79, A. P. A 
M\^^ A. M.Begalar meeting flrat and third 
^nn^MoQdajr eveninga of every month at 7 :M) 
y\^o'flIoek. Next meeting Jan. 15, 1894. 
f. ^^ Work. Third degreeTW. E. Covey, W. 
M„ Bdwin Mooere. secret iry. 

XI 

i^^\meetlngJan.8tIi, 1894. Work, E A'de- 

' ^ Vee.S.L.irraser,W.M..H.W.Cheadle, 
■ecretary. 

EY6TONK CHAPTER No. M, B. A. M. 

Stated commnnicationa second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each month at 7i» 
o'clock. Next meeting Dec. 13, annual meeting 
—election of <olficerB. Geo. A. Flack H. P., T. 
J. Hunter, secretary. 



TONIC LODGE No. 186, A. F. <ft A. M 

J. Regular meetings seoond and foorth 

^Monday »veuin^ nf^ery month. Next 



^.^"rvULUTH ftOMMANDEBT No. 18. 
•. * Ad2^ -"-^ ^- "^^ stated conclave at 7 :» 
%Ba^^ o'clock first Tnenday evenings of 
j^^^m every month. Next conclave will 
<r held on Tuesday, Jan. 2, 1894. W. 

O. Ten Brook, E. C; Alfred LeRieheux. secre- 
tary. 



FOR RENT-FIRST FLOOR FLAT OF 
live rooms, hardwood flnigh, centrally lo- 
cated. Apply 120 First avenue west. 



LADIES-IF YOU LIKE TO KNOW THE 
way through married life troubles, send 
2-cent stamp and get a pass. Address E 23, 
Herald. 

MARRIED LADIES— SEND 10 CENTS FOR 
"Infallible Safeguard" (no medicine, no 
deception ;) just what you want. Ladies' Bacar, 
Kansas City, Mo. 



MIDWIF'B. 

PRIVATE HOSPITAL-MRS. L. BALDWIN, 
Midwife. Full graduate of German eolleee 
of accouchement, i'upping and vaccinating 
done. 609 East Third street. 



WANTED, TO BUY A SECOND HAND 
organ^ill pay in monthly installments. 
.4ddres8 2218 VVeet Second street. 



WANIED-THE USE OF TWO LARGE 
wood heating stoves for the winter, by 
the Associated Charities. Apply at 415 Wood- 
bridge bnllding. 



EMPLOYMENT OFFICE. 

THE MOST RESPECTABLE LICENSED 
office in Duluth, free of charge to all girls, 
alao have a full line of hair switches, chains, etc. 
Mrs. M. C. Seibold, 2z5 East Superior street. 



CiriZ KyUHKEKHS. 



RICE k McGILVRAY, CIVIL ENGINEERS 
and surveyors. 521 Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

\T S. A W. H. COOK, nUBVEYOBS AND 

ivA • civil engineers. W5 Weet Fourth street. 



GOLD. 

OLD GOLD AND SILVER BOUGHT FOR 
cash by Hirschy & Regli, manufacturing 
jewelers, 105 W. Sup, st. Rooms 5 and 6. upstairs. 



dyeing and cleaning 

FirstTxabs^yeingandclkaning of 
of all si}rt8 of ladies and geots i?arments, 
at the Lake 8ui)crior Steam Dje TforlcB, 32 
West First street. Mrs. A. Forstcr, Prop. 

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS. 

C A Coates and wife to H Howe, lot 8, 
block 1, Macfarlane's Grassy Point ad- 
dition $ 500 

Duluth & Iron Range Railroad company 
to B L Clark, land in section 21, 27-55- 
21... 280 

M H Norton to Duluth Transfer Railway 
company, land in 49-15 1,325 



Total transfers $2,109 



STOVB SKPAIBINO. 



HEATING STOVES, COOK STOVES AND 
ranges cleaned and repaired on short no- 
tice, eestinge ftimished for any kind of stoves 
made : American Stove Repair Works, 118 East 
ciuperior street. 



AUCTIOITEEB. 



W. 



D. GORDON, 334 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



f*'V. PAUL A DDLUTH BAlLBOAl*. 




DaUy 








Except 








Simday 


Liniitod 


Night 
Dally. 




Fast 


Daily. 




Train. 






Lv DuiuUi 


9 00 am 


130pn 


llUpw 


ArSt. PauL. 


2 50 pm 


6 20 pm 


716 aan 


Ar MinneapoUa... 


310 pm 


6 4<)pm 


7 35 am 


ArStiilwKter 


3 15 pm 


7i0pm 


7 20 pm 


Ar Chicago 


6 46 am 


7 00 am 


9 36 pm 


irMUwftukae 


330 am 


4 20 am 


710po> 


-Vr Omaha ..« 




9 25 pm 
515 pm 
4 50 pm 


10 00 pm 


Ar St. Louis 




5 55 am 


Ar EausasCity 




6 30as> 


Lv for Cloqnot, 








Carlton 


7 30 am 


^^«m_ 


IKpir 



DnlQth, Sontb Shore & 
Atlantic R'y. 

SI]R.BiOrr Z.I33TBI TO 

Boston, Nk, 

Montroal, BuCUo, 

Philadelphia, PiUsbur^, 

Clereland, Detroit, 

All pointi in Miehi^n, 
The East and South 

Over 1 00 miles horter than any other 
line to Bosto and all New England 
PolntE. 

Over 70 mile the shortest line to aU 
Points East of Mackinaw or Detroit 
Mich. 

WAGNER SLEEPING CARS 

ON ALL THBOUGH TBAINB. 



F. B. BOSS, 
Northern Pasoenger A^ent, 
429 Wa6t Superior Street 



For tickets, sleeping ear aeaommodatioiu and 

full information, apply to 

T. H. L.ARKE, Commercial ▲srent, 
426 Wert Snptrlor Street, DCLUTfl,KIS5 
floalding Hfite Blook 



D., >L & N. RAILROAD TDLE TABLE. 
Daily, except Simday; in effect Dec. 18, 189S. 

Train No. 1, northbound— 

Lv Duluth (Union depot) » 8^ am 

Ar Virginia 11:30 am 

Ar Biwabik I2«lm 

Ar Mountain Iron ...■. 11:35 am 

Ar Hibbing 12:20 pm 

Train No. 2. southbound— 

Lv Virgmia l:SOpm 

Lv Mountain Iron 1:40pm 

Lv Biwabik Wi'Spm 

Lv Hibbing... 12S5pm 

Ar Duluth (Union dei>ot) 5. -05 put 

G. C. OILFILLAN, 
D. M. PHILBIN, Oen'l Pass. Agt 

Gen'l Manager. 



DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE & 
ATLANTIC R. R. 

Atlantic Limited (Daily) 
Leave Duluth 5 45 pra 

Arrive Marquette . 4 45 am 

Arrive Sault Sto. Marie 10 30 am 

Arrive Detroit (2d day) 9 10 am 

Arrive Toronto (2nd day) 6 30 am 

Arrive Montreal (2nd day) . S 20 am 

Arrive Boston (2nd day) 8 35 pm 

Arrive New York (2nd diay). 8 .V) pm 

West lx>nnd train arrives Duluth 10 S5 am 

Wagner Buffet Sleeping Car between Dulnth 
and Sault Sto. Marie. 
Direct line and lowest rates to Toronto, Mon- 
I treal. New York, Boston. Saginaw, Grand Rap- 
, ids, Detroit and all i>ointe East. 

Lowest rates for Emigrant Tickets via this 
line to and from Europe. 

T. H. LARKE. 
Commercial Agent, Dulnth. 

Ticket offices 426 Spalding House and Union 
Depot. 



IF YOU 



WANT A COOK, 



— WANT A SITUATION, — 

- WANT A SALESMAN, - 
WANT A SERVANT GIRL, 



- WANT TO HIRE ANY HELP, - 

WANT TO RENT A STORE 

WANT AN AGENT OR PARTNER, 



—I————— W^ANT TO BUY OR SELL A FARM, — ^— ^^ 
^^^— — WANT TO BUY OR SELL A HOUSE, — — ^— — 
— — — WANT TO HIRE OR RENT A HOUSE. -^-^-^— 
— ^^— — WANT A GOOD BOARDING HOUSE, ^-^— ^— 
-^-^^-^ WANT TO BUY OR SELL A CARRIAGE. ^-^-— 
-^— ^— WANT TO GET BOARDERS OR LODGERS. — ^ 

— WANT TO LEND OR BORROW MONEY. -^^ 
— - WANT TO TRADE OR EXCHANGE ANYTHING. ^— 
— — WANT TO FIND ANYTHING YOU HAVE LOST, — 

— WANT TO FIND STRAYED OR STOLEN ANIMALS, — 

— WANT TO ACCOMPLISH ANYTHING UNDER THE SUN. ■ 

— YOU CAN DO IT EASILY THROUGH THE WANT COLUMNS OF 

TH£ EVENING HERAIjD duluths leading paper. 



■^m 





























r 






1 




























1 






























f 












il 1 














■> 


I 














■ 






























L.. 













A' 



I 



■: 



't^'.T "f "■ *J r-.-^' 



■'J^~"~T ~-S'T^ ■ 



THE DULUTII EVENING IIEBALD: FRIDAY. JANUARY 5.1891. 




WILL LEAVE THE ii 



D. M. Fhitbin is Considering the Resigna- 
tion of His Position as General Man- 
ager of the Missabe Road. 



It is Expected That He Will Become General 
Manager of the Duluth & Win- 
nipeg Road. 



Text of the Resolutions Regarding the Wil- 
son Bill, Drawn by the Jobbers' 
Union Committee. 



There is a well-deUned rumor kT'^iinj,' 
the rounds to the effect that I). M. Phil- 
bin will, upon his return from the r.icific 
coast resign his present position as gen- 
eral manairiT of the I>uliith, Missabe & 
Northern railroad and assume a similar 
position with the Dululh «S: Winnipeg 
road. When Mr. Philbin left for his va- 
cation he went ostensibly to Califurnla, 
bat it is ouiie certain that he went to 
Montreal and from there it is said that 
he will CO to New \ork to attend the ad- 
journed meeting of the Duluth & Winni- 
peg people and perfect the arrangement. 
This rumor is neither denied iir con- 
tirraed by the cfiicials ct either of the 
roads ititerested. but The Herald is in 
possession of such information as leaves 
no doubt of the correctness of the ru- 
mor. 

WANT THE DUTY LER. 



Jobbers' Union Committee Wants Iron Ore 
and Lumaer Protected. 
The following are the resolutions con- 
cerning the Wilson bill drafted by the 
legislative committee of the jobbers' 

union to be presented at the ne.\i regular 
meeting: 

We, your committee on legislation beg 
10 submit the following resolutions for 
your consideration and cjnrtrmation: 

Whereas, it is our belief that the 
clauses of the Wilson bill relating to 
lumber and iron ore. if passed, would 
have the effect of materially injuring our 
interests as jobbers, lumbermen and 
manufacturers both directly and indi- 
rectly, therefore be it 

Resolved, that we urge on our repre- 
sentatives in congress to use the best ef- 
forts, both by their votes and intluenre 
to abrogate said clauses and preserve 
the present duty on both these products. 

Resolved further, that they assist in 
bringing legislation on the tariff ques- 
tion to as speedy a termination as possi- 
ble so as to restore confidence in busi- 
ness circles and remove hesitancy among 
our manulacturers. that both idle capital 
and labor may be employed, the essen- 
tials necessary to the retention of prus- 
perity. 

Resolved, that copies of the resolution 
be s'gned by our president and forward- 
ed to our senators and representatives in 
congress. C. C. Prindle, 

A. M. .Marsh.ali , 
William McKixley. 



WILL COME TO DULUTH. 



Hon. F. E. Searle Will Remove Here From St. 
Cloud. 

At the regular meeting of the board 
of directors of the C^erman-American 
National bank, of St. Cloud. F. E. Searle 
tendered his resignation as president, to 
take effect upon the election of his suc- 
cessor. The filling of the vacancy was 
postponed until ttseannual meeting. The 
board adopted resolutions highly com- 
, mending him for the ability with which 
he had managed the bank, which during 
the time he has been connected with it 
has grown to be one of the largest and 
strongest in the city. 

The St. Cioud Journal-Press says: 
"Mr. Searle doss not disclose his luture 
plans, but it is understood that he has 
been ofifered a partnership in a promi- 
nent law lirm, and an official posi- 
tion in a stning financial institution, 
one of which offers he will accept, and 
shortly remove from this city to Du- 
luth. In Mr. Searles removal, St. 
Cloud s loss is great. Friend and foe 
alike admit his many and reliable servi- 
ces rendered to this city. He has 
brought more foreign capital in St. Cloud, 
and interested more capital in St. Cloud 
investmtrnts, tnan ar.y ether influence. 
.'iMl hi 5 efforts for the advancement of 
thf city have been untiring. 

The loss, in a social way, will also be 
keenly regretttd, as Mr. and Mrs. Searle 
have contributed largely to social events. 
Mrs. Searle is one of St. Cloud's charm- 
ing and popular ladies, active in church 
and social circles, and her removal from 
St. Cloud will oe deeply deplored. 
Wherever they may locate they will be 
followed by the best wishes of a host of 
St. Cloud citizens." 



SOJOURNING IN THE SOUTH.' 

A Dululhiin's Story ol Lilc in and Around 
Galveston. 
J. R. Myers, of this city, whoisat pres- 
ent temporarily residing in Galveston, 
Tex., writes as follows to The Herald: 

"I have received the holiday number 
of The Kvening Herald and it is cer- 
tainly one of the f>cst advertisements 
that Uuluth has ever received. Th>; 
statement of the improvements and the 
vast amount of new developments on 
the Mcsaba range is something remark- 
able, considering the general depression 
in business during the past summer. But 
it is hard for me to realize that your re- 
ports on the weather in The Herald from 
time to time are true, from the fa.t that 
here there are no signs ot winter. We 
have clear, warm weather constantly 
and the gardens are full of tlowers, and 
the orange trees are bending with ripe 
fruit. This is certainly a most dtlighi- 
tul climate, being very healthy, the stat- 
istics showing the di^ath rate here to be 
less thin anv point in the United States. 
"But climate and tlowers are not the 
only things worth mentioning in Texas. 
I notice by l!radslreet's report of the 
bank clearances for the week ending Dec. 
21, that the clearances of this city are 
$7,233,000, being greater than the cities 
of St. Paul, Duluth, Seattle. Tacoma, 
Spokane Falls, Saginaw and Bay City, 
Mich., combined: being ^^3.000,000 more 
than the bank clearances ot the city ol 
Milwaukee, and Jt2,5oo.ooo greater than 
the city of Cleveland, and $1,500,000 
more than Omaha, Neb. These figures 
are all the more remarkable when we 
consider that Galveston has only a pop- 
ulation of about 35,000, and that the 
state is as yet largely undeveloped, but 
IS rapidly tilling up by the immigration 
of men of families who are seeking 
homt^s, It being practically the only 
•West" that is left in which cheap lands, 
good soil and a healthy climate are com- 
bined. 

"Since the government has begun the 
expenditure of §6,200,000 on a system of 
jetties for the improvement of this bar- , 
bor, it has attracted the attention of the 
business men of all that part of the 
Tnited States lying west of the Missis- 
sippi river, who are now looking to this 
port as an outlet to the sea, instead of 
over a long rail-haul to the East by the 
way of New York. 

"We are, as yon are aware, interested 
in the town called Texas City, on the 
mainland opposite Galveston, and di- 
rectly in front of the improvements 
being made by the government, it being 
Situated the same as W^est Superior is to 
Duluth. On this water front docks are 
now being constructed, anil warehouses 
will soon be erected for the handling of 
a large amount of the heavy freights 
now passing through the port of Galves- 
ton. There is one large cotton firm who 
has already agreed to ship 50,000 bales 
of cot;on of next year's crop by the way 
of our new town, this business being at- 
tracted to Texas City by a system of free 
docks which we have adopted, while 
here in Galveston the water front is all 
owned by one company, and a dock 
charge is made which very materially 
restricts tlie commerce of this port. 

"We have fine artesian water on our 
townsite, which raises twenty-five feet 
above the level of the sea, and is the 
only point on the gulf coast where fresh 
water has been discovered so near tide 
water, at all other points it being too 
salty for domestic use, or to be used in 
boilers. We have a well 726 feet deep 
which flows 150,000 gallons per day. We 
have connection with all the railroads 
that enter Galveston, and have the same 
freight rates to our town that 
are made to this city, which 
gives us a great advanatge in 
the handling of freight. Wishing you a 
happy and prosperous New Year, I re- 
main, Yours very respectfully, 

|. R. Myers." 



Removal Sale! 

Monday we move into our new store, 224 West Superior street, (next 

« 

to Smith, I'\'irwcll ».\: Steele) and to reduce our stock as much as pos- 
sihle, we offer 

For Tomorrow, Saturday, 
Any Suit or Overcoat 

In our Men's and Boys' Clothing Department at 



OT'Our gvarautee is like a 
bank check. If yonr pur- 
chase docs uoc suit you 
hriuK back the eroods and 
draw your money. 



% OFF! 

THE 

\YOODWARD 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 

No. lo East Superior Street. 



CLOTHING CO. 

J. L. Dickinson, Manager. 



KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS. 



Union of Two Lodges and a Banquet Held Last 
Evening. 
The Knights of Pythias had a celebra- 
tion last evening, the occasion tor it 
being the consolidation of Zenith and 
Syracuse lodges into Duluth Lodge No. 
47. The ceremonies took place in the 
new K. of. P. hall at i8 West Superior 
street and were conducted by Grand 
Chancellor F. S. Wheaton, of Minne- 
apolis, and Grand Keeper of Records 
and Seals G. M. Orr, of St. P.^ul. The 
otticers elected and installed were: 
George E Arbury, C. C; G. K.Chester, 
V. C; F. L. Young, P.; C. J. Marshall, M. 
W.: George V. Burgess, M. A.; George 
Orchard, K. R. S. and M. F.; C. A 



DECEMBER DONATIONS. 



W 



AMUSEMENTS. 



The Saturday Club. 

The program for the Saturday club for 
this week is as follows; 

Leader 

Mri», Grannia. 
"CarrPiit Eveats, Foreiffn and Dompstic." 

Leader. . , ., 

Mrs. SSpencer. 
Mutiic 

Mrs. Findlcy. 

Maryland ■ 

_, Mrs. Hmit. 

"The C aruliutb and (jenrgiii".. 

Mrs. .McdonaJsK 

"Ciilunial Lift> in tbn eknitlj" 

Urv. ('athoraii. 
"KiDg Williarn 8, Quoeu Aunc's ami Kint- 

fttjorgo's Wars". ., 

MW Hicken. 
Talk -"Edaratiwi 'm the .South ' 

Mr< McUath. 
TaUt-"lndiKo.T.,baccoan<l ! ■- ■- - ■!. 

era Colonic.*". 

Mib. Williaii 



Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 



Frank Daniels. 
Frank Daniels is to make his annual 
bow to a Duluth audience tomorrow 
night. The engagement of this favorite 
comedian and his hip comedy company 
is for one night only. Daniels will be 
seen again in that furiously funny fan- 
tastical farce, "Little Puck," but in so 
different a form as to practicallv make it 
a new plav. "Spectacular Littie Puck" 
is what it is called now, and a carload of 
scenery is to be used in the production 
to carry out this promise. 



Gregory. M. E.; Peter Graff, I. G.; J. 
Hollsworth. O. G.; W. A. Cant. H. P. 
Wieland, Simon Clark, trustees. 

After the installation was over there 
was a banquet and general good time, 
(ieorge L. Span^^ler was toastmaster. 
Toasts were responded to as follows: 
"Future of the K. of 1'.," Charles 
Hopkins; "How to Advance 
Pvthianisni in Duluth," C. R. Normandy; 
"Pythian Drawbacks," C. J. Marshall; 
"Pvthianism in Minnesota," G. M. Orr, 
of St. Paul; "Pythian Obligations," Dr. 
Routh; "What is Pythianism.'" F. S. 
Wheaton, of Minneapolis. Songs were 
were sung by Messrs. Arbury, Harris 
and Sherwood and a solo by J.G. Harris. 
".^uld Lang Syne" was sung at the con- 
clusion. 

(Jn Wednesday night Gate City Lodtrc 
No. 35 installed as officers: C. W. Stil- 
soh, C. C; A. H. Holgate, \\ C; W. 
Pillsburv, P.: W. H. Craves, M. of W.; 
George M. Cruikshank, K. of R. and S ; 
Dr. Pillsbury. M. of E.; W. L. Seaton, 
M. at A.; A. B. Lout.euhiser, T. G.; J. D. 
Young, O, G. 



STOLEN BY THE ICE. 



Car Service Report. 

Chairman James Keiiv. of the Lake 
Superior Car Service association, reports 
the total number of cars bandied at the 
head of the lakes in December as 18,649, 
as against 28,784 in December of last 
year. Dufuth handled 7965 and Superior 
10,684 The average of detention was 
nut quite I 10 days. Of the cars h mdled 
II 471 carried coal or coke, 4242 wheat, 
flax, rye or barley, and 1049 flour, fcid 
or bran. 



The Mayoralty Contest. 

Geo. W. Stevens, manager Cranberry 

LnmbPF company _. 

Henry Haski' s 

\V. E. Iiichardiion 

K. A. Gray 

A. M. Morriuon 

Kobwrt- L. Knt-b"! 

a. W. Cornell 

|{. F. Howard.. 

H. ('. KMiaU 

a W. (lark 

F C. Hartley ......." 

W. GomherB- 

(ienrgB W Back 

J. B. Hatiibin _ 

Scatt<?riuK 



21,030 

17.916 

474:. 

17.0 

»;:>:! 

-;.;7 
4i;o 

iti:. 
i«t 

i:vi 

120 

l::72 



The Most Pleasant Way 
Of preventing the grippe, colds, head- 
aches, and tevers is to use the liquid 
laxative remedy Syrup of Figs, when- 
ever the system iieedb a gentle, yet 
ctfcctivc cleansing. To be benctitcd one 
must Kct the true remedy nianuiaclured 
bv the California Viy, Syrup company 
onlv. For sale by all drug^'ibts iii 50c 
and $[ bottles. 



Inspector Lawrence Traces a Lighthouse 
Theft at Superior. 

Inspector Lawrence, of the treasury 
department, returned to Minneapolis 
yesterday, from Duluth and West Su- 
perior, where he has been workiD}^ on 
what promised to be a most interesting 
case. A short time ago a complaint was 
made by Capt. Mead, of the li;;hthoiise 
department at Detroit, Micfi., to the na- 
tional lighthouse board, that lighthouse 
supplies were being stolen from the sta- 
tion at .Superior. 

The -.board immediately asked per- 
mission from the treasury department to 
deuil a man for a period of thirty ilays 
tn investigate the case. Col Lawrence 
wns accordiutrly selected. About two 
weeks ago he came to Duluth. where he 
has worked on the case, which he found 
to be not so serious as supposed. The 
material alleged to be stolen, consisted 
of three expensive signal lights valued 
at about S70 apiece. These were missed 
after a storm and could not be traced 
anywhere. 

Inspector Lawrence found one ot the 
lights jammed in the ice on the Superior 
shore ot Superior bay. After due in- 
vestigation, he came to the conclusion 
that the lights had not been stolen, but 
that the severe force of the storm had 
torn them from their fastenings and that 
they had simply been'lost in this way. 

ITASCA COUNTY REASSESSMENT. 



Twill do Duluth Good 
To mail your Eastern or Western friends 
copies of The Herald's Christmas num- 
ber. 



Highest of all in Leavening Power. — Latest U. S. Gov't Report. 




Baking 

Powder 



ABSCNJUTEiy PURE 



The Valuation Has Been Raised $2,225,165 
by Senator Ucdon. 

The report of Senator W. S. Dedon, 
who was appointed by Governor Nelson 
last July tocxamine and reassess emitted 
and undervalued property in Itasca 
cniinty, was received by the 
ycstenlay. 

Senator Dedon appointed tbirly-sevcn 
men to assist him. lie examined lihy- 
thrce townships, six of which he found 
assessed is highly as they should be. In 
the other lorty-seveii he raised the valu- 
ation $2,2_'5,i'')v The personal property 
of the county he did not change the 
valuation of. His total bill for all the 
expenses of the examination was $6486, 
as .nRainst the original estimate of JiPdoo 
to $9000. 

The Library Report. 
December was a readini^ month as 
shown hy tho library report lor 874') 
books were issued during the mouth. 
The greatest number issued in one day 
was ss-S and the least number ii)7; avei- 
age daily circulation, 350. On Dec. 30 
there we-e 2186 books in circulation and 
OSoo ( ards. During the month 145 cards 
were isstied and $23. 17 was collected in 
lines. 



Names ol Those Who Kindly Remembered the 
Women and Children's Home. 
The December donations to the Wo- 
men and Children's home were as fol- 
lows: 

Mrs. Palmer, baby s clothing; Airs. 
Nye, picture books, 'j barrel potatoes 
and magic lantern; Mrs. J. T. Hale, 'j 
dozen cotton flannel waisls; Mrs. A. B. 
Jones, milk every day: Mrs. C. D. Cong- 
don, childs flannels and childrens waists: 
Mrs. W. E. Lucas, large package of 
shoes, hose, dresses and coats; Ccngre 
gational church ladies, enough oyster 
soup and rolls for children's sujiper, m'.lk 
ana cofiee; board ladies, new outing 
flannel night gowns; Mrs. James, a pair 
of crib blankets; Youiitf Ladies auxiliary, 
sewing for children; Jackson school, 
seventh and eighth grades, pug dogs, 
kittens and dolls, neatly sewed and 
stuffed for the babies Christmas; I'ndion 
school, picture books, dells, clothing and 
money for two of the hoys; Mrs. Henry, 
oil painting, fancy work, table mats, con- 
tectionery, four cakes of maple sugar; 
Mr. Sick, a fine Christinas tree: Thomas 
Claik, 2 line turkeys, cranberries, apples, 
oranges, grapes, raisins, candy aad nuts, 
sweet potatoes; little Will Sargent, toys, 
picture books and little slippers; Im- 
perial mill, 100 pounds flour; street rail- 
way company, 40 ticketi to take chil- 
dren down luwn lo see Santa Claus; 
package of clothing left oa door step; 
Mrs. E. W. Markell, nice large com- 
forter, children's hose, waists, shoes, 
toys: ♦ Panton c\: Watson, large 
package of nice Christmas toys: 
Mrs. Harrison, $1.00 for Christmas toys; 
Mrs, Mac.eod, | pairs of mittens, felt 
hats; Mrs. E. C. Gridley, shoea, over- 
shoes, dresses and flannel; Mrs. O. H. 
Simonds, very nice flannels; Mrs. H. L. 
Perrir, 2 nice games; Mrs. James Hun- 
ter, toys and games and long strings of 
popcorn tor tree; King's Daughters, 215 
bags of popcorn; Mrs. F. A. Patrick, 
large prettily dressed doll; Mrs. James 
A. Howard, rocking horse and wheel- 
t)arrow lilied with toys; Lida 15. I-^arhart, 
20 pounds of mixed nuts; Mrs. Frank 
Hibbing, large turkey, apples and nuts; 
Mrs. Towne, oranges and cakes; Mrs. 
Norton, large bag of oranges; Mrs. 
Haines, large doll house furnished, doll's 
bed, games, etc.; Daisy Ray, basket of 
delicious cookies; Irving school, ;>5 50; 
Duluth News Tribune and Merchants, 
bushel basket of beet and chickens, 2; 
pounds of flour: Dr. Speicr, medicine 
and infants' food; Hardy school, 5 dolls, 
2 tets of dishes, 2 toilet sets and 2 stoves; 
D. Anderson, 8 (|uarts ol milk; Miss Car- 
rie Wager, toys, dolls, etc.: Max Pul- 
ford, sled; Mrs. Rupley, contents of 
little Robert's Christmas stocking; Mrs. 
Henry Smith, i large quilt, soft warm 
underwear and crocheted sacques for 
little ones; Imperial mill, 50 pounds of 
flour; Mrs. Towne, 3 thermometers; A. 
Kirst, 16 pounds of granulated sugar, 
coffee; a friend, q little wool shirts and a 
parcel of parsnip^; Mrs. E. W. Harnc?, 
16 bags of nuts and canriy for Christniis 
tree. 

A kindergarten school .at the home is 
conducted by Miss May Sherwood every 
Saturday, assisted bv Miss Helen Spen- 
cer and Misses Williams and Smallwood. 
Seven pairs of scissors for the children 
were donated hy the Costello Hardware 
company and E. Ficbiger. 

In the list of donations made on New 

Year's to the home, the gift of 500 bags 

each from tLc Weils-Stone Mercantile 

company and Stonc-( )rdean company 

j and the printing on them by J. J. Lc- 

I Touriieau iS: Co, was ommtttcd in The 

{ Herald yesterday. Paul Hale also made 

i gifts of overshoes, h ggmgs, etc., to the 

governor 1 ^^j^^ ,^f ^^^^^ p,^^ money he received 

for the s.iU ol some: 'Tides for l.ittlc 
hi'lks," uiittcii and I'libiishctl bv him- 
self. 



tnceting of the boaid will be held next 
Tuesday evening. 

The governor appointed Dr. McGaug- 
hey, of Winona; Dr. C. B. Pillsbury, ot 
Duluth, and E. \ . Chilton, of Howard 
Lake, as members of the stale board of 
health. The first two are reappointed 
and the last is a new appointment. 



SOME CITY CHAT. 



Views on 



Every One Mall Them. 
No one should fail to mail one or more 
copies of The Herald's Christmas num- 
ber to distant friends. 



NAMED BY GOVEKNOR NELSON. , 

The State Executive Makes a Number ol 
Appointments. 
Governor Nelson, under the new gen- 
eral law of 180;!, which reimir^d that the 
state medical board go out of office on 
Jan. 1. ilv^l, and anew boar<! of nine 
members be appointed, m.ndc the follow- 
ing .tppointmoiit' , three of whom ar<* 
new: Dr. I'hillip':, of I'rcston, retires and 
the other six members of the board are 
reappointed. Doctors floegh, IJoeck- 
mann and Hcebe are the new members. 



Diflerent Subjects as Expressed by 
Well Known People. 
"1 am glad to see that the authorities 
upon the Mesaba range have at length 
awakened to the fact that it is unlawful 
to kill moose in this state," said a Mesaba 
man last night. "My business takes me 
up in that part of the county very often 
and I have eaten moose and venison 
steaks at nearly every hotel and stopping 
place ever since last Juiy. If the men 
who are hungry killed the game no one 
would trouble them, but there is a gang 
of pot-hunters up there that slaughter 
tor the market and spend their gains in 
the dives. Those are the fellows that 
should be looked after." 

* * * 

"Charity is sure to be abused by some 
people," said a business man yestcrdav, 
' and I will tell you of one case that has 
come under my personal observation 
lately. The county is supporting a man 
who worked all summer for $65 a month, 
and who has, I firmly believe, because a 
reliable person told heard him say so 
and told me ot it, $160 in the bank. He 
lives in a house on Lake avenue which 
belongs to a man who generally makes 
his tenants pay rent in advance or they 
go out. 1 do not suppose that there are 
many such cases, but this one shows 
what may exist." 

* * * 

John T. Jones returned yesterday from 
Iron Mountain, Mich., which place is in 
the heart of the mining district where so 
nauch distress exists. He said: "It is 
pitiable in the extreme to witness the 
scenes around the charity stores. The 
Italians, Austnans and that sort of peo- 
ple do not mind begging for anything 
that they want or can get. They are 
educated to it, but to men who have 
worked all their lives, and in m.any cases 
own their own houses and lots, it comes 
hard to have to ask for tharitv. liutiiicy 
have to do it or starvt, as ihcy cannot 
bellcr themselves bv going anywhere 
else, even if they hail \hc funds todo i;o." 



tliat it takes 

John Jcns- 
limb of the l;iw, 
a gang of them 



"It is generally conceded 
a smart mail to get .ihcad o 
wold," said a brother 
"but a small boy or 
played it on him in a way that he must 
despise. John has a fine St. liernard 
dog. The dog disappeared for some 
days. Mr. Jenswold advertised for him, 
offering $5 reward, and presto, almost 
before the paper was delivered, an in- 
nocent small boy was at his bouse wiih 
the dog securely fastened to him bv a 
rope. Jenswold paid the reward, and is 
now consulting with other owners of fine 
good natured dogs how to stop this pick- 
ing up and caring for supposedly stray 
dogs until a reward is offered for them." 
* * * 

A member of the city Republican com- 
mittee said today: "We are having 
some trouble in figuring out just how 
many delegates each of the new wards 
are entitled to. We wish to allot the 
delegates upon an e«iuitablc basis, fair to 
all, and we hope no petty jealousies will 
arise. The Republican voters must be 
aware of the immense disadvantages we 
labor under, and in using ihc vote cast 
for Nelson for governor wc arc simply 
doing the best wc can." 

+ + * 
I >t. A. Rockwell, of West Duluth said 
today; "Plcabc let people know that it 
is my brother, A. I- . Rockwell, .ind not 
myself, who was elected to the po.sition 
of keeper of the <:ounty poor l.irm. If I 
ever go to the poor farm it will not be as 
keeper, but because I < annot keep out." 

Iff, * *> 

"Why on earth do you keep your office 
so infernally liotr" asked a visitor of 
C.npt. Prcssncll this morning. 

"He is prariisiiig" said anoiher man 
who was silling in the olticc. 

"Prjrtisiiig for wli;»t? ' 

"For the hereafter" w;is the reply. 



I K \Tm v»'ish to drink a choice 
■ Glass of Lager call for 

Fitger's Beer. 

V^h-'l««;om«. Pitliiriihlp an.i Nnnrlwhtnv 



SPATK OF MINNEHOT.^, („^ 

CocNTV or Ht. Loui)«. ) 

liiNtrict (loiirt, Rl(»r.!atli Ju lici;i'. Distiict. 
Buireun F. Lniii>, 1 



riaiutill. 



I 



Frnnk PkipwitJ!. Muri L. Uot:- 
pfh, liUcy (iriiy Harrison, 
l-ucy (iray Harrison iip oxn- 
ciit,ri:< (if ilic <-»<latn of Mm- j 
tlii'w U. Ilati if.i!ii. (locoasmi. ^Saminor.s. 
tbi' Trij-*t Htiil llortffaKocom- i 
pany of Iowh. (Lin>ito<li, Ln- I 
tlicr Moiiitpuhnll, .ind all par- I 
HoiiH iiuknow'ii. havinc; or j 
claiiiiiiit; nil intnrcBt in the 
prupcrty ilcscribed liorcin. I 
Dffeijdants. I 

Tho Bliito of Miiinosota to tho ntHivr named lU*- 
fenilaiits: 

Yon and e.icli of yon are liercby summonpfl 
au(i rriiiiirod to auswor Uip complaint of tho 
plaintiir in the .•il><.)vn entitied action, whicli lia.s 
boen filed in theotlice of the clerk of said dis- 
tr'ct coiirtaud to sorvo a copy of j-fnir aiiswnr 
fo the said complaint on tho eohsprilMT, .1. L. 
Washburn, at Iub office in the city of Duluth, in 
the county of St. Louis and ctate of Minnesota, 
within twenty days aft<?r the service of this suni- 
niuus upon you, exclusive of the day of sucli 
service: and if you fail to answer tho s-aiil 
complaint witliin the time afores.iid, the plain- 
tifr in this action will »»pply to the court for 
the relief di-manded in said complaint. This 
action is for the partition of the fullowiii^ de- 
scribed property situatod in eaid county and 
.state, viz :Tliesontiieast<iuarter('4)of tht-sontli- 
west Ci) of section number twenty-eichl (24), 
townsinp lUJmber lifty (.Vji north of rau^e num- 
ber fourteen (U) west. 

EuoEXE F. Lark, 

I'laintiff pro sc, 
J. L. Wasiibcex, 

Attoruey for Plaintiff, 
OHico 31'M hanibRr of t'ommcrce huildiiii;, 

luth, Minn. Besidonce Oxford street 

Roslyn avenue, Hunter's Park. 



LEGAL NOTICES. 



OFFICE OF Tin: WADIQON IRON COM - 
pany. Duluth, Minn., J/ecHmbor JS*, ISU.1. 
Notice is hereby giv^n tjiat the aunuril'tSePtinK 
of the stockhuliersof tli" Wabi(,'Oii IihAi("oni- 
pany for the flection of directors and thetrans- 
actioo of such ottier business at> may bo brought 
before it, will l>e held at the oflico of tho coiii- 
pany. 407 Lyroum building,', in the city of Du- 
Intli, Btatoof Minne-ota, on the tenth day of 
.January. 18m. at two o'clock p. tn. The trant- 
f<-r iKiokHTvttl be closed at rioon on I>eeMnl»>r 
30th. l"<<.«:i, and reoirfncd oD.Iannary II. 1>I9I, ut 
ten o'clrjck n in. \V. U. t i^utiM.. 

•■?8oc"i. 

/\FFHK OF THK NJhlWA IRON f'OM- 

V " imny, Dnhitlj, Minn,, December 21. l"-'.":*. 
Notice is hereby Kiveii that the annual meMini; 
of tliest/ickholders of the Nibiwa irniH.'<»iri- 
pany for the «lec'ioii of dinH;t'ors and the trans- 
action of such oihcrbiisineiis as may be brouKhi 
Ixiforc it. will lie held at the otiice of thp com- 
pany, 4'I7 Lyceum building, in tho city of Du- 
luth. stat/>of Minnesota, on tiio tcniU 4ay of 
.lannury, l«;4. at two o'clock p. m. The trans- 
fer tMiokB will be rinsed at iiimju on y«>ci>inl>er 
3<>th, IhSr.l, and reoi>ened on Jannary 11, IWM, at 
ten o'clock a. m. \V. IJ. riiiH£ic. 



Du- 
and 



Notice of Lis Pendens. 

ST.\TE OF MINNESOTA, ?„ 
CocNTY OF St. Loctb. 5 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial District. 
Eugene F. Lane, | 

Plaintiff, | 
vs. I 

Frank Skipwith, Mary L. Bog- I 
ers, Lucy Gray Harrison, I 
Locy(iray Harrison as exe- | 
cuttiz of tho estate of I 
Mattli^w H. Harrison, de- 
ceased ; the Trust A- Mori- 1 
Kape company «»f Iowa (Lim- i 
ited.iLutlior .Meudenhall. and | 
other persons unknown hav- I 
it}); or claiming an interest in | 
the property described heroin. I 
Defendants. J 

Notice is hereby driven, tliat an action has 
been commenced in this court by the above 
named plaintiff' against the above 
named defendants. That the object of eaid 
action is to secure judgment of partition of the 

firemises hereinafter described as provided by 
aw in such case.s and that the liens existinir 
upon the respective interests of the parties b'.t 
made a cliarge tipo-i the parts set off to "uch 
parties respectively: That riie costs and ex- 
penses of snch partition be ciiually apportioned 
amonir tho parties as their interests may appear 
and for sucli other and further order or relief 
as to tbe court mav seem meet. 

The premises affected by said action are sit- 
uated in the county of 8t. Louis and state of 
Minnesota, and are described as follows : The 
southea.st ijuarter of the southwest quarter of 
section u'liiilier twenty-eight (it*; in township 
number lifty (."iO) north ranf;c fourteen west (14 
west) according . to tlio_ Rovornment snrvey 
thereof, situated in the city of Duluth in said 
county .-11 id state. 
Dated December U, is-ga. 

.1. L. W.ISIII'.URN. 

310 Chamber of Commerce Jiuildicff, 
Dulotli, Miiines4.<ta. 
(Doc-29-Jan-r>-12-19-2C-Feb 2-'ii 




DR. L. A. FAULKNER 

King of 
Specialists. 

Treats successfully 
all forms of Ulood, 
NeiTouB aad Crinary 
diseases. 

NKEVOU.SDHBIL- 
ITY, with it* many 
ffliximy symptoms, 
cured. 

LOST VITALITY 
perf>>ctiy and iieriE.-i- 
nently restored. 

RLOOD I'OISON cured for life without mer- 
cury. 

URINARY DISEASES cured quickly and 
thoroufflily. 

C0N80LTATION FREE. 

Office Room 4, Over 19 East Superior Street. 



The Salt 
haVs AM Salt 



!•. "ho >:;)! i\ f.-v Olii' sini!«I«; Usp. TllO 

1 ifi'viii: i.'.* I • »)»»• mhiT Uii.df mf iinc- 

h'>>. <;f coiir^.'. iiiit, I'.'ii: -fi in- .il/-'». 
'llK' li;n(.', !•.;•.>,■. •■ul . Is t!i»' f,->tff lA 
ni'li h Ki'Iiie.y f! ;^' ><•. 

Diiamond 
Co^siai Salt 

■.'.iKch tlic iMir;>*. : i<! 11 erefore (he 

liosi ;.ult Uiiov. II. ^, ..1,1- til ju II. <• lir»t 

!l'ri"e, f.y lav bo-: i>!'..<-h>.-. w;!!) ihe 

[ »i;--.t trniin. alui soirt iii the Ik?,- : pn«-k- 

-an nii-fiL'l)t <t' i iion-nb^-orljeut i 

|l:o\ A>k Tor ! liai.K-! -M rysml. 

'I't;(^ f;;cl. f !i;ir '-■;iitts fi.enp'is r.o rea- 
j'-'on why.voii s'noiiid i:<>l b:i\e pure I 
-Jill. l! > our "r;><Tr si.oiiUI noi l.uve] 

DIAMOPji CRYSTAI. S.^.LT CO., 
St. c:ai:', mzh. 



OAJPAHE&IE^ 




pi II^E 



^•••••■■■■•••■•■•■■■•■•«««*««« •••»••■«*■■•«■ 




JW. 



Beebe, 



^tssj'.i.r.t.nf.ifiit&iii.ts^'.f.i^ir^t.'tir.iitj 



A New nnd CoTnpleto Treatment, cotisl»tir>e of 
8DTI'0SIT<;)K1F.S, Cnpsniea «<f OintnietJt and two 
Boxpfiof Ointment. Anever-failluK <^jro for Dlfs 
(if ev«>ry tisliiroand depree. It mnkes nnoperstliin 
vlfhthekTiifo or jnjecllnnsor cailx>lic acid, whlr^ 
are i.ninful and peldoni a iiori-jpnent nirp, and nffon 
repuitiPtr in denth, nnnfoesFury. Why endurn 
this terribia divease'? W« guarantee 6 
boiea to euro anv caaa. ^"" only p«y for 
beopflt* rerelv<;d. (1 a Iwt. ti f- r »■ Iv riiall. an-iio." 

free. <«n»raiile<»H issue*! by our nttenl. 

JOHNSON.S ORIENTAL SOAP 

The (treat .'Jkio Cure and l'".iri> l'->«nfili«r. Ii 
is hisrjily modirated, dolicntely tifrfiimivl nii.| 
ahsolutoly iiure. It rh?auiK<» the okin ;iiid scalp, 
proiuotes the »rrowth of tho liair and is a luxury 
for ladies' aud children's balh. .S. F. HOYCK. 
Dnigsist. XS) tinperior street W., Duluth, Miou. 



WISCONSIN GBNTRAL LINES. 



XjCLtest Timo Oa,rci. 



4 mpxa 

7:25pm 

iO KlRam 



Lv. Ar. 

....Duluth.... 

...Ashland 

Ar Cliieaim Lt 



If 
ll:10«m ' 7:S5piD 
KtSHm , l.;iiiiijm 
R: Opni'l II ^Knf* 



Tickets fM'lil II, el ItnxRUfrn rlifH<ke<l thropirh ttj 
oil lKii"tB in ttio United Ruiloi- eii'l CnnoiN. 

Close couiiertioni" Tiiade in * I'lr't^'" ^lUi all 
trains voing Kant and Houth. 

For rnll iofnrmaliofi applf tc ironr aearaat 
ticket aiTMitC-- VAS. C. POKO, 

oeu. Faas. and Tkt. A«rt., ( bicaeo, ID 



OlFK E OF THJi: MINIWA IKO.N C05I- 
pany. Dnluth. Minn.. December i«, ^^Vi. 
Notice is hereby eiven that tlie annual meotinn 
of tho stockholders of the .Miniwa Iron Com- 
pany for the election of <lirecUirs aud the trans- 
action of i-nch other business us may be hrouKlJt 
before it. will bo held at tlie oHlce of the com- 
pany, 407 Lyceum building, j'.i ilie city of Du- 
luth, 8t<ite of MiuuetiOta. on tJie tenth day of 
January, 1894. at two o'cioci. p.m. The trans- 
fer IkxiIjs will be closed at noon on Dceeiiiber 
:jutli, ims, and reopened on •.Jauuarv U, UM. at 
tan o'clock a. m. W. H. IisHtK. 

becy. 



/ VFFICE OF THK WENONA IKON CO.M- 

V / pany, Duluth, Minn., Decenibor 'M, IKi'A. 
Notice is hereby «iven that tlie annual meeting 
of the stockholders of the Wenona Iron Com- 
pany for the election of directors and tnc trans- 
action of ^uch other business as may be brought 
before it. will be held at the office 'if the com- 
pany, 407 Lyceum buildinv, in tlie city of Du- 
lutli, static of 51iuoe84)T.'i, on the tentb day of 
January, IV.M. at two o'clock p. m The trans- 
fer books will l)o closed at n<xin fwi December 
»ith, IHftj. and rt opened on January 11, 181*4, at 
ton o'clock a m. W. H. Fishee. 
aec'y. 

/ vri-icK OF tuj: minchin ihon com- 

\ / pauy, Duluth, Minn.. December 29. IWJ. 
Notice is herebv civen that tho anuual meeting 
of the stockholders of tlie Uinosin Iron C-om- 
pany for the election of direct«irs and the traii6- 
actio;i of such otiier business as may be brought 
before it, will lie hold at the othce of the com- 
pany, 107 Lyoeniii buildin;?, in the city of Du- 
luth. state of .Minnesota, on tlie tenth day of 
January, l"i;i4, at two o'clock p. m. The trans- 
fer books will be closed at uo^iu on December 
SDlli. l>!i:!, and riMipened on Jani;ary 11, 1M*4, at 
ten o'clock a. m. \V. H. Fisiiek. 
Secy. 

■V-OTICE OF AXNCAL MRRTING-THE 

li secretory iif the Duluth A- Winnipeg Rail- 
road company having omitt<dt<i give proper 
notice by jiuliHcation <if the .-lunual meeting of 
said railroad ccinpacy, which ;iunnal meeting 
is re.piired by the by-laws of said company t<> 
be held on tho second Thursday of December in 
each year, now theroforo. we, the undersigned 
directors of said railroad company, do hereby 
give notice that the annual meet me of the 
stockholders of tiie Duluth A Winnipeg Kail- 
roa<l company to elect directois for the ensuing 
year and to transact all such other busines.s ar- 
may lH^^ fully t'<' transacted by said company a' 
it* auauni meeting, will be held at the office of 
the company in tlic Lyceum biuldiug, iu.^ho 
city of Duluth, Minnesota, on the twelfth day 
of -lannary, 18<il, nt two o'clock p. m. ■ . 

Dated Dec. 1\ IM.!. , 

W. F. FiTf It, ■■-ii^ 

H. J. HOARDM.4K, 

J. HcGii Fetebs, 
Directors of the Duluth & Winnipeg Railroad 
(."ompany. 

Dec 23 to Jan 12 inc. 



8 



SHERIFF'S EXECrt-ION SALE- 



Under and bv virtue of an execution issued 
out of and under the seal <if the district court 
of the .state of Minnesota, iu and for -flm 
Eleventh judicial district, and county of Ht. 
Ixjuis. on the 7th day of December, IMi, upon n 
iutlgmeut rnudereu in the municipal court, ef 
tlie city of Dnlutli, on the'J^nd day of Nov., I'^H'J, 
and docketed in said court and cou'jI>' 
lu an action therein, wherein Penu Land and 
1 .oan Company, a corporation, was plaintiff and 
W. H. liearii and Wallace Warner were d«i- 
fendauls. in favor of said plaintiffs aud against 
said defendants for tlio fum of forty- 
six arid .'^il-lCo I $40.51) dollars, whiob 
said execution iias to i-.u-, oai sherilT <>' 
said St. Louts County, oeen dujy directed and de- 
livered, 1 have ]evii!d uixm and will sell at pub- 
lic auci ion, to tlie highest cisli bidd(>r, at the 
front door of the court house in the city of Dir- 
luth. in s&id count.v of St. I.iouis, on Monday. 
thi> rJnd day uf January, 1>'.'4, at ten o'clock 
in the forenoon of that day, .nil tlie right, title 
and intoreft that the alxive named judgment 
debtor, W. II. Uearu hail in and to tho reai^tip- 
tate hereinafter describ^^d on the 22 day Of 
November, 1*.":!. that Ijeing tlie date of tin* 
dokceting of said judgment, tbe deeeriptioi. 
of the proijerty belugas follows, to-wit: 

Lot two i2.i. bkick eight (SJ, En- 
dion Division, of Duluth. according to 
the recorded plat thereof ou file 
in the oHioe of tiie register of deeds in and 
for St. Louis Couuty, Minnesota, the afc>ove 
descril)ed property behjg iu St. Louis County. 
Minn. 

Dated Dutatb, Minn.. December 7th, 1898. 

Paul Sharvv. 
Shsrill St. Louis County, Minn. 
Ry H. R. Abmetkono, 
Deput}. 

Nrdll PRKT A Wl( K\X TKE, 

Aitoriu-js for Judgment Creditor. 
Di'C-vi.v.'-;;'_"J-Jan-.'i 12-19 



CURE YOURSELF! 




i'tieviuys&leandrelinuir euivtorCONORRHIEA. 
GLEET, LEUCORRHCEA, and uilier diw h.irtro. 
im uln-rscv. A speady CUre "f the most ol«itinii»» 

Stx-iotux-e. Leuding dru^^ii^ts, 91*<^C>« 



Tli6 irtliffestiifiLiiie! 

V. ST. P. M. & O. U'Y. 

THE SHORT LINE TQ CHICAGO 

And the Pnllman Car IJne to St. Paal 
and Minneapolis. 



r'or at. Paul 
and Minneapolis. 



iDaylup. 

lEx.SonV 



L.W Dnlnth j lOnOam 



LvWaut Sniierior.. ..! 

^r Ktillwat^ir 

\rHt, Paul „ 

\r Min;:><H|Hi]|B. ,.... 

For K»ii Claire, ('Idcavo 

and ti>uK<uit and Sonlh. 



10 20 am 
4 Mj pm 
fiOOpm 
r.40pm 



Mignt Kc 
Dailjr- 



»ay Kxp. 
Ki.Bnn'i 

40 00 anv 

10 ;in am 

I ..« ....... 

, M»i>n> 



llOOpni 

liaOprt 

TZStm 

660 am 

7 3D am 

C^hiea#>- 

Liniilti-I 

Dally. 

n 1* Mr 

h 'M> l>0»' 

7 r/» ■„, 
9mmv\, 



Lt r>nlr»lh;.;i.;.-... ^ 

f jT Wwnt Hn|M<rt4>r , 

Ar Milttniit'"*. ...... . 

Ar ('hinngo .. .. 

Liiii,iirioii>. |'nrtnr<^«rK<>udny Iraiiw. 

Direct iMiiiii<ctioiis in t'niou <lei>ol. !(, 
r.i I. foi .ill I i'iiitit^<Hitli nod West. ' • 

Pulhn.in and ;W«gner tine.-rl buffet slfrieta 
on the ' CliicMKo Limiied." 

Connections in Chicago with morning trai-i 
South nud East. 
«KO. M. SMITH, n. W. FUUMER8, 

(ienenil Agent. <:if.y Ticket Ageu^ , 

4/. VV«*t Mnpariofflf ' 

IIIK I'l'Llllll ,V lints KAM.K It \IM:«>\iM*u7 



CM. 



1 • A SM K N « i FU T I M Kl * I t |,K. 
SrATlpNt^ " j f. U. 

Ar Duluth L\!:i I'l 
T\vi> liaTb(>r<i |» 1% 
Alleu Jiincflon \'t M 



A.M. 


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« 33 
WOO 


7 M) 



RiWRktk |e 40 

McKi'nley '' 00 

Lv VtrginU Ar|7 ;«i 



At 
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bv « 17 
Ar|7 4'» 



A.I 



ttrj . 






Daily except Suadii. 

„ , 1. K. \JFIX. 

n-i.iv ui mT ''Wrju taisexiset Agent. 
Dnlaui, Ulan., Not. M, l^ys, ^^ 




i 





f 



4 



y 






\ 




CLARK 

Grocery Co. 



Cash Grocers. 



17 East Superior Street. 



THE DISTRICT COURT. 



Two Divorce Cases W«re on the Calendar 

Again Today and Both Were 

Granted. 



i<1 rrc.uncr\ 



\V.: miike a specialty of Dairy 
lUitler, and can 

oiYor vou the best the 
aiTordi at the lowest ea>-li 



C. 0. Blanchard Was Separated From Car- 
rie Blanchard and Engjerd Strom 
From Peter S. Strom. 



KEEP 
YOUR 



derd a double rifr, bound and gagged 
the stable mm and drove south. The 
marshal and stable man were found and 
liberated this morning. The rig was 
found four miles from town. 



GIVES HIS OPINION. 




The Court is Asked to Appoint a Receiver 

for the Ricinate Fire Proofing 

Company, 



Oi r Tea Department is worthy 

V. iir .itleiition. Our Teas ami 

« arefiilly selected by 

a:ie:perl. W U a trialorder. 

In Green Veg-etables and Fruits 
we can-- a tul line and receive 
tresli consignments daily. TO- 
\'0''RO\\\ SATURDAY, we will 




ON 



V L I c I 



Minnesota Tomatoes, 
Minnesota Cucumbers, 
Minnesota Lettuce, 
Minnesota Spinach, 
Kalamazoo Celery. 



SIMON CLARK 

Grocery Co. 

Cash Grocers, 

1 7 East Superior Str«et. 



Divorce cases again occupied a por- 
tion of the calendar of the district court 
today and each of the judges had one to 
hear. The defendants failed :o appear 
in both cases. C. O. Blanchard was re- 
leased from the ties which bound him to 
Carrie Blanchard. He charged her with 
unfaithfulness and produced letters in 
which she compromised herself and 
which seemed to be sufiicient in Judge 
Lewis' mind to prove her a dissolute 
woman. The divorce was ordered. 

judge Moer granted Kngejerd .Strom a 
divorce from Peter S. Strom on the 
ground of cruel and inhuman treatment. 
After hearing her evidf nee one would 
wonder that she is alive. Her hege 
lord at times threatened her with an ax 
and other dangerous implements. He 
even went so far as to sleep with a knife 
under his pillow which he used to 
threaten her with, to her great terror. 

In the case of M.iry MusoH vs. John 
Musolf et al., a suit concerning some 
mortgages, Judge Moer overruled the 
demurrer and gave the defendant tive 
davs in which to answer. 

Before Judge Lewis the defendant in 
Nellie A. Windolf vs. S. G. VVightman 
et al„ asked for a continuance but it was 
denied. The case was passed to the foot 
of the calendar as was also J. W. Rey- 
nolds vs. W. P. Strickland et al. Judg- 
ment was rendered for the plainu£f in 
Crowley Electric company vs. T. VV. 
Abell et al.. the defendant failing to ap- 
pear. 

The Setting of Cases. 
The following setting of cases 
made fornext week: 

Monday— I o8, 109, 112, 115, 116, 
120. 121. 122. 
Tuesday— 123, 125. 133, I37. 138. 



LAKESIDE! 



LAKESIDE LAND CO.. 

Wm. C. Sargent, 

Manager. 



507 
FIRST NAT. BANK BLG 



CITY BRIEFS. 



was 



"7. 



CURLING CONTEST. 



156, u/), 7. 20. 



ThrM Rinks Coming From Superior Tomorrow 
to Curl the Duluthians. 

Tc Borrow will be a great day at the 

Duk th Athletic club's rink at Glen Avon. 

Thr -. rinks will cometover from Superior 

iring the afternoon and evening 

will ontest three rinks from Duluth. On 

New Years day the Duluth rinks went to 

Superior and were royally entertained 

and iiev will endeavor to give the men 

h(.m there a nne reception. Supper 

ui 'ved in the rooms in the rink 

3j:^, ,g will be resumed afterward. 

Spc. ators will be admitted tree to view 

the t arling. 

Th e rink coming trom Superior wdl be 
skip icd by Neil Smith. R. M. Todd and 
W. v. Anderson. The Duluth rinks 
will lie as follows: No. l, Alex McKae, 
E. S Palmer, S. F. FuUerton and R. J. 
Ma -eod. skip. No. 2. R. J. Powell, L. 
D. C Lmobell, L. D. Hall and George F. 
Mac.venzie, skip. No. 3, George Din- 
wooc ie. T- Gibson, Ron Smith and H. 
Hurt- on, skip. 

__ ii> ■' — ■ ■— 

Proceedings Dismissed. 

M.mager A. C. Weiss, of The Herald, 
returned this morning from Grand Rap- 
ids, where he was called by reason of 

■ Hal libel proceedings started by 
ty Attorney Pratt on account of a 
iiewi article recently published in this 
paptr. The proceedings against Mr. 
Wei .s and The Herald were dismissed 
by c jnsent of Mr. Pratt, the report hav- 
ing ! een furnished this paper by a cor- 
respondent who was supposed to be re- 
liabk'. 

Will be Married Again. 
Janes O. Rodney's recent matrimonial 
venture may have been a failure, but he 
is widing to try it over. Yesterday he 
secu ed a divorce. Today he took out a 
marriage license to wed Tillie Tolbert. 
Licenses were also issued to Wojciek 
Kur::ak and Stanislawa Kubicka. Adolph 
Johnson and Eva Carlotta Eskelsen. 



Wednesday— 13 
no. 4O1 36, u. 47- 
Thursday— 152, 45i -9. 

57, 27. 



153. 

135. «36. 143. m8, 

79, QO, Qi, 56, 



RECEIVER ASKEO FOR. 



the 



be- 



■ 

P 

} 



Bad Holes in the Street. 

Chief ot Police Horgan called upon the 
board of public works this morning and 
gave notice that several annoying pitch- 
hole ; are on Grand avenue on both sides 
of O icota. They are caused by the un- 
usu;i! depth of the snow and not by de- 
pressions in the street. The board will 
see that the matter is remedied at once. 



Crane-Ordway Company Wants One For 
Ricinate Fire Proofing Company. 

The Crane-Ordway company has 
gun an action against the Ricinate Fire 
Proofing and Lake Superior Mineral. 
Paint. Oil and Color company et al. and 
its stockholders to compel the appoint- 
ment of a receiver and the payment of 
all amounts due on the stock of the com- 
pany. Judge Moer has made an order 
requiring the defendant to show cause 
tomorrow in the special term why a re- 
ceiver should not be appointed. The 
plaintiff obtained judgment in the muni- 
cipal court of Duluth against defendant 
for $228.31. 

Judge Lewis has filed an order deny- 
ing the plaintiff's motion to amend the 
findings of facts and conclusions of law 
in the case of W. J. Holmes vs. Lakeside 
Street Railway company. 

A stipulation admitting judgment on 
Jan. 23, has been filed in the case of 
Charles F. Lcland vs. Shaw Iron com- 
pany et al. , , , . • J 

Judge Lewis has handed down his de- 
cision in the case of Harriet and R- L- 
Wilkins vs. John H. Brigbam et al. The 
suit involved the title to lot 37, on West 
Superior street in Duluth proper. First 
division. The plaintiff. Harriet Wilkins. 
is declared to be entitled to possession 
of the property on payment of the sum 
due on same to the defendant. Brigham, 
who is only the trustee for the plaintiff. 
The evidence in the divorce case of 
Mabel Richmond vs. Robert Richmond, 
taken before W. G. Bonham, referee, at 
Tower has been filed in the clerk's of- 
fice. It does not have the effect of giv- 
ing a high opinion of the husband's 
morality. 
Other papers filed today were: 
Mandate and transcript of judgment 
from supreme court in case Henry Nel- 
son vs. Village of West Duluth; also 
same in case of Elizabeth Janny vs. 
luth Street Railway company. 



CuUum. Dentist, top floor Palladio. 
Smoke tndion cigar. W. A. Foote & Co. 
Imperial Flour the best in the world. 
Good applications for loans on inside 
property wanted at once. S. M. Chand- 
ler, 404 Palladio bldg. 

Extra copies of the 24-page Christmas 
number of The Herald can be had at The 
Herald counting room. 

Tremont hotel now open. Board, $5 
per week; board and room, $7:50 and 
upwards per week. 
We buy mortgages. Crosby Bros. 
The Merchants' hotel has cut rates for 
table board to $5 per week ; room and 
board, S8.50. 

Vernon Carleton. the infant child of 
Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Carleton, died at i 
o'clock this morning, after living thiity- 
eight doys. The remains will be taken 
to Brainerd this afternoon for burial. 
Mrs. Carleton, who has been ill for the 
past month, is in a critical condition to- 
day. 

Joe Bolton, of Cloquet, was examined 
before Judge Carey last evening for in- 
troducing liquor on to the Fond du Lac 
reservation. He was held to the grand 
jury and in default of bail was taken to 
St. Paul. 

First citizenship papers have been is- 
sued in Clerk Sinclair's office to Charles 
Gust Bunnell, a former subject of 
Sweden. 

City band at Fifth avenue rink tomor- 
row evening. 

Alexander Michaud's residence on 
East Superior street, near Fourteenth 
avenue east, was damaged by fire to the 
extent of about Sioo last evening at 8:30 
o'clock. It started In the attic near a 
chimney. 

The youngest child of William Craig, 
manager of the gas and water company, 
died this morning at S o'clock. 

A land contest, Charles M. Henshaw 
vs. Oscar F. Sias, is on before Register 
Taylor today. It is a homestead pro- 
testant against a timber and stone claim- 
ant. N. B. Thayer appears tor Henshaw 
and Capt. Smallwood for Sias. 

In police court this morning John Falls 
and James Austin denied that they were 
vagrants, and John Owens insisted that 
he had not been drunk. Pat Burke and 
lona Hicks pleaded guilty to the charge 
of drunkenness and were fined $10 and 
costs. 

John T. Condon has given up the La 
Crosse and Winona opera houses. The- 
atrical business in those cities is at some- 
thing worse than a standstill. 

The annual election of oflRcers and di- 
rectors of the boird of trade will occur 
on Jan. 16, A caucus of the members of 
the board will be held tomorrow to nomi- 
nate a ticket, 

Capt. Ray T. Lewis received a tele- 
gram today announcing the death of his 
mother, Mrs. George Lewis, of Boston. 
Mrs. Lewis died of pneumonia at the ad- 
vanced age of 83 years. 



E. C. Gridley Thinks the Iron Ore Duty is Not a 
Protective One. 
E. C. Gridley, in reply to the question, 
"By those who opposed the late meeting 
it is being asserted that the gentlemen 
who signed the call are protection Demo- 
crats. Is that imputation a correct one? ' 
said: 

"While I have every reason to believe 
that the political faith of the gentlemen 
who joined with me in that call is prac- 
tically the same as my own, I would not 
undertake to speak for anybody but my- 
self. To answer the question as regards 
myself I would say that I believe that I 
am as far from being a protectioiiist and 
as diametrically opposed to the idea of 
protection as any Democrat in Duluth. 
We have simply asked for the retention 
of the duty on iron ore." 

"Is the present duty on iron ore a pro- 
tective duty, in the sense that the Demo- 
crats oppose protection?" was asked. 

"If it were to any extent whatever I 
would favor a reducuon to a point where 
it would not be protective. My definition 
of a protective tariff briefly is this: It is 
a tarifif that results in gi"ing a special 
advantage to a certain business or to a 
certain class of people, and results 
through that in making it compulsory 
upon the purchaser and consumer of any 
article so levied on to pay extra therefor, 
over and above what they would be com- 
pelled to pay, but for the tariff. 

"In the case of the present duty on iron 
ore, I maintain that notwithstanding the 
present diity on foreign ores, that iron 
ore for the last two or three years has 
paid no profit whatever to the producer. 
Sales during that time have universally 
been made to the consumer^ of ore from 
a compulsion to realize, and almost with- 
out exception at a loss to the producers 
of the ore. If there would have 
been no duty whatever on iron ore 
for that time, the conditions up 
to this date would not have been ma- 
terially affected, but continued fro-n this 
time forward , free ore must soon -esult 
in stimulating large furnaces and manu- 
facturing interests on the Atlantic sea- 
board. The result to the American con- 
sumer of this could not possibly be to 
lower the price of the product, because 
the foreign mines worked could not fur- 
nish but a small fraction of the American 
demand, but would result for the next 
two or three years in largely disarrang- 
ing business matters regarding iron ore 
and its products and still further depress 
a business that is at the foundation 
second only to agriculture of all the busi- 
ness interests of this country, and that at 
a loss to the government of the present 
duties on ore and resulting in no bene- 
fit whatever to the consumer or to any 
class of our people. 

"Hence, my conclusion is this: The 
present duty is not protective, and my 
objection to the removal of it is that it 
would seriously interfere with vast busi- 
ness interests, at a loss to the govern- 
ment and without any resulting advan- 
Uges whatever to anyone in this 
country." 



A House of Solid Progress and True Merit. 

Special for Tomorrow, 

Your choice of 500 FINE MEN'S SUITS AND OVER- 
COATS; reg-ular prices were $25.00, $22.50 and $20.00; 
will g"o at 

$15.00. 

Mind you, they are magnificent— the Suits being made 
of English Rough Worsteds, imported Cheviots, stylish 
Tweeds, Covert Cloth, German Thibets, and numerous 
other qualities. 

The Overcoats of Royal Kersey, Irish i rieze, Montague 
and German Chinchillas. 

NO BETTER TIME TO BUY 

CHILDREN'S CLOTHING than Tomorrow. 

Extraordinary inducements in the way of low prices. 
Bear in mind that with every purchase in any department 
you receive a key that may unlock the box next Wednesday 
and secure for you the S20 in gold. 

n. S. BURROWS & CO. 



FfiMUTH'S 



TOMORROW 

AND SAVE MONEY 



• 



Prices cut and slaughtered prior 
to taking inventory. Our stock 
must be reduced S25,0OO during 
this month. 



Buy Shoes Now! 

30 



Per cent 



discount from 
prices. 



our low 



Men's Underwear, 



PERSONAL. 



Alex Fraser's House Scorched. 

About noon today the tire department 
was caUed out to the residence of Alex 
Fraser, 217 West Fourth street. A blaze 
liad jroken out and made some progress 
up tie side of a chimney but was ex- 
n ished with only a nominal loss. The 
M n of the tire was uncertain. There 
\.3Ly an insurance of I3500 in R. A. 
Tau.si::; X Cc's "agency. 



Du- 



Professor Meier May Leave. 

Professor Meier, of the City band, has 
1,'ont to Minneapolis in response to a call 
from some people there who wish to en- 
gage him for the commg season. 



Acquitted by the Jury. 
The dispatch republished in yester- 
day's issue from the St. Paul Pioneer 
Press regarding a shooting affair near 
Carlton is misleading masmuch as the 
man Haggertv, who was accused of kill- 
ing Frank Young, is no desper- 
ado but is well known m 
that vicinity as an honest working man 
and was acquitted by the coroner's jury 
on acareiul investigation of the facts. It 
was clearly accidental shooting. 



Order at Once 

The number of copies of the 
Her dd you want. They can 
The Herald counting room. 



Christmas 
he bad at 



Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 



Dealness Cannot be Cured 

hv local apolicationc as they cannot roach tho 
(Hiieasod portion of tho oar. Thero 13 only one 
way to euro deafnops, and that is by constitn- 
tioual rtrtnedios. I>eafnesa is caused by an in- 
HiU'iod condition of the mucous lining of the 
(Mistachian tube. When this tube gets lutlamed 
yon have a rumbling so-md of unpcrfcct liear- 
itiK and when it is entirely closed deafness is 
tho result, and unless tho iiiflammation can be 
taken out and this tube restored to its nortnal 
condition hearing will »>o deRtroyed forever; 
nine cases out of ten are caused by catarrh, 
wliich is nothing bnt an inflamed condition of 
the mucous surfaces. . . ,, , 

We will tfivo one hundred dollars for any case 

of deafness (caused by catarrh 1 that cannot be 

cured by llaU's Catarrh Cure. Send for circa- 

larp. free. F. J. CHKNKy ii Co., Toledo, Ohio. 

I j:*-'Sold by druggists, 75c. 



AWARDED HIGHEST HONORS-WORLD'S FAIR. 




PRICE'S 



The only Pure Cream of Tartar Powder.— No Ammonia; No Alum. 

Used in Millions of Homes— 40 Years the Standard. 



Mrs. Will McQuade and children re- 
turned to Tower this afternoon after a 
visit of several days with S. C. Mc- 
Quade and family. 

P. H. Seymour, the well known land 
office attorney of Washington, D. C, is 
at the Spalding. 

District Attorney Hay made a flying 
visit to this city last evening and dis- 
posed of a whisky case or two. 

C. H. Brooks, representing the Trom- 
mer Extract of Malt company, is at the 
Spalding. 

H. Poole, of Uubuque, father of Clark 
Poole, the lumberman, is in the city. 

Frank Daniels and Mrs. Daniels, 
"Bessie Sanson," are at the Spalding. 

Owen Fargusson returned from New 
York today and is at the St. Louis. 

A. H. Yancey, traveling passenger 
agent for the Burlington, is in the city. 

W. A. Barr, attorney for the Duluth & 
Winnipeg, returned home today. 

C. D. Quigley is up from Chicago. 

W. R. Chapman, of 1832 Nineteenth 
avenue west, is ill with the grip. 

R. P. McCune, general Northwestern 
agent ot the Hoosac Tunnel line at Min- 
neapolis, is in the city. 

John B. Sutphin left today for Chicago 
where he will remain for one or two 
weeks. 

M. L. Parker & Co. Assign. 
M. L. Parker and Wallace W. Pearcc, 
co-partners as M. L. Parker & Co., have 
hied a voluntary deed ot assignment for 
the benefit of creditors to W. A. McLeod, 
of Minneapolis. The estimated value of 
the property is $1335-29. The firm has 
been doing a tailoring business m the 
Kitchi Gammi building and succeeded 
to Frank I. Breeze last winter. 

Bold Robbery at Delavan. 
Delavan, Wis., Ian. ;.— At i o'clock 
this morning three masked men bound 
and gagged the village marshal, C. Sags, 
and then blew open the postoffice safe, 
taking *6oo, mostly stamps. They then 
went to HoUister & Calkins' livery, or- 



MEALS FOR THE HUNGRY. 

Charitably Disposed People Should Distribute 
Bethel Meal Tickets. 
The execudve committee of the Bethel 
would like to state that they have issued 
6 and 9 cent meal tickets. These tickets 
will be on sale, up town, at the Duluth 
paper company's store; so that ill per- 
sons who are charitably disposed to- 
wards the numerous callers who apply at 
their residences for meals, can purchase 
these tickets, give them out instead of 
giving money or taking the persons thus 
applying into their kitchens to feed them. 
Or better still, they can purchase these 
tickets and place them in the hands of 
the superintendent of the Bethel, Mr. 
Robel, who has ways and means of find- 
ing out the really needy,andwho is care- 
ful to look up every case who applies to 
him for aid, and give only where aid is 
actually needed. 

Or these tickets can be puchasod and 
placed in the hands of any other chari- 
table society, such as the Ladies Relief 
society, or the Associated Charities, who 
are careful to look into every case of 
persons applying for aid. Any or all of 
these ways would help in the present 
criucal situation and give many a chance 
for a meal who otherwise mu^t go 
hungry. 

The Bethel is offering food at so near 
its actual cost that they have no margin 
to go on in offering free meals to the 
needy, and in view of their work in this 
direction they feel that they should not 
be called upon to do so. Indeed jt must 
appear plain to every one, considering 
the low prices asked, that they can 
not give free meals without endangering 
the restaurant enterprise, thus closing to 
all the help they are now extending. A 
6 cent meal will give a person pork and 
beans, bread and butter enough to satisfy 
the largest appetite. A g-cent meal gives 
roast beef, potatoes, bread and butter. A 
i2-cent meal gives meat, potatoes, bread 
and butter, coffee, tea or milk. Thus a 
man can take his three meals a day for 
iS cents and get all that he requires. He 
would not be badly off at a cost of 12 
cents per day. The committee would be 
most glad of the assistance of all in this 
direction, so that they will not be under 
the painful necessity of turning away any 
really hungry person, and there are 
many such constantly apply to them. 



FORGING THE LINKS FAST. 



Dan Coughlin and the White Horse Brought 
Very Close. 

Chicago, Jan. 5.— Dan Coughlin and 
the white horse which conveyed the mur- 
dered Cronin from the Conklin residence 
to the Carlson cottage were brought 
dangerously close together at the trial 
this morning. Mrs. Patrick Dinan, ar- 
rayed in widow's garb, sat in the witness 
chair and told the court and jury what 
she saw and heard in her husband's 
stable the night of May 4. i88g. ^^ 

"I went down stairs about 7 o'clock,' 
testified Mrs. Dinan, "and in the stable I 
saw two rigs, one white horse, which my 
husband told me was rented to Dan 
Coughlin for a friend, and the other a 
sorrel, which I understood was rented to 
Thomas Jones. The man talking to mv 
husband was excited. He talked fast 
and seemed to be in a great hurry. He 
insisted that the curtains be put on the 
side of the buggy. The man drove 
north on Clark street after leaving the 
stable. I was standing at the window of 
the living room above, overlooking the 
entrance to the stable." 

Read Century Piano Co.'s ad., page 6. 



33 



I 
3 



Per cent off, tomorrow. 



A. WIELAND, 

SPECIAL LOW PRICES ON 

Shoes, Slippers M Rubbers, 

Men's Jersey Ventilating Cloth Overshoes, Cil (\(\ 
always sold for $1.25; reduced to 4^ ■ ■ W 

MEN'S ARCTICS, $ | . 

MEN'S RUBBERS, gQ 

Men's Winter Tan Shoes, 

Water proof and calf-lined. 

Ladies' Skating Shoes, 

Lace or Button. 

Overgaiters and Leggings. 

WiELAND, 



Cloaks, 

so 

Per cent discount now. 



LADIES' UNDERWEAR, 

special low prices. 



Lewis and Ypsilanti 
Underwear, 

25 per cent discount. 



Dress Goods, 

At prices to suit your purse. 

Blankets and Comforters, 

One-fourth off from our low prices. 

If you do not need the g-oods 
now. buy for next winter and save 
money. 

All' goods sold strictly for cash 
during this sale. 





PROPRIETOR. 





WE WISH YOU A MOST 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 

AMD WILL EMPHASIZE IT BY OFFERING YOU 

PIANOS 

AT HALF PRICE 

With us this means a GENUINE REDUCTION on 
twenty-five Pianos of One-Half of the regular retail prices. 

It has been claimed for some time, and we had begun 
to think so, that there is but little money at the head of 
the lakes. We now think different. 

Our large Christmas trade proved to us that there is 
lots of money stored away ready to be brought out when 
our people afe convinced that GENUINE BARGAINS arc 

offered, , 

We now propose to give our people the 

CHANCE OF A LIFETIME 

To procure a new STANDARD PIANO at prices barely 
covering the cost of material and labor. 

$250 Pianos for 8125 

$300 Pianos for 8150 

8400 Pianos for 8200 

$500 Pianos for 8250 

$600 Pianos for 8300 

We have a host of customers to whom we refer as to 
the quality of instruments sold by us. No "stencil'' or 
-InX^' Pianos, only standard, FULLY GUARANTEED 
FOR SIX YEARS by RELIABLE MANUFACTURERS. 
No such bargains have been offered during the past 
twenty years. 

"One man's loss, another's gain. 
Manufacturers' loss, now your gain." 

Now is Your Time. 



DULUTH INVENTORS. 

We are informed by 
ME.SSRS. MASON, FENWICK & lAW^ENCE, 

PATENT LAWYERa AND 80L1CITOR8. 
Of 104 PftUadio bnildinp, Dnlnth, and of Wash- 
iiiKton D. C. that tlio followmg Dnlnth inTep- 
tore have recently been sranted patontfl by the 
United States Patent office : 

Edward E. Fitzgerald, Siyert B. NOson, Peter 
J. Caesar, John E. Ennis, Alexander Mc»on«aU, 
Edward C. Ende and John Opdale. 



S. GELHAAR 

DULUTH'S 

PRACTICAL FURRIER, 

Established 1SS7. Makes and repairs all kinds 
of FCK GARMENTS. Sealskin Sacqnes re- 
and ro-fittod on the premLBee. PLUSh 




dyed 

(JOAT8 STEAMED. 
209-21- WEST 



SUPERIOR ST. 



$8.00— BEST SET OF TEETH 




Century 
Piano Co. 

OF DULUTH AND WEST SUPERIOR. 

1 1 10 Tower Avenue. West Superior, Wis. 



! TEMPLE OPERA HOUSE. 

J. T. Condon, Lessee and Mgr, 

A NOTABLE EVENT. 

Monday, Jan. 8, 

One Performance Only. 
CHARLES FROHIiANS COMPANY 

From tlie Empire Theater, New York ^ 
Presenting "The Best American Drama, 
Sen- York Hi'mld, 

"The Girl I Left BeMnd Me." 

NOTE— All tho scenic •uvironmt'nt and««r- 
roundinjft* which characterized the produc- 
tion for 2M niKhts in New Y.rk and 150 
tiipbtein Chicaso, will be Been licre. iTicos 
25c, "lOc, .5c, $1. Seat 8a!« commences Satur- 
day mornin« at 9 o'clock at l>ox otiice and 
Kilgoro & Siewert's, 





RESTMElliliD 



DR. Mom 

KEBTEBDtS 

PILLS 

The prcat remedy fur norvons prostration and^Ii.nff^J^'.^.'i^S.N.?' 




ror Ssule B^r 3. V". Eovoo euici Max ^A^lrtll. 



TEMPLE THEATER. 



One Night, Saturday, Jan. 6lh. 

Yon will thont ! You will wroain I V'on 
will yell? You won't do a thiDR bnt 
♦ lauuli at that funnv comedian 

MR. FRANK DANIELS 

And hia big comedy company which in- 
eludes Bessie Sanson and 



Other Players-= 



20 S 
t 



I "LITTLE PUCK." 

X All Fun : All Lau«h9 ! All Surprises ! 

♦ 9cat« now on tale at box office and Kjl- 

♦ goro it Siowerl's. Price : i!)C, Wc, <5c f 1. 

?♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦ 



^m 






nil wrt tlM C — f ia 
I lit Il«rtl4 this Mtsi^f 
m4 MRd it to this ttfict. 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 



" !S' ^ 




ELEVENTH YEAR 

OFFICE SUPPLIES. 
BLAN K BOOKS, 

W» HATE njSjtTTHlNU^g^PmCTO LETTER FI' = S, 

New Year's Cards, f 

See Our Display. i' 

Chamtolaln & Taylor's BooksJ «, 

323 West Superior Street. ** * 

Look Out for Auction Sale 
Early in January! 

V :iavia!»^ goods to include in catalogrne, send me word 



SATUEDAY. J.VXUARY 6, 1894. 



FIVE O'CLOCK EDITION. 



THREE CENTS 



-t- 



W. D. GORDON. Auctioneer, 

0:iivc. ?-2-^ West Superior street. Duluth. 



FOUR lEN ARE KILLED 



THIRTY RIOTERS SHOT DOWN. 



TbeLiflin^ Rand Powder Mill in Ulster 

County, New York, Blew Up This 

Morning. 



Four Men Were Killed and Several Badlj In- 
jured, and Glass Broken Two Miles 
Awaj. 



The Luplcsion Took Place in the Gla^e De- 
partment, Where the Powder is 
Fina'ly Dried. 




More Bread ! ^ ^ 
Better Bread ! 

Is made from a sack of 

Tlian from any other similar amount 
of Flour in the world. It is the best 
and sold ever)-where by all dealers. 

ASK YOUR GROCER! 



FOR SALE CHEAP. 



riaaH 'Otto iMdi fiaibn. 1 
Om»I 
Om*l»i 



Cm Off Eatim. 




Mimiam*M ■pmrt¥homt* MMa* iM tte Wtmmtm ObmijI ■•jjrte C,V •* «!»• fnot 
of Plttli avfra* mm. on Ish*' front, mad m ib I — II m imom hA of Pi|«iiic uMl StMin 



Pmim. Mhafttac. Pollvf*. M«. 



tsipii. 
iQtl 



KSQriBS 



HAHTIAII GENERAL ELECTRIC COHPAMT, 

ROOM 3, EXCHANGE BUILDING 



-DON^T BORROW TROOBLR' BUY 

SAPOLIO 

'TIS CHEAPER IN THE END. 



Members of the Dulatli Cleanug House Association. 



CAPITAL. BVRPLUh 



Bank 

Marine N«tlo:ii»l Bank 

N*tioii»i Battle of Comai.«ro*-— 

»■'■««• Bank of DuiuO: 

BvCQTicy BaaJc of Dulm 



T*>"n Eichanite Baak 



1 1.000.000 


f2O0.000 


500.000 


350.000 


S50.000 


20.000 


200.000 


21.OO0 


100.000 


40.000 


100.000 


40.000 


100.000 





MENDENHALL k HOOPES, /Employers Liability, 

BiMM^ Mmmoffer,, I Elevator Accident, 

Ulii GiaRElee & ASiiHt Cl workmen's collective, 

•"*"TED,. /Surety Bonds, 

\ Individual Accident 



OF LONDON, ENG. 




>i^:m 



\ 



If You Wear 

THE DDNLAP HAT 

You have the one preferred by 

all good dresses. 

SOLD IN DULUTH ONLY BY 

GATE & CLARKE 

333 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. '' 



New York, Jan. 6.— A special to the 
Mail aod Express from Poaghkccpsie 
says: Tbe Latiia & Rand powder mill, 
at Kifton. Ulster county, twelve miles 
fiDOi this city, blew up at 7 o'clock this 
monuog. Four meti were kilied and 
several hadly injured. Tbe dead are: 
Gardner Fricndenburg, Solomon Fricnd- 
esburg, Joseph Saunders. Kipp. 

The explosion occurred in the glaze 
department, where the powder .s ancd 
after it has gone through the other pro- 
cesses of manufacture. The explosion 
shook the near-by country, and in the 
\-ilIageof Rosedale. ^two|miles away. 
many paces of glass were shattered. Tbe 
explosion was distinctly felt m this city 
and the fire department was called out. 

TO RELIEVE OLD SOLDIERS. 



CMiaissi«iier Lockrta is Making Maay Cases 

Washington. Jan. 6.— Commissioner 
Lochren is daily receiving an unprece- 
dented number of applications to have 
pension claims made specia! by reason 
of the fact that tbe claimants are in dis- 
tressed circumstances, and in argent 
need of help. 

Never before in the history of tbe of- 
fice has there been so much suffering 
among old soldiers, and the commission- 
er «s doing his utmost to relieve them. 

Every case that comes to his attention 
is made special and if it be found that 
the claim is a good one it is immediately 
allowed. Many cases have been taken 
out of their regular turn, examined and 
allowed in forty-c:ght hours. 

IMURED IN A RUNAWAY. 



BaiM twii Dreiber ar»d Twt Otiicrs Wert 
Very BadlY Hurt 

Bethlehem. Pa., Jan. 6.— While out 
driving last evening. Barxm von Drei- 
ber. who had charge of Knipp's exhibit 
at the World's fair, his host Lieut 
Tacqvcs, chief Of ordnance at the Bethle- 
nem Iron wcrks, a«d Mannsel White 
were seriously injured in a runaway. 

Their horses took fright near a grade 
CTOSsiBg of the Jersey Central railway 
and overturned the carnage. Baron 
von Dreiber was cut about the legs and 
a-THS. L:eat. Jacques escaped with cats 
and bruises about the face and Mr. 
White suffered frightful scalp wounds. 
The latter was dragged quite a disunce. 
All arc under the care of a surgeon. 

ARRESTED FOR BIGAMT. 



AattR Jorgensofl. ■arrictf at Grand Rapids. 
Accused sf Havirg Anotiier Wtif. 
GR.wn Rapids, Minn., Jan. 6.— {Spe- 
cial to The Herald. i— Last Sunday An- 
ton Jorgenson. a musician at the variety 
theater here, marnei Belle Bnggs. The 
bride's father opposed the match and 
list evening he made a complaint riarg- 
ing Jorgenson with bigamy and alleging 
that he has a wife in West SuQenor. 
The accused spent the night in jail and 
was released on 'r>onds today. He strenu- 
ously denies tbe truth of the charge. 

NEW DULUm DOINGS. 



•OINGS OF CONGRESS. 



IlM Repalilfcaas Filibuster mi Ocaocnti 
Cw i l Get a Qmtwm, 

V." ' .in-, 6. — The ilibnster- 

iaf. Dy me .neponlicauts i*a 

is llic house toAs-v- the n^ndtngr 

being t: ^ - revioas qnei- 

tioiicm ' ^rt'Oi the roles coomiit- 

tce. m.i -.ii'ions as to the tariff 

b : 1 ■ . 

A vtxc xQ ice rjnestHHi shoved, tbe 
alMcace of a qaomm. and Mvetal 'VnitS' 
«Cfe 'takes • tth the same rcsnlt. TltC' 
hoiiise at 4 P- m. aijoafned. 



■ORE rENStON FRAUDS. 



amoinit came back yesterday protested. 
He is charged with embezzlement. 

TO BAKE MITCHELL FIGHT. 

CtfMt iafs Me Will Fifiit ia Privale. ii 
Ntctfuary. 

jACKSOStviLLF., Fla., Jan. 6.— Corbett 

if going to do all in his power to make 

Mitchell fight. He still thinks that the 

I matter, which has now gotten to be a 

personal one. will be settled in the ring. 

Corbett said this morning that, if the 
dob finds it cannot have the fight with- 
out interfexence 01* the part of tbe gov- 
ernor, he is willing to forego the purse 
and have a meeting in private beyond 
the reach of the sute oAcials. 



and His %•» aai 

Arrested. 

Bcr F A LO, Ian. 6.— W . Bowne M' oore . 
a 'pcasiiOii sttoracf of this nty, w'as ar- 
ffotcdatncxm today on the charge of 

defrauding the Ur-tted States govem- 
atcat throu .^ ' ^^-nsion depanment. 

liispatcL.- - VVasbfBtrten about a 

HMMtli api :st4tc<t^ - - frauds 

'gmgrrf IT a r .■ 1 1 .. f> i.i i ' ;- .'6*4,500 

atic '^ office 

were .ti^«» -'-f .-c rs are 

IICM III St'OQO 1 



Dissolvarf. 
TOPEKA. Kar.. Jan. 6.— The supreme 
court this morning dissolved the injunc- 
tion granted by the .Atchison county dis- 
trict court to the Symns Grocery com- 
pany, restraming railroads from redoc- 
tog rates of freight on carloads of sugar. 
co€ee, beans and canaed goods, making 
them cansMletabty less than those vpon 
the sauBC commodities shipped in less 
than carload lots. 



\ 




Gioied Wr.ls EB!.b(^i*f. 
Texaek -.. 6.— Charlei 

Barry, a :^:^.^. ^^.. «»MVtt bosinesa 
man here, has been arrested at H'Ouston 
where be has be:m engaged as repreaeo- 
tasi:ve of B^radstreet's cofnmcrdal. 
agoicy. On last. Sunday be cashed a 
liaft witli a friend and left for Houston. 
'TMs. draft, which was only for a small 



Will Prwn a Oealli BIsw. 
Jeffer>«jn City. .Mo.. Jan. 6.— Attor- 
ney General Walker this morning filed 
quo warraatt pracecdiags in tbe sb- 
preme court ac ** — * ^^ three bood in> 
vestment companies doing bn srnca s in 
Che state. They are the Pettis county of 
Scdalia. the Guarantee, of Nevada, and 
the St. Louis, of Sl Louis. This will 
probably prove the death oC such com- 
panies in this state. 



Latest Happeniagt in the Suburb Up ike 
River. 

Xew Dulctth, Minn.. Jan. 6. — [Special 
to The Herald.]— Mr. Bowser has been 
spending tha holidays in the village. 

Miss Townsend spent Wednesday in 
Duluth visiting friends. 

A very enjoyable party was given on 
Monday night by the young men of the 
village at the K. P. hall. There was a 
large attendance and a very pleasant 
lime in music and dancing. 

.\ pro»?re$sive card party was ^ven 
Thursday night by .Mr. and Mrs. Kcyes, 
Misses Keyes and Townsend. A very 
pleasant evening was passed by those 
attending. 

William Smith, who has been spending 
the holidays in the village, has gorte to 
Minneapolis to resume his studies at the 
state university. 

Mr. Hurd has returned from a business 
trip to Chicago. 

The schools will open here for the 
winter term on Monday, after a vacation 
of tvo weeks. 

Miss Crowley returned today from a 
two weeks' visit to her bonK in Wausao, 
Wis., where she reports an enjoyable 
time at a family reuniou. 

Miss Hurd was in town Wednesday. 
She has formed a class in elocution 
which is said to be doing fine work under 
her instruction. 

MiSS Childs. stenographer of the fur- 
niture firm, spent her New Year's with a 
brother in Duluth. 

Mr. and Mrs. Galley were in Dulntb 
OB Sunday. 

Quite a number of young people have 
been enjoying the mild weather oy doing 
a yeat deal of saowshoeing and coast- 

«■«. ^^______ 

Hn<4 ky a Car. 
St. I.OVTS. Jan.6.— While Miss Nettie 
Endenborn. aged 17. daughter of the 
picsident of the Consolidated Wire 
works, was out riding at 3 o'clock yester- 
day aftemoooB she was struck and in- 
stantly killed by a Lindell avenue elec- 
tric car. The horse sh- ^ '.:> nding was 
also killed. Tbe accident occurred at 
Park aiKl Ohio aVenues. The motorman. 
Ferd Harold, was arrested. 



■ok ia 



CenRict Betwesa the TrMpa aad • 
Sicily. 

Palermo. Jan. 6.— The presence of 
large bodies of troops in Sicily and tbe 
establishment of martial law has not had 
the effect of quieting the disorderly ele- 
ment. Yesterday at Marineo. a town 
eleven miles southeast of this city, a 
most bloody hot occurred. 

A band of men, estimated to have 
numbered groo. gathered there in one of 
the low quarters i>f the town and started 
to parade the streets. Many revolu* 
nonary cries were uttered and threats to 
loot the town were frequently heard. A 
strong force of troops was dispatched to 
disperse the mob. When the troops ap- 
peared thev were attarked by the rioters, 
' manv of whom were armed with nfies or 
revolvers, and a desperate fight took 
place. 

\ollcy after volley was poured into 
the mob, and tl irty of the rioters were 
killed. Fifty others were wounded. 
Owing to the strict enforcement of mili- 
tary law it is hard to obtain full details 
oi the affair. 



Tbe Howard Case. 

Jacksox, Tenn.. Jan. 6.— When court 
convened ve^terday. Jan. ^2 was fixed as 
tbe date of the filing bill of exceptions 
in tbe Howard case. Meantime de- 
fendant will occupy a cell in the county 
jail. Judge Hammond ordered a special 
venire for Feb. i> when a grand jur>- 
will be impaneled to investigate the 
charges of perjury against the four wit- 
nesses, Heatley, Smith. Gleason and 
Brockaway. 

CoNvicied •! Libel. 

Dre.nDEn. Jan. 6. — Herr Gloess. a 
bookseller of this city, who was charged 
with libelling Chancellor von Capnvi in 
a pamphlet entitled "Bismarck in Ber- 
lin."* was convicted yesterday and fined 
100 marks. A:::on^ the witnesses sub- 
p<.cnaed bv the detense was Prince Bis- 
marck. The pnnce, however, did not 
appear. The judge read a certtficate 
from Dr. Schweniger, bis physician, stat- 
ing that the pnnce was too ill to attend. 

Pardons RataMd. 

Harrisbvrg, Pa.. Jan. 6— An execu- 
tive session of the hoard c.f pardons was 
held yesterday. The applications of two 
murderers, Henry Heist. Adams county, 
and Charles Salvards.Cun-.berland coun- 
ty, for commutation of the death sentence 
were refused. Heist will oe banged Jan. 
17 and Salvards Ian. 23. The applica- 
tion of Charles Tones, convicted in Alle- 
gheny county ot voluntary- manslaughter, 
will be also refused. 



A THEAKII III RUINS. 



The Albany Theater. Run by Manager Proc- 
tor. Wat Totally Destroyed by Fire 
at Noon. 



The City Hall Building Adjoining the Thea- 
ter Was Saved But Was Drenched 
With Water. 



All Effects of the "Capt. Heme, U. S. A." 
Company Destroyed- Loss One tUn- 

dred Thousand. 



Wars Severely Iniartd. 

Sax Frasci-SC'i. Jan. 6. George Car- 
.in. the horseman, whose people live in 
Ch.cago and who is well known in New 
York as a booknoaker, is lying in the 
hospital severely injured. Carlm, while 
under the infiuence of liquor, jumped 
into an empty plunge bath, striking 
heavily on the cement floor. His right 
leg was broken and the doctors believe 
he also sustained fractures of the skull 
and mav not recover. 



Thia CoapoQ eoaata for ooe voC* if Mut 
to Tb« UmnXd oAo* prvnoo* to J»a. ^ 



My choice *or Mayor 
at the ensuing spring 
election is 

I 

• ••••••••••••••••••• 

Siffmaturt. 



Albany, Jan. 6.— The Albany theater 
building on South Pearl street is in 
ruins. All the fire departments were 
summoned to the scene. William Dris- 
lan's big crockery store was underneath 
the theater. The theater has been run- 
ning as a second-class house for a few 
years. "Capt. Hcrni. I'. S. A" company 
IS at the thester this week and will lose 
its effects. The city building with city 
courts and fire department headquarters 
was next to the theater and is in great 
danger. Tbe fire brcke out on the stage 
shottly before coon and burned fiercely. 

The S'Story structure, which covers 
half a block, is occupied all above the 
first fioor on which is Drislan's and a 
saloon owned by H. P. Degraff. of New 
York city. The flames spread so rapidly 
that the Icsi w.ll be total on building 
and stocK. 

At I2:i0 p. m. the roof fell in. but 
r.obodv was injured. Tbe firemen had 
been having great difficulty in fighting 
the fire on account of the narrow street 
on which the building faced. Mr. Proc- 
tor IS operating the theater and will lose 
all fixtures, which arc owned by him. 
The firemen finally had to devote their 
efforts to save surrounding property. 
The "three sixes'" alarm was sent out 
shortly after the first alarm and tbe 
whole department is now fighting the 
fire. 

At 12:30 p. p. the back wall fell and 
the other walls gradually crumbled 
away down to the third story. Tbe loss 
will be touil and it is estimated at about 
$150000. The loss on the building will 
be $50,000 and the stock in Drislan's 
about $45,000. Mr. Proctor cannot figure 
his loss. 

The roof of the city building and 
other buildings fronting on tbe fire were 
ignited and the firemen's work was 
drawn to their saving. In tbe city 
hall on the top story is the fire alarm 
office and all efforts were devoted to 
saving that, causing the building to be 
flooded. No one has been injured so far 
as known. 

At I o'clock the fire was under control 
and twenty minutes after was about out, 
the firemen being successful in connning 
It to the building in which it started. 
'The roof of the city building was 00 hre 
for a while, and the structure was 
drenched with water. Tbe total loss is 
about $100,000. 



STILL FIGHTING THE CUT. 



Cenvicied sf MHfdef. 
Georgetown, Ohio. Ian. 6. — E. H. 
Jones was found guilty of murder in the 
first degree yesterday afternoon. The 
jury was out from g o'clock. The pris- 
oner received the verdict without be- 
rraymg any emotion. This is (ones' 
third trial and third con>-iction on the 
charge of killing his son. The murder 
occurred at a political meeting at Olive 
Branch several months ago. 

Prsbakiy Fatally Injured. 
ClNCiNNATi, Jan. 6.— Joseph Taylor.of 
Tavlor & Co.. wholesale grocers, at 05^ 
Central avenue, while driving along 
Colerain avenue yesterday was run into 
by a fire engine. ' The buggy was over- 
turned and Mr. Taylor thrown to tbe 
pround. His injunes are probably fatal. 
He IS 65 years old and lives 00 "Terrace 
avenue. Clifton. 



Wants an lavtstifatiee. 

San pRAStisco. Jan. 6.— Frank Van 
Ness, owner ot Morelio and other famous 
horses, who was notified a few weeks 
ago by the Blood Horse association that 
his entries would not be accepted in 
future, is making an effort to have his 
case mvestigatal. A majority of tbe 
racing people here think Van Ness 
should be given a chance to vindicate 
himself. 



LoxDOS. Jan. 6.— The Cunard Steam- 
ship company has ordered tbe laying 
down of two new steamers. Kach ves- 
sel will be of 6oon tons burden. They 
will he built by tbe London and Glasgow 
Engineering and Iron Ship Building 
company. 



A StalasaMa't 

Paris. Jan. 6.— The funeral of Victor 
Schoelscher. tns statesman, traveler and 
author, who died Dec. 26, Un^k place yes- 
terday axid was largely attended. 

Re Oaaiage Done. 

; Pai-ERVo, Jan. 6.— A dynamite cart- 
ridge that hail been placed under the 
residence of Baron Ali. at Trapani. ex- 
ploded yesterday. It did no damage. 

Pensieas 6nMrts4 Teday. 
Wa&hingtusj. Jan. 6— The following 

pensions were granted today: Minne- 
sota— William T. Mills. Maakato. Ben- 
jamin Gallop, WixMlom. 



Northern Pacific Teiagrapkars Are New 
PrtsaniiRf Their Case. 

St. Paul, Jan. 6. —This morning the 
telegraphers were still presenting their 
case to the Northern Pacific people. It 
will uke all of next week to complete 
the taking of testimony, and it is esti- 
mated that the expense of the four 
weeks' vis;t in this city will not be less 
than $17,000. 

It IS averred that a proportionate 
amount of the expenses rf the five griev- 
ance committees is b-ing paid by the 
men on tbe fireat Northern. Sot and 
Union Pacific, in the hope that persis- 
tence on the part of tbe commtties now 
at work may win the day and avert the 
cut on other lines which will inevitably 
follow a victory on the part of the 
Northern Pacific receivers. 



THE STATUS AT HONOLULU. 



Grtskaai is luai But Um Aacktaad Stery is 
Disbeiiffved. 

Washi.sgton. Jan. 6.— No information 
was obtainable at the state department 
up to I p. m. as to the nature ot the dis- 
patches which the Corwin brought from 
.Minister Willis. It seems probable that 
no inkling as to their contents will be 
perinittecf to escape until the senate 
meets again on Monday, though this 
understanding may be deviat^ from. 
Disbelitf in the Auckland story grows 
stronger. 

The United Sutes steamer Mohican, 
preparing for sea at Mare Island, wi.l 
not be sent to Honolulu to relieve or 
support the ships there. This much is 
learned trom an authoritative source to- 
dav. The Mohican was ordered to pre- 
oare for sea. simply to have bcr ready 
for an craergencv. As no necessity ex- 
ists for sending her on anyduty, she will 
remain at Mare Island in reserve until 
such n:;cessity arises. 

Lattr— While Secretary Greshan> still 
declines to say anything on the subject 
of the Auckland despatches, a s^orv was 
widely circulated at>out the capttol late 
this afternoon, for which memt>ers of the 
foreign affairs committee were given as 
authority, to the effect that tbe reply 
made by the queen in regard to offer cif 
the United Sutes which was first tranv 
mitted to this country by Mr. W llis was 
an informal verbal reply and that later 
she sent to Mr. Willis a formal written 
communication accepting tbe proposi- 
tion first made by Willis, and that in 
view of this Mr, Willis acted upon his 
original instructions and made a formal 
demand upon President Dole to surren- 
der the government of Hawaii to Liliuo- 
kaiani. 

• . I, ■ 

CONSPIRACY OF CRANKS. 



Tonight 



Rumored Plot el Colorado Craaks to Kill Kan- 
sas Populists. 

ToPEKA.Jan. 6.— Information has been 
furnished Adjf. Gen. Artr by a Fort 
Scott detective of a conspiracy of cranks 
to assassinate Governor Lewelling and 
kidnap Art:. What thev expect to do 
with Artz after they get him is not known 
and cannot be guessed. 

The story told by the detective has im- 
pressed the state house officials with its 
truthfulness, and a close watch is being 
kept for tbe would-be assassins. F. J. 
Close, the governor's private secretary, 
has placed a large revolver in his derii 
to be ready izr any emergency and Gen. 
-\rt2 haunts the steps and corridors of 
the state house at all hours of the day 
watching for the expected villains. 

The cranks, according to the discov- 
erer of the plot, are three in number, 
bail from Waldron. Col., and are liber- 
ally supplied with money. 

■ORE WORK AT CLEVEUND. 



To In dace Purchases. 
Nf.w York, Jan. '^.— President Havc- 
meyer, of the American Sugar Refining 
company, sutes that the recent decline 
of '^c per pound m refined sugar is to 
induce the country to buy, and to pre- 
clude the necessity of a prolonged stop- 
page of the refineries. If a further re- 
duction IS necessary, it will be made as 
it has been deter.mined to continue the 
opention of the refineries to keep the 
workmen employed and sell the sugar 
below the cost ot mauufacture if neces- 
sary. 

Arrested for Swiadlinf . 

MiLWAt KKE. Jan. 'V Frank Rcichen- 
bach and wife were arrested last night 
upon a charge of being accomplices of 
Joseph Batt, the real estate swindler, 
who was arrested a week ago and wbo 
secured $3600 by tbe sale of bogus mort- 
gages. KeichenSach is a sakxinkceper 
and doing business at 1061 Teutonia 
street. He admitted that he'and his wife 
had !>igned papers at the request of Batt 
and thai he had paid them $150 for so 
doing, but Reicbenbach and his wife de- 
clared that they were innocent of any in- 
tentional wrong doing. 

TiM SclMwe Failed. 

Montreal, Jan. 6. The news re- 
ceived here that the two Scotch crofter 
settlements at Killamey and Salt Coats 
in the province of Manitoba are utterly 
ruined, is the first announcement of the 
failure of the pet immigration scheri.c of 
the English colonization board and of 
•Sir Charles Tupper. high commissioner 
for Canada in London. 



Occaa Steaaisliips. 

New York— Arrived: Otxlam. Rotter- 
dam. 

New York— Arrived: Paris, South- 
ampton; Grecian. Glasgow. 

(^uccnstown— Arriveti: Umbria, New 
York and proceeded to Liverpool. 

Lm Asftles Caflared. 
New York. Jan. 6— Tbe Herald's 
Managua. Nicaragua, cable dated yester- 
day says: Gen. Hemadora. in com- 
mand of the Nicaraguan forces, which 
number 1500 men. has captured Los 
Angeles after taking Yuscaran. 



Gloke Iron Works Will Ce«itii»ee aad a Plate 
■ill Started. 

Cl«:velam), Jan. '..—The Globe Iron 
company has decided to build a freight 
steamer and keep irs workmen em 
plo>ed. It will be one of the largest on 
the lakes. Unless a buyer is found tbe 
boat will be pot into commission by her 
builders as soon as completed. 

The plate mill at the 0:is Steel works 
was set in operation yesterday, giving 
fifty men emplf>ymcnt. Next week other 
departments will be surted, giving tem- 
porarv work at least to 275 men. 

The Death Rell. 

Bt rlington, la., Jan. 6.— Benton J. 
Hall, a prominent Iowa lawyer and poli- 
tician, (lied hrfe yesterday aged 50. He 
was commissioner of patents under 
Cleveland in 188S. 

Co.vTfK>roOK, N. H.. Jan. f^.—Cai. 
Peter Sanborn, one of the best known 
citizens of the state, died List evening. 
He was state treasurer frf>m 1867 to 1871. 

New York. Jan. 6 — Col. Edward 
Hicklin, the oldest mensber of tbe i»ro- 
I duce exchange, died here this morning. 
He was stricken with apoplexy last Sun- 
day. 

Gee. Geerke Dying. 
Berms, Jan. 6.— Professor Bergmann, 
who went to Warsaw in the middle of 
the week to attend Gen. Gonrico, the 
military autocrat of Russian-Poland, is 
reported to have found his patient near 
death. Gen. Pavloff has been already 
appointed to succeed Goorkoin Warsaw. 
Numerous explanations of Gourko's ill- 
ness have been given. One is that he 
was poisoned; another that be has gan- 
grene of the foot; a third that he has a 
complicatidh of nervous diseases. 

- ♦ — 

, A Vaatt Blew* Oyea. 

STROt'r>SBLRG. Pa. Jan. 6l The reai- 
denu of tbts place living in the viciaily 
of the cemetery were startled early yes- 
terday morning bv a loud explosion. An 
investigation was made, and it was found 
that the large doors of the massive 
family vault of Col. E. E. Norton had 
been blown open with some powerful ex- 
plosive. The body of Col. Norton's wife 
was in the vault and the glass of the 
coffin WAS broken, but the thieves were 
frightened off before they had time to 
disturb the corpse. 

Saieide is New OrtcaJis. 
Nkw Orleans, Jan. 6. <xeorge Win- 
chester, soo-in-law of Capt. T. P. Leath- 
trs. the veteran steamboat man who is 
krown throughout the coun:ry walked up 
to the residence of bis father-in-law this 
morning ana placing a pistol to bis head 
blew out his brains. He married Miss 
Courtney Leathers, who was queen ot 
the carnival several vears ago. Illness is 
given as the cause for the suicide. All 
parties sund high socially. 

U9r4T in Fierida. 
Oak, Fla.. jan. 6.— Between Q and 10 
o'clock last night ex -Sheriff Potsdamer 
was shot six or seven times by parties 
concealed under a car standing on the 
railroad track. .Mr. Potsdamer was 
closing his store preparatory- to going 
home when he was shot. "There is an 
clue to the assassins. 



■ttlsArt 
VocJiGSTOWN, O, Jan. 6.— The entire 

plant of Andrews Ilrothers Sc Co.'s mills 
at Hazleton will be pot in operation next 
week. Tbe bridge works will resume 
also. 

■rs.C«ckrsll Daad. 

Washimgtos, Jan. 6.— Mrs. Cockrell. 
wife of Senator Cockrell, of Missouri, 
died this afternoon at 12:45 after a short 
illness of pneumonia. 



AT THE 



Glass 
Block 
Store 



You will find a g^rand array of 
desirable Bargains. 



Onr Great Odd and End Sale, 
Oor Great RemDaot Sale, 
Onr Great iDYcntory Sale, 
Oar Great Ciearaoce Sale, 

Is crcatitij^ much excitement in 
mercantile circles. 



TONIGHT 

Our store will be open until 10 
P. M. and the Barg^ains we will 
tfivc will make this the only busy 
mart in the city. 

Here They Are ! 

Trimmed Hats, 

300 Ladies' and Children's Trimmed 
Hats, formerlv sold for $3 00, (3.50. 
S4.25 and $; DC each, see oor window 
display. \Ve give you your pick for 

$ 1 .00 Each. 

Embroideries. 

We have put on sale a lot of Ham- 
burg Flmbroidcries from 4 to 34 
inches wide and worth from 25c to 
75c per yard. All go at 



I5c 



Per Yard, 



See our window display. 



Ladies' and Children's 
Wool Hose. 

All odd lots put in one big pile, 
formerly sold for 25c to 50c. Ail go 
at 

1 9C Per Pair. 



Remnants Remnants 

All Remnants of Dress Goo*<s and 
.Silks of every description go at 

exactly 



Don't niiss the Bargains in our Linen 
department just now. 

Table LioeDS, 
Damask Towels, 
MnsliDS and Sbeetings, 
Are Selling Yerj Cheap. 

Do Yofl Know 

That Blankets are being sold regard- 
less of their actual worth to reduce 
our stock which is too heavy? 



Shoes and Rubbers 

Are goiog f,ist. Itis the ridiculously 
low pnces which we are onoting 
that makes us busy in this depart- 
ment. 

TRADE TTKRFm 



SKATE SALE. 



Fnday and Saturday we will close 
out our entire stock of Skates in- 
cluding all onr regular f 1.00. $1.25. 
1 1.50 and $1.75 Skates. Your 
choice of any pair in the bouse for 



50c. 



Scissor and Shear Sale 

All oor regular 50c. 60c and 65c 
Shears and Scissors for Friday and 
Saturday only 

25c. 

Every pair warranted. 

All our regular 05c $ljOn, $i.2K 
.Shears and .Scissors for Friday and 
.Saturday ooly 



Every pair warranted. 



50c, 





t 



THE DULUTH E VEILING HERALD: SATURDAY. JANUARY 6, 1894. 




Hk Few Years Ago He Was Addicted to the 

Seductive Game But Plays 

No More. 



Two Incidents on Christmas Day That Serve 
to Illustrate Men's Different Man- 
ner and Purpose. 



Amos iihephard Trying to Get Even for a 

Joke Played on Him While at 

Soudan. 




"I am glad for one thing," said Mr. 
Ledger, as h« folded up a receipt for a 
year's subscription to The Herald, paid 
in advance, "and that is because the last 
New Year is the second that has marked 
my determination to forever quit the 
seductive game of poker. A few years 
ago I was considerably given in a small 
way to the pursuit of the festive jackpot 
and I bad acquired quite a reputation in 
my circle of friends as a venturesome 
and successful player of our national 
game. 

"Nearly two years ago I had business 
in Superior. When it was finished a 

friend of mine said, 'Ledger, we've got a 
new club house opened up here. Come 
alun;^ with me and meet some of the 
bovs.' I did so and it was not long until 
I was deep in a poker game with some 
pretty stiff players. I had $qp with me, 
and when I tjot up from the lable ahout 
midnight I was without a cent. I went 
home feeling rather crestfallen, but the 
next day I determined to go over and 
have my revenge. I went to the bank, 
got $75 and hunted up the tiger in bis 
lair. The $75 followed the $go in short 
order and 1 came home feeling rather 
sore. 

"I was in for about $175 which, while 
not much for a professional gambler, 
was pretty hard on me. Instead of quit- 
ting then like any sensible man, I gave 
way to an irresistible desire to "plav 
even,' so I scraped up $50 the limit of 
my bank credit and went over for a third 
and last whirl. 

"I soon found the game and took a 
band. On the first hand the dealer gave 
me a bob tail flush of spades, ace high. I 
was sitting ahead of the dealer. So it 
was my ante. Seven were in the game 
and about half way around the table one 
of the players raised us $7.50. He had 
three vueens and on the diaw did him- 
self no good. I drew a spade which 
gave me a flush. All dropped out but 
the fellow with the queens. I raised 
him $15. and he called me. I took the 
pot. 

"The next hand was mv deal. The 
pot was opened and all staid. Que fel- 
low drew one card which gave him a 
Jack full. Another fellow had a nine 
spot full. I dealt myself two aces and 
on the draw caught two more. The bet- 
ting was red hot, and I raked in a good 
wad of cash. The next deal the pot was 
opened and tor or five staid. I staid on 
a pair of sixes. I drew and caught 
three kings which gave me a king full. 
That time I won about $50. 

"When it came my cltal the second 
time, the game opened just the same as 
when I won the two first pots. I stood 
pat with a straight flush. On the draw 
two of the players made a full house and 
a mighty big pot was worked up. One 
had a queen full, and he had so much 
confidence that it was difficult to make 
him lay down. All dropped out and I 
was compelled to raise him again and 
again. Finally he called me and when 
I showed my hand he said: 'I always 
did want to run up against a pat straight. 
Your hand is ^ood. Take the pot.' 

"As I raked in the stuff I said, 'Well, 
you've got what you wanted. But Ira 
going to quit you. My fett are cold. So 
long fellows,' and po.:keting my win- 
nings, I walked out I had been playing 
less than forty minutes but not only dil 
I succeed in winning back my previous 
losses, but I was nearly 8250 ahead be- 
sides. I have never played a game of 
poker since and I never expect to." 

♦ * ♦ 

"Funny, aint it." said Col. Wayback, 
as he picked the back t>one out of a 
piece of white fish, "what a difference 
there is in the manner and purpose with 



MYSTERIES! 




The Nervous System the Seat 

of Life and Mind. Recerft 

Wonderful Discoveries. 

?To mystery has ever compared with that at 
humJin life, it has been the Ipiidin^ subject 
itt professioniil research and study In all aKe». 
But notvviihstaadiug thia tact it id not gener- 
ally k n o w a 
that the pfit 
of life in li>'H- 
tcdln tlio ui)- 
per part of the 
I spinal cord, 
I near the base 
I of the brain, 
and so sensi- 
tive is t h i f 
portion of the 
nervous sys- 
tem that even 
the prick of a 
needle will 
cause instant 
deata. 

Recent fitscoverles have demonstrated that 
all theorscans of the bo<ly are under the con- 
trol i>t the nerve centers, located In or near 
the base of the brain, and that when these are 
dera««t<l the orvtans which they supply with 
nerve flul<l are also deranged. When It Is re- 
memb«^^ed that a serious Iniury t<i the spina" 
cord will cause paralysis of the body U-low 
the injured point, because the nervt* force is 
prevented by the Injury from reacbinj? the 
paralyzed portion. It will be understtKjd how 
the derangement of the nerve center-i will 
cause thederanRcment of the various organs 
wliich they supply with nerve force. 

Two-thirds of chronic diseases are duo to 
the Imperfect actlQB of the nerve centers at 
the base of the brain, not from a derange- 
meut prltnarily originating In the oraan It- 
self. The great mistake of p^ly^i(•l:l^s in 
treatin;? these diseases Is that they treat tlio 
organ rather than the nerve centers which 
are the cause of the trouble. 

Dr. Franklin Miles, the celebrated spe- 
c!alist,ha3 profoundly studied tills subject for 
over 20 years, aad has made many Important 
discoveries in connection with It, chief among 
t hem being the facta contained in the almve 
sL'itement, and that the ordinary methofis of 
treatment are wrong. All headache, dtai- 
noss. dullness, confusion, pressure, blues 
rnaiMa, melaucholy. Insanity, epilepsy, St. 
VltUH dance, etc.. an^ nervous disejisos no 
matter how caused. The wonderful success; of 
Dr. Miles' Restorative Nervine Isdnetothe 
fact that It Is based on the foregoing principle. 

Dr. Miles' Re.storative NbrvinkIs s>kJ by 
all druggists on a positive guarantee, or sent 
direct by Db. Mn>E8 Medical Co.. Etkharr, 
I nil., on receipt of price. II per b ttle. six 
bottles for |5..ezi)reas prepaid. It oontaio* 
neither opiates nor duqswo<i»ayaca> 

WQU SALS BY ALL DBUOaiST8. 



which different individuals make holiday 
presents. Now up at the liitle hotel 
wti(. re 1 am compelled to cat. when not 
favored with an invitation to dine out.wc 
have a very smart, capable, rntelligent 
dining room girl, strange as it may seem. 
At the same pl.ice boards a young man 
« ho IS considered of some prominence 
who has had good advantages ior ac- 
quiring culture and learning the ways of 
propriety. A little incident that I saw 
Christmas day illustrates his make-up. 
Alter gorging himself at thedinner table 
on a surfeit of food ordered in a loud, 
imperative, pompous manner, be pulled 
his napkin out of his shirt collar, threw 
it unfolded onto the table, noisily shoved 
his chair back and started towards the 
door, talking in tones that attracted the 
attention of every person in the dining 
room. Just before he went out, he turned 
back, shoved his hand into his pocket, 
drew out a dollar and with a great 
flourish, threw it into the hands of the 
diningroom girl. He fully accomplished 
his purposes in every way,but he dropped 
about 67 degrees in the estimation of 
every soul in that room. 

"A most pleasing contrast to that man- 
ner and purpose in giving presents was 
seen in the act of another boarder. He, 
also, wanted to give the dining room girl 
a Christmas present. He chose also to 
give money, but he enclosed it in a 
small envelope, wrote thereon the young 
lady's n-»me and left it by his plate. She 
had no trouble in securing it and no 
vulgar demonstration was made. Both 
acts were characteristic of the men who 
performed them." 

* >• « 

Amos Shephard likes to perpetrate a 
good joke on the boys as well as the next 
one, but recently he got a dose of 
his own medicine which caused 
him to break one of the ten 
commandments. It was tnis w?y: 
Amos, as all know, has a horse of which 
he is very proud and whose speed and 
physical condi'ion he considers a little 
bit extra. Now about Chrisinis the ret;- 
isier of deeds for St. Louis county went 
up to Tower to visit his many friends. 
He left his horse in Sheriff Sharvy's 
stable to be cared for until his return. A 
few days passed by and then Sheriff 
Sharvy drew up a long telegram to 
Sbepbard saying that the horse was being 
carefully attended, that all the sprains, 
ring bones, cocked joints, etc., etc., had 
been cured up and that by the time he 
got back the animal would be fit to drive 
out in public. 

When the message arrived at Tower, 
Amos was over to Soudan. The Tower 
telegraph agent seemed to be something 
of a joker himself, anyway, he entered 
into the spirit of the affair by sending the 
message to shephard at Soudan by a 
special messenger. The combined 
charges were $2.65 and, of course, they 
were paid without question before the 
dispatch was openea. When Amos read 
the contents.his feelings may be imagined. 
They cannot be described. When he got 
back home he stepped into Sharvy's 
office and uttered language that would 
not look well in these columns. Sheriff 
Sharvy simply chuckled with great glee 
and said "score one for me." 

COUNCILLORS USE FISTS. 



Lively Scenes at Meetinqs of Municipal Coun- 
cils in Spain. 

Madrid. Jan. 6. — At the opening yes- 
terday of the new municipal council at 
Malaga the members became involved 
in disputes that ended in scenes of vio- 
lence. Several of the councillors en- 
gaged in fisticuffs and a free fight ap- 
peared to be imminent. A general row 
was averted only by the hasty adjourn- 
ment of the council. 

A similar scene took place at the meet- 
ing of the new council of Madrid. Owing 
to the rigidly free criticism of his acts in- 
dulged in by the councillors, the raayt r 
resigned. He will probably be succeed- 
ed by the duke of Tamames, who was 
one of the party that accompanied the 
infanta Eulalie to the United States last 
spring. 

Sixty Were Killed. 

Berlin, Jan. 6. — Thenews^pers here 
state that the recent massacre of Catho- 
lics at Krosche, Russia, by Cossacks, 
was due to the express order of Gen 
Kakhanoff, governor of Vilna. The pa- 
pers declare that sixty persons were 
killed and 100 injured by the Cossacks. 

Lowest in a Hundred Years. 

London, Jan. 6. — A dispatch from 
Isle of Wight where the queen is at 
present sojourning, says that the mercury 
registers Q degrees above zero (Fahren- 
heit) which is the lowest point it has 
reached in 100 years. The river in the 
Isle of Wight which empties into the 
Solent is frozen to within a few yards of 
the Solent. 

A Religious Entente. 
Rome, Jan. 6.— Autograph letters on 
the religious situation have been ex- 
changed by the czar and the pope. The 
disposition on the part of Russia and the 
Vatican tore-establish a religious entente 
is apparently firmer than ever. 

- - ♦' — ■ ■ - - 

May Prove Fatal. 

Washington, Jan. 6. — The condition 
of Mrs. Cockrell, wite of Senator Cock- 
rell, of Mijsouri. has grown worse and it 
is feared that the attack of pneumonia 
from which she is suffering will prove 
fatal. 

Mr. Maxim Decorated. 

Constantinoi'LE, Jan. 6. — The sultan 
has conferred the giand cross of the im- 
perial order of the Medjidie upon Mr. 
Maxim, the inventor of the quick firing 
guu bearing his name. 

Trouble Feared in Samoa. 

AiCKLAND, N. 7. , Jan. 6.— Advices re- 
ceived here from Apia, capital of .Samoa, 
show that since the departure of the war 
ships from Apia, the natives have again 
become restlcs;, and further trouble is 
feared. 

Hanged for Wife Murder. 

Tuscaloosa. Ala, Jan. 6. — William 
Farmer, colored, who brutally murdered 
his wife here about two weeks ago with 
a razor, was hanged at 12 o'clock yester- 
day in the jail yard here. 

If you are not satished with your laun- 
dry telephone 447 and have Lutes' laun- 
dry call. 

Have You Any Work? 
Are there any families in Duluth who 
would like a man to do odd work around 
the house, such as taking care of the 
fires, carpenter work, etc., by the week or 
month? If so, the Associated Charities 
would be glad to supply their need. 
There are several men who have been 
ill, and are out of work, who would be 
greatly helped in this way. Please send 
word to 415 Woodbtidge buildiog. 

— - • ■ — 

Telephone Lutes' laundry to call for 
your washing. 



1- 



SLID INTO THE TO 



The North West, the First of the Northern 

Steamship Company's Passenger 

Boats. Launched Today.' 



Miss Gertrude Hanna Performed the Act 
Launching and Mrs. F. P. Gordon 
Christened the Boat. 



of 



The Effect Was Startling as the Great Hull 

Was Suddenly Plunged Into the 

Lake. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Jan. 6.— The North 
West, the first of the Northern Ste.im- 
ship company's passenger steamships, 
which will run next season between Du- 
luth and Buffalo, was launched at 2:30 
o'clock this afternoon at the shipyard of 
the Globe Iron Works company on West 
Old River street. The launching was 
per'ormed by Miss M. Gertrude Hanna, 
representing the builders, while the 
vessel was christened by Mrs. F. P. 

Gordon, representing the Northern 
Steamship company. 

The North West was slid into the 
water "lake fashion," that is by a side- 
way launch, which is a novel sight to 
those who have witnessed launches from 
the shipyards of the Atlantic coast. 
These are always carried into the water 
end on and usually stern foremost. The 
location in the Cleveland yards is such 
th-it the vessel slid a distance of 60 t.-ct 
to be over the water, and dropped a dis- 
tance of between 4 and 5 feet before 
reaching it, then as the calculated 
draught is 8 feet and 6 feet forward it 
had to continue its descent for this ad- 
ded distance. 

The effect was startling. The weight 
of this vessel as she presented herself at 
the launching was 4.200,000 pounds 
This great hull representing the above 
weight, was suddenly plunged into 
the lake to displace that much 
water; the speed of the descending hull 
was considerable, and as the water could 
not move quickly enough through itself 
to receive the vessel, it found relief in an 
upward movement of a mass of wa